web site hit counter The Princess and the Pea - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Princess and the Pea

Availability: Ready to download

Bedtime Classics: charmingly illustrated board book editions of perennial favorites, simplified for the youngest readers! Bedtime Classics introduce classic works of fiction to little literary scholars through character-driven narratives and colorful illustrations. Designed to be the perfect one-minute bedtime story (or five minutes--if you're begged to read it over and ove Bedtime Classics: charmingly illustrated board book editions of perennial favorites, simplified for the youngest readers! Bedtime Classics introduce classic works of fiction to little literary scholars through character-driven narratives and colorful illustrations. Designed to be the perfect one-minute bedtime story (or five minutes--if you're begged to read it over and over), parents can feel good about exposing their children to some of the most iconic pieces of literature while building their child's bookshelf with these trendy editions! A King and Queen invite all the princesses in the land to their palace to find a proper suitor for their son, the prince. But when an unconventional princess stumbles through the castle gates, she's put to the ultimate test. By setting a pea under a large stack of mattresses, the royal family will discover if the girl is princess material once and for all.


Compare

Bedtime Classics: charmingly illustrated board book editions of perennial favorites, simplified for the youngest readers! Bedtime Classics introduce classic works of fiction to little literary scholars through character-driven narratives and colorful illustrations. Designed to be the perfect one-minute bedtime story (or five minutes--if you're begged to read it over and ove Bedtime Classics: charmingly illustrated board book editions of perennial favorites, simplified for the youngest readers! Bedtime Classics introduce classic works of fiction to little literary scholars through character-driven narratives and colorful illustrations. Designed to be the perfect one-minute bedtime story (or five minutes--if you're begged to read it over and over), parents can feel good about exposing their children to some of the most iconic pieces of literature while building their child's bookshelf with these trendy editions! A King and Queen invite all the princesses in the land to their palace to find a proper suitor for their son, the prince. But when an unconventional princess stumbles through the castle gates, she's put to the ultimate test. By setting a pea under a large stack of mattresses, the royal family will discover if the girl is princess material once and for all.

30 review for The Princess and the Pea

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bionic Jean

    The Princess and the Pea is a famous story from 1835, by Hans Christian Andersen, which has been adapted and retold numerous times. The original is quite short, and clearly satirical and tongue in cheek. Really it is a one-idea story, in which an obviously ridiculous situation is contrived, to test whether a princess is truly a princess. Charles Boner was the first to translate The Princess and the Pea into English, as "The Princess on the Peas" in "A Danish Story-Book" in 1846. In the story, a The Princess and the Pea is a famous story from 1835, by Hans Christian Andersen, which has been adapted and retold numerous times. The original is quite short, and clearly satirical and tongue in cheek. Really it is a one-idea story, in which an obviously ridiculous situation is contrived, to test whether a princess is truly a princess. Charles Boner was the first to translate The Princess and the Pea into English, as "The Princess on the Peas" in "A Danish Story-Book" in 1846. In the story, a prince is having difficulty finding a suitable wife. He suspects that all the candidates are imposters. They cannot truly be princesses, he thinks, because they are not perfect, "He couldn't quite tell; there was always something that didn't feel right. So he came home very put out, for he did long for a real princess." One stormy night a young woman, soaked to the skin with rain, asked for shelter in the prince's castle. She claimed to be a real princess, but the prince was dubious. His mother cunningly tested whether she was telling the truth by placing a single pea in the bed they offered the young woman for the night, covering it with twenty mattresses and twenty feather-beds. The young woman doesn't get a wink of sleep, and complains the next morning that something hard in the bed had kept her awake. The prince, of course, is overjoyed at such clear proof of her pedigree, for, "They could see that she was a real princess, as she had felt the pea through twenty mattresses and twenty feather-beds." So the two are married, and live happily ever after. The pea, the author tells us, is placed in a special Royal museum, where it can still be seen to this very day, unless someone has removed it. "That's a real story!" he concludes. Hans Christian Andersen wrote a preface to the story, claiming to have heard it in his childhood, but it is not a traditional Danish fairy tale. It is thought that he may instead have heard a Swedish version, "Princess Who Lay on Seven Peas" ("Princessa' som lå' på sju ärter"), about an orphan girl is told by either a cat or a dog that something (a bean, a pea, or a straw) had been placed under her mattress, to test out her identity. In later adaptations, the story is spun out in various ways, such as the bedding being piled higher and higher to make the princess more comfortable before she finally retires for the night. Some translations miss the final part - about putting the pea in a museum - out, and stress the high sensitivity of the princess instead. But this rather misses the humour of the story. It is a welcome relief to read a jokey story by this author. Even if Hans Christian Andersen was not responsible for originating the tale, he certainly made it popular, and the image of a highbred princess, so sensitive that she feels even a pea under her mattress, has been retained in fairy folklore to this day.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ahmed Ejaz

    What a lame story it is! Overview: A prince wants to marry a REAL princess. He tries to find, but couldn't. On the one rainy day, a girl comes to his castle and clams to be a real princess. But the queen doubts her and put her in a test which is: Queen puts a pea under TWENTY MATTRESSES where the girl has to sleep. If she is sensitive enough to feel discomfort due to a pea then she is a real princess and if she can't then she isn't a real princess. (view spoiler)[ She feels discomfort while sleeping What a lame story it is! Overview: A prince wants to marry a REAL princess. He tries to find, but couldn't. On the one rainy day, a girl comes to his castle and clams to be a real princess. But the queen doubts her and put her in a test which is: Queen puts a pea under TWENTY MATTRESSES where the girl has to sleep. If she is sensitive enough to feel discomfort due to a pea then she is a real princess and if she can't then she isn't a real princess. (view spoiler)[ She feels discomfort while sleeping and that proves she is a real princess. Then the prince marries her. (hide spoiler)] Things I didn't like: - The story, That doesn't make any sense to me. Prince couldn't find a real princess on his own REALLY!!! I mean Doesn't he have any relatives like himself? If he does then author doesn't write it. I think author has exaggerated this fact that rich people are very sensitive as compared to poors. Right! But that sensitive the author has written. WoW! Overall, this story is a perfect time pass.....^__^

  3. 5 out of 5

    Chelsey Connor

    I don’t really understand how feeling something is a mattress is reason you are a princess?

  4. 4 out of 5

    ade_reads

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. First impressions are not always correct and that the smallest of things can make a difference. A young girl who shows up at the king’s house at night claiming to be a princess. Due to the girl’s poor and dishevelled appearance, the royal family has a hard time believing her story. The queen decides to test the girl and discover if she is telling the truth by placing a small pea under her bed, which is made up of 20 mattresses and 20 feather beds. The next morning, the girl complains of bruises a First impressions are not always correct and that the smallest of things can make a difference. A young girl who shows up at the king’s house at night claiming to be a princess. Due to the girl’s poor and dishevelled appearance, the royal family has a hard time believing her story. The queen decides to test the girl and discover if she is telling the truth by placing a small pea under her bed, which is made up of 20 mattresses and 20 feather beds. The next morning, the girl complains of bruises and says she was unable to sleep because of something hard pressing down on her back. The queen then reveals the truth about the pea, and everyone rejoices as they realize that she was telling the truth all along because only a princess could have such delicate and sensitive skin. The prince, who was looking for a true princess, joyfully marries her, and they live happily ever after.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ahmed

    Very short but good story

  6. 5 out of 5

    Leanne Lynch

    This book tells the classic Hans Christian Andersen fairytale ‘The Princess and the Pea’ in which a young prince seeks to find a ‘real’ princess to marry. When a bedraggled girl knocks on the castle doors amidst a stormy night, the king and queen doubt her claims of being a ‘real’ princess. They decide to put her to the test, placing a pea under twenty mattresses and allowing her to sleep on it. Only a ‘real’ princess would object to such discomfort. In true fairytale style, the princess discove This book tells the classic Hans Christian Andersen fairytale ‘The Princess and the Pea’ in which a young prince seeks to find a ‘real’ princess to marry. When a bedraggled girl knocks on the castle doors amidst a stormy night, the king and queen doubt her claims of being a ‘real’ princess. They decide to put her to the test, placing a pea under twenty mattresses and allowing her to sleep on it. Only a ‘real’ princess would object to such discomfort. In true fairytale style, the princess discovers the pea and lives happily ever after with the prince. The pictures, although somewhat dated, are simple but relative, and accompany the story quite well. Although this book is a very brief take on the classic fairytale, I feel it still provides a lot of opportunity for classroom activities. The language used could inspire an activity on comparatives: ‘One was too tall and another was too small’ and ‘One was too sad and another was too jolly’. Also, the descriptive nature of the language could encourage a class discussion on weather: ‘Then one night there was a terrible storm. The lightening flashed, the thunder roared, the wind blew and the rain poured down’. I like how the sentences are short and the vocabulary is differentiated, therefore making the book accessible to a range of reading abilities. I dislike the hierarchical attitudes I feel the book presents, only a ‘real’ princess would be good enough for the prince and only a ‘real’ princess would be tender enough to feel a pea under twenty mattresses. Overall, I enjoyed re-reading this classic fairytale, and feel it is a flexible piece of literature for use in the classroom.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Abigail

    The Princess and the Pea, illustrated by Dorothée Duntze. One of Hans Christian Andersen's briefest tales, The Princess and the Pea was originally published in 1835, in his first collection of fairy-tales, Eventyr, fortalte for Børn. Første Samling. Første Hefte. ("Tales, Told for Children. First Collection. First Booklet"). The story of a prince who wants to marry a "real" princess, and a princess so sensitive that twenty mattresses cannot soften the bruising impact of a small pea, it was descri The Princess and the Pea, illustrated by Dorothée Duntze. One of Hans Christian Andersen's briefest tales, The Princess and the Pea was originally published in 1835, in his first collection of fairy-tales, Eventyr, fortalte for Børn. Første Samling. Første Hefte. ("Tales, Told for Children. First Collection. First Booklet"). The story of a prince who wants to marry a "real" princess, and a princess so sensitive that twenty mattresses cannot soften the bruising impact of a small pea, it was described by Andersen as a traditional tale heard in his own youth. This engaging edition features the beautifully stylized artwork of Dorothée Duntze - whose other fairy-tale projects include Andersen's The Emperor's New Clothes , as well as Rapunzel and The Twelve Dancing Princesses from the Brother Grimm - and her artwork gives the modest narrative real substance. From the decorative endpapers - embellished with little peas - to the gorgeously patterned clothing worn by the characters, Duntze creates an enchanting visual landscape. This edition is well worth the time of fairy-tale fans, particularly those who appreciate beautiful illustrations!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    I enjoyed particularly what this artist did to portray this story. It is unique and interesting, the mattresses being portrayed in a fun way as well as the attire of the princess and people. The author portrayed the story in a interesting way that made me realize I didn't know the story as well as I had thought. Its defiantly older than any version I have heard but I enjoyed how it seemed to stick true to what I would think is the original telling of this tale. I enjoyed particularly what this artist did to portray this story. It is unique and interesting, the mattresses being portrayed in a fun way as well as the attire of the princess and people. The author portrayed the story in a interesting way that made me realize I didn't know the story as well as I had thought. Its defiantly older than any version I have heard but I enjoyed how it seemed to stick true to what I would think is the original telling of this tale.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Fi's Journey

    I'm actually unsure how to rate this story. It's very short indeed and is not like other fairy tales, where you can sense a certain doom or moral in the story. I also read this two times in German but remember neither liking or disliking it. It's sort of "meh" to me. I'm actually unsure how to rate this story. It's very short indeed and is not like other fairy tales, where you can sense a certain doom or moral in the story. I also read this two times in German but remember neither liking or disliking it. It's sort of "meh" to me.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Saga

    A very short and yet enjoyable story

  11. 5 out of 5

    Leona Duignan

    This short fairytale tells the story of a Prince in search of a “real” princess. He searches far and wide for a real princess but returns home alone, sad and disappointed. One stormy night there is a surprise visit to the castle from a young girl claiming that she in fact is a real princess. The queen decides to test this by placing a pea at the bottom of the princess’s bed layered with 20 mattresses. The next morning the queen was shocked to hear that the princess had such a terrible sleep as o This short fairytale tells the story of a Prince in search of a “real” princess. He searches far and wide for a real princess but returns home alone, sad and disappointed. One stormy night there is a surprise visit to the castle from a young girl claiming that she in fact is a real princess. The queen decides to test this by placing a pea at the bottom of the princess’s bed layered with 20 mattresses. The next morning the queen was shocked to hear that the princess had such a terrible sleep as only a “real” princess would feel such discomfort. This clarified that the girl was indeed a real princess, so tender that she could feel a pea in her bed. The prince and princess married and lived happily ever after. The sentences are short and vocabulary is not particularly difficult making the reading experience an enjoyable and untiring read. Colourful picture illustrations add to this, giving it life and making the story even more interesting for small children. I really enjoyed reading this book and recommend this for children aged 4-5 as a short bedtime story.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kylie Mogan

    (Self-Selected Fairy Tale) I remember reading this story during one of my first days in Kindergarten. It is a story that has stuck with me until this day and I am about to turn 21. Re-reading it has brought back a sense of comfort and familiarity. However, I have come to the realization that this fairy tale is quite the stretch when compared to others.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Vicki

    I love this book. Read it when I was a kid, now again as a great grandmother. It’s a sweet fairytale with a silly fairytale ending. Something all little girls dream of. But the ending of this story’s version says it’s true and the pea can be seen in a museum, if it hasn’t been stolen. A quirky but true to life ending.

  14. 5 out of 5

    elijah routh

    beautiful as always mister Hans Christian Andersen <3

  15. 5 out of 5

    Smurf

    It was a very simple book. I could have told the story myself. The artwork was nice, but also as simple as the story.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sarina

    Meh. There should've been some other criteria to find out a princess who possesses the qualities of a fine and true royalty. Meh. There should've been some other criteria to find out a princess who possesses the qualities of a fine and true royalty.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bessana Kendig

    The princess and the pea is a classic fairy tale written by Hans Christian Anderson. As I grew up I remember viewing this story almost as a parody, making fun of the way princesses were chosen by princes because of ridiculous measures, Cinderella's shoe, Sleeping Beauty's aesthetics, and this Princesses ability to sense a pea under twenty mattresses while she slept. As an adult, it sounds like the beginning of a bad joke. quote: "Now they could tell that she must be a real princess, because she h The princess and the pea is a classic fairy tale written by Hans Christian Anderson. As I grew up I remember viewing this story almost as a parody, making fun of the way princesses were chosen by princes because of ridiculous measures, Cinderella's shoe, Sleeping Beauty's aesthetics, and this Princesses ability to sense a pea under twenty mattresses while she slept. As an adult, it sounds like the beginning of a bad joke. quote: "Now they could tell that she must be a real princess, because she had felt the tiny pea through twenty mattresses and twenty quilts. no one but a princess could be so sensitive." I have never read this version of Princess and the Pea. Dorothee Duntze's illustrations were very detailed with cute patterns and an overload of pink. It made me think of the way throughout history gender roles were associated with colors, even now shopping for baby blankets franchises want you to choose pink for girls and blue for boys. Because of this, I felt like this particular book was more geared toward girls to read, and that troubles me still. I don't want my children to grow up believing that they have to prove themselves to men with beauty, slippers, or sensitivity. Even the quote above makes me think that the only person worthy of a prince is someone who is ultra sensitive, and as a woman that word translates to more than just the physical sensing of a pea, it translates to the emotional state that women are stereotyped with. I would not use this classic story as a tool for teaching in a classroom. I'm too much of a modern intersectional feminist to try to morph it into a curriculum.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Madison Siegle

    Believe in or not, I’ve actually never read the princess and the pea. I ended skipping a lot of the traditional fairy tales/fables out there and just went to younger aimed children’s books. However, I’m glad to be reading these finally haha. The Princess and the Pea is such a cute story. She can’t sleep all because of one tiny pea under her mattresses. That feels like me trying to sleep at night. The illustrations were really cute, the story is short but adorable, and it was just a genuinely goo Believe in or not, I’ve actually never read the princess and the pea. I ended skipping a lot of the traditional fairy tales/fables out there and just went to younger aimed children’s books. However, I’m glad to be reading these finally haha. The Princess and the Pea is such a cute story. She can’t sleep all because of one tiny pea under her mattresses. That feels like me trying to sleep at night. The illustrations were really cute, the story is short but adorable, and it was just a genuinely good read. I think I’d like to read this to a classroom full of kids and watch them follow the princess through her search and laugh when she found it it was really just one lonely pea keeping her awake under all of those mattresses. I think it’s a light story that isn’t hard to read and doesn’t have any heavy moral to it, just to always check your mattress and also that small things can impact someone in big ways even if you don’t notice them. It’s a sweet little story that I’m glad I know now.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lauryn Carroll

    This book surprised me in how short it was. I read it because I did not know the story very well and wanted a reminder of how it goes. I thought that there was a lot more to it. I read it in about a couple minutes and I felt like there was no moral or theme in the story. Maybe that is how this story is supposed to go, but I would have to say it wasn't my favorite. However, I did like the illustrations. The princess' bed that was stacked high with mattresses was so creative and fun. It looked so This book surprised me in how short it was. I read it because I did not know the story very well and wanted a reminder of how it goes. I thought that there was a lot more to it. I read it in about a couple minutes and I felt like there was no moral or theme in the story. Maybe that is how this story is supposed to go, but I would have to say it wasn't my favorite. However, I did like the illustrations. The princess' bed that was stacked high with mattresses was so creative and fun. It looked so fluffy and comfy that I wanted my own. I also liked all the dresses and outfits that the princess and other people in the story wore.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Janette

    i thought I was well acquainted with this fairy tale but I was surprised by the ending. In all the stories I remember a bowling ball is placed beneath all the mattresses to ensure the princess will feel it, unlike the improbable pea. The more I thought about it though, I realized including a bowling ball would add a level of common sense to the story, but old fairy tales weren't always concerned by logic. Like Arthur pulling the sword from the stone and proving his right to rule, the princess fe i thought I was well acquainted with this fairy tale but I was surprised by the ending. In all the stories I remember a bowling ball is placed beneath all the mattresses to ensure the princess will feel it, unlike the improbable pea. The more I thought about it though, I realized including a bowling ball would add a level of common sense to the story, but old fairy tales weren't always concerned by logic. Like Arthur pulling the sword from the stone and proving his right to rule, the princess feeling the pea proves that she is in fact a princess. I really enjoyed this version and the drawings were a nice touch.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Matt Vagts

    Traditional-literature book #20 This book was about a prince who wanted to marry a princess but it had to be a real princess. He was having trouble finding a real princess so he went back home and stopped searching. A storm came and then a girl showed up and claimed she was a real princess, but the queen wasn't so sure. So they put 20 mattresses and 20 quilts on top of a pea and that's where the girl had to sleep. When they asked her how she slept, she said it was awful and she had bruises from w Traditional-literature book #20 This book was about a prince who wanted to marry a princess but it had to be a real princess. He was having trouble finding a real princess so he went back home and stopped searching. A storm came and then a girl showed up and claimed she was a real princess, but the queen wasn't so sure. So they put 20 mattresses and 20 quilts on top of a pea and that's where the girl had to sleep. When they asked her how she slept, she said it was awful and she had bruises from whatever was under the mattresses. The queen now knew the girl was a real princess because only a princess is that sensitive. So the princess and the prince got married.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Thabata

    I’m like the Grinch of children’s stories (lately). I had high hopes about this story because it is so well regarded. I felt very disappointed upon reading it however. It is absurd in its ridiculous prejudice of what defines royalty. Greatness in characters is not measured by being bothered and sore because there’s a pea beneath tons of mattresses. Being annoying is. Hahahah, sorry, but not really… I truly believe fairy tales are supposed to be at least enchanting, which this one is most definit I’m like the Grinch of children’s stories (lately). I had high hopes about this story because it is so well regarded. I felt very disappointed upon reading it however. It is absurd in its ridiculous prejudice of what defines royalty. Greatness in characters is not measured by being bothered and sore because there’s a pea beneath tons of mattresses. Being annoying is. Hahahah, sorry, but not really… I truly believe fairy tales are supposed to be at least enchanting, which this one is most definitively not. Not even charming, may I add. Worst of all, its is truly frivolous and silly, which is a waste of precious time and good reading moments.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kendal Pursel

    Genre: Traditional Fantasy Grade level: K-3rd grade This classic story is a good one! I like how they came up with the test of putting a single pea under so many mattresses. It is kind of funny that only a true princess would be able to notice the pea. The condition that she is in when she wakes up really adds to the story, and I feel like it emphasizes her royalty. One minor inconvenience that a normal person couldn't feel was able to disrupt her whole night's sleep and leave her with bruises. Th Genre: Traditional Fantasy Grade level: K-3rd grade This classic story is a good one! I like how they came up with the test of putting a single pea under so many mattresses. It is kind of funny that only a true princess would be able to notice the pea. The condition that she is in when she wakes up really adds to the story, and I feel like it emphasizes her royalty. One minor inconvenience that a normal person couldn't feel was able to disrupt her whole night's sleep and leave her with bruises. This version was one that I hadn't read before, so it was nice to expand my personal Princess and the Pea mental library.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Karissa Butikofer

    In this story there was a prince looking to marry a princess. He went looking all over the world but didn't find any. One night there was a storm and ended up having a princess that showed up. The queen told the servents to go to the garden and get a pea. She put the pea on the bottom and piled up 20 mattresses and this is where the princess was to sleep. The princess slept horribly that night and that is how they knew she was a real princess. They ended up getting married and lived happily ever In this story there was a prince looking to marry a princess. He went looking all over the world but didn't find any. One night there was a storm and ended up having a princess that showed up. The queen told the servents to go to the garden and get a pea. She put the pea on the bottom and piled up 20 mattresses and this is where the princess was to sleep. The princess slept horribly that night and that is how they knew she was a real princess. They ended up getting married and lived happily ever after.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    This is a nice book. The illustrations by Dorothee Duntze are nice. I've never quite understood this tale. First of all, 20 mattresses would have squashed a pea. Secondly, not even a princess could feel a pea through all that. But even if she did, what does that say about her? That she is so fussy that she is bothered by a mere pea would be reason to disqualify her from marrying the prince. Yeah, I know; I read too much into these things. This is a nice book. The illustrations by Dorothee Duntze are nice. I've never quite understood this tale. First of all, 20 mattresses would have squashed a pea. Secondly, not even a princess could feel a pea through all that. But even if she did, what does that say about her? That she is so fussy that she is bothered by a mere pea would be reason to disqualify her from marrying the prince. Yeah, I know; I read too much into these things.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Meltha

    This is pretty much Andersen's version verbatim, though the translation is a tiny bit different from the one I've read. The real draw here would be the illustrations. They're quite lovely, the sort of ones I could imagine framing and hanging on the wall in a child's bedroom. Everything is in soft pastels, and the princess does look like she just came out of a very heavy downpour. On the whole, it's a very nice vesion. This is pretty much Andersen's version verbatim, though the translation is a tiny bit different from the one I've read. The real draw here would be the illustrations. They're quite lovely, the sort of ones I could imagine framing and hanging on the wall in a child's bedroom. Everything is in soft pastels, and the princess does look like she just came out of a very heavy downpour. On the whole, it's a very nice vesion.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Steff Fox

    This is honestly such a ridiculous little story, but it's one that I don't think many haven't read at some point in their childhood. I have, of course, the odd childhood nostalgia that comes with having known this story as a kid but, as an adult, I can't help finding the concept kind of dumb. Imagine, a pea determining if someone is a Princess and therefore worthy of marrying someone. What a dumb concept. This is honestly such a ridiculous little story, but it's one that I don't think many haven't read at some point in their childhood. I have, of course, the odd childhood nostalgia that comes with having known this story as a kid but, as an adult, I can't help finding the concept kind of dumb. Imagine, a pea determining if someone is a Princess and therefore worthy of marrying someone. What a dumb concept.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Panda Incognito

    This board book retells "The Princess and the Pea" very simply, with colorful and racially diverse illustrations. I thought it was fine, but I wasn't particularly impressed, since the story is so rushed that it was never entirely clear that this was an ordinary girl whom the queen mistook for a princess. The book seems to end on the note that yes, indeed, this is a True Princess, without the irony and subversion of the original tale. This board book retells "The Princess and the Pea" very simply, with colorful and racially diverse illustrations. I thought it was fine, but I wasn't particularly impressed, since the story is so rushed that it was never entirely clear that this was an ordinary girl whom the queen mistook for a princess. The book seems to end on the note that yes, indeed, this is a True Princess, without the irony and subversion of the original tale.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

    The Princess and the Pea is a fairy tale that I would describe as simple, but cute. The story evolved around a test for a prince to find a real princess to marry. Another quality that I enjoyed about this tale was the fact that there were no villains. I do not know how I would use this story for educational purposes, but it is a enjoyable quick read for people of all ages.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    In unpacking boxes from my recent move, I found a treasure trove of books from my childhood. This is one of them. It was a lovely trip down memory lane. Everyone uses Goodreads for their own distinct purposes. One of my purposes is to attempt to document every book I've ever read. Will I be able to do it? Probably not. Am I enjoying the attempt? Absolutely! In unpacking boxes from my recent move, I found a treasure trove of books from my childhood. This is one of them. It was a lovely trip down memory lane. Everyone uses Goodreads for their own distinct purposes. One of my purposes is to attempt to document every book I've ever read. Will I be able to do it? Probably not. Am I enjoying the attempt? Absolutely!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.