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Girl Gurl Grrrl: On Womanhood and Belonging in the Age of Black Girl Magic

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In the vein of Roxane Gay’s Bad Feminist and Issa Rae’s The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl, but wholly its own, a provocative, humorous, and, at times, heartbreaking collection of essays on what it means to be black, a woman, a mother, and a global citizen in today's ever-changing world. Black women have never been more visible or more publicly celebrated than they are In the vein of Roxane Gay’s Bad Feminist and Issa Rae’s The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl, but wholly its own, a provocative, humorous, and, at times, heartbreaking collection of essays on what it means to be black, a woman, a mother, and a global citizen in today's ever-changing world. Black women have never been more visible or more publicly celebrated than they are now. But for every new milestone, every magazine cover, every box office record smashed, every new face elected to public office, the reality of everyday life for black women remains a complex, conflicted, contradiction-laden experience.  An American journalist who has been living and working in London for a decade, Kenya Hunt has made a career of distilling moments, movements, and cultural moods into words. Her work takes the difficult and the indefinable and makes it accessible; it is razor sharp cultural observation threaded through evocative and relatable stories. Girl Gurl Grrrl both illuminates our current cultural moment and transcends it. Hunt captures the zeitgeist while also creating a timeless celebration of womanhood, of blackness, and the possibilities they both contain. She blends the popular and the personal, the frivolous and the momentous in a collection that truly reflects what it is to be living and thriving as a black woman today.  


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In the vein of Roxane Gay’s Bad Feminist and Issa Rae’s The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl, but wholly its own, a provocative, humorous, and, at times, heartbreaking collection of essays on what it means to be black, a woman, a mother, and a global citizen in today's ever-changing world. Black women have never been more visible or more publicly celebrated than they are In the vein of Roxane Gay’s Bad Feminist and Issa Rae’s The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl, but wholly its own, a provocative, humorous, and, at times, heartbreaking collection of essays on what it means to be black, a woman, a mother, and a global citizen in today's ever-changing world. Black women have never been more visible or more publicly celebrated than they are now. But for every new milestone, every magazine cover, every box office record smashed, every new face elected to public office, the reality of everyday life for black women remains a complex, conflicted, contradiction-laden experience.  An American journalist who has been living and working in London for a decade, Kenya Hunt has made a career of distilling moments, movements, and cultural moods into words. Her work takes the difficult and the indefinable and makes it accessible; it is razor sharp cultural observation threaded through evocative and relatable stories. Girl Gurl Grrrl both illuminates our current cultural moment and transcends it. Hunt captures the zeitgeist while also creating a timeless celebration of womanhood, of blackness, and the possibilities they both contain. She blends the popular and the personal, the frivolous and the momentous in a collection that truly reflects what it is to be living and thriving as a black woman today.  

30 review for Girl Gurl Grrrl: On Womanhood and Belonging in the Age of Black Girl Magic

  1. 5 out of 5

    chantel nouseforaname

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. "I love Black women. I love us with a pure, bottomless, concentrated, no-added-ingredients kind of adoration that goes beyond the love I have for my mother, sister, aunts or even myself." - 87% in Girl Girl Grrrl by Kenya Hunt This book was PERFECT. It was just as amazing as This Is Major: Notes on Diana Ross, Dark Girls, and Being Dope by Shayla Lawson. There's something so magnificent in reading Black women chronicle other Black women. I am drawn like a magnet to works where Black women she "I love Black women. I love us with a pure, bottomless, concentrated, no-added-ingredients kind of adoration that goes beyond the love I have for my mother, sister, aunts or even myself." - 87% in Girl Girl Grrrl by Kenya Hunt This book was PERFECT. It was just as amazing as This Is Major: Notes on Diana Ross, Dark Girls, and Being Dope by Shayla Lawson. There's something so magnificent in reading Black women chronicle other Black women. I am drawn like a magnet to works where Black women shed light on the resilience that lives, grows and breathes inside of Black women. The ways that we maneuver and fight and keep on fighting - and you know we damn well shouldn't have to fight so fucking hard, but we do. Kenya Hunt talks about the various experiences of Black women without overkilling the strong Black woman narrative, instead exposing the strength in vulnerability. She sheds light on her own experiences coming up through a cut throat and discriminatory industry where not a lot of Black women and girls see the kind of success she's seen. She talks about the Black women who came before and opened up the door for her and other Black women and men to step through into the fashion-writing, and fashion industry. She talks about being an American expat abroad, living and trying to run away from police brutality in America to London, where she and her family still experience casual and not-so-casual racism. She talks about not having shit all figured out, and the ways that we try to manage even through strife, moments of infuriating and blatant racism, and the insanity of trying to battle through daily micro-aggressive bullshit that affects us as we try to build connections with one another as human beings. She reflects on the times where it's not successful due to competition and the system trying to push us further apart, and the ways that fighting through that and reaching into your community can be transformative. Kenya Hunt is a engaging writer. You can feel her passion and love, rage and concern, hurt, joy and happiness, you can just feel it bleed through every page. This book felt like a mirror in more ways than one. My favourite favourite FAVOURITE chapter was Bad Bitches. Yo, she knocked it out the park with this chapter. This book is camaraderie in paper form. It's a sister girl offering of 'you are not alone in this' in it's purest form. Yes, sometimes we get that on twitter, in the community that Black twitter creates, but Kenya gives it up here to you, in this book, in droves. Girl Gurl Grrrl is for the shelf in your home, it's that book to pick it up and thumb through when you feel like you quietly and reflectively need someone who sees you. She also reflects on some of the external trends and situations surrounding Blackness and Black womanhood that we wish would just leave Black women alone (the constant attempted extrapolation of Black hair, aesthetic and culture) or do better for the Black community on a whole (healthcare, especially around the birthing process). From the title to the cover and the added submissions from guests like Candice Carty-Williams and Freddie Harrel, Kenya Hunt just gives us soooo much to enjoy, feel and relate to in Girl Gurl Grrrl. When K. Hunt says: "I love us. We are beautiful, powerful queens. Masters of slays. Leaders of movements. Makers of culture and changers of games. We are Michelle Obama's leadership. Grace Jones's radicalness. Maxine Waters's candor. And Tarana Burke's compassion. Yara Shahidi's optimism. Dina Asher-Smith's speed. Serena Williams's stamina and Sade's elegance. Ava Duvernay's vision. Patrisse Cullors's activism. Missy Elliott's innovation. And Meghan Thee Stallion's knees. We are all these things and more." - 88% in Girl Gurl Grrrl by Kenya Hunt --- I felt that shit. Then, but never as an afterthought, she goes in and talks about how important the Black women who don't fit that heightened visibility and exceptionalism are. We are all important. In all our awkwardness, chillness, blerdery, when we're just out here living our lives everyday, maintaining, thriving and being regular-degular, if our house is a fucking mess, if we can't twerk, if your nails are not done, don't matter.. Black girls and women are important! WORD the fuck up! I love this book with every fibre of my being. Thanks, Kenya!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Oyinda

    Book 17 of 2021! And, first nonfic book of 2021! I LOVE THIS BOOK SO SO MUCH! Trigger warnings for mentions of police brutality, miscarriage, loss of a loved on, racism, and microaggressions. I've been seeing this book everywhere on Bookstagram, even long before it's release, and I'm so glad to say it's worth all the hype. This an amazing, insightful, educational, heartbreaking, and hard hitting collection of essays about the reality of being a black woman in the world we live in today. The essays Book 17 of 2021! And, first nonfic book of 2021! I LOVE THIS BOOK SO SO MUCH! Trigger warnings for mentions of police brutality, miscarriage, loss of a loved on, racism, and microaggressions. I've been seeing this book everywhere on Bookstagram, even long before it's release, and I'm so glad to say it's worth all the hype. This an amazing, insightful, educational, heartbreaking, and hard hitting collection of essays about the reality of being a black woman in the world we live in today. The essays in this book were so good! I learnt a lot, I felt a lot, and I cried a lot! The chapter on miscarriage and the epilogue on death and loss broke me and I was a sobbing mess. I was so greatly impacted by this book. This book featured essays not only by Kenya Hunt but by other black women as well, such as Candice Carty-Williams and Ebele Okobi. Ebele's essay broke my heart, as she told the story of racism faced by her son and the death of her brother as a result of police brutality. Candice's essay chronicles her experience as the author of Queenie, and what life has been like for her since her book was released. I have a lot of favorite passages, and one of them is, "I love us. We are beautiful, powerful queens. Masters of slays. Leaders of movements. Makers of culture and changers of games. We are Michelle Obama’s leadership. Grace Jones’s radicalness. Maxine Waters’s candor. And Tarana Burke’s compassion. Yara Shahidi’s optimism. Dina Asher-Smith’s speed. Serena Williams’s stamina. And Sade’s elegance. Ava DuVernay’s vision. Patrisse Cullors’s activism. Missy Elliott’s innovation. And Meghan Thee Stallion’s knees. We are all these things and more." I'm glad I picked this up, and I really enjoyed it. I highly recommend!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lou

    GIRL is a provocative, humorous, and, at times, heartbreaking collection of essays on what it means to be black, a woman, a mother, and a global citizen in today's ever-changing world. Black women have never been more visible or more publicly celebrated than they are now. But for every new milestone, every magazine cover, every box office record smashed, every new face elected to public office, the reality of everyday life for black women remains a complex, conflicted, contradiction-laden experi GIRL is a provocative, humorous, and, at times, heartbreaking collection of essays on what it means to be black, a woman, a mother, and a global citizen in today's ever-changing world. Black women have never been more visible or more publicly celebrated than they are now. But for every new milestone, every magazine cover, every box office record smashed, every new face elected to public office, the reality of everyday life for black women remains a complex, conflicted, contradiction-laden experience. An American journalist who has been living and working in London for a decade, Kenya Hunt has made a career of distilling moments, movements, and cultural moods into words. Her work takes the difficult and the indefinable and makes it accessible; it is razor sharp cultural observation threaded through evocative and relatable stories. Girl Gurl Grrrl both illuminates our current cultural moment and transcends it. Hunt captures the zeitgeist while also creating a timeless celebration of womanhood, of blackness, and the possibilities they both contain. She blends the popular and the personal, the frivolous and the momentous in a collection that truly reflects what it is to be living and thriving as a black woman today. A timely, necessary and eminently readable book filled to the brim with social commentary gems, heart wrenching stories and, ultimately, hope for the future by some of the most prominent black writers of our time. Highly recommended.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mina

    LOVE! LOVE! LOVE!

  5. 4 out of 5

    M. [storme reads a lot]

    I loved learning about how life in the UK is for Black people, because I did think it was better just because it does appear that way. However, this memoir shares how there is racism still in the UK and the impact it has upon the life of the author. This book is gorgeous and full of much needed Black Girl Magic. It made me proud of my heritage as well, having the chance to read and share this with other Black women. Echoing the words of other prolific Black women was great too, reminding me of a I loved learning about how life in the UK is for Black people, because I did think it was better just because it does appear that way. However, this memoir shares how there is racism still in the UK and the impact it has upon the life of the author. This book is gorgeous and full of much needed Black Girl Magic. It made me proud of my heritage as well, having the chance to read and share this with other Black women. Echoing the words of other prolific Black women was great too, reminding me of all the amazing voices which need to be shared more. It is very relevant to life as a Black woman, and I highly suggest this book to all women though. A huge thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for this ARC in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Haider

    4.5 stars In her new essay collection, author Kenya Hunt with the help of a handful of other authors, discuss what it means to be a Black woman in today's world. The essays are all thought provoking and are often humorous. They explore everything from what it means to be a Black woman in American vs. England to what it really means to be a "bad bitch". In the collection, Hunt shows vulnerability and discusses how there are more ways to be a Black woman other than the "Strong Black Woman" persona. 4.5 stars In her new essay collection, author Kenya Hunt with the help of a handful of other authors, discuss what it means to be a Black woman in today's world. The essays are all thought provoking and are often humorous. They explore everything from what it means to be a Black woman in American vs. England to what it really means to be a "bad bitch". In the collection, Hunt shows vulnerability and discusses how there are more ways to be a Black woman other than the "Strong Black Woman" persona. Hunt herself grew up in America but moved to England as an adult and became an editor at Elle magazine, where she helped to promote black representation in that publication. In the collection, we see the authors voice their frustrations with the stereotypes for Black women that still exist in modern society. The collection is relevant and references the pandemic, Obama, and Trumps presidencies and how they each in turn impacted the lives of Black women. So good. So readable. Pick it up already! Thank you to the publisher for the review copy!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Apoorva

    Girl Gurl Grrl: On Womanhood and Belonging in the Age of Black Girl Magic by Kenya Hunt The more feminist books we read, the more we realize why feminism is actually needed, especially for Black Women. This book is a celebration of Blackhood not just for women but also men. The author manages to touch upon a range of topics but with a touch of humor as well as perspective. There are notes on milestones or even small steps taken by actors like Chadwick Boseman, voluptous black models, black hair br Girl Gurl Grrl: On Womanhood and Belonging in the Age of Black Girl Magic by Kenya Hunt The more feminist books we read, the more we realize why feminism is actually needed, especially for Black Women. This book is a celebration of Blackhood not just for women but also men. The author manages to touch upon a range of topics but with a touch of humor as well as perspective. There are notes on milestones or even small steps taken by actors like Chadwick Boseman, voluptous black models, black hair braiding, pregnancy and healthcare. The author intermingles and puts herself, her education and her upbringing in perspective of all those women who are not comfortable in heir own skin, who are told they are not beautiful because of their wide noses, their skin shade and their wrinkly hair. The author reminisces how as a kid she though she had it all but now hates taking photographs and questions the idea of beauty. It also brings into light how black women are not able to afford healthcare and abortion is frowned upon. How there is a taboo that black women are more prone to getting an abortion..It also talks about how racism varies from country to country but the voices remains same. In spite of more and more conversations we have about racism, people still end up voting for white supremacy. The meaning of this book is to always put black women up, bolster them, encourage them and cultivate girl love and womanhood. "Braiding is a time commitment. But when it's between mother and daughter, its an act of love-one's hands passing through another's hair, the other's head lying in the braider's lap. That's why I believe sisterhood is drilled so deep into our DNA.'' As a woman, a writer, a business figure, a black woman, and a wife she encompasses so may roles but its never enough. Losing her own younger brother to police brutality.. sometimes emotions fall less to express their anguish.. We will be interpreting the meaning of bad bitch after reading this book. "That no postgraduate degree, high-powered job, or rock-solid credit score can protect you from the indignity of being followed by a security guard in a shop or mistaken for being the nanny of your light skinned baby in the park"

  8. 5 out of 5

    Trey

    Where to begin? This is the first nonfiction book that I just “couldn’t put down.” It was like reading the story of my life. It feels good to not be alone in a lot of life experiences. READ THIS BOOK! If you’re a non-POC, READ THIS BOOK! I can’t begin to talk about how good, real, and raw it is. I laughed, cried, was angry, but most of all, felt seen.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

    I loved the second half of this book much more than I enjoyed the first half but this was therapeutic for me. All of the questions and life decisions that this author made in regards to raising a black boy in America spoke volumes to me. The honesty throughout the book in the desire to shape her children's world view was hopeful yet almost overwhelming for me as a black mother who is also raising a black son. This book highlighted many things that I go back and forth on in my journey as a women, I loved the second half of this book much more than I enjoyed the first half but this was therapeutic for me. All of the questions and life decisions that this author made in regards to raising a black boy in America spoke volumes to me. The honesty throughout the book in the desire to shape her children's world view was hopeful yet almost overwhelming for me as a black mother who is also raising a black son. This book highlighted many things that I go back and forth on in my journey as a women, professional and as a mother. I so appreciate someone who could highlight them on paper in an elegant, thoughtful, and authentic way.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Matthews

    GIRL by Kenya Hunt is a wonderful read particularly for black women. It was interesting for me as a black Brit to read from Kenya's perspective - a black American living in England. While Kenya had some unique insights, perhaps most interesting of all was discovering that American black women and British black women face many of the same challenges despite the ocean between us. Hunt's collection feels current with references made to the pandemic and to Kamala Harris who was, at the time of writi GIRL by Kenya Hunt is a wonderful read particularly for black women. It was interesting for me as a black Brit to read from Kenya's perspective - a black American living in England. While Kenya had some unique insights, perhaps most interesting of all was discovering that American black women and British black women face many of the same challenges despite the ocean between us. Hunt's collection feels current with references made to the pandemic and to Kamala Harris who was, at the time of writing, a nominee for VP and not VP-Elect as she is now; nevertheless even her being nominated was historic. Ultimately this collection is about voicing the frustrations that come with the stereotypes that are assigned to black women but it is also, purely through its existence, a step in the right direction towards a time when a collection like this won't need to exist. Interspersed throughout the collection are essays from guest contributors, one of my favourite being the one by Candice Carty-Williams, author of Queenie. Candice speaks of how draining she finds interviews being someone far more comfortable at home and away from the limelight. She also expressed fatigue from interviewers assuming Queenie is completely autobiographical even going as far as to ensure her hairstyle in no way resembled the box braids featured on the book's iconic front cover. The idea that when a black story does break through into the mainstream it must be representative of all black women's experiences (including the author's) when the same assumption would not be made for a white woman is not new. It's as though because there are so few black female writers achieving commercial success, anything that does make the bestsellers list is given so much more weight with higher expectations placed on it than is proportionate. And yet, I left this collection feeling hopeful, Hunt writes: "to be woke is to long for a day when one doesn't have to stay woke" and having read and enjoyed this book I look forward to the day when black women can rest.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tara Reads (formerly known as) Book Reviews by Tara

    In this brilliantly written body of work, author Kenya Hunt tackles heavy topics with a matter-of-fact flare that make it’s content easy to digest. ⠀ In this collection of stories Kenya celebrates the beauty of black women, while also shining a much needed light on how we are often disregarded within this racist world in which we reside. Reading Kenya’s words made me feel seen and understood. ⠀ The topics discussed vary from black beauty, to the mortality rate during childbirth of black women versus In this brilliantly written body of work, author Kenya Hunt tackles heavy topics with a matter-of-fact flare that make it’s content easy to digest. ⠀ In this collection of stories Kenya celebrates the beauty of black women, while also shining a much needed light on how we are often disregarded within this racist world in which we reside. Reading Kenya’s words made me feel seen and understood. ⠀ The topics discussed vary from black beauty, to the mortality rate during childbirth of black women versus that of our white counterparts. She also writes about the Black AirBnB experience, religion and police brutality. Kenya took me on a historical journey that encouraged me to embrace all the glorious “hidden figures” from the past. ⠀ This book is filled with page upon page of familiar conversations. Conversations I’ve had with friends, family and even myself as I silently sat pondering the state of the world, and my place in it. ⠀ There are also some very vulnerable moments in the book. An example of this can be seen as the author shares her personal experience with childbirth, miscarriage, and abortion. ⠀ Overall, I was pleasantly surprised by this book. Honestly, I wasn’t sure if I was going to enjoy it. But I did. ⠀ Kenya Hunt is an eloquent wordsmith and I look forward to reading more of her work. ⠀ 𝘕𝘰𝘵𝘦: 𝘛𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘢𝘥𝘷𝘢𝘯𝘤𝘦 𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘥𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘤𝘰𝘱𝘺 𝘸𝘢𝘴 𝘨𝘪𝘧𝘵𝘦𝘥 𝘵𝘰 𝘮𝘦 𝘣𝘺 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘱𝘶𝘣𝘭𝘪𝘴𝘩𝘦𝘳 𝘈𝘮𝘪𝘴𝘵𝘢𝘥 𝘉𝘰𝘰𝘬𝘴, 𝘪𝘯 𝘦𝘹𝘤𝘩𝘢𝘯𝘨𝘦 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘮𝘺 𝘩𝘰𝘯𝘦𝘴𝘵 𝘳𝘦𝘷𝘪𝘦𝘸.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Karen Ashmore

    A collection of essays by Black fashion editor Kenya Hunt. Most relate to pop culture: an analysis of the word “woke”, what Wakanda means to Black community, being one of the few Blacks to sit on the front row at a designer fashion show, the origins of the hashtag #BlackGirlMagic. But also delves into miscarriage, motherhood and micro aggressions of living while Black in London. However, the most thoughtful essay was the epilogue which examined police brutality and the responsibility of raising A collection of essays by Black fashion editor Kenya Hunt. Most relate to pop culture: an analysis of the word “woke”, what Wakanda means to Black community, being one of the few Blacks to sit on the front row at a designer fashion show, the origins of the hashtag #BlackGirlMagic. But also delves into miscarriage, motherhood and micro aggressions of living while Black in London. However, the most thoughtful essay was the epilogue which examined police brutality and the responsibility of raising Black sons.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Eniola

    Gurrrrrl! ”Girl” is a series of essays discussing black womanhood. Described in the blurb as “part memoir, part celebration of womanhood and blackness. ”Girl” is about thriving when the odds are stacked against you”. Gurrrrrrl! I’ve been an admirer of Kenya Hunt for years. A Fashion Queen that I stan, but wow (insert clapping emoji’s). So glad that Kenya put her thoughts and pen to paper or fingers to keyboard to compile this essay collection. Gurrrl... It’s clear that Kenya poured her whole self in Gurrrrrl! ”Girl” is a series of essays discussing black womanhood. Described in the blurb as “part memoir, part celebration of womanhood and blackness. ”Girl” is about thriving when the odds are stacked against you”. Gurrrrrrl! I’ve been an admirer of Kenya Hunt for years. A Fashion Queen that I stan, but wow (insert clapping emoji’s). So glad that Kenya put her thoughts and pen to paper or fingers to keyboard to compile this essay collection. Gurrrl... It’s clear that Kenya poured her whole self into writing this. Honest, open, heartbreaking, thought provoking and a truly powerful account of her life, her trauma, her losses, her wins. There are guest writers who also add their voices to the narrative, all powerful women with powerful stories that are told in such an eloquent way. Gurrrrl... Yes this screams black excellence, but it is that and so much more. Gurrrrl. Read this please! 4.4*

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bree

    “My race made me stand out in the fashion industry, so I refused to dress to fit in” Kenya Hunt, a Mother, a Wife, a Fashion Director and A LOT more. Gurrrrrrrl is a badass boss and has a hella strong voice.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    An absolute must read. I was nervous that this book wasn't intended for me, but I was wrong. This book helps lend a strong base for alliance work and support. Hunt seeks to inform, motivate and change the reader, and I learned so much from it. An absolute must read. I was nervous that this book wasn't intended for me, but I was wrong. This book helps lend a strong base for alliance work and support. Hunt seeks to inform, motivate and change the reader, and I learned so much from it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tasha

    Girl by Kenya Hunt is a fantastic collection of essays with topics ranging from motherhood, baby loss, sisterhood, religion, the fashion industry and above all, what it means to be a Black Woman.  I loved it. Kenya's writing style is so easy to follow. The essays are interesting. Sometimes heartbreaking, sometimes funny, always honest and brilliantly written. I love being inside the mind of someone else. I love hearing about people's experiences, about their lives, especially when they are so dif Girl by Kenya Hunt is a fantastic collection of essays with topics ranging from motherhood, baby loss, sisterhood, religion, the fashion industry and above all, what it means to be a Black Woman.  I loved it. Kenya's writing style is so easy to follow. The essays are interesting. Sometimes heartbreaking, sometimes funny, always honest and brilliantly written. I love being inside the mind of someone else. I love hearing about people's experiences, about their lives, especially when they are so different to mine.  Sometimes it's hard being a woman in this world. I feel that. After reading Kenya's book I know no matter how hard it is to be a woman, it's so much harder being a Black Woman. One of the guest essays by Ebele Okobi sums it up when she says: "We would joke about how when white parents considered where to live, they thought about school achievement measures, number of parks, existence of local libraries, yoga studios. Black parents like us thought about all of those things, and also about all of the ways that the neighbourhood could punish our children for being Black." Reading that made me feel so angry. And sad. All of the essays, including the guest essays, were just brilliant. I thoroughly enjoyed reading the book and it's one I'd definitely recommend if you're looking to learn a little bit more about what it's like to be a Black woman in the world today. 

  17. 5 out of 5

    Olivia Fink

    Received Arc in exchange for a honest review The story starts out with a introduction written after she wrote rest of the book. It covered the topic on many peoples mind, Covid-19, and nicely tied it in with the theme of the whole book. The first essay of the book explained the book’s name. I truly enjoyed understanding why the author picked the title because when I first read the title I was curious as to why this name. The author wonderfully writing took us through her experiences good and bad Received Arc in exchange for a honest review The story starts out with a introduction written after she wrote rest of the book. It covered the topic on many peoples mind, Covid-19, and nicely tied it in with the theme of the whole book. The first essay of the book explained the book’s name. I truly enjoyed understanding why the author picked the title because when I first read the title I was curious as to why this name. The author wonderfully writing took us through her experiences good and bad with the word girl and what It means to her. I felt like I knew the author right from the beginning and knew that we would get an honest depiction and deep under the surface meaning for all the topics brought up in the book. This story goes through many different movements in the rights for black women. As well as news headlines, many of which I remember, about injustice done to black people. In another essay the author includes information on the woke movement and what to her that word really means. One of the first chapters explains the movie Black Panther and how popular it became and how it drew popularity to the work black people had done. It also talked about Wankanda and how implementing that aspect in the movie led to even more talk within social media. In this essay it explains the authors personal experience with social media in a positive way. How when she felt isolated, she was able to find ones to talk to through social media so she didn’t feel so alone. I enjoyed hearing how certain events have effected her personally. There are many essays that include her personal feeling on many of the movements and events happening in the world. There are also some essay written by other authors and I enjoyed hearing their prospective and personal experiences as well. I didn't agree with all the stuff that was said but I still enjoyed it. As a woman I could relate to some of the stuff but others I could only begin to understand. I enjoyed learning more about how the authors view of things has changed as our world is constantly changing. Nicely written if not a little wordy but it truly showed the authors strong feelings on the topics. Overall a great book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    J Earl

    Girl Gurl Grrrl: On Womanhood and Belonging in the Age of Black Girl Magic by Kenya Hunt is a case of the whole being greater than the sum of its parts. And make no mistake, the parts are very good. I'll try to explain what I mean by that comment. Like any collection of essays (of which a few are written by others) there will be some that are stronger than others or speak to the reader more. This is no different, though there wasn't, for me, any bad or even borderline essay, just some that spoke Girl Gurl Grrrl: On Womanhood and Belonging in the Age of Black Girl Magic by Kenya Hunt is a case of the whole being greater than the sum of its parts. And make no mistake, the parts are very good. I'll try to explain what I mean by that comment. Like any collection of essays (of which a few are written by others) there will be some that are stronger than others or speak to the reader more. This is no different, though there wasn't, for me, any bad or even borderline essay, just some that spoke to me more while reading than others. I phrased that last part the way I did intentionally. How we read it, what it stirs or doesn't stir, is largely a function of what the reader brings and the writer's style. What I find, especially in a collection that speaks to current events and social justice, is that how it sticks with me is more important than how I felt while reading it. And that is where I think this book excels and also why I consider the whole (the reading and the impact after reading) is greater than the sum of its parts (the collection of essays). I am not a woman and while I have some indigenous heritage I have essentially lived as a white, so anything I could somewhat relate to was either through a "similar to..." type exercise or remembering a friend mentioning something similar about how they feel or what they experienced. So I am not the target audience even though I imagine that I am the type of reader that can learn the most from the book. And learn I did even if it was/is at times uncomfortable (as it should be) and on a couple of occasions talking with friends who can more easily relate and asking questions (yeah, some of them were stupid questions, but they usually elicited the best answers). I highly recommend this to readers who can either directly relate or want to better understand our current political and cultural environment. These should be read not just with an open mind but while bracketing one's preconceived ideas and privileges. Read to understand, not argue or refute. You shouldn't be doing those things before understanding anyway or you're just debating your own strawmen. Reviewed from a copy made available by the publisher via NetGalley.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jamie (TheRebelliousReader)

    3 stars. I loved a lot of things she discussed but the writing wasn’t that engaging and there were other things that felt repeated from other books that I’ve read but just not as interesting. I wish this would’ve landed for me because the topics are so important but I’ve read them better elsewhere.

  20. 5 out of 5

    AJ Payne

    Really solid series of essays on social commentary and memoir. Some I found to be much stronger and more powerful than others, and especially liked the essays from guest authors. Overall enjoyable, though not the top set of essays on race and gender I’ve read in the past could of years. I’m definitely interested in more by this author though!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Vern

    I hated for this book to end! Empowering is an understatement! The honesty of these women was so touching. I listened to this book which I think made it even more amazing. It was like having conversations with a range of dear girlfriends that you’ve known for years.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dimple

    So, so, so good! Written and published during the pandemic, Hunt explores the myriad of emotions and experiences black women in America endure, such as what it means to be woke in the digital age, racial oppression, and how these women find strength in vulnerability and in each other.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tabitha

    3.5 stars. “Girl, Gurl, Grrrl" is a collection of essays written by Kenya Hunt and other black writers, including Candice Carty-Williams, author of "Queenie." Hunt takes us through her experiences as a black woman in the United States and the UK. She details how it felt at times to be the only one like her in the room, especially in the fashion industry. She tackles different topics, such as womanhood, motherhood, Black Girl Magic, racism, and police brutality. She starts her book off with an in 3.5 stars. “Girl, Gurl, Grrrl" is a collection of essays written by Kenya Hunt and other black writers, including Candice Carty-Williams, author of "Queenie." Hunt takes us through her experiences as a black woman in the United States and the UK. She details how it felt at times to be the only one like her in the room, especially in the fashion industry. She tackles different topics, such as womanhood, motherhood, Black Girl Magic, racism, and police brutality. She starts her book off with an introduction about the pandemic. She is able to neatly tie it in with the rest of her book. Her first essay explains the title and I found it to be one of the most relatable essays in her book, as I've used many variations of the word "Girl" in my lifetime. Motherhood was another favorite of mine as Hunt bared her soul about her experiences with pregnancy and the toll it took on her. In my opinion, it's one of the most transparent and vulnerable pieces I've ever read. Some essays were stronger than others, but that is expected when a book is compiled in this format. Although I could not relate to every experience, when I did relate, I felt seen and that is priceless. I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to 1) feel seen about their experiences as a person of color, especially black women, and/or 2) want to listen and better understand other people's experiences. I received this book as a digital ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I read about 1/3 of it in the digital format and then finished the book with a hard copy.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Allison Berkowitz

    This. Was. Wonderful! I so enjoyed hearing the author’s perspective on a variety of issues (culture, race, motherhood, etc.) from the lens of a black woman, looking to lift up other black women.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa Scott

    I honestly didn't know who Kenya Hunt was before this book, and that is a shame. I learned so much from her words and experiences and would recommend this book to everyone, especially as we approach Black History Month. She beautifully illustrates the nature of intersectionality and the importance of activism to further more "official" DEI work in every industry. I honestly didn't know who Kenya Hunt was before this book, and that is a shame. I learned so much from her words and experiences and would recommend this book to everyone, especially as we approach Black History Month. She beautifully illustrates the nature of intersectionality and the importance of activism to further more "official" DEI work in every industry.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Devin Moran

    For every two chapters that were boring, there was one that fascinated me. Most notable was the chapter on motherhood. As a “girl, girl, or grrrrlll” I felt that this chapter best embodied the many layers Black women respond to as mothers/nurturers. Loss, joy, expectation, fear all of it made sense and was expressed in layering narratives very well. Most of the book is centered in year 2020, so intersecting pandemics are discussed at length (which you may or may not be ready for yet). I scowled For every two chapters that were boring, there was one that fascinated me. Most notable was the chapter on motherhood. As a “girl, girl, or grrrrlll” I felt that this chapter best embodied the many layers Black women respond to as mothers/nurturers. Loss, joy, expectation, fear all of it made sense and was expressed in layering narratives very well. Most of the book is centered in year 2020, so intersecting pandemics are discussed at length (which you may or may not be ready for yet). I scowled often. The epilogue was pretty sad. All in all it’s not all bad, but it’s not super good.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Chantelle Hazelden

    In the year where we saw the Black Lives Matter movement heighten, there has been a focus for us as a world to learn more, to do more. And not just white people, I mean all people. No matter the colour of your skin, you can never know it all. Kenya Hunt (the author) is a fashion director of Elle, she is what I'd describe as a proud Black American woman living in London. And this book, her book “Girl” is I guess an accumulation of essays written by not only herself but other black writers too. This In the year where we saw the Black Lives Matter movement heighten, there has been a focus for us as a world to learn more, to do more. And not just white people, I mean all people. No matter the colour of your skin, you can never know it all. Kenya Hunt (the author) is a fashion director of Elle, she is what I'd describe as a proud Black American woman living in London. And this book, her book “Girl” is I guess an accumulation of essays written by not only herself but other black writers too. This isn't a book that preaches, it simply explains. I'd describe it as a necessary read. Not there to shock, but to open our minds to certain events, to how we treat others and how our actions create reactions. What I like is that although Kenya carefully explains what it's to be a black woman living in modern times, she also delves into the past, looks at the origins of some of the assumptions and behaviours of all races. There is a line that really resonated with me: 'I am so much more than my reflection.' The saying says don't judge a book by its cover and the same can be said of us as humans. We are all unique, individual and much more than what we look like on the outside. In this book there is a real sense of togetherness, that celebration of Black girl magic. Kenya covers topics from fashion and work, to motherhood and plenty of reflection. The writing is passionate, well researched and thought provoking. And even when I had finished reading, she left me feeling like actually I still have so much more to learn and that is definitely not a bad thing.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Malgorzata Narog

    First of all, thanks to NetGalley for a privilage of reviewing the ARC. It was a pleasure and I really enjoyed it. Kenya Hunt is a fashion director of Elle, she's a Black American woman living in London. Her book “Girl” is a bunch of essays written by her as well as other black writers. It explains how it is to be a black woman in modern times. It's a true celebration of Black girl magic. Some of the topic talk about motherhood, the “otherness”, differences in being Black woman in States and the U First of all, thanks to NetGalley for a privilage of reviewing the ARC. It was a pleasure and I really enjoyed it. Kenya Hunt is a fashion director of Elle, she's a Black American woman living in London. Her book “Girl” is a bunch of essays written by her as well as other black writers. It explains how it is to be a black woman in modern times. It's a true celebration of Black girl magic. Some of the topic talk about motherhood, the “otherness”, differences in being Black woman in States and the UK. “Girl show the system injustice and how the racism existing in the institutions such as hospitals. I was really happy that Candice Carty-Williams was one of the featuring authors. I loved the way she described process of writing “Queenie”. As I mentioned before, the book is a compilation of essays by different people. While they all talk about blackness and womanhood the whole thing lacks coherence as it jumps from one topic to another. Kenya's book is a really powerful and important piece in today's world. I can't recommend it enough. It's the time we stop avoiding the topic of racial prejudice.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Shaw

    Rating: 3.5 🍷 🍷 🍷 🍷 Book: Girl Gurl Grrrl: On Womanhood and Belonging in the Age of Black Girl Magic AVAILABLE NOW!!!! December 8, 2020 Author: Kenya Hunt Genre: Biographies & Memoirs/OwnVoices Sipping Synopsis: This was a book that was a much needed read for me. It was an easy read but felt so good to see some of my thoughts, feeling, experiences on paper. I enjoyed every chapter, from the oh-so-well written chapter on being WOKE to microaggressions, #blackgirlmagic, hair, black women not getting sam Rating: 3.5 🍷 🍷 🍷 🍷 Book: Girl Gurl Grrrl: On Womanhood and Belonging in the Age of Black Girl Magic AVAILABLE NOW!!!! December 8, 2020 Author: Kenya Hunt Genre: Biographies & Memoirs/OwnVoices Sipping Synopsis: This was a book that was a much needed read for me. It was an easy read but felt so good to see some of my thoughts, feeling, experiences on paper. I enjoyed every chapter, from the oh-so-well written chapter on being WOKE to microaggressions, #blackgirlmagic, hair, black women not getting same medical attention as other races and many other everyday events in a black woman’s life. Final sipping thoughts: What I liked most about this book is that it was not preachy- just Hunt’s (and a few other speakers) views and experiences on being a black woman in America. Not quite the black version of Girl, Wash Your Face but one that should be discussed just as much. If you read this, you will feel like you are just in a room surrounded by your black girlfriends discussing life. While some parts may be viewed as a little heavy, most of the book is just a true, WOKE 😉, conversation of real stuff. Cheers and thank you to @NetGalley, @Amistad and @KenyaHunt for an advanced copy of @GirlGurlGrrrl #GirlGurlGrrrl #Amistad #KenyaHunt #NetGalley #advancedreadercopy #ARC #Kindle #AmazonReads #Booksofinstagram #readersofinstagram #bookstagram #nicoles_bookcellar #bookworm #bookdragon #booknerd #booklover #bookstagrammer #bookaholic #bookreview #blackgirlmagic #blackauthorsmatter #blackreads

  30. 4 out of 5

    girlmeetsbooks_

    Initially I thought this was a novel, but I was pleasantly surprised by the short essays. I appreciate that there were so many women telling their experiences of being Black in this world, and how it affects everything on such a grander scale than just ourselves individually. The essays were heartfelt, and I found myself many times saying, "girl!, giirrlll, or grrrl" because I personally identified with those situations as a black woman or have heard them in my own personal circle. For the topic Initially I thought this was a novel, but I was pleasantly surprised by the short essays. I appreciate that there were so many women telling their experiences of being Black in this world, and how it affects everything on such a grander scale than just ourselves individually. The essays were heartfelt, and I found myself many times saying, "girl!, giirrlll, or grrrl" because I personally identified with those situations as a black woman or have heard them in my own personal circle. For the topics that I may have not been as well versed in, I learned more in depth about industries where I know Black women are seen as trends or have negative responses, but had never been exposed to. Hunt does a great job picking the right people to provide their stories and in turn creates a well rounded book about the successes, fears, and struggles of black women not only in the UK, but the US and worldwide.

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