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The Three Locks

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A heatwave melts London as Holmes and Watson are called to action in this new Sherlock Holmes adventure by Bonnie MacBird, author of "one of the best Sherlock Holmes novels of recent memory." In the West End, a renowned Italian escape artist dies spectacularly on stage during a performance – immolated in a gleaming copper cauldron of his wife's design. In Cambridge, the ru A heatwave melts London as Holmes and Watson are called to action in this new Sherlock Holmes adventure by Bonnie MacBird, author of "one of the best Sherlock Holmes novels of recent memory." In the West End, a renowned Italian escape artist dies spectacularly on stage during a performance – immolated in a gleaming copper cauldron of his wife's design. In Cambridge, the runaway daughter of a famous don is found drowned, her long blonde hair tangled in the Jesus Lock on the River Cam. And in Baker Street, a mysterious locksmith exacts an unusual price to open a small silver box sent to Watson. From the glow of London's theatre district to the buzzing Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge where physicists explore the edges of the new science of electricity, Holmes and Watson race between the two cities to solve the murders, encountering prevaricating prestidigitators, philandering physicists and murderous mentalists, all the while unlocking secrets which may be best left undisclosed. And one, in particular, is very close to home.


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A heatwave melts London as Holmes and Watson are called to action in this new Sherlock Holmes adventure by Bonnie MacBird, author of "one of the best Sherlock Holmes novels of recent memory." In the West End, a renowned Italian escape artist dies spectacularly on stage during a performance – immolated in a gleaming copper cauldron of his wife's design. In Cambridge, the ru A heatwave melts London as Holmes and Watson are called to action in this new Sherlock Holmes adventure by Bonnie MacBird, author of "one of the best Sherlock Holmes novels of recent memory." In the West End, a renowned Italian escape artist dies spectacularly on stage during a performance – immolated in a gleaming copper cauldron of his wife's design. In Cambridge, the runaway daughter of a famous don is found drowned, her long blonde hair tangled in the Jesus Lock on the River Cam. And in Baker Street, a mysterious locksmith exacts an unusual price to open a small silver box sent to Watson. From the glow of London's theatre district to the buzzing Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge where physicists explore the edges of the new science of electricity, Holmes and Watson race between the two cities to solve the murders, encountering prevaricating prestidigitators, philandering physicists and murderous mentalists, all the while unlocking secrets which may be best left undisclosed. And one, in particular, is very close to home.

30 review for The Three Locks

  1. 4 out of 5

    Paromjit

    Bonnie MacBird gives us another delightful entry in her Victorian historical series featuring Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson, set in the sweltering London and Cambridge of 1887. There are many who have resurrected the genius detective, but MacBird's remarkable attention to detail, and skilful characterisations of the famous duo and their relationship, makes this series a real favourite. The theme of locks, three locks to be precise, drive this addition. The first lock is a personal affair for the Bonnie MacBird gives us another delightful entry in her Victorian historical series featuring Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson, set in the sweltering London and Cambridge of 1887. There are many who have resurrected the genius detective, but MacBird's remarkable attention to detail, and skilful characterisations of the famous duo and their relationship, makes this series a real favourite. The theme of locks, three locks to be precise, drive this addition. The first lock is a personal affair for the 35 year old Watson, an ex-military doctor, burdened with a traumatic family history that still haunts him, his mother and sister, Rose, both died by drowning when he was young. He receives a mysterious package from an apologetic Aunt Elspeth Carnachan that he has never been aware of, his mother had instructed her to give it to him when he reached 21 years of age. Watson is furious that Elspeth had forgotten all about it until now, what is even more intriguing is that it has a complex lock that defeats almost all locksmiths. This poses the question as to what could be so important that his mother had taken such unusual levels of protection to ensure the safety and secrecy of the contents? It is going to take the input of Holmes and his extensive knowledge of locksmiths in London for Watson to become acquainted with deeply buried family truths. The strikingly unforgettable Mrs Ilaria Bolleri, comes to Sherlock to get him to uncover the truth of the conflict between her husband, the Italian escape artist, The Great Borelli, and her old beau, a magician and mindreader. A lovelorn Catholic Deacon from Cambridge, Peregrine Buttons, who wants Holmes to find the beautiful missing Odelia Wyndham, a clever if casually cruel woman, with a number of suitors. The Great Borelli is horrifically burned in front of an audience in a multiple locked bathysphere named The Cauldron of Death, and Odelia is discovered murdered at the Jesus Lock on the River Cam. Could there possibly be a connection between the two events? In these most twisted and complicated of cases involving strong passions, Holmes is determined to see truth and justice served despite the numerous obstacles that stand in his path, ably assisted by the faithful Watson. This is a terrific read, wonderfully entertaining and engaging, that will appeal to the many fans of Conan Doyle's famous detective and all those who love Victorian historical crime fiction. Many thanks to HarperCollins UK for an ARC.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nicola

    I am a huge lover of the Sherlock Holmes stories and adore the Arthur Conan Doyle’s originals, and I do love when new Holmes and Watson’s stories are written (when done well). They can either be fantastic or a bit of a flop I find, depending on how well the author portrays the characters and story, and this one was most definitely fantastic. I loved it! This was the perfect example of a new Holmes story done well! I got into the story straight away, with a mystery from the get go to get your teet I am a huge lover of the Sherlock Holmes stories and adore the Arthur Conan Doyle’s originals, and I do love when new Holmes and Watson’s stories are written (when done well). They can either be fantastic or a bit of a flop I find, depending on how well the author portrays the characters and story, and this one was most definitely fantastic. I loved it! This was the perfect example of a new Holmes story done well! I got into the story straight away, with a mystery from the get go to get your teeth into. It had all the feels of the original stories and I loved how both Sherlock and John were written. I’ll never tire of Sherlocks shenanigans and there were many here! Some so so funny and so true to character. I loved the humour and all the Sherlock-isms in this book. It was definitely an addicting story and I couldn’t put it down. The interactions between Holmes and Watson were great to read and the development of the story as it unravelled had me intrigued. There were several cases running alongside each other in this story however I didn’t find them hard to follow or get mixed up or confused at any point, which can easily happen with more than one case on the go! I love how each one concluded and the outcome and deductions Sherlock deduced was as amazing and clever as ever. I could read a million of these stories. It was a very entertaining book and one that any a Sherlock Holmes fan will enjoy. I definitely did! I was lucky enough to read this with thanks to the author and publishers on NetGalley to give an honest review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Stoolfire

    I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. The Three Locks (A Sherlock Holmes Adventure #4) by Bonnie MacBird hit all the right notes for me and may be (along with the second and third installments of this series) one of my favorite reads of 2021 so far. Bonnie MacBird does a marvelous job of bringing Holmes, Watson, and their world to life. Her style feels quite authentic to Arthur Conan Doyle's original characters while still keeping her take fresh. This series just keep I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. The Three Locks (A Sherlock Holmes Adventure #4) by Bonnie MacBird hit all the right notes for me and may be (along with the second and third installments of this series) one of my favorite reads of 2021 so far. Bonnie MacBird does a marvelous job of bringing Holmes, Watson, and their world to life. Her style feels quite authentic to Arthur Conan Doyle's original characters while still keeping her take fresh. This series just keeps getting better and better. I'm so happy to see that there's going to be a fifth installment called The Serpent Under. I can't wait to get my hands on it. If you're a fan of Jeremy Brett and Robert Downey Jr. as Holmes and David Burke and Jude Law as Watson with just a dash of Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman, I have a feeling you'll get a kick out of this series.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    I am an avid fan of Sherlock Holmes and his many adventures with Watson. I am fascinated with the inner workings of his mind and the quick ability he applies to observing and more-so, comprehending a scene or person within a matter of seconds. I am always intrigued to read new adventures of the dynamic duo by other writers and see how they approach such a daunting task. As is customary with a Sherlock Holmes adventure, the reader is greeted by Dr. John Watson who is famous for not only accompany I am an avid fan of Sherlock Holmes and his many adventures with Watson. I am fascinated with the inner workings of his mind and the quick ability he applies to observing and more-so, comprehending a scene or person within a matter of seconds. I am always intrigued to read new adventures of the dynamic duo by other writers and see how they approach such a daunting task. As is customary with a Sherlock Holmes adventure, the reader is greeted by Dr. John Watson who is famous for not only accompanying Holmes on his cases but also retelling their accounts to the public. The year is 1887 and the reader finds themselves sweating profusely as a heatwave in September melts London. There is no time to waste as Holmes and Watson quickly find themselves on not just one new case, but three. Madame Borelli the wife of Dario, a widely acclaimed escape artist comes to Holmes with a severed human finger in fear that her husband’s life is in danger. Just as Holmes begins to investigate the case, Deacon Buttons, a man of the cloth has traveled from Cambridge and is in desperate need of Holmes’ skills. He fears for the life Odelia Ann Wyndham, the daughter of a famous don. And on this very same morning Watson receives a mystical locked box that contains a secret from his past that has been kept hidden from him for years. MacBird applies all the essential ingredients that conjure a classic Holmes story. There is the mystery and suspense as you attempt to follow the bread crumbs in hopes of solving the crime yourself. But alas this is Holmes we are dealing with and it is a matter of observing what others often overlook, looking for the finer details that will lead us to the culprit. There are also plenty of red herrings thrown in that will misdirect you into thinking you have it all sussed. That’s the beauty of a Holmes story, just when you think you’ve worked it out the carpet is suddenly pulled out from under you and TA-DA you’re back to square one. The relationship between Holmes and Watson is always a interesting one to read. Apart from the exciting new cases that approach them, their relationship and camaraderie is what makes reading a Sherlock Holmes story such a captivating, surreal experience. Both characters are highly intelligent and educated in their fields and require the other’s skills more than they care to admit. As is classic with Holmes he is often perceived as cold and unemotional, always being ahead of Watson and surprising him with his conclusions. Holmes sees Watson as blank page meaning he is free to accompany him on cases. It is one of the things that he treasures about him. Watson admires Holmes’ vast knowledge that is always expanding and how he is able to see what others can not. However I felt MacBird allowed at times to show a small vulnerability in Holmes with his relationship to Watson. It is only shown for mere seconds but you are reminded that Holmes is a human with emotions, ones he keeps locked up and hidden along with his personal history. I also enjoyed diving into Watson’s past and learning about his childhood. It was an unexpected twist that sent chills down my spine. The contrast with the scorching heatwave and dash to solve the cases entwined beautifully together. I could feel the sweat dripping off the page as my heart pounded in my chest for answers. It was intense and I found myself downing ice cold lemonade after lemonade to keep hydrated. I give A Sherlock Holmes Adventure The Three Locks By Bonnie MacBird a Four out of Five paw rating. I was on tenterhooks as the pair raced between cases in an attempt to save more than one life. There are plenty of twists and turns that keep you on the edge of your seat. It’s addictive reading, I was hooked and couldn’t put it down until I knew everything! MacBird respected the original source material which these two legends are built upon but also added her own twist and brought a new refreshing adventure that would easily slot beside the classics.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ceecee

    It’s September 1887 and Dr Watson is sweltering in the heat of an Indian Summer. He receives a strange small box his mother entrusted many years ago to a lady who claims she is his aunt. The box is impossible to open. Meanwhile, Holmes is as ever learning new (if not bizarre!) skills which link to the Barelli stage act and later to a consultation concerning, yes, locks! The final lock is Jesus Lock in Cambridge where a doll is found floating in the water belonging to Odelia Wyndham which seems t It’s September 1887 and Dr Watson is sweltering in the heat of an Indian Summer. He receives a strange small box his mother entrusted many years ago to a lady who claims she is his aunt. The box is impossible to open. Meanwhile, Holmes is as ever learning new (if not bizarre!) skills which link to the Barelli stage act and later to a consultation concerning, yes, locks! The final lock is Jesus Lock in Cambridge where a doll is found floating in the water belonging to Odelia Wyndham which seems to be a warning of some kind ..... This is the fourth in this really good series which is written so cleverly in the style and spirit of the original Conan Doyle books. The author captures the lead characters perfectly with the long suffering Mrs Hudson putting up with a great deal! There’s a lot going on in this one with parallel investigations which works really well. I really like the magic show element especially as this was a very popular form of entertainment in Victorian times. Of course, Holmes brings his own marvellously individual and observant eye to the proceedings. The storytelling is lively, colourful and atmospheric, it’s amusing in places especially the repartee between Holmes and Watson. The late Victorian era is depicted extremely well and I like how it includes a couple of female characters who, though very unpleasant, show the beginning of the trend of ‘bold women’ who want freedom and independence from the restraints of society’s expectations. There is quite a plethora of unpleasant, rude, imperious and arrogant characters but they do provide for interesting storytelling. So, we have locks, magic acts, trickery, illusion, science and one independent woman who has an abundance of ardent suitors, murder and mayhem, a large suspect pool, mistaken identity, set ups and self preservation. The busy and intriguing plot takes us from London to Cambridge where the intrepid and suspicious pair try to sift through the professional and personal jealousies, volatile temperaments and arrogance, cast their beady eyes over macabre warnings to try to solve intriguing puzzles. It leads to some dramatic and colourful scenes and inevitably given his incisiveness , Holmes succeeds in unlocking all in a surprising conclusion. Overall, another intriguing and worthy addition to the Bonnie MacBird Holmes and Watson series. With thanks to NetGalley and Harper Collins, Harper Fiction for the arc in return for an honest review.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

    The first of the titular “three locks” in this book appears in the form of a mysterious box sent to Dr. John Watson by an aunt of whom he had previously been unaware. It had been his mother's and she had requested that it be given to him on his 21st birthday, now years in the past. The trick lock on the box, however, renders its secret inaccessible for the present. Secondly, his colleague and friend Sherlock Holmes is approached by the wife of an Italian escape artist, The Great Borelli, who beg The first of the titular “three locks” in this book appears in the form of a mysterious box sent to Dr. John Watson by an aunt of whom he had previously been unaware. It had been his mother's and she had requested that it be given to him on his 21st birthday, now years in the past. The trick lock on the box, however, renders its secret inaccessible for the present. Secondly, his colleague and friend Sherlock Holmes is approached by the wife of an Italian escape artist, The Great Borelli, who begs him to discover the truth behind a feud between her husband and another magician. Borelli comes close to death that same night when Holmes and Watson attend his show and one of his acts goes horribly wrong. Finally, Peregrine Buttons, a young Catholic deacon, asks Holmes to discover the whereabouts of a missing young woman, the strong-willed Odilie (Dillie) Wyndham, who has disappeared from her father’s home in Cambridge. The “lock” in this case is the Jesus Lock on the River Cam, which will play a crucial part in the story later on. How are these mysteries connected, if indeed they are? Holmes skillfully juggles the two cases, in both of which lives are at stake and in both of which, if loss of life can be considered failure, he fails despite his best efforts, but, as in many of the original stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, he succeeds to the extent that some justice is achieved. The final mystery, that of the locked box, is also solved at the end, giving us some knowledge of events in Watson’s past and how they have affected his subsequent life. The Three Locks is the fourth in a series of Sherlock Holmes pastiches by Ms. MacBird, but the first I have read. However, I did not feel lost or confused in any way, which may be a benefit of reading a book, even out of order, that is set in a much larger fictional world. At first, I didn’t care for the somewhat testy - even rude - way in which the relationship between Holmes and Watson is presented, although there is some comedy in it, but eventually I felt that the author hit her stride. I will certainly seek out the other books in the series in the hope that they are as enjoyable as this one was. I received a copy of The Three Locks for free from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    John

    It is the summer of 1887 and London is in the grips of a stifling heat wave when Watson receive a mysterious and long delayed package from his deceased mother. It is a beautifully engraved silver box with a lock so complex that not even the best locksmith can open it without the original key. The mystery of this box is not solved until the end and the story provides a look into the childhood of Dr. Watson and to his character. This is first of the three locks in the title of the fourth book in a It is the summer of 1887 and London is in the grips of a stifling heat wave when Watson receive a mysterious and long delayed package from his deceased mother. It is a beautifully engraved silver box with a lock so complex that not even the best locksmith can open it without the original key. The mystery of this box is not solved until the end and the story provides a look into the childhood of Dr. Watson and to his character. This is first of the three locks in the title of the fourth book in author Bonnie MacBird’s marvelous Sherlock Holmes series. The second lock arrives with the fiery and beautiful Ilaria Borelli, the wife of Italian escape artist The Great Borelli, who demands Holmes help in settling a feud between her husband and her former beau, another magician and mind reader. This leads Holmes and Watson to the London stages where the Great Borelli performs his Houdini like magic act. While still involved in this investigation Holmes is also approached by a young Catholic Deacon who requests Holmes help in finding one of his parishioners, Dillie Wyndham, a young woman who has gone missing. The deacon had found a childhood doll of hers floating in the Jesus Lock of the River Cam at Cambridge University. This is the third lock of the story. The doll is disfigured, and it is feared that this indicates that Dillie will come to harm. This leads Holmes and Watson to the famous university where they find her family strangely unsympathetic to the missing girl. Dillie is a strong-willed and impetuous young woman who has two fiancés fighting over her, and a jealous sister. This provides plenty of suspects who might want to do her harm. The author does an excellent job of portraying the time period and capturing the feel of the Conan-Doyle characters and stories. The interplay between Holmes and Watson is well done and often amusing. I really enjoyed the behind the scenes look into the world of magic, as well as the look into the unusual and competitive world of Cambridge University. Anyone who enjoys Sherlock Holmes tales or Victorian mysteries will enjoy this book. I received an advance copy of The Three Locks for free from the publisher Harper Collins via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    C.P. Lesley

    Sherlock Holmes is one of the rare literary characters who has achieved a kind of cultural immortality. As Bonnie MacBird notes in this interview, display an image of a deerstalker hat and a pipe almost anywhere in the world, and people can identify the great detective without a second thought. So is it any wonder that an entire industry is devoted to expanding the Conan Doyle canon? Not all these attempts succeed, but MacBird’s novels are a gem. The Three Locks, fourth in her series and set in 1 Sherlock Holmes is one of the rare literary characters who has achieved a kind of cultural immortality. As Bonnie MacBird notes in this interview, display an image of a deerstalker hat and a pipe almost anywhere in the world, and people can identify the great detective without a second thought. So is it any wonder that an entire industry is devoted to expanding the Conan Doyle canon? Not all these attempts succeed, but MacBird’s novels are a gem. The Three Locks, fourth in her series and set in 1887, opens with a mysterious package delivered to Dr. John Watson. London is in the midst of a heat wave, Watson’s friend Holmes has withdrawn in one of his periodic funks, and the package offers the rather disgruntled doctor a welcome distraction. Its appeal increases when Watson discovers that it contains an engraved silver box sent by his father’s half-sister, an aunt he didn’t know he had, and represents his mother’s last gift to him. But as he struggles to unlock the box, Holmes appears, warning of danger. Watson’s drive to prove Holmes wrong (he rejects his friend’s suggestion that the aunt’s letter may be a forgery and the lock designed to cause harm) must compete with the demands of two other cases. The wife of an escape artist requests help in protecting her husband from an angry rival, her former lover—a case that becomes more urgent when the escape artist’s most dramatic stunt goes awry, leading to murder. Then the rebellious daughter of a Cambridge don goes missing, to the great distress of the local deacon who has unwisely fallen in love with her. Holmes initially dismisses the second case, although he takes a personal interest in the first. But when a doll made to resemble the young woman is found in the Jesus Lock on the Cam River, with a broken arm and an illegible threat written in purple ink on its cloth chest, the hunt is on, for both the don’s daughter and the person who wishes her harm. In time, it becomes clear that the two cases are connected—and that Holmes must defeat not only a cunning villain but the over-zealous local police. Interview with the author at New Books in Historical Fiction.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Darius Ostrowski

    “The Three Locks” by Bonnie MacBird takes us to London during the sweltering summer of 1887, specifically to 221B Baker Street, the residence of Sherlock Holmes and his associate Dr. John Watson. As referred to in the title, there are three stories interwoven in this book, each of them features a lock of one sort or another. A stage magician’s wife comes to Holmes to ask him to look into a rivalry between her husband and her ex, both magicians, that’s spinning out of control. Madame Borelli invi “The Three Locks” by Bonnie MacBird takes us to London during the sweltering summer of 1887, specifically to 221B Baker Street, the residence of Sherlock Holmes and his associate Dr. John Watson. As referred to in the title, there are three stories interwoven in this book, each of them features a lock of one sort or another. A stage magician’s wife comes to Holmes to ask him to look into a rivalry between her husband and her ex, both magicians, that’s spinning out of control. Madame Borelli invites Holmes to the performance, where her husband barely escapes with his life. As Holmes investigates this rivalry, another stage accident (featuring a hidden lock) turns this into a case of murder. A deacon from Cambridge provides us with the second mystery – one of his parishioners, a young lady with whom he is obviously infatuated with, has disappeared. Holmes and Watson travel to Cambridge only to be rebuffed by the family, it seems that Odilie “Dillie” Wyndham has disappeared before and indeed will disappear again before the story is over. Being pursued by three suitors, Dillie plays a dangerous game, one that results in a murder featuring the Jesus Lock on the River Cam. The third lock is a personal one for John Watson – a puzzle box from his long-dead mother is delivered many decades later than planned. Holmes and Watson need to find a locksmith that could open the box without destroying the contents. What could have Watson’s mother sent him two days before her death? I have not read Arthur Conan Doyle’s stories in several decades, but it seems that Ms. MacBird does a fantastic job of being faithful to the canon, making Victorian England come alive. She focuses on the relationship between Holmes and Watson, which was always a critical part of the stories, while also providing loads of action and suspense. I have not read the three previous Sherlock books Ms. MacBird has written, but they are going on my to-read list. I requested and received a free advanced electronic copy from Harper 360 / Collins Crime Club via NetGalley. Thank you!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    The Three Locks by Bonnie MacBird is a Sherlock Holmes and Dr. John Watson novel. To my way of thinking, MacBird is one of the better Holmes' novels working today. The story was good with two mysteries and only a very brief overlap, with a small personal one as well, just to keep the story moving. Dr. Watson had just returned from Bath after a well-earned ten-day holiday to discover Holmes hanging upside down trussed up in a straitjacket, attempting to free himself. He had seen a Magician do it The Three Locks by Bonnie MacBird is a Sherlock Holmes and Dr. John Watson novel. To my way of thinking, MacBird is one of the better Holmes' novels working today. The story was good with two mysteries and only a very brief overlap, with a small personal one as well, just to keep the story moving. Dr. Watson had just returned from Bath after a well-earned ten-day holiday to discover Holmes hanging upside down trussed up in a straitjacket, attempting to free himself. He had seen a Magician do it and was now challenging himself. What was required was that he dislocates a shoulder to accomplish his task, which he did and landed on his feet. After a thorough scolding by Watson, Holmes demonstrated that he could put it back in his socket by himself. Shortly after, the wife of the magician arrived to request help from the great Holmes. It seems the rivalry between her husband and he former lover, another magician, was getting out of hand. Well, so she thought at the time, but it got so much worse. Shortly a young deacon from Cambridge also made an appearance with concerns about a young parishioner. Much to do. Much to do. Homes is most like himself in these books as his drug habit is front and center, as his reliance on his friendship with Watson. He isn't able to keep crimes from happening, sadly, but he is able to solve them once they have happened. The mysteries are intense but easily solvable for a mind like Holmes'. He is quick to action, often bearing the police to the witness or suspect, or even the crime. It is supremely enjoyable to watch him work as he searches for clues and parses whose he finds. Watson is often clueless as to Holmes' though process but is available to lend his expertise where it is required. Very satisfying dose of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. John Watson. I recommend it. I was invited to read a free ARC of The Three Locks by Netgalley. All thoughts and opinions are my own. #netgalley #thethreelocks

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jane Turner

    I read The Three Locks as part of a Blog Tour by Random Things. I received a free copy of the hardcover. I’ve got a confession to make; I’ve never read any Conan Doyle, never read an original Holmes book. Oh, I’ve seem loads of the films, including those with “definitive Sherlock Holmes”, Basil Rathbone – but I’ve never read a Holmes book. But The Three Locks is exactly how I imagine them to be. And I love the cover art! The book starts with a note from the author about how a mysterious ‘Lydia’ deli I read The Three Locks as part of a Blog Tour by Random Things. I received a free copy of the hardcover. I’ve got a confession to make; I’ve never read any Conan Doyle, never read an original Holmes book. Oh, I’ve seem loads of the films, including those with “definitive Sherlock Holmes”, Basil Rathbone – but I’ve never read a Holmes book. But The Three Locks is exactly how I imagine them to be. And I love the cover art! The book starts with a note from the author about how a mysterious ‘Lydia’ delivered a cache of previously unpublished tales written by Dr Watson – setting the tone for what’s to follow. The characterisations are strong and seem perfectly aligned to the original. Holmes is spontaneous, arrogant and overbearing, and his antics are fraught with danger and comedy in equal measure. Watson is at once exasperated, mystified by, and inspired by his friend. Mrs Hudson the housekeeper is there, as is Inspector Lastrade. This has everything one would expect from a Holmes story. “An object is frequently not seen, from not knowing how to see it, rather than from any defect of the organ of vision.” – Charles Babbage. The Three Locks of the title are; a lock used by an escape artist in a stage show, a canal lock, used to take boats up/downhill; a lock on a memory box from John Watson’s mother, which is devilishly difficult to open. And, though the mysteries we read here are separate and distinct, they link together very well. Ms MacBird evocatively captures the era, location and characterisations perfectly. She’s done her research – that’s for sure. The writing is smooth and fluid, the dialogue perfect, and the fact checking is spot on. (And, yes, if you’re wondering, there was ‘flash powder’ of the kind used by photographers – it was invented in 1887 and still very new.) I thoroughly enjoyed this one. Bonnie MacBird’s recreated some of the most famous and best loved characters in literature – and done it fantastically well.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Annie

    Originally posted on my blog: Nonstop Reader. The Three Locks is the fourth book in Bonnie Macbird's new Sherlock Holmes Adventures. Due out 13th April 2021 from Harper Collins on the Harper360 imprint, it's 432 pages and will be available in hardcover, audio, and ebook formats (ebook available now). It's worth noting that the ebook format has a handy interactive table of contents as well as interactive links and references throughout. I've really become enamored of ebooks with interactive fo Originally posted on my blog: Nonstop Reader. The Three Locks is the fourth book in Bonnie Macbird's new Sherlock Holmes Adventures. Due out 13th April 2021 from Harper Collins on the Harper360 imprint, it's 432 pages and will be available in hardcover, audio, and ebook formats (ebook available now). It's worth noting that the ebook format has a handy interactive table of contents as well as interactive links and references throughout. I've really become enamored of ebooks with interactive formats lately. This is another strong entry it a very well crafted series with meticulous attention to detail and a truly impressive ability to channel the detail and characterizations of the canonical Holmes and Watson. The three locks of the title are a clever play on words and refer to literal lock & key type fastenings and one of the channel locks (for boats) on the River Cam. The author has such a wonderful way with descriptive prose and the plot arc is very well controlled and the story itself is engaging and compelling. I stayed up way too late reading this one. The climax, denouement, and resolution are deftly handled. I really couldn't find any problems with any parts of the story or continuity. I enjoyed this story and I suspect that most Holmesians will find enough here to keep them entertained. The story is written around a framework of real historical occurrences and the author provides a link in the book to annotations and historical notes which are well worth a read. Five stars. Delightful to see Holmes and Watson in fighting form. Disclosure: I received an ARC at no cost from the author/publisher for review purposes.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    Note: the below will contain minimal spoilers - I have avoided referencing entire plots or naming characters, but do talk about both in vaguer terms. Having read the author's previous books, I'm happy to find out that the characterisation in The Three Locks has stayed as amazing as ever - both in regards to Holmes and Watson, and to the two main female characters, the locksmith and the victim of the magicians' case. I have also greatly enjoyed the author's style of writing - fast paced, action-pa Note: the below will contain minimal spoilers - I have avoided referencing entire plots or naming characters, but do talk about both in vaguer terms. Having read the author's previous books, I'm happy to find out that the characterisation in The Three Locks has stayed as amazing as ever - both in regards to Holmes and Watson, and to the two main female characters, the locksmith and the victim of the magicians' case. I have also greatly enjoyed the author's style of writing - fast paced, action-packed and with many witty lines thrown in. I guess what stops me from giving a 5/5 is that this isn't a much longer book - firstly these amazing characters really leave us a bit too soon - they get us hooked during their brief interactions with the famous duo and then disappear abruptly as the plot unfolds. There is also a lot going on behind the scenes that maybe could benefit from being addressed more directly, such as a plan to elope that is only mentioned again when it reportedly failed, the unrevealed fate of the treacherous sister and the sadistic father who was only unmasked around the end, or how due revenge (or self-preservation) has been exerted upon a certain someone. It is another regret of mine to not see more of the good doctor reflecting upon his childhood life to re-examine the causes of his family tragedies, knowing that such tragedies are supposed to feature heavily in the book (though, understandably, with how fast things develop it is hard for Watson to spare much time on this). And lastly the biggest thing is that I would also have really loved to see more of the Holmes!torture stuff that, frankly, was my very favourite when reading the previous books (yes I'm a monster :)). Despite these, I still think this is the best pastiche I have read in a while even based on characterisation and pacing alone, and really appreciate such a great read to pass time during Easter. My commendations to the author; and I really can't wait to read the next release in the series.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bethany Swafford

    London is the grips of an intense heatwave in the late summer of 1887. Watson receives a strange silver box in the mail that appears to have no key. An Italian escape artists experiences problems with his performance and his wife demands the Holmes prove her former lover be cleared of suspicion. A young lady runs away from home, leaving her father strangely unconcerned. As these cases intertwine, locks play on an important part as Holmes and Watson race to find the answer. I am always delighted w London is the grips of an intense heatwave in the late summer of 1887. Watson receives a strange silver box in the mail that appears to have no key. An Italian escape artists experiences problems with his performance and his wife demands the Holmes prove her former lover be cleared of suspicion. A young lady runs away from home, leaving her father strangely unconcerned. As these cases intertwine, locks play on an important part as Holmes and Watson race to find the answer. I am always delighted when I find a Sherlock Holmes novel that closely mimics the original characters and the spirit of the original stories. I found it in this book. The author does a marvelous job of writing a plot, dialogue, and characterization much like Sir Arthur Conan Doyle first wrote so long ago. Though I will admit I had my suspicions about a character soon after he was introduced, most of the mysteries are laid out in a way that kept me guessing. Clues are scattered through the story and come together in a satisfying way. I was kept glued to the narrative from page to page to find out just how everything connected. The story is filled with colorful, memorable characters. The atmosphere of the year, with the oppressive heat, is excellent as well. The writing is reminiscent of Doyle's work, as I mentioned before. My only concern would be that I didn't realize that this is the fourth in a series. There are details that obviously come from earlier books that influence choices, such as Watson's mother drowning, and that Watson had a twin sister, Rose, who...also drowned. This isn't necessarily a bad thing, but it was unexpected. I'm going to have to find the first three books, but I would recommend this one to readers looking for a new Sherlock Holmes adventure. I received a free copy from NetGalley and all opinions expressed are my own.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Carol Evans

    The Three Locks is the fourth in MacBird’s Sherlock series, but can be read as a stand-alone. She puts her own spin on the classic characters and she brings the era to life well. The story begins with Dr. Watson receiving a mysterious box, supposedly from his mother, who has been dead for many years. It’s locked with the first of the three locks, a lock no one can open and for which Watson doesn’t have the key. Soon, Sherlock and Watson are approached by the first client, the wife of an Italian es The Three Locks is the fourth in MacBird’s Sherlock series, but can be read as a stand-alone. She puts her own spin on the classic characters and she brings the era to life well. The story begins with Dr. Watson receiving a mysterious box, supposedly from his mother, who has been dead for many years. It’s locked with the first of the three locks, a lock no one can open and for which Watson doesn’t have the key. Soon, Sherlock and Watson are approached by the first client, the wife of an Italian escape artist. She wants him to discover the truth behind the feud between her husband, The Great Borelli, and a rival magician. That night, one of Borelli’s acts goes wrong. He escapes, but barely. So, the second lock is involved in the magic tricks. Another client presents the third lock. Peregrine Buttons, a young Catholic deacon, asks Holmes to find a missing young woman, the strong-willed Odilie Wyndham, who has disappeared from her father’s home in Cambridge. Her doll was found in the Jesus Lock on the River Cam and it seems Odilie might be in danger. Sherlock as always finds clues the police miss, saving innocent people from being charged with murder. Both cases were interesting and had several twists. Sherlock and Watson make a good team as usual, and the supporting characters are nicely rounded out, including a couple of women who are not content with the strictures Victorian society places on them. I could have done without some of the wandering into Watson’s past, but that’s just me – apparently I don’t really want my detective’s, or side-kick’s, personal lives to take up too much space in the story. I admit that I enjoy most Sherlock adaptations, but this series is one of the best, in my opinion.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Shelley

    Oh but I adored this novel. It is the first time I have encountered Bonnie’s Sherlock Holmes and I have to say she manages to capture this famed character and Conan Doyle’s Victorian Britain brilliantly. Being a fan of the crime and mystery genre I always look forward to escaping into a thrilling tale and I just love watching and reading any Holmes and Watson adventure that may grace books or film/tv. For me, opening Bonnie’s contribution to this canon of work felt just like returning to an old Oh but I adored this novel. It is the first time I have encountered Bonnie’s Sherlock Holmes and I have to say she manages to capture this famed character and Conan Doyle’s Victorian Britain brilliantly. Being a fan of the crime and mystery genre I always look forward to escaping into a thrilling tale and I just love watching and reading any Holmes and Watson adventure that may grace books or film/tv. For me, opening Bonnie’s contribution to this canon of work felt just like returning to an old friend. It was just wonderful. In The Three Locks we follow long suffering Watson as he deals with, the at times infuriating, Sherlock Holmes. Their relationship is as joyful as ever to watch, the love, irritation and reliance upon each other is all there as they work together to solve the cases and bring justice. As is quite often with a Holmes tale, there more than one mystery under way at the same time – seemingly completely irrelevant to one another. In this story we have the mysterious and un-openable box left to Watson by his mother, a dangerous rivalry between two conjurers, and the mysterious disappearance of a beautiful, yet spiteful young lady in Cambridge. The Three Locks has all the humour and brilliance that we come to expect from a Sherlock Holmes adventure, he does after all have a mind unlike any other. I am so thrilled that authors such as Bonnie MacBird are still able to bring new Sherlock Holmes adventures to us, it absolutely NEVER gets old and I thoroughly enjoyed returning to 221b Baker Street. I shall definitely be looking to read the previous Holmes adventures from Bonnie.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Deb

    4 mysteriously entertaining stars A big fan of Sherlock Holmes in my youth, I thoroughly enjoyed a quick trip to England while revisiting him and Watson in this entertaining book by Bonnie MacBird. It was fun to read the ‘old fashioned language’ such as “My extended holiday in Bath had been restorative.” Occasionally a touch of humor snuck in, “The man’s face, previously so benign had now shut as tight as a pub at breakfast time.” Holmes was described as a tall man built like a lamp post, full of 4 mysteriously entertaining stars A big fan of Sherlock Holmes in my youth, I thoroughly enjoyed a quick trip to England while revisiting him and Watson in this entertaining book by Bonnie MacBird. It was fun to read the ‘old fashioned language’ such as “My extended holiday in Bath had been restorative.” Occasionally a touch of humor snuck in, “The man’s face, previously so benign had now shut as tight as a pub at breakfast time.” Holmes was described as a tall man built like a lamp post, full of himself. Sherlock Holmes hasn’t changed since the Arthur Conan Doyle versions I read 50 years ago. Still clever. “My friend was a tireless warrior for the wronged, possessing gifts in the realm of genius, and making contributions to justice far beyond anything I could imagine. His work was life changing, his intellect beyond compare.” Watson, friend and scribe of Sherlock’s adventures, remained true to the original character except he seemed a bit more personable than I remembered. The book was not in a hurry, but excitement built towards the end. I appreciated a clean story without graphic violence. Do not neglect to browse the very interesting facts and photos of places and things mentioned in the novel: https://macbird.com/the-three-locks/n... Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for providing an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Stevie

    First off I would like to say, I aspire to be so crafty of a writer as Bonnie Macbird. This was my first time reading any of her work and I must say she has earned herself a new fan. This book is the fourth installment of her Sherlock Holmes adventure series. This book stands alone, so there's no need to have read the previous three novels. (But do add them to you TBR list like I did) Macbird is able to capture the likeness of Sherlock Holmes so much that Doyle would enjoy this book (in my humbl First off I would like to say, I aspire to be so crafty of a writer as Bonnie Macbird. This was my first time reading any of her work and I must say she has earned herself a new fan. This book is the fourth installment of her Sherlock Holmes adventure series. This book stands alone, so there's no need to have read the previous three novels. (But do add them to you TBR list like I did) Macbird is able to capture the likeness of Sherlock Holmes so much that Doyle would enjoy this book (in my humble opinion). I also admired the fleshing out of Watson's character. The story begins with London in the middle of a sweltering heatwave where it would seem that your own body temperature rise because of the writer's ability to make the reader feel engaged in the moment. Watson receives a package through the mail from an old family friend where there is an intricate lockbox that belonged to his mother enclosed within. The story caught my curiosity from that point forward. There are three plots all involving locks from colorful characters that come from different walks of life within the story. The author masterfully weaves those plots throughout the book. This book was a pleasure and an entertaining adventure to read. Highly Recommended!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sara (thebookwebb)

    The year is 1887 and an Indian Summer broils London and Cambridge. A mysterious impregnable box arrives for Watson, locked and with a secret from his past. Then a famous escape artist/conjurer fails to unlock his “cauldron” and burns to a crisp during a performance at Wilton’s Music Hall. And in Cambridge, three suitors including a priest, an aristocrat and a young physicist vie for the love of a spiteful beauty, who vanishes after her lookalike doll is found dismembered in the Jesus Lock on the The year is 1887 and an Indian Summer broils London and Cambridge. A mysterious impregnable box arrives for Watson, locked and with a secret from his past. Then a famous escape artist/conjurer fails to unlock his “cauldron” and burns to a crisp during a performance at Wilton’s Music Hall. And in Cambridge, three suitors including a priest, an aristocrat and a young physicist vie for the love of a spiteful beauty, who vanishes after her lookalike doll is found dismembered in the Jesus Lock on the River Cam. The cases convolve as Holmes and Watson tangle with clergy, police, academics and scheming siblings, risking life and limb to solve the murders and to keep the innocent from the gallows. Having never read a Sherlock Holmes novel before I was not sure what to expect from this book, however from the first page I knew I was going to love it. The writing is fantastic with incredible attention to detail and evocative descriptive writing. The story is engaging, with lots of tension and twists and a sprinkling of humour. The cast of characters is brilliant, and I loved the interaction between Holmes and Watson. I will definitely be looking to read the other books in this series in the near future. This was a gifted copy in exchange for an honest review.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Caroline Venables

    The measure of reading a modern Sherlock Holmes story is forgetting that it is not written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle himself. This is what happened when I started The Three Locks. The author has obviously immersed herself in the works of Sherlock and Dr Watson to have created such an authentic telling of this story. London is in the middle of a heat wave and tempers are at boiling point as Sherlock and Dr Watson find themselves investigating not just one curious situation but three. Dr Watson has b The measure of reading a modern Sherlock Holmes story is forgetting that it is not written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle himself. This is what happened when I started The Three Locks. The author has obviously immersed herself in the works of Sherlock and Dr Watson to have created such an authentic telling of this story. London is in the middle of a heat wave and tempers are at boiling point as Sherlock and Dr Watson find themselves investigating not just one curious situation but three. Dr Watson has been sent an intriguing box by an aunt he didn’t know he had. The box can not be opened, several locksmiths have already tried. Sherlock is quite dismissive of the communication but Watson is determined to open the box. A magician’s assistant contact Sherlock to settle the feud between two rival magicians, but when one of them dies is the other responsible? He is also contacted about a missing woman but he feels too little time has passed since her disappearance for anything to have happened to her, however will he regret the decision not to act immediately. A brilliantly written book, that would not feel out of place within the original works.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    I received an ARC copy of #TheThreeLocks from #NetGalley for review. The Three Locks follows Holmes and Watson on three separate cases playing out at the same time. The book opens with Watson receiving a locked box that belonged to his mother, who died under questionable circumstances when he was a child. The box is locked with a trick lock & requires a special key. While puzzling over the box, the wife of a stage magician arrives at 221B Baker Street begging Holmes for help fining who was trying I received an ARC copy of #TheThreeLocks from #NetGalley for review. The Three Locks follows Holmes and Watson on three separate cases playing out at the same time. The book opens with Watson receiving a locked box that belonged to his mother, who died under questionable circumstances when he was a child. The box is locked with a trick lock & requires a special key. While puzzling over the box, the wife of a stage magician arrives at 221B Baker Street begging Holmes for help fining who was trying sending threats to her husband. While investigating the magician, a young priest arrives claiming that one of his patrons is missing. If you are a fan of the original Sherlock Holmes stories, then I highly recommend this series. I absolutely love the way that Bonnie MacBird is able to capture both the feel and voice of the original Sherlock Holmes stories. She neatly ties the events in-between Doyle's stories and even lightly foreshadows further events that we are all very familiar with. The twists and turns on the plot kept me hanging on the edge of my seat. This of the fourth book of hers that I've read and I greatly enjoyed it.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    The fourth novel in this acclaimed series by author Bonnie MacBird, THE THREE LOCKS, takes the reader to a sweltering London and Cambridge of September 1887 as they experience an unusually hot Indian Summer. A prequel to the other three titles in her Sherlock Holmes Adventure series, it can easily be read as a standalone or without having previously read the other novels. The first of the ‘locks’ involves a mysterious ornate box , sent to Watson from an unknown Aunt Elspeth, with profound apologie The fourth novel in this acclaimed series by author Bonnie MacBird, THE THREE LOCKS, takes the reader to a sweltering London and Cambridge of September 1887 as they experience an unusually hot Indian Summer. A prequel to the other three titles in her Sherlock Holmes Adventure series, it can easily be read as a standalone or without having previously read the other novels. The first of the ‘locks’ involves a mysterious ornate box , sent to Watson from an unknown Aunt Elspeth, with profound apologies that she had forgotten to give this to him on his 21st birthday! A little late then as we find Watson six years into sharing rooms with Holmes at the age of 35. It was left for him, with the forgetful aunt, by Watson’s mother, who had drowned when Watson was a young boy. Unable to open it and with no idea as to what might be inside, he decides to try a couple of local locksmiths. The second lock refers to the renowned Italian escape artist called the Great Borelli and his wife Madam Ilaria Borelli, who visits Sherlock asking for his help with the rivalry between her husband and another magician, Santo Colangelo and the third refers to the Jesus Lock in Cambridge on the River Cam, where the end comes for an independent thinking daughter of a well known don, who’s disappearance is brought to the attention of Holmes by a local Deacon and friend to the missing young woman. Working the two cases, Holmes and Watson travel back and forth between London and Cambridge in the oppressive late summer heat, finding themselves in trouble with the police, lied to by the suspects and in physical danger! I found this new book yet another wonderfully researched, highly enjoyable adventure, where I got to enjoy the delights of not just 2 old friends, but also a cast of entertaining characters, including some wonderfully strong and capable women. The interaction between Holmes and Watson is wonderful to read and portrayed brilliantly by the author. For me Sherlock had a delightful Jeremy Brett ‘flavour’ , the pursing of the lips and closing of the eyes when thinking, the dismissive wave of the arm. She had the mannerisms and banter between the two character just right. The plot and story moves at a great pace and things are always happening, keeping the reader both entertained and engaged. The short chapters help with the quick flow and the drop-cap with its picture relating to each new chapter was a really nice touch to the book. Cambridge and London are wonderfully portrayed in the story and I followed the author’s online annotations, which gave a lovely visual aid and some extra information to add to the enjoyment. A great read for any Sherlock fans but also for those that like their crime with a strong Victorian flavour.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Bill Lynas

    The fourth Sherlock Holmes adventure from lifelong Conan Doyle fan Bonnie MacBird is rip roaring fun from start to finish. Holmes & Watson have not just one, but three mysteries to solve taking them from London to Cambridge. The pace is relentlessly fast & the dialogue positively sparkles. Bonnnie MacBird has a great affection for Arthur Conan Doyle's creations. She pulls off the amazing feat of treating them with great respect & at the same time making them her own. That's an incredible thing to The fourth Sherlock Holmes adventure from lifelong Conan Doyle fan Bonnie MacBird is rip roaring fun from start to finish. Holmes & Watson have not just one, but three mysteries to solve taking them from London to Cambridge. The pace is relentlessly fast & the dialogue positively sparkles. Bonnnie MacBird has a great affection for Arthur Conan Doyle's creations. She pulls off the amazing feat of treating them with great respect & at the same time making them her own. That's an incredible thing to achieve. I have read many books in my life, but I have to say that I found the ending of this novel incredibly moving. It's rare I feel this emotional about any book these days. I can also say, hand on heart, that The Three Locks has my favourite ending to any Sherlock Holmes story I have ever read. I'll even go as far as to say it's the best ending of any story I have ever read by anyone. Incredible.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nicky Skene

    As a massive Holmes and Watson fan I couldn’t resist the chance to read this! I’ll admit that I was a wee bit sceptical that this would feel like a true Sherlock story however I am pleased to say that my scepticism was unwarranted! From the first page I was sucked in, by the end of the first chapter I was hooked! The Three Locks has everything - murder, mystery, magic, love and deductions! Holmes and Watson take on a few cases and as the title suggests all involve locks of sorts, a magician/esca As a massive Holmes and Watson fan I couldn’t resist the chance to read this! I’ll admit that I was a wee bit sceptical that this would feel like a true Sherlock story however I am pleased to say that my scepticism was unwarranted! From the first page I was sucked in, by the end of the first chapter I was hooked! The Three Locks has everything - murder, mystery, magic, love and deductions! Holmes and Watson take on a few cases and as the title suggests all involve locks of sorts, a magician/escapist locked in his own “trick”, a girl found drowned in the Jesus Lock and a box bequeathed to Watson that doesn’t seem to be openable. Fast paced, full of intrigue and a pleasure to read the adventure with true Sherlock essence - highly recommended and I cannot wait to read the first three in the series

  25. 4 out of 5

    Aoine Ni

    Thank You to NetGally and Harper Collins UK for allowing me to read this book. This is the fourth book in Bonnie MacBird's Sherlock Holmes Adventures series. Set in London 1887 during An Indian summer, Dr Watson receives a box that had been given to a person who claimed to be his aunt. The box is lock and seems to be impossible to open. Holmes in the mean time is doing his typical Holmes stuff like secret experiments and learning new skills. Soon clients start arriving with intriguing cases sendi Thank You to NetGally and Harper Collins UK for allowing me to read this book. This is the fourth book in Bonnie MacBird's Sherlock Holmes Adventures series. Set in London 1887 during An Indian summer, Dr Watson receives a box that had been given to a person who claimed to be his aunt. The box is lock and seems to be impossible to open. Holmes in the mean time is doing his typical Holmes stuff like secret experiments and learning new skills. Soon clients start arriving with intriguing cases sending Watson and Holmes to two very different cases that seem Perplexing to Watson and the local police but off course it doesn't take Holmes long to see what is going on. The author uses Victorian Society to show us how men had so much control over the women in the lives, foe example Madam Borelli designs all of her husbands illusions bet he takes all the credit for them and often abuses he for his faults. It is also shown how a young girl is nothing without a man and the lengths one must go to to like their own life. As a fan of Conan Doyle's famous detective and Victorian London in general, I really enjoyed this book.I thought the touches of how Holmes treat the women in this book refreshing and so like him. The twists and turns of the two cases and the bumbling police make it feel a continuance of Conan Doyle's work. I highly recommend the series and they can also be read as stand alone's

  26. 5 out of 5

    Robin Rowles

    This is Bonnie MacBird's fourth Sherlock Holmes pastiche and it's just as intriguing as the first three. I'm about a fifth of the way through and the mysteries are building up. No spoilers, but some of Sherlock Holmes irritating habits are seen. The story begins in an August heatwave, and we learn that while Watson's military adventures in Afghanistan allowed him to bear warm temperatures better than cold, you can have too much of a good thing. Add in a locked box puzzle and bizarre incidents ha This is Bonnie MacBird's fourth Sherlock Holmes pastiche and it's just as intriguing as the first three. I'm about a fifth of the way through and the mysteries are building up. No spoilers, but some of Sherlock Holmes irritating habits are seen. The story begins in an August heatwave, and we learn that while Watson's military adventures in Afghanistan allowed him to bear warm temperatures better than cold, you can have too much of a good thing. Add in a locked box puzzle and bizarre incidents happening to escape artists and you have the beginnings of a superb mystery. Moreover, Bonnie MacBird has captured the 'voice' of Arthur Conan Doyle, as narrated by Watson. This review is based on the Audible reading. This is an honest review and I have not received any incentives from the author.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Meredith

    I have always been intrigued by the Sherlock Holmes canon but have found over the years that several of the new takes on Holmes and Watson are even more intriguing than the original Sir Arthur Conan Doyle stories. Bonnie MacBird's take on the duo is incredibly well done and does an exceptional job on fleshing out the two characters. The Three Locks is her newest and I absolutely loved it, reading it in one sitting! The interweaving of three separate cases into one cohesive story that kept me eng I have always been intrigued by the Sherlock Holmes canon but have found over the years that several of the new takes on Holmes and Watson are even more intriguing than the original Sir Arthur Conan Doyle stories. Bonnie MacBird's take on the duo is incredibly well done and does an exceptional job on fleshing out the two characters. The Three Locks is her newest and I absolutely loved it, reading it in one sitting! The interweaving of three separate cases into one cohesive story that kept me engrossed. The inclusion of a personal case involving Watson was very interesting. I highly recommend this series and look forward to her next one! Thank you to #NetGalley for the review copy of #TheThreeLocks.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Daisy

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. BIG Thank you to NetGalley and Bonnie MacBird for this ARC. Hiding for spoilers, just in case! As a long time fan of the adventures of Holmes and Watson, I was ecstatic to get my hands on this ARC. There are so many different types of Sherlock media out there, but I believe that this was the closest to the actual depiction of the character that I've seen in a VERY long time. It is obvious that MacBird is a student of Sherlock, and did a remarkable job of bring Sherlock to life. I enjoyed her dep BIG Thank you to NetGalley and Bonnie MacBird for this ARC. Hiding for spoilers, just in case! As a long time fan of the adventures of Holmes and Watson, I was ecstatic to get my hands on this ARC. There are so many different types of Sherlock media out there, but I believe that this was the closest to the actual depiction of the character that I've seen in a VERY long time. It is obvious that MacBird is a student of Sherlock, and did a remarkable job of bring Sherlock to life. I enjoyed her depiction of Watson as well, as he came off as a young bachelor finding his way through life. The mysteries were entertaining and introduced us to new characters I hope to see in later books. Overall, I'm excited to read more by MacBird and I'm only my way to get more of her books now1!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sarah-Hope

    I've enjoyed Bonnie MacBird's Holmes novels from the beginning, but The Three Locks takes what was already a satisfying series up a notch. The plot is woven from multiple mysteries that entwine with and echo one another. Watson comes more fully into his own. Readers meet an engaging ensemble cast, most based in the community of Victorian-era magicians. What I particularly love about MacBird's take on Holmes and Watson is the humor she can inject into the novels without undercutting the tension o I've enjoyed Bonnie MacBird's Holmes novels from the beginning, but The Three Locks takes what was already a satisfying series up a notch. The plot is woven from multiple mysteries that entwine with and echo one another. Watson comes more fully into his own. Readers meet an engaging ensemble cast, most based in the community of Victorian-era magicians. What I particularly love about MacBird's take on Holmes and Watson is the humor she can inject into the novels without undercutting the tension of the mysteries. If you appreciate new takes on the Holmes canon, I'm confident you'll find this title rewarding reading. I received a free electronic copy of this title for review purposes; the opinions are my own.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Matt Witten

    This is the fourth Sherlock Holmes novel by Bonnie MacBird that I've read, and I've enjoyed them all. This novel, like the others, has a lot of humor in it, which I really appreciate; that's an aspect of the original Holmes novels that some writers forget about. Also, The Three Locks gives us intriguing new insights into Watson's character and what has been driving him all these years. MacBird looks at Holmes' world through a feminist lens, which makes The Three Locks feel very contemporary, not This is the fourth Sherlock Holmes novel by Bonnie MacBird that I've read, and I've enjoyed them all. This novel, like the others, has a lot of humor in it, which I really appreciate; that's an aspect of the original Holmes novels that some writers forget about. Also, The Three Locks gives us intriguing new insights into Watson's character and what has been driving him all these years. MacBird looks at Holmes' world through a feminist lens, which makes The Three Locks feel very contemporary, not just an exercise in Holmesian nostalgia. With all of these things going for it, along with the usual Holmesian deductions and plot twists, this is a great read.

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