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During her lifetime, Audre Lorde (1934-1992), author of the landmark Cancer Journals, created a mythic identity for herself that retains its vitality to this day. Drawing from the private archives of the poet's estate and numerous interviews, Alexis De Veaux demystifies Lorde's iconic status, charting her conservative childhood in Harlem; her early marriage to a white, gay During her lifetime, Audre Lorde (1934-1992), author of the landmark Cancer Journals, created a mythic identity for herself that retains its vitality to this day. Drawing from the private archives of the poet's estate and numerous interviews, Alexis De Veaux demystifies Lorde's iconic status, charting her conservative childhood in Harlem; her early marriage to a white, gay man with whom she had two children; her emergence as an outspoken black feminist lesbian; and her canonization as a seminal poet of American literature.


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During her lifetime, Audre Lorde (1934-1992), author of the landmark Cancer Journals, created a mythic identity for herself that retains its vitality to this day. Drawing from the private archives of the poet's estate and numerous interviews, Alexis De Veaux demystifies Lorde's iconic status, charting her conservative childhood in Harlem; her early marriage to a white, gay During her lifetime, Audre Lorde (1934-1992), author of the landmark Cancer Journals, created a mythic identity for herself that retains its vitality to this day. Drawing from the private archives of the poet's estate and numerous interviews, Alexis De Veaux demystifies Lorde's iconic status, charting her conservative childhood in Harlem; her early marriage to a white, gay man with whom she had two children; her emergence as an outspoken black feminist lesbian; and her canonization as a seminal poet of American literature.

30 review for Warrior Poet: A Biography of Audre Lorde

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tim Haslett

    Alexis De Veaux spent years doing exhaustive research (qualitative rather than quantitative) on the terribly missed activist/writer/goddess-head figure, Audre Lorde. When she passed, it left an empty space in my soul, and Prof. De Veaux fills that space. This is a biography born of a fierce love for its subject, a woman who saved peoples' lives with her writing. It's a careful, meticulous book and it is certainly no hagiography. And that is some feat. If someone asked me to write a bio of Audre L Alexis De Veaux spent years doing exhaustive research (qualitative rather than quantitative) on the terribly missed activist/writer/goddess-head figure, Audre Lorde. When she passed, it left an empty space in my soul, and Prof. De Veaux fills that space. This is a biography born of a fierce love for its subject, a woman who saved peoples' lives with her writing. It's a careful, meticulous book and it is certainly no hagiography. And that is some feat. If someone asked me to write a bio of Audre Lorde, I'd find it impossible to even suggest anything other than some kind of sainthood. The terrible sadness of Lorde's cruelly truncated life resonates throughout this biography. She died of cancer in St. Croix, where she lived with her partner after having spent her entire life in New York City. Lorde's nearly miraculous poetry and prose are thoroughly reanimated in this biography. The words are suffused with her courage, humor, generosity, and beauty. Lorde refused 'market values', instead she embraced love, care, service to others, sacrifice, risk, community, struggles for justice, and solidarity On another note, one constantly sees numerous 800 page biographies of Ronald Reagan, all of the Kennedys, Louis Pasteur, Richard Nixon and so many others. So, De Veaux's biography of Lorde is quite lengthy, and it needs to be. And it marks the fact that the significance of Audre Lorde is tremendous; she deserves this kind of careful attention.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    Wah wah, just read Zami instead. De Veaux makes...an effort? but the biography basically results in a "Audre did this; Audre did that; Audre moved here; Audre moved there" and a who's-who of the people Lorde fucked. Has a certain factual weight, but feels very thin; not to mention, de Veaux just does not make a case for locating Lorde culturally/historically. Where is the discussion of lesbian bar culture? (A measly paragraph with lipservice to butch/femme terminology.) Where's the elaboration o Wah wah, just read Zami instead. De Veaux makes...an effort? but the biography basically results in a "Audre did this; Audre did that; Audre moved here; Audre moved there" and a who's-who of the people Lorde fucked. Has a certain factual weight, but feels very thin; not to mention, de Veaux just does not make a case for locating Lorde culturally/historically. Where is the discussion of lesbian bar culture? (A measly paragraph with lipservice to butch/femme terminology.) Where's the elaboration of women's political communities in the 70s/80s? Why does De Veaux not even attempt to rethink "Lesbian" with regard to Lorde's very obvious refashioning of the 'identity' as a kind of motivated worldview that lies in a 'beyond'-orientation space? It also just doesn't...thrill in any way. If I hadn't know Lorde before, I'd have no interest in reading further. Again, go to the poetry. Go to Zami. Then, if you must, see this biography. But don't start here; you'll forget all about Lorde if you do.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Eleanor Cowan

    I found this bio well-written and of a high authorial standard. After reading it, I wondered about this brave poet who contested the hypocrisy of her times. For this she merits praise, great respect and thanks. Yet, I wondered how many women learned harsh lessons from Ms. Lorde? A number of times, as I read, I was reminded of Ayn Rand, who helped herself to a married man, Nathaniel Brandon, simply because she was being 'honest.' She wanted him. Period. Never mind the deeply hurt wife who turned I found this bio well-written and of a high authorial standard. After reading it, I wondered about this brave poet who contested the hypocrisy of her times. For this she merits praise, great respect and thanks. Yet, I wondered how many women learned harsh lessons from Ms. Lorde? A number of times, as I read, I was reminded of Ayn Rand, who helped herself to a married man, Nathaniel Brandon, simply because she was being 'honest.' She wanted him. Period. Never mind the deeply hurt wife who turned herself inside out to accept her loss. I wonder how Lorde's partner and co-mother of two children handled Lorde's sense of sexual entitlement? I got the sense that just as Lorde's parents were distant, that Lorde herself was distant too. After all, how many deep relationships can one nurture over the long haul? Did Lorde's righteous anger splash a little wildly and hurtfully too? Out of Lorde's voiced anger, insight, and clear thinking, the world improved. I know we all have to bear with each other's flaws as much as possible, but as I put down the book, I thought that it might have been dangerous for me to have been Lorde's friend. Eleanor Cowan, author of A History of a Pedophile's Wife: Memoir of a Canadian Teacher and Writer

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jesi

    I am not sure how to articulate what was so frustrating about this biography. First, the good: it’s clear that this was an exhaustively researched labor of love, and I am very glad that this account of Lorde’s life exists. There were a few soaring moments—I loved the final paragraphs of the epilogue and her gloss of “Eye to Eye” (my favorite Lorde essay). I also appreciated that de Veaux does not try to smooth out Lorde’s rough edges. I struggled with this initially, but ultimately I felt like I I am not sure how to articulate what was so frustrating about this biography. First, the good: it’s clear that this was an exhaustively researched labor of love, and I am very glad that this account of Lorde’s life exists. There were a few soaring moments—I loved the final paragraphs of the epilogue and her gloss of “Eye to Eye” (my favorite Lorde essay). I also appreciated that de Veaux does not try to smooth out Lorde’s rough edges. I struggled with this initially, but ultimately I felt like I appreciated the clear-eyed look at the parts of Lorde that were very human: her capacity for selfishness, jealousy, rage towards her perceived enemies, and that very specific brand of narcissism that all poets seem to cultivate (probably out of necessity, since the world does not necessarily ask for or want poetry, and so you have to generate the inward sense that your work is necessary). That said: sometimes reading this biography felt like reading a very long, dutifully written assigned paper. Sometimes I really, legitimately could not tell if de Veaux even liked Lorde, or felt any sense of passionate connection to her work. Whole chunks of the book were written in this strangely detached tone, like she was working so hard to be neutral that she just presented us with a record of the facts (where Lorde went, what she said, what she ate, who she saw) without interpretation or really any explanation of why this mattered in the broader arc of Lorde’s life/thought. It was even weirder to me because I think of Lorde as someone whose work was passionately personal. Her entire body of work is basically an argument against the fiction of objectivity, against divorcing structural analysis from the personal. For Lorde, an analysis of the deep emotional structures of our lived experiences is what enables us to understand and begin to dismantle the violent structures of white supremacy, patriarchy, capitalism. I just kept thinking like, why adopt a super traditional narrative structure, tone, and approach to writing about the life of someone whose work is basically a rejection of those traditions? I spent the whole book wondering, Will it become clear?? Will I understand by the end? It did not; I do not. My best theory right now is: I wonder if it was maybe a personal/political decision on de Veaux’s part to let Lorde speak for herself. Like, maybe she chose to avoid reinterpreting Lorde’s work and instead focused on building out the context around the work as a way of respecting the versions of her life that Lorde crafts (and revises, over and over again) in her poetry and fiction. Idk. I don’t find that theory (or this biography, unfortunately) all that emotionally satisfying.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jalisa

    I really struggled through this. It took me months (during which I read three other books) and I've been sitting with why. It finally hit me that I struggled through this book because it shows Lorde in all her complexity - in not only the shining light of her genius, but in the dark side of her petulance and constant need for recognition. It portrayed her in all of her humanity which in turn forced me to look at myself in all my dark and light. That's the beauty of this biography. It doesn't whi I really struggled through this. It took me months (during which I read three other books) and I've been sitting with why. It finally hit me that I struggled through this book because it shows Lorde in all her complexity - in not only the shining light of her genius, but in the dark side of her petulance and constant need for recognition. It portrayed her in all of her humanity which in turn forced me to look at myself in all my dark and light. That's the beauty of this biography. It doesn't white wash anything about Audre Lorde and allows you to truly understand the inner and outer work it takes to be at the top of your game and reminds us that all of our greats are fallible humans. We all fear our own mortality and relevance. We change our opinions and positions as we expand our awareness of the world around us. We make mistakes in our interpersonal relationships. We need and sometimes ask for more than we give. But through it all we make our mark. We contribute to our collective growth and liberation. I'm thankful for Lorde's gift and the work Alexis De Veaux did to contextualize and humanize the person behind the art.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Shakerra

    Audre Lorde's story is amazing, and the level of detail that the author goes into is extraordinary. Unfortunately, it can also be a bit tiring. It is clear that the author admires and cares for Audre so she wanted to paint as accurate and clear a picture of her as possible. She goes to great pains to look at Audre's life objectively. However, at times this book turns into a chronology of the mundane. It was hoping for a deeper understanding of Audre Lorde. She is a woman with many, many layers. Audre Lorde's story is amazing, and the level of detail that the author goes into is extraordinary. Unfortunately, it can also be a bit tiring. It is clear that the author admires and cares for Audre so she wanted to paint as accurate and clear a picture of her as possible. She goes to great pains to look at Audre's life objectively. However, at times this book turns into a chronology of the mundane. It was hoping for a deeper understanding of Audre Lorde. She is a woman with many, many layers. However, I think in an effort to do too much (maybe?), the author gave too much detail. In the end, it felt a bit sterile. That said, it is definitely worth reading. I'd also recommend reading Zami: A New Spelling of My Name. It is interesting to contrast the two tellings of Audre Lorde's life - one from her own perspective, the other from someone else. Despite my feelings about the book, I am incredibly grateful that someone is telling her story.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    thank god for this book. i finally have some context in which to put the masses of audre lorde poems i have loved for so many years. this is the first of many biographies of audre lorde (i dearly hope).

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sonja

    Full of rich detail about Audre Lorde’s life, this is an important book about a leader and a voice that has influenced our times greatly. Because she died of cancer and had to struggle with the disease, I felt sad when the book ended but that struggle too is important for our times. Most of the book shows her life in the context of the 70s and 80s when the women’s liberation, civil rights and gay and lesbian movements were at their height. Reading the life of this great black lesbian poet, I rea Full of rich detail about Audre Lorde’s life, this is an important book about a leader and a voice that has influenced our times greatly. Because she died of cancer and had to struggle with the disease, I felt sad when the book ended but that struggle too is important for our times. Most of the book shows her life in the context of the 70s and 80s when the women’s liberation, civil rights and gay and lesbian movements were at their height. Reading the life of this great black lesbian poet, I realize how much she influenced me (I am not black but a political radical and a lesbian). While she was alive I read her poetry and Zami and followed her breakthrough accomplishments and appearances. I read eagerly the details of her life and experienced parallels events. How she moved from knowing her attraction to women to marriage to a man and the identification as a lesbian. Her poetry is woven in minimally, enough to get a taste. Her struggles with the publishing world was an important breakthrough for black and lesbian writers. “Audre Lorde became the first out black lesbian to crash the gates of the literary mainstream.” I also loved how deVeaux includes background on other people important to Lorde’s life—June Jordon, Sonia Sanchez, Pat Parker, Michelle Cliff—and details the great gathering of black cultural figures FESTAC in Lagos, which was ignored in the Western media. De Veaux writes academically and a bit drily for my taste but her thorough research and accurate portrayal had a warm and trusting effect on me, the reader. Unfortunately, Audre’s passionate character and strong political convictions did not come through in the book. I love some of de Veaux’s bold and honest statements: “Neither Rich nor Cliff was interested in Lorde sexually and both resisted her persistent attempts at seduction.” In her most important work, Zami “ Lorde’s spiritual connection to the ‘zami’ women of Carriacou contextualizad her lesbianism within a ‘new living the old in a new way.’” We see Lorde in her travels, adopting a transnational blackness not unlike what Malcolm X was moving towards at his death. That view toward solidarity with people beyond borders is what I love and feel in the end about Audre Lorde as a poet leader. All in all this book shows that Audre Lorde took important strides that helped Black women, lesbians, and really all women today and in the future.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kandace

    On my biography journey I read a chapter of this book a day and found it to be rich with thoughtful insights into the personality and deep readings of Audre Lorde’s work. That her legacy lives beyond her is evident in how fiercely she worked for this to be true. A who’s who in multicultural and lesbian “second wave” feminism - essential reading for the feminist scholar. De Veaux seamlessly integrates Lorde’s poetry amongst Lorde’s writerly and personal transformations. A deeply satisfying book t On my biography journey I read a chapter of this book a day and found it to be rich with thoughtful insights into the personality and deep readings of Audre Lorde’s work. That her legacy lives beyond her is evident in how fiercely she worked for this to be true. A who’s who in multicultural and lesbian “second wave” feminism - essential reading for the feminist scholar. De Veaux seamlessly integrates Lorde’s poetry amongst Lorde’s writerly and personal transformations. A deeply satisfying book that deserves revisiting since Lorde’s passing in the early 90s.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Cait

    Quite simply, I loved this book. I felt that Alexis de Veaux provided readers with a great sense of who Audre was beyond/within/in spite/because of her self-invention and significance as a feminist literary icon. Knowing Audre's insecurities, fears, anxieties, heartaches, mistakes, etc. only left me in deeper awe and respect for her work, the way she attempted to live her life, and what an immeasurable contribution she made to the world during her too-brief life. The did think she rushed things Quite simply, I loved this book. I felt that Alexis de Veaux provided readers with a great sense of who Audre was beyond/within/in spite/because of her self-invention and significance as a feminist literary icon. Knowing Audre's insecurities, fears, anxieties, heartaches, mistakes, etc. only left me in deeper awe and respect for her work, the way she attempted to live her life, and what an immeasurable contribution she made to the world during her too-brief life. The did think she rushed things a bit at the end, and there could have been a smoother transition into Audre's decline and death. However, she said she wanted the book to be about her life, not her illness, and it was. I was so sad upon finishing the book, because Audre was gone all over again. It moved me to tears, and I can't stop thinking about it since I've finished. This is such an important book to have out there, because Audre's life and her works provide a much-needed model for wumyn all over the world engaging in struggles with oppression and silence. Furthermore, it is one of the few books to grant Audre the critical attention and appreciation she deserves as a a major international poet and scholar, social figure, and thinker of the 20th century.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Pia

    I read this in one sitting during a delicious browsing session at my local B&N bookstore. I deeply admire Audre Lorde's vision, words, and accomplishments, so I was excited about this book. While I understand that every public figure as her inherent contradictions, I was disappointed that his analysis of Lorde often focused on what Deveaux interprets as her difficult personality and domestic inequalities between her and her long-term partner, Francis. In fact, I wanted to hear way more from Lord I read this in one sitting during a delicious browsing session at my local B&N bookstore. I deeply admire Audre Lorde's vision, words, and accomplishments, so I was excited about this book. While I understand that every public figure as her inherent contradictions, I was disappointed that his analysis of Lorde often focused on what Deveaux interprets as her difficult personality and domestic inequalities between her and her long-term partner, Francis. In fact, I wanted to hear way more from Lorde herself, rather than Deveaux's interpretation.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Caleb

    This book is not riveting, but it sheds light on Audre Lorde's life, widening the picture that people get from reading Zami or The Cancer Journals to understand the many strands she was pulling together over decades. The narrative style is very factual, which might be a bit dry for some readers. I enjoyed it for the windows into Lorde's personal journals and the insight into the nuts and bolts of her process...its amazing how creativity over the course of a life emerges in fits and starts from t This book is not riveting, but it sheds light on Audre Lorde's life, widening the picture that people get from reading Zami or The Cancer Journals to understand the many strands she was pulling together over decades. The narrative style is very factual, which might be a bit dry for some readers. I enjoyed it for the windows into Lorde's personal journals and the insight into the nuts and bolts of her process...its amazing how creativity over the course of a life emerges in fits and starts from the perspective of the artist, but the product can be transformative for so many readers.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Yamilet

    Reads more like a novel, I was hooked.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Stedwards

    Compelling, complex biography. Great for any and all Lorde-heads.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    This is a very useful book for getting an overview of Lorde's life and work, but I was left wanting more. I'd been hoping to find more in-depth discussion of Lorde's writing processes and more discussion of what was referred to as Lorde's "theory of difference" -- there was a bit more telling than showing on that subject. Though there was a fairly extensive cataloging of Lorde's relationships with women, at some points the various women felt interchangeable, which contrasted with Zami, where the This is a very useful book for getting an overview of Lorde's life and work, but I was left wanting more. I'd been hoping to find more in-depth discussion of Lorde's writing processes and more discussion of what was referred to as Lorde's "theory of difference" -- there was a bit more telling than showing on that subject. Though there was a fairly extensive cataloging of Lorde's relationships with women, at some points the various women felt interchangeable, which contrasted with Zami, where the women Lorde was involved with were described in much more specific detail. I also had hoped for more on Lorde's discussion of self-care as a political act -- just checked and the quote I'm thinking of is from her Burst of Light (1988), which falls somewhat outside of De Veaux's timeframe, since she doesn't discuss much of Lorde's last years. However, very glad to have read this as a starting point (especially after reading Zami), but thinking that more of Lorde's own writings will be next.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sokari

    Reading through the life of Audre Lorde. De Veaux breaks through the myths and iconic status of Lorde and takes us on a journey of Lorde’s transformation from lesbian “gal” to poet. social activist, cancer survivor and finally black feminist lesbian warrior poet. A homage to a great Black lesbian feminist woman - no one has come near Audre Lorde as yet - De Veaux is nonetheless brave enough to give us details of the not so pleasant side of Lorde such as her taking of amphetamines and bouts of ab Reading through the life of Audre Lorde. De Veaux breaks through the myths and iconic status of Lorde and takes us on a journey of Lorde’s transformation from lesbian “gal” to poet. social activist, cancer survivor and finally black feminist lesbian warrior poet. A homage to a great Black lesbian feminist woman - no one has come near Audre Lorde as yet - De Veaux is nonetheless brave enough to give us details of the not so pleasant side of Lorde such as her taking of amphetamines and bouts of abusive anger. She also lays open Lorde’s relationship to white women which up to the last 10 years, dominated her friendships and affairs and her somewhat ambivalant relationship to Black women. All of which makes Lorde even more of an exceptional human being given that she had flaws like the rest of us. Excellent first biogrpahy.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

    I was surprised how much I enjoyed this book! I picked it up not knowing much beyond a slight familiarity with Audre Lorde's name, and what an interesting human I learned she was! I liked how the author not only told the story of Lorde's life but also described how the different life events influenced her thinking about feminism, being Black, and her sexuality within the context of what was going on society and the specific areas and movements that Lorde's work was impacting. It seemed that the I was surprised how much I enjoyed this book! I picked it up not knowing much beyond a slight familiarity with Audre Lorde's name, and what an interesting human I learned she was! I liked how the author not only told the story of Lorde's life but also described how the different life events influenced her thinking about feminism, being Black, and her sexuality within the context of what was going on society and the specific areas and movements that Lorde's work was impacting. It seemed that the author had access to many of Lorde's journals to bring the first person account and views to light. I would recommend this book, though a bit lengthy, for those even a little bit interested in who Audre Lorde was and the influence she had in the world through her poetry and connections she made who shared some parts of her identities.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Anicka Austin

    The amount of research that went into this book is astounding. De Veaux left no stone unturned. I appreciate her balanced, yet admittedly (sometimes) harsh perspective on Lorde's life and decision-making. Lorde was both generous and selfish, fierce and insecure, loving and standoffish. She was a whole person. It also gives some perspective into where her ideas stemmed. There is definitely some room for the next author who wants to choose a section of Lorde's life to delve into. Warrior Poet is bo The amount of research that went into this book is astounding. De Veaux left no stone unturned. I appreciate her balanced, yet admittedly (sometimes) harsh perspective on Lorde's life and decision-making. Lorde was both generous and selfish, fierce and insecure, loving and standoffish. She was a whole person. It also gives some perspective into where her ideas stemmed. There is definitely some room for the next author who wants to choose a section of Lorde's life to delve into. Warrior Poet is both broad and detailed and I'm looking forward to reading a more narrowly focused biography on Lorde. I agree with some other readers that some of the exhaustive details felt unnecessary and dryly written. I understand this approach (to give a full and exacting look at her life), but it did make some sections difficult to get through.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    I want to write biographies like this one. De Veaux is thorough and engaging, her writing flows, she simultaneously de-mythifies Lorde while respecting the public persona that Lorde created for herself. Not only is her research of Lorde's life and work admirable, but also she gives brief biographies of nearly all of Lorde's friends and colleagues (which really help to explain how Lorde knew each person and was attracted to them). Lacking is Frances Clayton's voice (Lorde's longtime lover who ref I want to write biographies like this one. De Veaux is thorough and engaging, her writing flows, she simultaneously de-mythifies Lorde while respecting the public persona that Lorde created for herself. Not only is her research of Lorde's life and work admirable, but also she gives brief biographies of nearly all of Lorde's friends and colleagues (which really help to explain how Lorde knew each person and was attracted to them). Lacking is Frances Clayton's voice (Lorde's longtime lover who refused to speak to De Veaux on the project), and I think De Veaux made a good decision not to include Lorde's last few years, which were spent struggling against the cancer that killed her. Instead, she focuses on the "productive" years of Lorde's life. A wonderful book.

  20. 5 out of 5

    thinker bell

    Inspirational Audre Lorde. She actually reminds me of someone I'm very close to and now I have more insight as to why my special someone is the way they are and how not much has changed in the feminist movement that does not talk about the root causes of the injustices working class lesbians of color face today. It also saddened me that my generation of queer identified, non heterosexual people do not know the long journey and struggle our LGBTQ ancestors paved for us to have what we have now an Inspirational Audre Lorde. She actually reminds me of someone I'm very close to and now I have more insight as to why my special someone is the way they are and how not much has changed in the feminist movement that does not talk about the root causes of the injustices working class lesbians of color face today. It also saddened me that my generation of queer identified, non heterosexual people do not know the long journey and struggle our LGBTQ ancestors paved for us to have what we have now and we have taken for granted what we have today, while not continuing to struggle for the issues that remain.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Bre

    Audre Lorde described herself as 'black, feminist, lesbian, mother, poet warrior.' While DeVeaux definitely did her research and was clearly in awe of Lorde, I feel that there was a certain coldness in her work. The lack of discussion surrounding her personal relationships (aside from a list of lovers) was odd and disappointing to me. Frances Clayton, Beth, and Jonathan were just kind of 'there' in the background. I feel like the author skipped over most of Lorde's 'mother' life and focused almo Audre Lorde described herself as 'black, feminist, lesbian, mother, poet warrior.' While DeVeaux definitely did her research and was clearly in awe of Lorde, I feel that there was a certain coldness in her work. The lack of discussion surrounding her personal relationships (aside from a list of lovers) was odd and disappointing to me. Frances Clayton, Beth, and Jonathan were just kind of 'there' in the background. I feel like the author skipped over most of Lorde's 'mother' life and focused almost exclusively on her activism. Obviously she was an amazing poet, feminist, and social activist. But she was also a mother and a partner/wife. Disappointing on that level....

  22. 5 out of 5

    Colin

    This book was pretty juicy, haha. I thought De Veaux did an excellent job complicating and illuminating Lorde's personality, relationships, writing career and legacy. I felt it was overly academic at times, and I was disappointed that De Veaux chose to end the book in 1986 instead of 1992 because she "did not want to overemphasize the cancer." I don't understand that. Audre Lorde lived six more years. Why was this part of her (disabled) experience left out? Overall, though, I really enjoyed it. This book was pretty juicy, haha. I thought De Veaux did an excellent job complicating and illuminating Lorde's personality, relationships, writing career and legacy. I felt it was overly academic at times, and I was disappointed that De Veaux chose to end the book in 1986 instead of 1992 because she "did not want to overemphasize the cancer." I don't understand that. Audre Lorde lived six more years. Why was this part of her (disabled) experience left out? Overall, though, I really enjoyed it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jacoby

    It was really wonderful to read the particulars of Audre Lorde's life, and to see how all of the other lesbian and gay authors of that time related to her. It was also really wonderful just to be able to see her as a person who also made mistakes, who was a jerk sometimes. It was well written and I appreciated the statement by the author at the beginning. It was really wonderful to read the particulars of Audre Lorde's life, and to see how all of the other lesbian and gay authors of that time related to her. It was also really wonderful just to be able to see her as a person who also made mistakes, who was a jerk sometimes. It was well written and I appreciated the statement by the author at the beginning.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jerrie Kumalah

    So disappointed in the book. I had such high hopes for it and was excited to read her biography. Sadly the author does a poor job of making this an exciting read. The title is way more exciting than the book itself. The whole book is an array of facts about Audrey lorde that the author recites for us one after the other.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Brother Sophia

    I re-read this book after attending a conference. Lorde is a writer whose thought has influenced those who have influenced me, so it was good to read what formed her. I thought this biography was very well written and researched, and very readable.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte

    I am a biography junkie..and this book fulfilled all my expectations. It is an amazing exploration in the life of an incredible poet and activist. Check it out man!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Meen

    I just finished it, like 5 minutes ago, so I am still processing. All I can say right now is... Well, I don't think I can say anything. I feel like crying actually. :( I just finished it, like 5 minutes ago, so I am still processing. All I can say right now is... Well, I don't think I can say anything. I feel like crying actually. :(

  28. 5 out of 5

    Angela Douge

    Would love to re-read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Winter Sophia Rose

    Disturbing, Brilliant & Awesome!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    "I wish to survive and that has always meant war." "I wish to survive and that has always meant war."

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