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A guide to some of the world’s most fascinating places, as seen and experienced by writer, television host, and relentlessly curious traveler Anthony Bourdain Anthony Bourdain saw more of the world than nearly anyone. His travels took him from the hidden pockets of his hometown of New York to a tribal longhouse in Borneo, from cosmopolitan Buenos Aires, Paris, and Shanghai A guide to some of the world’s most fascinating places, as seen and experienced by writer, television host, and relentlessly curious traveler Anthony Bourdain Anthony Bourdain saw more of the world than nearly anyone. His travels took him from the hidden pockets of his hometown of New York to a tribal longhouse in Borneo, from cosmopolitan Buenos Aires, Paris, and Shanghai to Tanzania’s utter beauty and the stunning desert solitude of Oman’s Empty Quarter—and many places beyond. In World Travel, a life of experience is collected into an entertaining, practical, fun and frank travel guide that gives readers an introduction to some of his favorite places—in his own words. Featuring essential advice on how to get there, what to eat, where to stay and, in some cases, what to avoid, World Travel provides essential context that will help readers further appreciate the reasons why Bourdain found a place enchanting and memorable. Supplementing Bourdain’s words are a handful of essays by friends, colleagues, and family that tell even deeper stories about a place, including sardonic accounts of traveling with Bourdain by his brother, Chris; a guide to Chicago’s best cheap eats by legendary music producer Steve Albini, and more. Additionally, each chapter includes illustrations by Wesley Allsbrook. For veteran travelers, armchair enthusiasts, and those in between, World Travel offers a chance to experience the world like Anthony Bourdain.


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A guide to some of the world’s most fascinating places, as seen and experienced by writer, television host, and relentlessly curious traveler Anthony Bourdain Anthony Bourdain saw more of the world than nearly anyone. His travels took him from the hidden pockets of his hometown of New York to a tribal longhouse in Borneo, from cosmopolitan Buenos Aires, Paris, and Shanghai A guide to some of the world’s most fascinating places, as seen and experienced by writer, television host, and relentlessly curious traveler Anthony Bourdain Anthony Bourdain saw more of the world than nearly anyone. His travels took him from the hidden pockets of his hometown of New York to a tribal longhouse in Borneo, from cosmopolitan Buenos Aires, Paris, and Shanghai to Tanzania’s utter beauty and the stunning desert solitude of Oman’s Empty Quarter—and many places beyond. In World Travel, a life of experience is collected into an entertaining, practical, fun and frank travel guide that gives readers an introduction to some of his favorite places—in his own words. Featuring essential advice on how to get there, what to eat, where to stay and, in some cases, what to avoid, World Travel provides essential context that will help readers further appreciate the reasons why Bourdain found a place enchanting and memorable. Supplementing Bourdain’s words are a handful of essays by friends, colleagues, and family that tell even deeper stories about a place, including sardonic accounts of traveling with Bourdain by his brother, Chris; a guide to Chicago’s best cheap eats by legendary music producer Steve Albini, and more. Additionally, each chapter includes illustrations by Wesley Allsbrook. For veteran travelers, armchair enthusiasts, and those in between, World Travel offers a chance to experience the world like Anthony Bourdain.

30 review for World Travel: An Irreverent Guide

  1. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Smith

    I’ve long been a fan of Anthony Bourdain: ten years ago or more I read, and loved, Kitchen Confidential and A Cook’s Tour and ever since I’ve voraciously chased down episodes of his television shows No Reservations and Parts Unknown. In these shows he travels the world, meets people, explores the area and eats and drinks his way through just about anything can think of. I was so obsessed with these programmes that I even tracked down a food shack he visited in one of his episodes. After watch I’ve long been a fan of Anthony Bourdain: ten years ago or more I read, and loved, Kitchen Confidential and A Cook’s Tour and ever since I’ve voraciously chased down episodes of his television shows No Reservations and Parts Unknown. In these shows he travels the world, meets people, explores the area and eats and drinks his way through just about anything can think of. I was so obsessed with these programmes that I even tracked down a food shack he visited in one of his episodes. After watching it on a flight from the UK to Australia I tracked down Harry’s Café de Wheels, in Sydney, which is known for its meat pies and mash – and I have to say the food really was very good! Like so many people, I was devastated when AB took his own life in 2018. What a tragic loss. And I was surprised when I spotted this book, due for release in April 2021 – is it a book that had been written before his death and was just now being released? Unfortunately not, in fact it’s something that grew out of the recording of a one hour meeting between Bourdain and his assistant, a few months before he died. The net result is, I think, something of a mishmash. In close to five hundred pages we are treated to brief overviews of quite a few of the places Bourdain visited, with each section comprising a collection of quotes from the man himself, details of restaurants he visited (address, average cost of a meal etc.) and some travel information such as where the airports are situated and how much it might cost you to get from there into the nearest centre. To be fair, the lines from Bourdain are often priceless, reminding me just what a clever and amusing writer and raconteur he was. But why mix it up with the sort of information you’d get from a travel guide or online? In addition, in the e-copy I read the text was broken up by a series of drawings - what a missed opportunity, I’d happily have dispensed with the travel information and swapped the drawings for some photographs. In this format the book just didn’t work for me. So where is the audience for it? I suppose the best fit might be fans of the man who decide they want to track down some of the places featured in his shows, or perhaps just have a record of these places accompanied by some of Bourdain's memorable lines. My thanks to Bloomsbury Publishing Plc and NetGalley for providing a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    Anthony Bourdain's show "No Reservations" and his other shows featured his irreverent humor and his biting observations. Though Bourdain has taken another path in his journey, many of us can still hear his voice. This book, which was in progress before his untimely demise, attempts to harness that voice to a sort of rambling travel guide. At best, this book offers us readers quotes from Bourdain's voice overs. Itlso offers a kind of travelogue and sometimes interviews with fortunate or unfortuna Anthony Bourdain's show "No Reservations" and his other shows featured his irreverent humor and his biting observations. Though Bourdain has taken another path in his journey, many of us can still hear his voice. This book, which was in progress before his untimely demise, attempts to harness that voice to a sort of rambling travel guide. At best, this book offers us readers quotes from Bourdain's voice overs. Itlso offers a kind of travelogue and sometimes interviews with fortunate or unfortunate proprietors of restaurants whose lives were changed by Bourdain's show featuring their restaurants.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sofia

    This is not written by Anthony Bourdain but by his assistant Laurie Woolever. It mainly consists of Anthony's quotes about particular places and information about restaurants, hotels he visited in that place joined together by information on how to get there. Occasionally there are short essays from Bourdain's family, friends and collaborators. Is this the book for me? Well no, it is not. I do not read travel guides. Why did I choose to read it, well because I love Bourdain's shows and wanted som This is not written by Anthony Bourdain but by his assistant Laurie Woolever. It mainly consists of Anthony's quotes about particular places and information about restaurants, hotels he visited in that place joined together by information on how to get there. Occasionally there are short essays from Bourdain's family, friends and collaborators. Is this the book for me? Well no, it is not. I do not read travel guides. Why did I choose to read it, well because I love Bourdain's shows and wanted some more of that. I only got a bit, because I got a chock full of quotes from him, which are as usual very good but I had hoped for more. I sort of imagined that this was going to be his world view, a recap after all that travel. It wasn't. I think my sadness at his loss and my wish for more misled me in this case. An ARC gently provided by author/publishers via Netgalley.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nursebookie

    World Travel By Anthony Bourdain Anthony Bourdain was an icon who saw different cultures and parts of the world through the food that binds us together as humanity. His voice and style with the auspiciousness of understanding the world in which we live, is written so beautifully in this book. This travel guide is a collection of his favorite places that he has visited and is a wonderful read especially now that an escape read is part of what keeps our sanity intact. I enjoy the deep dive into the World Travel By Anthony Bourdain Anthony Bourdain was an icon who saw different cultures and parts of the world through the food that binds us together as humanity. His voice and style with the auspiciousness of understanding the world in which we live, is written so beautifully in this book. This travel guide is a collection of his favorite places that he has visited and is a wonderful read especially now that an escape read is part of what keeps our sanity intact. I enjoy the deep dive into these places and what makes these special and memorable. This would make an amazing gift for foodies, travel junkies and anyone that loved Anthony Bourdains' show and books. I highly recommend this book!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    As a fan of Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly and a lover of travel, I was excited and a bit confused to see a new Anthony Bourdain book set to come out three years after his untimely death. My assumption was this was a project he'd had half done - maybe a first draft submitted or something like that - and subsequently some clean-up work was required prior to turning it into a posthumously released book. Sadly, this was not the case. As Bourdain's assistant Laurie Woolov As a fan of Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly and a lover of travel, I was excited and a bit confused to see a new Anthony Bourdain book set to come out three years after his untimely death. My assumption was this was a project he'd had half done - maybe a first draft submitted or something like that - and subsequently some clean-up work was required prior to turning it into a posthumously released book. Sadly, this was not the case. As Bourdain's assistant Laurie Woolover explains in the introduction, this book was basically born from a recording of a one hour brainstorming session that the two of them had a few months before he passed away. That's it. World Travel doesn't read like a Bourdain book... at all. Because it's not. I personally do not believe this book should be published. Basically, this book is an unhelpful travel guide to places around the entire world. It's broken down into short chapters devoted to Bourdain's travels in 43 (!!) different countries, most of which are subsequently broken down into several different cities Bourdain traveled to within them. It is highly formulaic in that each chapter starts with a brief overview of the city followed by (I kid you not) the 3-letter airport code and cost/timing of getting from the airport to the actual city. Next comes a description of some $600+/night hotel that Bourdain tended to stay at, then maybe one tourist attraction he liked, and finally 2 or 3 bars/restaurants he loved. Pepper in some Bourdain quotes, short stories told by people who knew him in said city, and random drawings and repeat this formula. Over and over. For 43 (!!) countries. If I want travel tips for a particular locale, I'll buy a travel guide devoted to said spot. If I want to read stories from Anthony Bourdain, I'd reread Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly or check out A Cook's Tour: Global Adventures in Extreme Cuisines. This book attempted to do both of those things together and it failed miserably. Thanks to NetGalley for an ARC of this book in exchange for my honest review.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Niklas Pivic

    This is a puzzle book of sorts. It’s mainly built on an idea that Bourdain and Woolever—the latter of who is a writer and editor who’s written Appetites with Bourdain and spent a decade assisting him—had where they would collate Bourdain’s experiences as a travelling eater in his TV shows into book form. It was never my intention to be a reporter, a critic, an advocate. It was also never my intention to provide audiences with “everything” they needed to know about a place—or even a balanced or co This is a puzzle book of sorts. It’s mainly built on an idea that Bourdain and Woolever—the latter of who is a writer and editor who’s written Appetites with Bourdain and spent a decade assisting him—had where they would collate Bourdain’s experiences as a travelling eater in his TV shows into book form. It was never my intention to be a reporter, a critic, an advocate. It was also never my intention to provide audiences with “everything” they needed to know about a place—or even a balanced or comprehensive overview. I am a storyteller. I go places, I come back. I tell you how the places made me feel. Through the use of powerful tools like great photography, skillful editing, sound mixing, color correction, music (which is often composed specifically for the purpose) and brilliant producers, I can—in the very best cases—make you feel a little bit like I did at the time. At least I hope so. It’s a manipulative process. It’s also a deeply satisfying one. ANTHONY BOURDAIN, 2012 Bourdain was highly passionate about food. He also loved people, music, some culture, an old-world view of rock ‘n’ roll, and seemed to try to be a better person; upon revisiting foods, peoples, and cities, he reevaluated his old self and tried to come to grips with things. Where he’d been a full-blown drug addict who, after having attended rehab, wrote funny and glammy stuff about drugs and the cool life of a ‘rock chef’, he later wrote truly introspective and contemplative stuff. This book consists of soundbites from different episodes of Bourdain’s TV series, paired with geographical info á la Lonely Planet guides; the book is updated with current information on all of the restaurants, hotels, and weirder places that Bourdain talked about, containing tidbits down to how much you pay for a night at any hotel. The book also contains at-times fascinating parts about the series from others than Woolever and Bourdain, for example, Jen Agg speaks of what her restaurant became famous for, post-TV: The camera operators planned their angles and shots for the next day, while Tom and I made small talk, into which he slipped, oh-so-casually, “I heard you guys do bone luges here.” I had no idea what that was, so he clarified: After scraping and sopping up the last of the glistening marrow out of halved and roasted veal bones, you pick something like sherry or bourbon, and hold the narrow end of the bone to your mouth, as you would with a beer funnel, while a game pal pours the shot down through the wider end, and into your mouth. I was skeptical, very skeptical. I feared appearing on a show I loved as, essentially, a shooter girl—a fear that turned out to be entirely warranted. I also worried that if we did this whole bone luge thing on the show, we’d be doing it for guests, forever and ever, in an Edge of Tomorrow–style loop. I wasn’t wrong about that, either. So I expressed a fair and reasonable amount of doubt. We’d never served anyone a bone luge before, I said. It wasn’t, like, our thing. At all. But Tom was adamant, and so, on shoot day, I played along, if a bit unhappily, pouring bourbon down a still-warm marrow bone into Anthony Bourdain’s mouth. I was incredibly uncomfortable, which is very rare for me. But I did it. I watched the episode once, when it originally aired in 2012, and only recently watched it again. I was happy to be reminded that the only thing I said on camera was, “I feel like a shooter girl, and it’s actually just a little humiliating.” With the perspective of time, though, I have to agree with Tom’s instinct to insert this bit of bone luge weirdness. It crystalized the segment, was such a huge hit, and, to be completely honest, we made a lot of money off supplemental bone luges. Tony never knew that it was a manufactured bit, and, frankly, it became such a part of Hoof lore that it doesn’t matter. Time really is a flat circle. I mention it because fabrication is part of so many series. Bourdain never knew about that, it seems, and it doesn’t really matter. One of the lovely things about this book is how it serves as a perfect reminder of how things were, historically speaking. Woolever writes of how Bourdain took time to prepare before visiting a place—be it in the USA or another country—and read a lot about it beforehand. After a Finnish fan created a Facebook page that garnered 100,000 votes for Tony’s coming to Finland, he went: Helsinki, Finland. What I knew about the place wasn’t, shall we say, encouraging. I knew the Finns were tough people, tough enough to fight off Nazis and Russians. Tough enough to handle the cold, harsh climate, the long, depressing winters, the short, binge-drinking summers. I knew it was a place not long on easy smiles, or even eye contact, for that matter. One thing that strikes me about Bourdain’s style of writing is that it somewhat matches that of the makers of The Wire; it’s not completely strange, then, that Bourdain was invited to write part of Treme, the TV series by the gang behind The Wire. Their style of writing spills back and forth over Bourdain’s lingo; it’s not surprising to know Hunter S. Thompson was a major literary figure in Bourdain’s life, as was Charles Bukowski. It works most of the time and provides Bourdain with the style for which he was known, slightly derivative, as it were. I think Bourdain became a better writer with time; the older he became, the more he cut to the chase and didn’t dance around. He embraced the world more and more. An example of this: In 1975, the newly independent Mozambique looked forward to a brighter future. But this was not to be. Yet rather than giving up after enduring a sixteen-year civil war—one of Africa’s most brutal and senseless—the country picked itself up and began the enormous, daunting task of rebuilding, well, everything, from the ground up. There are very few places left in this world like Mozambique. The climate is nice. The people are really nice and the food is extraordinary. Yet today, Mozambique is barely a pit stop on the tourist trail. It was with all this in mind that I arrived on my first visit to this East African country of twenty-three million people. Mozambique, it should be pointed out, is a darling of the World Bank. It’s seen as an African success story, and the fact is, things are good, very good, here, compared with how things have been in the past. Five hundred years of truly appalling colonialism, eighteen years of enthusiastic but inept Communism, and a brutal and senseless sixteen-year civil war ending less than twenty years ago left Mozambique with a devastated social fabric, a shattered economy, and only the memory of an infrastructure. Shockingly, people here, throughout the country, after being relentlessly screwed by history, are just as relentlessly nice. It’s fun to read about places where both he and I have eaten, as with Quimet y Quimet, in Barcelona: If I lived across the street from this place, I’d quit my job and just hang out here all day, until all the money was gone. Quimet & Quimet is a four-generations-old tapas bar in the El Poble-Sec neighborhood of Barcelona, which relies heavily on that Catalonian tapas bar staple of canned food. There’s an extensive wine selection, along with cocktails and beer, but the real draw are the montaditos, or canape-sized open-faced sandwiches populated with the likes of cipriones (stuffed baby squid), anchovies, mussels, tuna belly, sea urchin, Spanish and French cheeses, pickled vegetables and more, all prepared to order behind the bar—there is no kitchen on site, and it’s a tight space, with room for only about 20 guests at a time. QUIMET & QUIMET: Carrer del Poeta Cabanyes, 25, 08004 Barcelona, Tel +34 93 442 31 42, www.quimetquimet.com (tapas 2–18 euros/US$2.25–$20) All in all, this book is quite interesting even though, at its worst, it’s fragmented. But if you’re looking for a rocky version of a Lonely Planet guide, this is it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lily

    As a big fan of the late and great Anthony Bourdain, this book was a great way to reminisce about his favorite locations and plan new travels. Sadly, it was not the book it was initially intended to be due to his death. Most of his words are from other sources. But it's great to see them compiled and his recommendations all in one spot. The added bonus of essays by people who knew him well is a great tribute to him and shares stories of his travels behind-the-scenes. I recommend this book to any As a big fan of the late and great Anthony Bourdain, this book was a great way to reminisce about his favorite locations and plan new travels. Sadly, it was not the book it was initially intended to be due to his death. Most of his words are from other sources. But it's great to see them compiled and his recommendations all in one spot. The added bonus of essays by people who knew him well is a great tribute to him and shares stories of his travels behind-the-scenes. I recommend this book to anyone who loved Anthony Bourdain or enjoys travel writing.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Trevor Seigler

    I was devastated when Tony Bourdain took his own life in June 2018; I had been a fan of his work for over a decade, having come across a marathon of "No Reservations" on the Travel Channel in 2007 or 2006 and becoming hooked on his snarky, take-no-prisoners, but still surprisingly warm style. I'd followed him to CNN and "Parts Unknown," where he arguably matured beyond "the guy who goes to places to eat stuff" to a more serious reporter on what kind of state the world was in and what people in c I was devastated when Tony Bourdain took his own life in June 2018; I had been a fan of his work for over a decade, having come across a marathon of "No Reservations" on the Travel Channel in 2007 or 2006 and becoming hooked on his snarky, take-no-prisoners, but still surprisingly warm style. I'd followed him to CNN and "Parts Unknown," where he arguably matured beyond "the guy who goes to places to eat stuff" to a more serious reporter on what kind of state the world was in and what people in countries with bad reputations were doing to fix that. He was always a fantastic tour guide, whether he was being serious or funny, because you could tell that he cared about the people he met and the places he visited. It wasn't a job for him, it was life. This guidebook was conceived between Bourdain and Laurie Woolever (who also co-authored a cookbook with him) in the spring of 2018, but Bourdain didn't live to help Woolever put it together. Instead, what we have is a tour guide with Woolever's helpful input on what to do when you arrive in places as far off as Saigon/Ho Chi Minh City or as near as Charleston, South Carolina. That utilitarian purpose is well-done here; I'm not usually a reader of guide books like this so I can't judge it on its merits in the genre but she does a good job of providing useful information. What sells me on the book, however, and makes it more than just a guide book is the input from Bourdain; combing through his decades of TV shows plus interviews and writings, Woolever quotes Tony at length on many of the places he visited and loved. Hearing the words in his voice as I read them in the book was a great pleasure for me; I think watching Bourdain made me a better human being, and it was nice to be reminded of the joy that he could take in a simple meal prepared with heart and soul. There's the snarky Tony here too, of course; that was part of his appeal. But overall, the effect is like hearing from a friend that you haven't talked to in a while, and enjoying his company. For that alone, I recommend this book. Including essays from some of the folks that Tony met along the way (the most moving being from his former production assistant and fixer, Nari Kye), this book is a welcome addition to the Bourdain library, and it's also a damn useful book too, for whenever we can travel again. Because when we can, it wouldn't be such a bad thing to see the world through Tony Bourdain's eyes.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jack Hrkach

    I came to Anthony Bourdain rather late, though by now I've seen several of his Parts Unknown Series. This book is due more to Tony's collaborator Lauri e Woolever. And it's a labor of love. She quotes Bourdain extensively, fills in with her own sharp assessments, and has recruited several people who were touched by the master in different ways to contribute brief essays. His brother writes two of them. So there's an interesting mix of voices for your reading pleasure. All told 45 countries, some I came to Anthony Bourdain rather late, though by now I've seen several of his Parts Unknown Series. This book is due more to Tony's collaborator Lauri e Woolever. And it's a labor of love. She quotes Bourdain extensively, fills in with her own sharp assessments, and has recruited several people who were touched by the master in different ways to contribute brief essays. His brother writes two of them. So there's an interesting mix of voices for your reading pleasure. All told 45 countries, some with only one city described, but several with two or more are represented. The US is by far the largest section, with 18 different cities covered. Each of the cities/places written about offers a brief view of how to get there, how to get from the airport, to the center, though Woolover insists, rightly that the book is NOT a travel guide. Most of the entries describe the hotels he stayed in, with prices included, and of course all feature eateries, from posh places (relatively few of those) to street markets and food wagons (many many of these). The countries, as well as the cities within them, are alphabetical in order, and the leaps of culture from one to the next can be almost dizzying. For just a few examples we are taken from Australia to Austria, next to Bhutan followed by Brazil; and from Ghana to India, then Ireland and Israel. Each description is short but sweet, laced with Bourdain's colorful language, which might give offense to dome, though I curse just as much as he does, just not nearly as creatively, so I got a kick out of his use of expletives. I enjoyed the surprise moving from culture to culture, and coming out of the pandemic this book will excite those who, like myself had to cancel international trips planned for spring of 2020 and are still sorely missing it. Think of it as an armchair travel book. I'm an old guy, and while I'm pretty well traveled and found myself drooling for places that the authors paint in such vivid colors, I know I won't get to most of them. But a man can dream, and Bourdain & Woolever are happy to your dreamworld up. Highly recommended, particularly in these crazy days we live in. Thanks to Bourdain, and I have to say, especially to Laurie Woolever, who is the unsung hero of this book, for without what must have been massive amounts of work and research on our part, we'd never have been able to give it a good-read!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sarmat Chowdhury

    *Arc provided by publisher to Barnes & Noble* It’s definitely weird to be reading a travel guide (even an irreverent one) during one of the the worst global pandemics, and yet, being one coming from Anthony Bourdain himself (posthumously after one interview to plan the book with his co-author, and excerpts of his provided from previous books, shows, and analysis and highlights from close family and friends that were familiar with the cities/countries chosen for the guide) - it is a refreshing ta *Arc provided by publisher to Barnes & Noble* It’s definitely weird to be reading a travel guide (even an irreverent one) during one of the the worst global pandemics, and yet, being one coming from Anthony Bourdain himself (posthumously after one interview to plan the book with his co-author, and excerpts of his provided from previous books, shows, and analysis and highlights from close family and friends that were familiar with the cities/countries chosen for the guide) - it is a refreshing take from being locked up at home to read about the food and sights of far away places, and hoping to add to the travel ideas for down the road when things begin to clear up. This isn’t a comprehensive guide to travel and indeed, the countries and cities highlighted only contain a fraction of the food and sights that Anthony himself either enjoyed or experienced - but its more real, personal, and made to get you to understand why Anthony and his friends in particular stopped and ate at these places, and also the context in where he went. From the social, political and cultural flashpoint, Anthony does an amazing job balancing these contextual issues while also ensuring that the reader gets to experience the magic that is found in these places. I can’t wait to read and experience the finished product when it comes on in April

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cat Gaa

    I greatly enjoyed this book. Fair - Bourdain himself didn't write it, but his wit, his potty mouth and his indelible ability to make greater sense of the human condition through food and hospitality is not absent from this book. Part travel guide, part anthropological study and wholly in the spirit of Tony, this was like reading a tearful yet good-humored goodbye to a celebrity that people revered for much more than his TV or books. I discovered him far too late in his life, but his death shook m I greatly enjoyed this book. Fair - Bourdain himself didn't write it, but his wit, his potty mouth and his indelible ability to make greater sense of the human condition through food and hospitality is not absent from this book. Part travel guide, part anthropological study and wholly in the spirit of Tony, this was like reading a tearful yet good-humored goodbye to a celebrity that people revered for much more than his TV or books. I discovered him far too late in his life, but his death shook me more than most. In laughing my way through this book (who could utter something truly funny about the commute from LAX or the beauty of deep fried entrails in Myanmar), I felt hopeful about travel, about long meals, about finally learn to fricking cook myself. In some ways there is closure in Tony spewing out his most favorite places on Earth, no matter how far-flung. It made my homesick for Chicago, for Lyon, for the entire subcontinent of India. Tony may have been a chef by trade, but he was a traveler and a storyteller.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Cam Kovach

    In a year when travel has not been an option, this book provides a glimpse of potential travel to places both exotic and familiar. This book was completed after the death of Anthony Bourdain, but he provided his collaborator with vivid impressions of the countries and cities covered in the book. His inimitable voice is present throughout. For this native Pittsburgher (eastern suburbs, but who's trying to be exact?), his selection of three off-beat but excellent eateries proves that he seeks the In a year when travel has not been an option, this book provides a glimpse of potential travel to places both exotic and familiar. This book was completed after the death of Anthony Bourdain, but he provided his collaborator with vivid impressions of the countries and cities covered in the book. His inimitable voice is present throughout. For this native Pittsburgher (eastern suburbs, but who's trying to be exact?), his selection of three off-beat but excellent eateries proves that he seeks the unusual and interesting far more often than the expected. His perspective makes the book's featured locations surprising and compelling.

  13. 4 out of 5

    reading is my hustle

    this book offers the chance to experience the world much as Anthony Bourdain did. it's also an ode of sorts to his open mind & sincere curiosity about the people of this world. the short vignettes highlight countries he visited & include practical advice about traveling + enjoying a good meal. there are also essays written by anthony’s friends, family, & colleagues. sadly, he was unable to see this book through to the end but with the help of others & his longtime assistant it was finished. this book offers the chance to experience the world much as Anthony Bourdain did. it's also an ode of sorts to his open mind & sincere curiosity about the people of this world. the short vignettes highlight countries he visited & include practical advice about traveling + enjoying a good meal. there are also essays written by anthony’s friends, family, & colleagues. sadly, he was unable to see this book through to the end but with the help of others & his longtime assistant it was finished.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    Fans of Bourdain and travel literature fans will enjoy this guidebook of essays that gives just a small taste of the places Bourdain traveled to when he was alive. You could think of it as small bites of the world since it hovers somewhere between guidebook and travelogue. Good reading during these pandemic times! Thank you to NetGalley for an ARC of this book.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Anna Hammerschmidt

    Let me put it out there, “World Travel: An Irreverent Guide” by Anthony Bourdain and Laura Woolever was one of my most anticipated travel guides coming out this year. I was counting down the days until its release in October, excited to read more about Anthony Bourdain’s insights on the world. So you couldn’t believe my excitement when I got my hands on an early copy of this guide for this review. “World Travel: An Irreverent Guide” is less practical and more of an inspiration guide to some of Bo Let me put it out there, “World Travel: An Irreverent Guide” by Anthony Bourdain and Laura Woolever was one of my most anticipated travel guides coming out this year. I was counting down the days until its release in October, excited to read more about Anthony Bourdain’s insights on the world. So you couldn’t believe my excitement when I got my hands on an early copy of this guide for this review. “World Travel: An Irreverent Guide” is less practical and more of an inspiration guide to some of Bourdain’s favorite places. This is a guide designed for Bourdain super fans and those inspired by his way of travels. It is full of wit, entertaining antidotes, and sprinkled with useful tips throughout. This is the type of book you keep on your bedside table. It’s the type of book you pick up from time to time to whisk you away to a new destination. It is full of inspirational tidbits that will encourage you to deep dive into the destination. This is a starting point that does not just show you the top of things to do in each destination. Rather it shows you how to experience these places a little further and a little fuller, just as Bourdain did. Read the full review @ https://www.comejoinmyjourney.com/rev...

  16. 5 out of 5

    TEELOCK Mithilesh

    There will never be anyone quite like Anthony Bourdain. But World Travel (Ecco) offers readers the potential to travel the world as he did. A life of experience is transformed into an entertaining, practical, fun, and frank travel guide with introductions, in his own words, to some of his favourite places. Featuring essential advice on how to get there, what to eat, where to stay, and, in some cases, what to avoid, World Travel provides context that will help readers further appreciate why Bourd There will never be anyone quite like Anthony Bourdain. But World Travel (Ecco) offers readers the potential to travel the world as he did. A life of experience is transformed into an entertaining, practical, fun, and frank travel guide with introductions, in his own words, to some of his favourite places. Featuring essential advice on how to get there, what to eat, where to stay, and, in some cases, what to avoid, World Travel provides context that will help readers further appreciate why Bourdain found a place memorable and enchanting. Supplementing Bourdain’s words are a handful of essays by friends, colleagues, and family that tell even deeper stories about a place, including sardonic accounts of travelling with Bourdain.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Leslie Nipkow

    As a devoted Bourdain fan, I was excited to read Ms. Woolever's compilation. My expectations were probably misplaced, because World Travel is more like a world travel guidebook for Bourdain devotees, and quite difficult to follow in galley form. I will use this book as a source when looking for an adventure abroad or even close to home, a reminder of high points in Mr. Bourdain's journey, and who wouldn't want to pop in and follow AB's footsteps if in the vicinity? I'm personally grateful for Ms As a devoted Bourdain fan, I was excited to read Ms. Woolever's compilation. My expectations were probably misplaced, because World Travel is more like a world travel guidebook for Bourdain devotees, and quite difficult to follow in galley form. I will use this book as a source when looking for an adventure abroad or even close to home, a reminder of high points in Mr. Bourdain's journey, and who wouldn't want to pop in and follow AB's footsteps if in the vicinity? I'm personally grateful for Ms. Woolever's work creating this book, and ever and always grieve the lose of Anthony Bourdain's eyes to go where I have not gone before.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lisa of Hopewell

    I devoured Kitchen Confidential when it came out, but oddly, I've never watched more than a few minutes of any of Anthony ("Tony") Bourdain's tv shows--I prefer reading about food and travel (and, until last week when my daughter gave me one) I do not own a tv. (I occasionally watch online though). After reading this book, I doubt I'll go in search of any of Boudain's tv shows, but I would be I might read more of his word. His style is not mine. It's more Bobby Knight than I'd like--especially a I devoured Kitchen Confidential when it came out, but oddly, I've never watched more than a few minutes of any of Anthony ("Tony") Bourdain's tv shows--I prefer reading about food and travel (and, until last week when my daughter gave me one) I do not own a tv. (I occasionally watch online though). After reading this book, I doubt I'll go in search of any of Boudain's tv shows, but I would be I might read more of his word. His style is not mine. It's more Bobby Knight than I'd like--especially around food. But he certainly knew good food and exciting travel. At the time of his death in 2018, Bourdain and his "lieutenant," Laurie Woolever, were at work on the project of telling about people, places, and most importantly, food he had encountered over his twenty years of making travel and food tv programs. Unfortunately, they only got to have that one meeting. Tony ended his life and left Laurie with the idea to finish the project. Instead of Tony writing about places and experiences he'd loved, friends, coworkers, and relatives have contributed prose and memories. Tony's words, drawn from his television shows and writing, make up the balance of the book. In this world tour, I enjoyed all of his stops, but I was especially drawn to two places--the first of which is Salvador in Brazil. I was taken in by the interesting sound of the taste of a caipirinhas [a lime juice-based cocktail with sugar cane "spirits"] and for the acaraje. What's not to like about this: "[A] paste a batter, a falafel-like wad of smushed-up black-eyed peas, seasoned with ground dried shrimp and onions, deep-friend till crispy and golden, in some chili-spiked dende oil [red palm oil]. On top you got your catapa which is, sort of, a shrimp curry paste, and your tomato salad, your friend shrimp, your cararao frito. A must." As Bourdain points out in his tv show [transcript] the slave trade was very big in Brazil. You can certainly tell that just from the description above of the acaraje. Black-eyed peas ["cowpeas" in some parts of Africa], red palm oil, dried shrimp? How much more West African can you get? But you are eating it in South America. Love that whole picture. Wash it down with a caiprinhas. which to me evokes memories of Malwai and Cathay, a sugar cane "spirit" that could knock over a Teamster with its kick. The second most compelling portrait was of Barcelona: "Outside of Asia, this is it: the best and most exciting place to it in the world." That's a pretty bold statement even for as bold a guy as Tony was. "The simple, good things of Spain that most Spaniards see as a birthright...'How can ham be this good?! How can something that comes in a can be that terrific. Simple things--an anchovy, an olive, a piece of cheese. Really really simple things, the little things that you see every day here--that's what's cool about Spain.'" I love everything about this statement--simple food that lends itself to daily life, to visiting with friends. Food that fills you up but doesn't weigh you down. Sign me up! There was no place in this book I wouldn't want to see and experience. I must admit, though, that shark's live and various types of tripe do nothing to my taste bud, but do make my gag reflex kick in. Ok, so I'm not as adventurous as Tony--not many of us are. But to eat my way through all the versions of wonderful Piri-Piri chicken in Mozambique, or sample street foods in India or Singapore. Those would certainly be amazing meals. As for the book--it isn't nice to criticize a posthumously published book. But, this, in essence, was a copy-and-paste of a dead man's tv orations, padded out with words from a woman who was his assistant and with whom he wrote a cookbook. While Laurie Woolever's prose was wonderfully descriptive and does set the scene well, I must say I was underwhelmed by this repackaging of Tony. When Laurie was asking herself if the world really needed this book, she should have listened to her gut saying, "Probably not." Tony's vision for the book would have been much better as it would have been populated with his planned essays on places, food, experiences, and more. Bourdain's larger-than-life personality does well on the tv screen. Transcribing those words spoke, shouted, or muttered into the camera in a specific context, is just not great reading. Nonetheless, it is still a decent addition to contemporary travel literature for those who want a super-quick read. ["How thoroughly passive-aggressive can she be?" I hear you asking! LOL]

  19. 5 out of 5

    Keith

    World Travel is a very unusual book that is hard to categorize correctly. Subtitled An Irreverent Guide, the volume presents a country-by-country summary of more than forty of the places that the late Anthony Bourdain journeyed to over the years while making his various television shows. Before discussing its contents further, it is probably useful to understand how this project came to fruition in the first place. As Laurie Woolever, the book’s co-author, writes in the Introduction, Bourdain ha World Travel is a very unusual book that is hard to categorize correctly. Subtitled An Irreverent Guide, the volume presents a country-by-country summary of more than forty of the places that the late Anthony Bourdain journeyed to over the years while making his various television shows. Before discussing its contents further, it is probably useful to understand how this project came to fruition in the first place. As Laurie Woolever, the book’s co-author, writes in the Introduction, Bourdain had the initial vision to create a guidebook based on his extensive travels, but the two only had one brief meeting to discuss the idea before his untimely demise. So, the finished product is really the result of Woolever fleshing out virtually all of the details of what began as a fairly embryonic concept. The result is a very odd book that lacks a clear focus. In particular, it is really not useable as a guidebook, at least not in the traditional sense. The information it provides in each country-specific chapter is far too limited to actually sustain someone’s travels. Instead, what is presented are a few dining tips (for the places Bourdain visited for the shows, of course), along with detailed instructions of how to get from the airport into whatever major city where he was staying. Far less frequent are mentions of hotels or other sights worth seeing in the area. In fact, when hotels are noted, they are the ones that Bourdain himself used and they tend to be high-end luxury places in the $400-500/night range. (Tony clearly like to stay in style, which is really out of keeping with his “man of the people” style of eating and probably why his accommodations were seldom featured on the shows themselves.) Where the book shines is in reading Bourdain’s own thoughts about the places he visited, which is achieved by inserting parts of his transcribed monologues from each of the respective episodes. It was a pleasure to relive these moments; Bourdain was a wonderful writer as well as a deeply insightful observer of the world around him, and these passages capture that quite well. Unfortunately, one thing that is uniformly missing in the book are the times when he would go to a person’s home and sit down for a family meal. (For me these were always the best part of any show and cast Bourdain at his gracious and appreciative best.) In this same spirit, the volume also includes a somewhat random collection of essays by friends, colleagues, or relatives, but these often read more like personal tributes than anything else. So, what is the proper overall assessment of this project? I am really torn in answering that question. On one hand, the information it contains is disappointingly shallow and it is really unfocused in its execution—I simply do not need that much detailed information about airport transportation options, which is likely to be outdated in a very short time. On the other, it really was great to revisit some memorable places in Bourdain’s presence again and be reminded of just how much we all are missing with his passing. I cannot imagine that this was very close to the final product he originally imagined, but World Travel is a book that should resonate with many of his fans. However, for those looking for an introduction to just how great a food and travel writer Bourdain could be, a volume such as A Cook’s Tour or No Reservations would be a better choice.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Karen Germain

    Thank you to Ecco for providing me with a copy of Anthony Bourdain & Laurie Woolever’s World Traveler: An Irreverent Guide, in exchange for an honest review. World Traveler: An Irreverent Guide is a compilation of Anthony Bourdain’s travel advice and reflections, including his favorite local eats and bits of tourism. It turns out that Bourdain really loved quirky museums, independent bookstores, and lavish hotels. Tragically, Bourdain died during the early stages of planning World Traveler, in fa Thank you to Ecco for providing me with a copy of Anthony Bourdain & Laurie Woolever’s World Traveler: An Irreverent Guide, in exchange for an honest review. World Traveler: An Irreverent Guide is a compilation of Anthony Bourdain’s travel advice and reflections, including his favorite local eats and bits of tourism. It turns out that Bourdain really loved quirky museums, independent bookstores, and lavish hotels. Tragically, Bourdain died during the early stages of planning World Traveler, in fact, his co-author, Laurie Woolever, only had one in-person meeting to plan the book prior to his passing. Naturally, this changed the tone of the book a bit, turning the focus towards collecting memories from people who knew Bourdain. The most poignant were the essays from his younger brother, Christopher. Christopher recounts their childhood travels to France and the joy he experienced from traveling with his brother as adults, including taking part in a few episodes of Bourdain’s various tv series. Christopher’s love for his brother and the way he cherished their travels together is moving. Bourdain was passionate and outspoken. He had a unique way of expressing himself through his words, both written and spoken, that was a kick to experience through his quotes in World Traveler. His voice is irreplacable. Woolever definitely honors Bourdain’s spirit and life in this guide book. His energy oozes on every page. That said, under different circumstances (not reading for a review) I would have enjoyed World Traveler in a different way. It is the sort of book that you have on a coffee table for perusing at leisure or perhaps keep on a shelf as a reference for planning travels, not the sort of book that you race through start to finish. I say this, because a large chunk of World Traveler is practical travel advice, such as airport information or the best way to tour a city. It was a bit tedious to read quickly and clearly not intended for that sort of reading experience. As far as the recommendations, I was pleased to discover a few that I have experienced (St. John in London, Din Tai Fung, and Voodoo Donuts) and to add many more to my list that I hope to try on future travels. I always loved that Bourdain was game to try the range of establishments, from dive to fine dining, all of which are included in his recommendations. He was unapologetically enthusiastic about his love for food and the people who create it. World Traveler: An Irreverent Guide is a book that I intend to purchase for my permanent collection and one that I imagine will be a great inspiration for my future travels. It is also the ideal book for this moment, when many of us are feeling a deep longing towards travel and planning our post-covid adventures.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    Anthony Bourdain offered a straightforward, sometimes brutally honest outlook on the world and its problems, broadening horizons and having meaningful conversations through the context of travel and food. He had a great ability to capture the essence of a place and to share his experience through an entrancing combination of knowledge, emotion, and dark wit. The world lost a unique voice when he left it. When I heard World Travel: An Irreverent Guide was coming out, I immediately placed my pre-o Anthony Bourdain offered a straightforward, sometimes brutally honest outlook on the world and its problems, broadening horizons and having meaningful conversations through the context of travel and food. He had a great ability to capture the essence of a place and to share his experience through an entrancing combination of knowledge, emotion, and dark wit. The world lost a unique voice when he left it. When I heard World Travel: An Irreverent Guide was coming out, I immediately placed my pre-order, then waited as it was delayed month after month in the midst of the pandemic. When Ecco Press sent me an uncorrected proof, I couldn't wait to get reading. It was a great way to armchair travel when travel has been otherwise hampered by the worldwide pandemic. What you should know before you read this: World Travel is NOT Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly. World Travel was largely compiled after Tony's death and is essentially a collection of quotes from his TV shows, broken down by country, with the addition of information on some of the hotels and restaurants he enjoyed. While not an expose or a novel, I wouldn't really consider it a travel guide either. While I enjoyed reading it cover to cover, I consider this book more of a reference guide. Before traveling somewhere, I may thumb it's pages, turning to the appropriate country and seeing if Tony's recommendations pique my interest and therefore might merit a place on my itinerary. I appreciate the way Tony's assistant (and co-author of the book) Laurie Woolever makes it clear if the words written are Tony's or hers (Tony's are all in blue), and she provides an appendix that cites which TV episodes each of his quotes is taken from. All in all, I enjoyed reading this and am planning to refer back to it for my own travels in the future. Reading the quotes throughout the book made me wish that the future held more books written by Anthony Bourdain, but this one serves as a great reminder of the outsize impact he had. If you're a fan of his writing or his shows, I definitely recommend reading it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Riana Autumn

    This book criss-crosses the world, alphabetically by country, sharing tidbits from the late Anthony Bourdain's travels to that country, as well as logistical information and the occasional essay by a foodie friend who travelled with Bourdain. The book was put together by Laurie Woolever, Anthony Bourdain's long time assistant. Laurie and Tony had a one hour conversation about what this book would look like before he died, so don't mistake this for the last unfinished manuscript by Anthony Bourda This book criss-crosses the world, alphabetically by country, sharing tidbits from the late Anthony Bourdain's travels to that country, as well as logistical information and the occasional essay by a foodie friend who travelled with Bourdain. The book was put together by Laurie Woolever, Anthony Bourdain's long time assistant. Laurie and Tony had a one hour conversation about what this book would look like before he died, so don't mistake this for the last unfinished manuscript by Anthony Bourdain. All of his words in this book are borrowed from his past TV shows and writing. For the most part, I enjoyed this book. I liked being dropped into the different countries and could definitely feel the wanderlust growing and my mouth watering, especially during the section about food in Shanghai. However, if you're a Tony super fan, none of these stories will be new. And if you're not a Tony super fan (like me), you may find some of the stories a bit boring or unnecessarily crass (this book uses the word "prostitutes" more times than a food book should need to). I really disliked the logistical information that was added in. From the top, Laurie explains that this isn't a travel guidebook and you'd be better off buying a real guidebook or using the internet for practical information. But then she adds information about the local airport, how to get into the city and the website for the transit system for every place mentioned. It seemed really useless and took me out of the book completely. Maybe in the paper book this would be easy to skim over, but in the audiobook, it was awful. My favourite parts of this book were actually the essays penned by fellow writers and foodies who travelled with Anthony Bourdain. In my opinion, a collection of these essays would have made for a much better book. They were all original and extremely heartfelt. I particularly liked the story of the bone marrow shooters in Toronto and of a crew member reigniting her love for her culture in South Korea. A quick note on audio VS paper: On the audiobook you can hear the voices of Laurie, the different chefs and, I believe, Anthony Bourdain's brother reading Tony's parts. In the paper copy, there are illustrations. Rating: 3.5/5

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    I am a big fan of Anthony Bourdain. I’ve seen every episode of No Reservations and Top Chef and have recently reread Kitchen Confidential. I was heartbroken when he passed, so when I saw the ARC for a new Bourdain book, I was very excited to read it. Unfortunately, it didn’t surpass my expectations. The main author/editor (Laurie Woolever) says in the beginning of the book that Bourdain and her only met one time to talk about this book before he passed. That’s kind of how the book reads - like i I am a big fan of Anthony Bourdain. I’ve seen every episode of No Reservations and Top Chef and have recently reread Kitchen Confidential. I was heartbroken when he passed, so when I saw the ARC for a new Bourdain book, I was very excited to read it. Unfortunately, it didn’t surpass my expectations. The main author/editor (Laurie Woolever) says in the beginning of the book that Bourdain and her only met one time to talk about this book before he passed. That’s kind of how the book reads - like it is trying to stretch one conversation into an entire book. All (or so it seems) of Bourdain’s quotes in the book are taken from episodes of his shows (No Reservations, The Layover, Parts Unknown), so it’s like a highlight reel of his TV career. Except I would rather just watch the shows than read the dialogue in a book. I didn’t completely dislike this book though. Bourdain’s signature irreverence is definitely present and the tone is reminiscent of his other books. There were some interesting glimpses behind the scenes of his shows which I found fascinating. Friends, colleagues, and family members wrote essays about Bourdain and/or food that were placed throughout the book. I liked that part a lot, especially the one written by his brother, Christopher Bourdain. Each chapter of the book was about a country that Bourdain visited in his travels; there was a bit of Bourdain quotes about the country at the beginning (it read like a narration), then there were transportation directions, and finally a couple restaurants and/or pubs were described with contact info. I especially liked the France and Canada chapters. Laurie Woolever did a thorough job of compiling information, quotes, and essays for this book. I can appreciate the sheer amount of time, energy, and love put into this tribute to Bourdain by his friends and family. This book wasn’t what I was expecting, though, and I was disappointed to see that Buourdain himself had had such a little part in the writing of the book. In the end, I would have loved to read this book as it would have been had Bourdain not passed. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher (Ecco) for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Craig Amason

    This book barely made it to a 3-star rating from me. I love Bourdain and his life's work in reviewing some of the best cuisine on the planet, but I have to agree with the response of many readers on Audible.com about this audiobook. It could have been much better. It would have been nice to hear more of Bourdain's commentary about food, the dining experience, the atmosphere, and even more about the history of the places included in this book, which are listed in alphabetical order -- a little od This book barely made it to a 3-star rating from me. I love Bourdain and his life's work in reviewing some of the best cuisine on the planet, but I have to agree with the response of many readers on Audible.com about this audiobook. It could have been much better. It would have been nice to hear more of Bourdain's commentary about food, the dining experience, the atmosphere, and even more about the history of the places included in this book, which are listed in alphabetical order -- a little odd, but okay. What is so unnecessary in a book like this is travel planning information. The book would have been long enough without it, but more of the rich content and less of the logistics would have been preferable. Oddly enough, the narrator in the introduction warns the listener that this is not a standard travel guide, so don't expect a rundown on all the sights and details about travel. And yet, the book is filled with passages labeled "arrival and getting around," which provide information about airports, transportation, and expenses. How many times does the listener need to hear "tips aren't expected, but rounding up the fair is much appreciated?" This kind of mundane information is at our fingertips now with the Internet and from traditional travel guides like Rick Steves, Lonely Planet, Fodor's, and many others. What saves the book from a 1 or 2-star rating is Bourdain's wonderful and reverential way of describing an exquisite dish. His enthusiasm could make the most squeamish of us ready to bite into brains, tongue, genitals, and other less-traditional parts of cooked animals, and we're not just talking about chickens, cows, and pigs here. What's also admirable about Bourdain's philosophy of food is how he pauses to give more than just a passing glance at franchises like In and Out Burger and Waffle House, which immediately wipes away the snob factor. I think reading the print version of this book would have been a better option because I could have more easily skipped over the irritating content and focused on the good stuff -- the almost-spiritual experience of a wonderful meal and all that comes with it, as only Tony Bourdain could describe it.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dasha Slepenkina

    A big thank-you to NetGalley, the author, and publisher for giving me a copy of this book for an unbiased review. 3.5/5 This book was a delightful sampling of the world's cultures and cuisines, told by Laurie Woolever through Bourdain's quotes and insights. The text is full of detail and information - not only about the best and most iconic dishes around the globe, but also about their history and the history of the people who make them. I especially appreciated the political and historic context A big thank-you to NetGalley, the author, and publisher for giving me a copy of this book for an unbiased review. 3.5/5 This book was a delightful sampling of the world's cultures and cuisines, told by Laurie Woolever through Bourdain's quotes and insights. The text is full of detail and information - not only about the best and most iconic dishes around the globe, but also about their history and the history of the people who make them. I especially appreciated the political and historic context of each section, which introduced not only the flavor of a given country's kitchen, but also the "flavor" of the country itself. I enjoyed the regions selected, which presented a diverse range of cultures. I also felt that I learned a lot about these nations through their food, including information I never learned before. For example, I've never thought of U.S. Southern food as being heavily influenced by West African flavors due to the slave trade. This book really highlights how history, politics, and food are all part of an ever-evolving tapestry shaped by the local community. There are several reasons my review is not higher: - There were errors within the book which made me doubt the facts in other chapters. Most egregious among these was the claim that Croatia is not part of the EU - it is and has been since 2013. It is not a member of the Schengen zone. - Most hotels recommended were at a price range which is obscene for the average reader. I found these recommendations for luxurious hotels somewhat annoying - I get it, Bourdain could afford to stay at very pricey hotels, but the constant references to $400 per night rooms got old fast. - A large portion of the book was dedicated to getting to and from the airport. This information is easily google-able and really not very relevant, as it's subject to frequent change. That being said, I would certainly recommend this book as it's a worthwhile read.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Kowalski

    I liked this book. It was written by someone who worked closely with Tony for almost a decade, and it was made with love. I liked it, but I didn't love it, and I'll tell you why: we are all always going to be disappointed by any new Tony content, simply because it isn't written by him. I'm a huge fan, and have a tattoo to honor his memory. I was excited to read this, but my heart felt heavy when I started it. I couldn't shake the thought of "I just wish this was a new book written by the man him I liked this book. It was written by someone who worked closely with Tony for almost a decade, and it was made with love. I liked it, but I didn't love it, and I'll tell you why: we are all always going to be disappointed by any new Tony content, simply because it isn't written by him. I'm a huge fan, and have a tattoo to honor his memory. I was excited to read this, but my heart felt heavy when I started it. I couldn't shake the thought of "I just wish this was a new book written by the man himself." It's heartbreaking that it's never going to be something we experience again. The book is broken into chapters with how to's for exploring different areas around the world. Each chapter includes quotes from Tony about the atmosphere, history, people, and of course, local chefs and food. The quotes are collected from his various shows and essays he had written. I loved that all direct quotes from Tony are printed in blue and other text is in black, so if you want to skim through travel info and get straight to the meat, it's easy to do. None of the content is "new", in the sense of previously unreleased stuff that was squirreled away. You've probably heard it or read it all before. But it's nice to have his thoughts about various countries and cities collected in one place. It also has a few essays written by people who had interacted with him throughout his life to fill in the gaps, and these essays offer some fun behind the scenes information (there's one about the bone marrow shot luge that I found pretty interesting). This book is gorgeous and something I'm happy to have in my collection. It feels like a strange relic to have on my bookshelf, next to all the books he had written himself. I appreciate the effort and respect that went into putting this book together, and I'd recommend it for anyone who wants to learn a little about the world around them.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Natalie (readswithnatalieb)

    I gave this 3.5 stars! This book is tailored specifically for Anthony Bourdain fans or those who base their vacations on food spots. Either way, you can’t go wrong! But if food isn’t your jam, this book wouldn’t be for you. My fiancé opened up the food loving side of me so since we started dating so we are constantly exploring new restaurants in Atlanta. Or, when we travel, we look for the best hidden gems. This book has exactly that! It features most of the places Bourdain traveled to during his I gave this 3.5 stars! This book is tailored specifically for Anthony Bourdain fans or those who base their vacations on food spots. Either way, you can’t go wrong! But if food isn’t your jam, this book wouldn’t be for you. My fiancé opened up the food loving side of me so since we started dating so we are constantly exploring new restaurants in Atlanta. Or, when we travel, we look for the best hidden gems. This book has exactly that! It features most of the places Bourdain traveled to during his shows. When he traveled to Portugal in 2019, we watched Bourdain’s Lisbon episodes highlighting places he visited to hit all his recommended spots. There is a disclaimer at the beginning that this story that the writing process started with Bourdain, but due to his untimely passing, he didn’t see the book through. As much as I enjoyed the insider scoop of cities, restaurants, travel in general (I mean this book is complete with airport information, taxi fares, etc.), it felt a tad incomplete knowing quotes for specific locations were pulled from other sources. Now, don’t get me wrong, this book is awesome having everything compiled in one, but something about it felt a tad out of place. This guide includes essays from chefs and close friends from across the globe that added nice sentimental touches. To reiterate, I really enjoyed this because traveling and visiting food spots like Bourdain did is a hobby of mine. I will absolutely buy a copy to reference once we are able travel! But if food and travel doesn’t interest you, I think you could pass on this. Think of this as an ode to Bourdain mixed with travel recommendations along with a behind the scenes feel of his shows. Big thank you to Net Galley and Ecco for this ARC!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lais Atilano

    How to write a book without its author? That’s exactly what Laurie Woolever had to do in this ‘irreverent’ travel guide. Although Anthony Bourdain had agreed to work on this book, his untimely death prevented him from actually writing it, leaving Woolever to piece it together with the use of extracts from his tv shows. The choice in design for the book is like an attempt at transparency. Bourdain’s quotes are clearly demarcated in blue/boldface, and there is an appendix at the end that tells us e How to write a book without its author? That’s exactly what Laurie Woolever had to do in this ‘irreverent’ travel guide. Although Anthony Bourdain had agreed to work on this book, his untimely death prevented him from actually writing it, leaving Woolever to piece it together with the use of extracts from his tv shows. The choice in design for the book is like an attempt at transparency. Bourdain’s quotes are clearly demarcated in blue/boldface, and there is an appendix at the end that tells us exactly where they came from, which comes across as a conscious effort from Woolever’s part not to impersonate Tony. “Does the world need this book?”, asks Woolever. Do we need yet another travel guide? Probably not. But if you’re like me, you didn’t watch Bourdain’s tv shows for travel tips. His appeal was his frankness, his eclecticism, and his unique view of the world. As a travel guide, this book has nothing new to offer, nothing that hasn’t already been shown in Bourdain’s shows, at least. Perhaps if he had lived past the conception phase of this book, this would have been a very different book. Perhaps: a mix of possibility and wishful thinking. The best parts of this book are the commissioned essays, written by either people who knew Tony or who encountered him during the production of his shows. They offer a glimpse of the behind the cameras and of the manufactured-reality-for-tv-ness that even Tony could not escape from. You don’t need this book. But if you admired Tony’s work, you might want to have it. It is admittedly not the most comprehensive world guide one could have, but it is beautifully illustrated and it does offer some of Bourdain’s unique worldview — even if you seen it before.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Adriana

    I'm perfectly aware that I'm rating this book fueled by wistfulness for the voice of a man who always showed the best of the world and its food. Because I would have probably not even finished reading it if almost any other name were attached to this 'travel guide'. It began as a nugget of an idea and several hours of initial planning and discussion between Bourdain and Laurie Woolever, a writer/editor who had collaborated with Bourdain on previous books, a year before Bourdain's passing. Sadly, I'm perfectly aware that I'm rating this book fueled by wistfulness for the voice of a man who always showed the best of the world and its food. Because I would have probably not even finished reading it if almost any other name were attached to this 'travel guide'. It began as a nugget of an idea and several hours of initial planning and discussion between Bourdain and Laurie Woolever, a writer/editor who had collaborated with Bourdain on previous books, a year before Bourdain's passing. Sadly, laying out what places he wanted to talk about and giving a general idea of what to talk about in each place seems to be his only contribution. This is more of a greatest hits journal of Bourdain's travels over the many years of making television. It's laid out by country and city and it does give you basic information on how to get somewhere and move around once there, but the bulk of the book is mostly quotes taken directly from the shows. Things an avid binger of No Reservations, The Layover, and Parts Unknown already knows. One of the things that flesh out the page count are essays from people he traveled with. These are the parts that I found most interesting. I would read an entire book of nothing but fellow chefs, family members, fixers, and collaborators writing about the experience of visiting places with someone as enthusiastic (albeit grumpily) about visiting places and eating well. Overall, it's not actually a travel guide (irreverent or not) and it's not really a Bourdain book beyond being a collection of his quotes, but it does remind a fan of how great visiting parts unknown and having no reservations about eating there is a great way to live.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Brooke Stouffer

    REVIEW: “World Travel: An Irreverent Guide” by Anthony Bourdain and Laurie Woolever Thank you to @eccobooks @netgalley and the authors for giving me this eARC copy of “World Travel” in exchange for an honest review. WORLD TRAVEL is part travel guide, part history, and part a monument to the late travel and food writer/tv persona Anthony Bourdain. It takes you through countries that Bourdain traveled to during his life and includes quotes from his various tv shows intermingled with a brief history REVIEW: “World Travel: An Irreverent Guide” by Anthony Bourdain and Laurie Woolever Thank you to @eccobooks @netgalley and the authors for giving me this eARC copy of “World Travel” in exchange for an honest review. WORLD TRAVEL is part travel guide, part history, and part a monument to the late travel and food writer/tv persona Anthony Bourdain. It takes you through countries that Bourdain traveled to during his life and includes quotes from his various tv shows intermingled with a brief history of the areas, descriptions of how to get to the areas mentioned, and restaurants that were featured in the show (both vivid and drool-worthy descriptions of the food, as well as a “where are they now”). I grew up watching NO RESERVATIONS and I’ve read some of Bourdain’s books. As a teen, he was definitely one of the figures that gave me a travel bug. It was really great to see one last book from him, finished by Laurie Woolever. I loved when I could recognize quotes from the show in the book, and it was cool to see what restaurants were still around in 2021, and more specifically, how we could get to the areas. Tips about hotels and transportation were included, and are super helpful especially for international travel. During a time when travel isn’t exactly happening for a lot of us, it was nice to cozy up with this book and imagine that I was going to the restaurants and hotels that were described. I think that this would be a great gift for a friend, or yourself, if they/you are experiencing some wanderlust and need something to look forward to for the future! WORLD TRAVEL comes out April 20th, 2021!

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