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These free-wheeling, often exhilarating dialogues—which grew out of the acclaimed Carnegie Hall Talks—are an exchange between two of the most prominent figures in contemporary culture: Daniel Barenboim, internationally renowned conductor and pianist, and Edward W. Said, eminent literary critic and impassioned commentator on the Middle East. Barenboim is an Argentinian-Isra These free-wheeling, often exhilarating dialogues—which grew out of the acclaimed Carnegie Hall Talks—are an exchange between two of the most prominent figures in contemporary culture: Daniel Barenboim, internationally renowned conductor and pianist, and Edward W. Said, eminent literary critic and impassioned commentator on the Middle East. Barenboim is an Argentinian-Israeli and Said a Palestinian-American; they are also close friends. As they range across music, literature, and society, they open up many fields of inquiry: the importance of a sense of place; music as a defiance of silence; the legacies of artists from Mozart and Beethoven to Dickens and Adorno; Wagner’s anti-Semitism; and the need for “artistic solutions” to the predicament of the Middle East—something they both witnessed when they brought young Arab and Israeli musicians together. Erudite, intimate, thoughtful and spontaneous, Parallels and Paradoxes is a virtuosic collaboration.


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These free-wheeling, often exhilarating dialogues—which grew out of the acclaimed Carnegie Hall Talks—are an exchange between two of the most prominent figures in contemporary culture: Daniel Barenboim, internationally renowned conductor and pianist, and Edward W. Said, eminent literary critic and impassioned commentator on the Middle East. Barenboim is an Argentinian-Isra These free-wheeling, often exhilarating dialogues—which grew out of the acclaimed Carnegie Hall Talks—are an exchange between two of the most prominent figures in contemporary culture: Daniel Barenboim, internationally renowned conductor and pianist, and Edward W. Said, eminent literary critic and impassioned commentator on the Middle East. Barenboim is an Argentinian-Israeli and Said a Palestinian-American; they are also close friends. As they range across music, literature, and society, they open up many fields of inquiry: the importance of a sense of place; music as a defiance of silence; the legacies of artists from Mozart and Beethoven to Dickens and Adorno; Wagner’s anti-Semitism; and the need for “artistic solutions” to the predicament of the Middle East—something they both witnessed when they brought young Arab and Israeli musicians together. Erudite, intimate, thoughtful and spontaneous, Parallels and Paradoxes is a virtuosic collaboration.

30 review for Parallels and Paradoxes: Explorations in Music and Society

  1. 4 out of 5

    Abdulslam

    كتاب جميل للمهتم في الموسيقى وفهمها من الناحية النقدية، حديث إدوارد سعيد دائما مثير للإهتمام بالنسبة لي مهما كان الموضوع، تغاضى عن فكرة تحقيق السلام بالشرق الأولى بالموسيقى فهي بالنهاية فكرة جانبية في الحوار بين إدوارد ودانيال، التكاملية بين الإثنين هي ماجعلت الحوار متنوع المفاهيم، إدوارد يتحدث عنها كناقد واستاذ للأدب والفنون، بينما دانيال كموسيقي بحت، لذلك نجده يتكلم احيانا عنها تقنيا اكثر منها كحالة تحليلية مجازية كما هو الحال عند إدوارد. إدوارد سعيد: في الأدب الكلمات مشتركة للجميع. الجميع يست كتاب جميل للمهتم في الموسيقى وفهمها من الناحية النقدية، حديث إدوارد سعيد دائما مثير للإهتمام بالنسبة لي مهما كان الموضوع، تغاضى عن فكرة تحقيق السلام بالشرق الأولى بالموسيقى فهي بالنهاية فكرة جانبية في الحوار بين إدوارد ودانيال، التكاملية بين الإثنين هي ماجعلت الحوار متنوع المفاهيم، إدوارد يتحدث عنها كناقد واستاذ للأدب والفنون، بينما دانيال كموسيقي بحت، لذلك نجده يتكلم احيانا عنها تقنيا اكثر منها كحالة تحليلية مجازية كما هو الحال عند إدوارد. إدوارد سعيد: في الأدب الكلمات مشتركة للجميع. الجميع يستخدم اللغة.الكلمات التي تراها في قصيدة أو مسرحية أو رواية هي الكلمات ذاتها المستخدمة في الحياة اليومية، لكنها منسّقة بطرق مختلفة مايعطيها ملمسا فنيا عاليا. أجد الموسيقى فاتنة جزئيا لأنها تكتنف الصمت، رغم أنها مكونة طبعا من الصوت. لاتفسّر الموسيقى نفسها بالطريقة التي تفسّر فيها الكلمة نفسها في علاقتها مع الكلمات الاخرى.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bliss

    A collection of deeply thoughtful, provocative conversations between Barenboim and Said. I suspect I will be returning to this now and then for years to come.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lynn Wilson

    A wonderful book about cultural differences, "home" and the healing power of music to bring all of us together. A dialogue between two men with great minds. A wonderful book about cultural differences, "home" and the healing power of music to bring all of us together. A dialogue between two men with great minds.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Martha

    I picked this up because I've long admired Edward Said and didn't realize he had interest or expertise in music. But perhaps I'm not enough of a musician to appreciate the details--it seemed a rather self-indulgent and meandering series of conversations esp since they weren't presented in chronological order. The discussions of music making were abstract and almost mystical rather than describing the practical details of performing and interpreting music I would expect from a soloist and conduct I picked this up because I've long admired Edward Said and didn't realize he had interest or expertise in music. But perhaps I'm not enough of a musician to appreciate the details--it seemed a rather self-indulgent and meandering series of conversations esp since they weren't presented in chronological order. The discussions of music making were abstract and almost mystical rather than describing the practical details of performing and interpreting music I would expect from a soloist and conductor like Barenboim. Maybe it was b/c Said wasn't a musician. I rapidly began to feel as though they were on a different plane from me and we weren't getting anywhere. Further I get annoyed when people start talking, as they did early in these conversations, about getting Israeli and Arab kids together to (activity of your choice here--make music, do sports, study computers) in the hope that this will bring a solution to the war in Palestine. There will be peace there when the adults stop killing each other (and their children) and when the Israelis give back the land they stole which will be done when the US stops bankrolling Israeli aggression at $3B plus a year. Summer music camps aren't going to cut it. And Said knew that very well.

  5. 4 out of 5

    HAMZA AL-AMEER

    ذا الحوار الساحر بين اثنين من أبرز شخصيات الثقافة المعاصرة، دانيال بارنبويم، مدير الشؤون الموسيقة لاوركسترا شيكاغو السيمونية ودار الأوبرا الألمانية، وإدوارد سعيد الناقد الأدبي البارز والعالم الأخصائي والقيادي حول الشرق الأوسط، نشأ من حوارات قاعة كارنغي الشهيرة. إنه نقاش فريد من نوعه وملتهب حول السياسة والثقافة، ويتطرق إلى مواضيع مختلفة جداً: أهمية الإحساس بالمكان، الفرق بين كتابة النثر والموسيقى، بتهوفن مؤلفاً أعظم للسوناتا، صعوبة عزف فاغنر، الصوت في (مسرحية مدينة) بايرويت، الكتاب بالزاك وديكنز ذا الحوار الساحر بين اثنين من أبرز شخصيات الثقافة المعاصرة، دانيال بارنبويم، مدير الشؤون الموسيقة لاوركسترا شيكاغو السيمونية ودار الأوبرا الألمانية، وإدوارد سعيد الناقد الأدبي البارز والعالم الأخصائي والقيادي حول الشرق الأوسط، نشأ من حوارات قاعة كارنغي الشهيرة. إنه نقاش فريد من نوعه وملتهب حول السياسة والثقافة، ويتطرق إلى مواضيع مختلفة جداً: أهمية الإحساس بالمكان، الفرق بين كتابة النثر والموسيقى، بتهوفن مؤلفاً أعظم للسوناتا، صعوبة عزف فاغنر، الصوت في (مسرحية مدينة) بايرويت، الكتاب بالزاك وديكنز وأدورنو، أهمية الأساتذة الكبار، وقدرة الثقافة على تجاوز جميع الفوارق القومية والسياسية. ورغم أن لكل من بارنبويم وسعيد وجهة نظره المختلفة جداً، إلا أنهما يعملان كمادة حفازة للآخر، أصالة أفكارهما تجعل هذا الكتاب سهل المنال ويفرض نفسه بقوة على كل من يهتم بثقافة القرن الحادي والعشرين.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Yaser Maadat

    حوارات الموسيقى "وحدها" الشيقة حوارات الموسيقى "وحدها" الشيقة

  7. 4 out of 5

    Declan Hickey

    Rich, concise, and extremely readable. Two titans in their own fields, equally at ease in discussions of music, politics, society, and so much more.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Kinsey

    "But I think that every great work of art has two faces: one toward its own time and one toward eternity. In other words, there are certain aspects of a Mozart symphony or a Mozart opera that are clearly linked to their time and have no relevance today. The droit du seigneur of the count in Figaro is so totally time-bound. But there is something that is timeless about this music, and that aspect of it has to be performed with a sense of discovery." -Daniel Barenboim "There is a contradiction in t "But I think that every great work of art has two faces: one toward its own time and one toward eternity. In other words, there are certain aspects of a Mozart symphony or a Mozart opera that are clearly linked to their time and have no relevance today. The droit du seigneur of the count in Figaro is so totally time-bound. But there is something that is timeless about this music, and that aspect of it has to be performed with a sense of discovery." -Daniel Barenboim "There is a contradiction in the fact that we live in an age that considers itself extremely critical but does not require of the individual to have the means to criticize." -Daniel Barenboim "I've often thought: What is the difference between a politician and an artist? A politician can only work and do good if he masters the art of compromise: tries to find the areas where the different parties are able and willing to compromise, bring them as close as possible together, and then hope that with the right momentum and the right time, it will become seamless; whereas the artist's expression is only determined by his total refusal to compromise in anything- the element of courage." -Daniel Barenboim "But I think that unless you are able to digest the piece to the point where you feel it is part of you, even though it may be incomplete, then you shouldn't perform it." -Daniel Barenboim "And if you try to objectively reproduce what is printed and nothing more, not only is this not possible to do - and, therefore, there's no fidelity - it is also a complete act of cowardice because it means that you haven't gone to the trouble to understand the interrelations and what the dosage is, to speak of nothing else - and I'm speaking at the moment only about volume and about balance, let alone the question of the line and the phrasing and all that." -Daniel Barenboim

  9. 5 out of 5

    Aya Mtoori

    يمكن للموسيقى أن تكون أفضل مدرسة لمواجهة الحياة وبنفس الوقت أفضل وسيلة للهرب منها. يفتتح آرا غوزيمليان الكتاب بذكر خلفية مقتضبة عن حياة كل من إدوارد سعيد الناقد الأدبي البارز والعالم الأخصائي والقيادي حول الشرق الأوسط ودانيال بارنبويم مدير الشؤون الموسيقية لأوركسترا شيكاغو السيمفونية ودار الأوبرا الألمانية، وتجربتهم الجريئة التي جمعت موسيقيين اسرائيليين وعرب في ڤايمار في المانيا كجزء من الاحتفال السنوي بالذكرى المئتين وخمسين لميلاد غوته. إدوارد "لا أعتقد إن عملية انقاذ السلام كانت هدفنا الرئيسي، ك يمكن للموسيقى أن تكون أفضل مدرسة لمواجهة الحياة وبنفس الوقت أفضل وسيلة للهرب منها. يفتتح آرا غوزيمليان الكتاب بذكر خلفية مقتضبة عن حياة كل من إدوارد سعيد الناقد الأدبي البارز والعالم الأخصائي والقيادي حول الشرق الأوسط ودانيال بارنبويم مدير الشؤون الموسيقية لأوركسترا شيكاغو السيمفونية ودار الأوبرا الألمانية، وتجربتهم الجريئة التي جمعت موسيقيين اسرائيليين وعرب في ڤايمار في المانيا كجزء من الاحتفال السنوي بالذكرى المئتين وخمسين لميلاد غوته. إدوارد "لا أعتقد إن عملية انقاذ السلام كانت هدفنا الرئيسي، كانت الفكرة في ان نرى ماذا سيحدث ان جمعنا هؤلاء الشباب ليعزفوا في فرقة اوركسترا في ڤايمار بروح غوته، الذي كتب مجموعة هائلة من القصائد انطلاقاً من حماسته للأسلام ..." يُفرد غويزيليميان فصلاً من الكتاب للحديث عن فاغنر، الموسيقار العبقري الذي احدث ثورة في الأوبرا، والمؤلف الموسيقي كاتب نصوص أوبراته، مبتكر فكرة حفرة الأوركسترا المغلقة ومفهوم العمل الفني المتكامل موسيقياً وتمثيلياً (Gesamtkunstwork). إدوارد"خلال عملك كعازف يادانيال، وخلال عملي كمترجم يجب علينا ان نتقبل فكرة وضع هويتنا على الرف كي نستطيع اكتشاف الأخر" يوضح بارنبويم ان شخصية فاغنر المعادية للسامية ضلت بمعزل عن أعماله، الا إن النازيين أساؤوا استخدام أفكاره واستغلالها، حيث اعتُبرت أوبرا "المطربون" عملاً أيدلوجياً نازياً لسنوات طويلة. دانيال "سررت كثيراً عندما علمت ان بتهوفن لم يكن يحب كثيراً الاستماع الى اعمال موتسارت لأنه كان يخشى إنها ستحد من إبداعه". كيف يمكننا ان نصغي دون ان نسمع؟! هل صحيح ان العازفين كالمترجمين لهم اسلوبهم الخاص في تعاملهم مع النص الذي يحاولون ترجمته؟! وهل صحيح ان المقطوعة الموسيقية تولد عندما يتم تحويلها الى صوت ..؟! هذا ماسيوضحه بارنبويم في نقاش فريد من نوعة حول الثقافة والسياسة والفن. يختتم غويزيليميان سلسلة حواراتهُ المنتقاة والمركزة والتي كانت حصيلة ٥ اعوام، بمقال "بارنبويم وتحريم فاغنر" لإدوارد سعيد ومقال "الألمان واليهود والموسيقى" لبارنبويم، لينتهي بنا هذا الحوار الشيق والمتكافىء بايماننا بقدرة الثقافة على تجاوز جميع الفوارق القومية والسياسية.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    ***Finally finished the book!! Was a wonderful read. Definitely worth the work to get through it, but it also was so intellectually stimulating that I feel like I am still on a learning "high", two days after finishing it. It is a fascinating read and I highly recommend it for anyone that wants to see the parallels and paradoxes between music, society, religion, and culture.*** **UPDATE** - Putting this book back on my Currently Reading List, because I have recently picked it back up again, and i ***Finally finished the book!! Was a wonderful read. Definitely worth the work to get through it, but it also was so intellectually stimulating that I feel like I am still on a learning "high", two days after finishing it. It is a fascinating read and I highly recommend it for anyone that wants to see the parallels and paradoxes between music, society, religion, and culture.*** **UPDATE** - Putting this book back on my Currently Reading List, because I have recently picked it back up again, and it is still as fascinating as it first was...***** I started this book a while ago and have never finished it. But it is the most fascinating and spectacular book, given the interweaving of dialogue between Edward Said and Daniel Barenboim and their attempts to discuss and solve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in the context of intellectual and musical pursuits. Music and society influence each other on a degree and level that most people don't see, and I am enthralled by the subject. It is hard to get through though because you have to be in the right mindset to digest all that these two men are saying.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    Busoni said, says Barenboim on one of his last pages: 'Music is sonorous sound.' The could have left it at this. They, Barenboim and Said, didn’t. Said tries to bring the conversations to a higher abstract level by attempting to make connections between music on the one hand, the chapter Barenboim ‘conducts’ concretely, and other art forms and society as a whole on the other hand, the complementary parts where Said stays in all kinds of vagueness. I am glad that Barenboim didn’t let Said seduce hi Busoni said, says Barenboim on one of his last pages: 'Music is sonorous sound.' The could have left it at this. They, Barenboim and Said, didn’t. Said tries to bring the conversations to a higher abstract level by attempting to make connections between music on the one hand, the chapter Barenboim ‘conducts’ concretely, and other art forms and society as a whole on the other hand, the complementary parts where Said stays in all kinds of vagueness. I am glad that Barenboim didn’t let Said seduce him to say untrue ideological things about Wagner’s music-on-itself. From halfway the book, I focused on the utterings of Barenboim, they interest me far more than what his counterpart has to say; in that way the (rest of the) book was bearable. JM

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rana Aref

    Awesome dialogues between two of the world's most remarkable people. The translated version in Arabic was not so good, though. Planning to re-read it in English once I find it. Awesome dialogues between two of the world's most remarkable people. The translated version in Arabic was not so good, though. Planning to re-read it in English once I find it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Torresdale Branch

    "I was in constant touch with him. I think I spoke with him every day, sometimes to the consternation of our wives..." Daniel Barenboim descended from Russian Jews that emigrated to Argentina before his family moved to Israel when he was a child. He has since become one of the leading conductors in the world and a leading proponent of modern classical music. Edward Said was born in Jerusalem to an Arab-Christian family before moving to Egypt as a child and eventually to the United States as a tee "I was in constant touch with him. I think I spoke with him every day, sometimes to the consternation of our wives..." Daniel Barenboim descended from Russian Jews that emigrated to Argentina before his family moved to Israel when he was a child. He has since become one of the leading conductors in the world and a leading proponent of modern classical music. Edward Said was born in Jerusalem to an Arab-Christian family before moving to Egypt as a child and eventually to the United States as a teenager. He has since become a Columbia University professor of literature and a leading voice on the Middle Eastern Peace Process. A chance meeting in a London hotel lobby in the early 90s led to an intimate friendship that lasted until Said died in 2003. The gestation of this book began with the Carnegie Hall Perspectives Project where they were interviewed by Ara Guzelimian. Over the years, Ara further contacted the two friends leading to more in-depth conversations. The book was compiled and edited from those sources. Neither man can be pigeonholed. Of Said, Barenboim writes that, “Edward did not fit into any single category”, but the same can be said of both. They are considered leaders in their individual disciplines, but they were also dedicated students of culture, philosophy, and politics. Despite their differing backgrounds, it was art that drew them together. Said states, “…Anybody who communicates, whether a musician, or a writer, or a painter is obviously trying to have a certain amount of power not only over the material, but of the craft itself.” From Proust and Dickins to Verdi and Wagner, their interpretations led to fascinating discussions between the two friends. In particular, the dialogue about Wagner is extremely interesting. There is a two-fold “difficulty” in performing Wagner. The complexity, scope, and majesty of his music is often at odds with his personal anti-Semitic beliefs – a cognitive dissonance of the music and the man. Yet, Barenboim fought against the ban on Wagner’s music in Israel and sponsored performances by a collective of Israeli and Palestinian musicians. Building upon these performance, Said and Barenboim collaborated to form the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra, named after a collection of poems by Goethe. This orchestra is made up of young Israelis and Arabs working together despite their differences to create something moving, beautiful, and - ultimately – unifying. Neither friend would become teary eyed and argue that this will somehow solve the crisis in the Middle East, but there is a deep-seated belief that separation is also not a solution. The orchestra is a melting pot where collaboration is rewarded. This juxtaposition of musicians working together is like the parallels and paradoxes that sits at the heart of Said and Barenboim’s friendship. “The eternal value of Beethoven… is because the works are of a certain duration, and when they are finished, the sound disappears and does not live in our world. Where does this sound disappear?”, states Barenboim. Considering Said’s death, one could argue that the sound does not disappear, but reverberates into time as it is reshaped by each generation – like ripples on a pond. Their friendship, like a work of art, will endure beyond the "sound". This is a compelling work and will be of interest to those with an abiding passion for music, literature, and culture.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Kooman

    Daniel Barenboim and Edward W. Said cover a lot of ground, touching upon music, literature, and society. They explore the legacies of great artists like Mozart and Beethoven, discuss Dickens, Wagner’s anti-Semitism, and the need for “artistic solutions” to the conflict in the Middle East. If you enjoy reading interviews and conversations between peers who are experts in their fields, you'll really enjoy this! You'll leave the book, as I did, inspired to know more your field and to be more passion Daniel Barenboim and Edward W. Said cover a lot of ground, touching upon music, literature, and society. They explore the legacies of great artists like Mozart and Beethoven, discuss Dickens, Wagner’s anti-Semitism, and the need for “artistic solutions” to the conflict in the Middle East. If you enjoy reading interviews and conversations between peers who are experts in their fields, you'll really enjoy this! You'll leave the book, as I did, inspired to know more your field and to be more passionate about what you do.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Molly Jane

    All I can say is please, PLEASE read this book. I wish I had read it sooner. This book is so important, how is it older than me and still so so relevant and important right now? I don't know, don't dwell, just read. All I can say is please, PLEASE read this book. I wish I had read it sooner. This book is so important, how is it older than me and still so so relevant and important right now? I don't know, don't dwell, just read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Juan Mansfield

    Mas allá de la musica Un libro que nos adentra en el pensamiento filosófico y practico de dos grandes pensadores el uno un gran músico y el otro un escritor de alto vuelo.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    Basically a transcription of conversations. Not particularly interesting.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Austin

    Discussions between two great 20th century thinkers about music and its connections to other aspects of life.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ina

    If I could marry Said BLESS OUR WEDDING PLS COS THIS BOOK WAS THE MOST PHENOMENAL THING TO EGGSIST! saiD MARRY ME OR I AM DIE

  20. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Johns

    I found this easier to read than Music Quickens Time (essays by Barenboim). Although in this one I found the Daniel Barenboim sections more interesting than those by Edward Said - maybe because DB has a deeper understanding and wider experience of music than ES. Reading DB's thoughts, ideas, and exeperiences on conducting Wagner at Bayreuth, Beethoven Symphonies, and German Orchestras was fascinating. I was particularly interested that he singles out the Staatskapelle Berlin as a special orchest I found this easier to read than Music Quickens Time (essays by Barenboim). Although in this one I found the Daniel Barenboim sections more interesting than those by Edward Said - maybe because DB has a deeper understanding and wider experience of music than ES. Reading DB's thoughts, ideas, and exeperiences on conducting Wagner at Bayreuth, Beethoven Symphonies, and German Orchestras was fascinating. I was particularly interested that he singles out the Staatskapelle Berlin as a special orchestra. He attributes this to the fact that music education in Germany is different (or even exists) compared to other countries, and that it is more focused on really undertanding each note of the music than virtuosity. I am not sure I agree with the view (espoused by DB) that muisc is fundamentally different from literature in that a piece of music does not exist until it is performed, whereas a piece of literature exists as soon as it is written on the page. Surely a Shakespeare play does not exist until it is performed - there are good performances and bad ones - which fail to make sense of the text and miss the point - as there are in music. And when you are read a novel for example, you are hearing it "performed" by an imaginary voice inside your head. Nonetheless, fascinating thoughts and ideas throught the book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ruth

    I loved reading (I want to say listening b/c it felt like listening) to the conversations between these 2 guys. They are so interestingly matched in their perspectives: one guy is a writer and thinks about things in terms of literature; one guy is a musician/composer and thinks about things in terms of music; one guy is an Israeli Jew and the other is a Palestinian. And they talk about this broad range of topics that are just humanly interesting: parallels between the different arts, the role of I loved reading (I want to say listening b/c it felt like listening) to the conversations between these 2 guys. They are so interestingly matched in their perspectives: one guy is a writer and thinks about things in terms of literature; one guy is a musician/composer and thinks about things in terms of music; one guy is an Israeli Jew and the other is a Palestinian. And they talk about this broad range of topics that are just humanly interesting: parallels between the different arts, the role of the writer vs. the composer and the performer vs. the reader., peace in Israel, and how the way we respond to art is colored by the artist's history (specifically about Wagner's antisemitism). They both have this sense of openness in the way they talk about things, but they also are really direct in expressing their ideas.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Wei

    Definitely worth reading if you are a fan of classical music or literary criticism (I am more of the former). Though due to limitation of the format (an unchronological juxtaposition of six dialogues), I feel that a lot of ideas and motives could have been developed further and more systematically. Particularly interesting is the "parallels and paradoxes" between the two participants of the dialogues. EWS provided a more abstract and academic perspective and DB echoed, and in a lot of cases, dis Definitely worth reading if you are a fan of classical music or literary criticism (I am more of the former). Though due to limitation of the format (an unchronological juxtaposition of six dialogues), I feel that a lot of ideas and motives could have been developed further and more systematically. Particularly interesting is the "parallels and paradoxes" between the two participants of the dialogues. EWS provided a more abstract and academic perspective and DB echoed, and in a lot of cases, disagreed, using practical and first-hand experiences and observations. Nevertheless both are very thought-provoking in their own rights. I will surely go back to read this book several times in the future as I gain more understanding of music.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    I loved this book. Edward Said's brilliance compared with Barenboim's experience lead to a book full of fresh philosophical, musical, and idealogical insights into what music is, isn't, and what makes it the powerful phenomenon that moves us. I have been involved with music for sixteen years now, and reading this book brought new insights to my attention and revolutionized the way I saw music in many regards. This book was definitely a worthwhile read, and I plan on returning to it again and aga I loved this book. Edward Said's brilliance compared with Barenboim's experience lead to a book full of fresh philosophical, musical, and idealogical insights into what music is, isn't, and what makes it the powerful phenomenon that moves us. I have been involved with music for sixteen years now, and reading this book brought new insights to my attention and revolutionized the way I saw music in many regards. This book was definitely a worthwhile read, and I plan on returning to it again and again.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Beyzanur KUDAL

    Bu kitap gerçekten bende büyük derin izler bıraktı.Çünkü 2.dünya savaşında her ne olursa olsun ne kadar dünyada barış olmasa bile bu kitapta müzikle barış sağlanmaya çalışılmış.Bunu her ülkeden farklı çalgıcıları toplayarak orkestra kurmuşlardır.Ve müzik hakkında çok derin şeylerden bahsetmişler kitap gerçekten bana çok şeyler kattı.Gerçekten herkesin okuması gerekli bu kitabı çünkü insana çok şeyler katabilen ve insanı derinden etkileyen bir kitaptır.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kriegslok

    Transcriptions of intellectual debate and ramblings between great minds on the subject of music and society. Some fascinating philosophical discussion (some of which left me feeling very inadequate and non the wiser but enough in it to keep my mind interested and challenged by interesting approaches to questions I'd either never asked or thought I knoew the answers to. Transcriptions of intellectual debate and ramblings between great minds on the subject of music and society. Some fascinating philosophical discussion (some of which left me feeling very inadequate and non the wiser but enough in it to keep my mind interested and challenged by interesting approaches to questions I'd either never asked or thought I knoew the answers to.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mira Tabsh

    The book approaches music from its philosophical perspective, which was somehow difficult for me to comprehend. Nonetheless, I managed to read it all and learned many interesting facts specially about Wagner, a topic that I find substantial.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Wackedout

    Beautifully insightful and thought-provoking conversations which allowed a glimpse into the minds of two great artists and intellectuals. Highly recommended.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Beyzanur Kudal

    kitabın adı:paralellikler ve paradokslar kitabın yazarı:EDWARD SAID ISBN:9944 916 24 2 BEYZANUR KUDAL

  29. 4 out of 5

    Siqi

    Their conversations show clearly how much more brilliant, interesting and modest the classical musician is than the intellectual. I feel sorry for my profession now...

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bassel Damra

    مجموعة حوارات عبارة عن قيء متكرر و قرف أدبي و تطبيع دنيء في اطار ما يسمى بالسلام ! حتى الموسيقى لا تصنع السلام مع قتلة الأطفال يا سيد ادوارد !! لم أستطع حتى على اكمال هذه القدر الكبير من الدناءة

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