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Rituals Of Blood: The Consequences Of Slavery In Two American Centuries

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In the first essay, Patterson analyzes the very latest survey data to delineate the different attitudes, behaviors, and circumstances of Afro-American men and women, dissecting both the external and internal causes for the great disparities he finds.In the second essay, Patterson focuses on the lynching of Afro-American boys and men during the decades after Reconstruction, In the first essay, Patterson analyzes the very latest survey data to delineate the different attitudes, behaviors, and circumstances of Afro-American men and women, dissecting both the external and internal causes for the great disparities he finds.In the second essay, Patterson focuses on the lynching of Afro-American boys and men during the decades after Reconstruction, particularly on the substantial number of cases that constituted apparent ritual human sacrifice. As no one has done before, Patterson reveals how the complex interplay between Christian sacrificial symbolism and the deep recesses of post-bellum Southern culture resulted in some of the most shameful, barbaric events in American history.The third essay brings us into the late twentieth century, with an investigation of the various images of Afro-American men portrayed by the media. From the demigod (Michael Jordan) to the demon (Colin Ferguson) to the demigod-turned-demon (O. J. Simpson) and the crossers of racial and gender boundaries (Michael Jackson and Dennis Rodman)—all contribute to the cultural complications of our contemporary society.Rituals of Blood advances Patterson's new model of ethnic relations that opens American society to a new and freer dialogue.


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In the first essay, Patterson analyzes the very latest survey data to delineate the different attitudes, behaviors, and circumstances of Afro-American men and women, dissecting both the external and internal causes for the great disparities he finds.In the second essay, Patterson focuses on the lynching of Afro-American boys and men during the decades after Reconstruction, In the first essay, Patterson analyzes the very latest survey data to delineate the different attitudes, behaviors, and circumstances of Afro-American men and women, dissecting both the external and internal causes for the great disparities he finds.In the second essay, Patterson focuses on the lynching of Afro-American boys and men during the decades after Reconstruction, particularly on the substantial number of cases that constituted apparent ritual human sacrifice. As no one has done before, Patterson reveals how the complex interplay between Christian sacrificial symbolism and the deep recesses of post-bellum Southern culture resulted in some of the most shameful, barbaric events in American history.The third essay brings us into the late twentieth century, with an investigation of the various images of Afro-American men portrayed by the media. From the demigod (Michael Jordan) to the demon (Colin Ferguson) to the demigod-turned-demon (O. J. Simpson) and the crossers of racial and gender boundaries (Michael Jackson and Dennis Rodman)—all contribute to the cultural complications of our contemporary society.Rituals of Blood advances Patterson's new model of ethnic relations that opens American society to a new and freer dialogue.

47 review for Rituals Of Blood: The Consequences Of Slavery In Two American Centuries

  1. 5 out of 5

    Shawn

    A very informative and educational book. And yes, the last paragraphs, so eloquently written, sum up the power of the arguments in this book. I'll quote, "Another effect of this now pervasive influence is the near-complete rejection of intellectual achievement as a model to be strived for." (278) | I recommend this book. There is a substantial amount of statistical information and it is employed by the pen of a genuine scholar. Patterson references not only the analyses of other sociologists but ex A very informative and educational book. And yes, the last paragraphs, so eloquently written, sum up the power of the arguments in this book. I'll quote, "Another effect of this now pervasive influence is the near-complete rejection of intellectual achievement as a model to be strived for." (278) | I recommend this book. There is a substantial amount of statistical information and it is employed by the pen of a genuine scholar. Patterson references not only the analyses of other sociologists but explores myth, South American (Tupinamba) tribal behaviors, and West African patterns of kinship and their hierarchy of relations, I could go on. It is a great read for it is thorough in revealing the glaring problems. | "...those few who, by some sociological miracle, become engaged with their studies and do well at school must find ways to camouflage their interest, either through clowning or through overcompensatory involvement in sports." (278) "America's conservative leadership, who dishonorably disclaim all responsibility for the unhealed injuries of the nation's shameful racist past." (279) "But the entrapment is, above all else, the making of Afro-Americans themselves, a large proportion of whose men contemptibly choose to abandon their children to the welfare of the state, the authority of the streets, and the seductions of gang life and drugs; whose women choose to have more children than their emotional, economic, or social resources allow; and whose youth choose to reject literacy in favor of orality and choose to drop out of the educational system before achieving minimal levels of skills for survival in an advanced postindustrial society...who condemn intellect, debase women, demonstrate by their fortunes and illiteracy the absurdity of ordinary work and pay," (279) I found this book enlightening, and disturbing. It has three parts, the first part is the longest, and the middle part is nauseating for its subject of lynching, and the third part is entertaining and somewhat a softening conclusion to so weighty a theme. Gosh, I felt in my heart several times in reading this book a profound appreciation for scholars such as Orlando Patterson who dedicate their time and direct their will for the betterment of our nation and the world.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    I read only the first section of this book but was really troubled by the sexist, pathologizing, victim-blaming arguments he makes about Black people and families. Also he made lots of claims - with statistical data, charts and graphs - that just didn't seem right. Like he goes on at length about how there's more gender hostility between Black men and women than there is among other races (for which he mainly blames Black women, as I recall). Or he claims it's not true that Black people have mor I read only the first section of this book but was really troubled by the sexist, pathologizing, victim-blaming arguments he makes about Black people and families. Also he made lots of claims - with statistical data, charts and graphs - that just didn't seem right. Like he goes on at length about how there's more gender hostility between Black men and women than there is among other races (for which he mainly blames Black women, as I recall). Or he claims it's not true that Black people have more robust complex kinship/ extended family structures (that have helped them to survive economic and social discrimination and violence in the US), despite generations of Black scholars naming this as a strength within Black communities.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Rating this book is difficult; the second essay (which is a searing, unflinching analysis of the ritualistic aspects of lynching) definitely deserves four stars, but Patterson's methods of analysis in the first and third troubled me. I'm still planning to read On Slavery and Social Death, but I need to spend some time pondering Patterson's subject position and methodology. Rating this book is difficult; the second essay (which is a searing, unflinching analysis of the ritualistic aspects of lynching) definitely deserves four stars, but Patterson's methods of analysis in the first and third troubled me. I'm still planning to read On Slavery and Social Death, but I need to spend some time pondering Patterson's subject position and methodology.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Elyssa

    Excellent examination of the effect of slavery on African-Americans. I appreciate Orlando Patterson's objective evaluation using statistics and studies. He is straightforward with his analysis, even when it is painful to expose. At the same time, he is optimistic and solution-oriented. Excellent examination of the effect of slavery on African-Americans. I appreciate Orlando Patterson's objective evaluation using statistics and studies. He is straightforward with his analysis, even when it is painful to expose. At the same time, he is optimistic and solution-oriented.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kenny

    Great stats, decent organization, some good insights and a few that seem more speculative...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ben

  7. 4 out of 5

    Corinne E. Blackmer

  8. 5 out of 5

    jenny

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Tucker

  10. 4 out of 5

    Elicka

  11. 5 out of 5

    CARL A.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Will Meyerhofer

  13. 4 out of 5

    Steven

  14. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  15. 5 out of 5

    Eric

  16. 4 out of 5

    Arthur

  17. 5 out of 5

    Adrian Overton

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bterry

  19. 5 out of 5

    Elena

  20. 4 out of 5

    Terrell

  21. 4 out of 5

    dlpoetx

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ophelia

  23. 5 out of 5

    Evie

  24. 4 out of 5

    Matt Clark

  25. 4 out of 5

    Bria Young

  26. 5 out of 5

    Paul

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jacquelynn Parent

  28. 5 out of 5

    Chris Dancy

  29. 4 out of 5

    Pascale

  30. 5 out of 5

    solomon

  31. 4 out of 5

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  32. 5 out of 5

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  33. 4 out of 5

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  34. 5 out of 5

    Richard Williams

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    Nicole Oswald

  36. 5 out of 5

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  37. 5 out of 5

    ctwayfarer

  38. 4 out of 5

    Kenya Hudson

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  40. 4 out of 5

    Alankaar

  41. 5 out of 5

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  42. 5 out of 5

    Rdn

  43. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Thompson

  44. 4 out of 5

    Flat

  45. 4 out of 5

    Kaveri

  46. 5 out of 5

    Jbondandrews

  47. 5 out of 5

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