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Classics of Indian Spirituality: Includes: The Bhagavad Gita, The Dhammapada, and The Upanishads

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A beautiful boxed set of the three scriptures of ancient India most meaningful to an American reader: the Bhagavad Gita, the Dhammapada, and the Upanishads.


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A beautiful boxed set of the three scriptures of ancient India most meaningful to an American reader: the Bhagavad Gita, the Dhammapada, and the Upanishads.

30 review for Classics of Indian Spirituality: Includes: The Bhagavad Gita, The Dhammapada, and The Upanishads

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Smith

    These novels are such a great introduction to these classic Indian texts. They are not able to stand alone (they do not have all of the texts as they are quite long) but they are a wonderful sampler of these ancient and rich texts that seem to apply more and more to our current lives.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Brian Wilcox

    Excellent !

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cole Feldman

    I read The Dhammapada as an introduction to Buddhism. It is a much more poetic and metaphorical writing than Western philosophy and religious texts. My biggest takeaway was the Four Noble Truths: of suffering, of the origin of suffering, of the cessation of suffering, and the way leading to the cessation of suffering (which is the Noble Eightfold Path). Buddha put great emphasis on meditation, especially to "rise out of" selfishness and duality (pleasure and pain, for example)—this, however, see I read The Dhammapada as an introduction to Buddhism. It is a much more poetic and metaphorical writing than Western philosophy and religious texts. My biggest takeaway was the Four Noble Truths: of suffering, of the origin of suffering, of the cessation of suffering, and the way leading to the cessation of suffering (which is the Noble Eightfold Path). Buddha put great emphasis on meditation, especially to "rise out of" selfishness and duality (pleasure and pain, for example)—this, however, seems to place Buddhism in a very tight niche with regards to humanism and asceticism, depending on how we define a human in relation to the self and how Buddhists should regard their human bodies as they pursue a higher consciousness. For further study on Buddhism, I want to read the Pali Canon.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lon

    If, heaven forbid, everything Jesus said were lost to history, and we had only his Sermon on the Mount as our guide and blueprint for building a moral and virtuous life, we would still have a supernal treasure. The Dhammapada is like that for those, like me, who also admire the Buddha's teachings. It's a verse collection of some of his most profound insights into living a life fully awake. Really enjoyed. Powerful insights. This collection had a helpful introduction to each chapter. "There is no fi If, heaven forbid, everything Jesus said were lost to history, and we had only his Sermon on the Mount as our guide and blueprint for building a moral and virtuous life, we would still have a supernal treasure. The Dhammapada is like that for those, like me, who also admire the Buddha's teachings. It's a verse collection of some of his most profound insights into living a life fully awake. Really enjoyed. Powerful insights. This collection had a helpful introduction to each chapter. "There is no fire like passion. There are no chains like hate. Illusion is a net, Desire is a rushing river."

  5. 5 out of 5

    Meghal Bhatt

    Read the Bhagavad Gita, Book -1. I won't be reading Upanishad and Dhammapada by Eswaran though. Writing is bland and repetitive. I am sure there are better texts of Bhagavad Gita out there. This was written for someone at the pre-school level. Self detachment from the fruits of labour, giving generously without expectation in return, self-will and self-control as a duty, and following the 'Dharma' - which is to "to do good" and "it is what is" with no strings attached. Great work on distilling t Read the Bhagavad Gita, Book -1. I won't be reading Upanishad and Dhammapada by Eswaran though. Writing is bland and repetitive. I am sure there are better texts of Bhagavad Gita out there. This was written for someone at the pre-school level. Self detachment from the fruits of labour, giving generously without expectation in return, self-will and self-control as a duty, and following the 'Dharma' - which is to "to do good" and "it is what is" with no strings attached. Great work on distilling the text from main book, however, if you want to go deeper into the text, this book is not the one.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cyrus

    I read this book ,every morning (almost) when I wake-up..and have been doing so everysince 4 years ago when I got in a car accident, got hit in the head and came to believe in God; I still find it funny at the very least that nobody can prove there is no God; but at the same time , nobody can prove that being hit in the head; and having a severe concussion is not the only reason why people like me have seen what they saw. thanks

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rahul Banerjee

    The Upanishads: An excellent introduction to the metaphysical and ethical ideas contained in these philosophical texts. Selected verses from all the 10 'Mukhya' Upanishads are included in this book and are aided by simple and lucid explanations of several ideas (as 'Notes') and a brief introduction before each Upanishad. Commentaries are based on the interpretations of Max Mueller/ Deussen/ Shankaracharya. To anyone interested in studying the 'nature' of the religion now known as Hinduism, I will The Upanishads: An excellent introduction to the metaphysical and ethical ideas contained in these philosophical texts. Selected verses from all the 10 'Mukhya' Upanishads are included in this book and are aided by simple and lucid explanations of several ideas (as 'Notes') and a brief introduction before each Upanishad. Commentaries are based on the interpretations of Max Mueller/ Deussen/ Shankaracharya. To anyone interested in studying the 'nature' of the religion now known as Hinduism, I will definitely recommend this as a first book. [Note that the included text does not contain the original Sanskrit verses but the English translations of them]. A minor remark : I really liked the choice of font colors, typesetting and the overall print quality!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Hitt

    Seems presumptuous to review a sacred text. I'll only say that the translation is incredibly accessible, and the chapter introductions by Easwaran are very helpful in getting the most out of this. Highly recommend this translation.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Maureen

    I liked the Upanishads best of the three, then the Dhammapad and then The Bhagavad Gita. If I hadn't found The New Message from God, this would have been my path.

  10. 5 out of 5

    J

    I finished reading Bhagavad Gita on 3 May 2008. Delicious. I like the commentary that goes with each chapter. Now I'm done with the Upanishads (1 March 2009). They have a strong wisdom-of-the-ancients flavor. It's that pithy kind that calls for rumination and seems like it could be a deep truth that I haven't yet understood or something that sounds cool but is actually hollow. At times I can't tell which. But like the companion books in this set, this book has nice commentary to go with the trans I finished reading Bhagavad Gita on 3 May 2008. Delicious. I like the commentary that goes with each chapter. Now I'm done with the Upanishads (1 March 2009). They have a strong wisdom-of-the-ancients flavor. It's that pithy kind that calls for rumination and seems like it could be a deep truth that I haven't yet understood or something that sounds cool but is actually hollow. At times I can't tell which. But like the companion books in this set, this book has nice commentary to go with the translations. My favorite excerpt from the Upanishads is: Two birds of beautiful plumage, comrades Inseparable, live on the selfsame tree. One bird eats the fruit of pleasure and pain; The other looks on without eating. I finished reading the Dhammapada and therefore all three books in this collection on 27 May 2009. My main takeaway from this translation of Buddhist texts is that meditation is essential to understanding the teachings. I don't draw this conclusion because the text exhorts meditation, but because personal meditation practice has shown me that these insights are understood through meditation, not reading or lectures. Also, I like this bit in the section titled "Impurity:" "...lack of generosity taints those who give." Overall I think this trilogy of translations is a great read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Pete

    Read the Bhagavad Gita, not the whole set. Excellent, interesting, and surprising. I have no way to judge the translation, but it read well and the chapter introductions were generally helpful. I came in with a limited understanding of Hindu mythology and ideas, and finished this short book with a much better grasp of the field. Certainly it was more uplifting than your average religious text.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    The best translation and edition of these three texts that I've found in English (Vintage Spiritual Classics and various other versions are often reprints of this edition), plus Easwaran's editorial material is just absurdly good. [And yes, he's a bit of a syncretist / perennial philosophy guy, but I don't think the quality suffers.]

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ardhanarishvara

    such a beautiful translation (his Bhagavad Gita translation also one of my favorites. alongside Ghandi's) and so much excellent insight in the introduction, which states that we need nothing more than the Dhammapada to follow the way of the Buddha.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Chantal

    One of the best translation if not the best!Extraordinary understanding of the disciple's path, the master, the living experience of the devotee and his/her realization.. Something to read again and again as a sweet remembrance. Not a substitute for the experience.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    eknath's translation of the bhagavad gita in his "classics of indian spirituality" is so beautiful and true. i want to read it again and again.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    a great compilation. nice to read again and again

  17. 5 out of 5

    Angela Joyce

    This is quite beautiful, I liked it. I also see what inspired a lot of George Harrison's songs!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Steven

    Eknath Easwaran = The Shit.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michaela

    Less poetry and meaning than expected for a beginner.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

    What an unexpected wonderful great read. I read the intro in the beginning and to all chapters up to 8. After that chapter I read only the Gita and really enjoyed the interpretation of my own.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra Chauran

    This translation brought the text alive for me!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Barnes

    The nest spiritual literature ive ever read.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Bridget

    I read the Bhagavad Gita. Its a timeless work of great importance for all.

  24. 4 out of 5

    James

  25. 4 out of 5

    Deneka

  26. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

  27. 5 out of 5

    David

  28. 4 out of 5

    JeffBrowning

  29. 5 out of 5

    R. V.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michael Lloyd-Billington

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