web site hit counter Slightly Perfect: A Lake District Love Story: One Family's Journey to Create the Perfect Hotel in an Imperfect World - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Slightly Perfect: A Lake District Love Story: One Family's Journey to Create the Perfect Hotel in an Imperfect World

Availability: Ready to download

It’s 1987, and John and Christine Cunliffe’s first hotel, the Hole in the Wall in Bath, has turned into a disaster. Realising he was never going to be a corporate ‘yes man’, John had left a successful career in hospitality at the Forte empire, holding senior positions in hotels around the world, in charge of catering and banquets for the City of London’s most venerable ins It’s 1987, and John and Christine Cunliffe’s first hotel, the Hole in the Wall in Bath, has turned into a disaster. Realising he was never going to be a corporate ‘yes man’, John had left a successful career in hospitality at the Forte empire, holding senior positions in hotels around the world, in charge of catering and banquets for the City of London’s most venerable institutions, and organising dinners for heads of state at Number Ten. They had bought an established restaurant in a tourist hotspot popular with Americans – but it was plagued with problems. The Americans bombed Libya. Business plummeted. The roof leaked, business people stopped doing lunch, and tourists preferred pizzas and burgers. There were staff problems and the accounts were a mess. Then Chris sees a small ad in Caterer & Hotelkeeper. ‘John. Gilpin Lodge is for sale. We need to get out of this place. It’s been wrong since day one. Get up to Windermere today. Get the accounts. See the bedrooms. You’ve always wanted a hotel in the Lake District. They don’t grow on trees. You know the Lakes. It’s in your blood. Just go and get us out of this mess.’ It’s a pivotal moment in Slightly Perfect, and within weeks Gilpin Lodge, the Lake District country house near Windermere once owned by his grandmother, where John had spent childhood summers, is theirs, and so begins a 30-year project to create one of the Lake District’s most successful hotels. Slightly Perfect is John Cunliffe’s warm, entertaining and honest account of one marriage, one family, and one industry – from the 1960s to the present. Chris is ever present, from meeting at hospitality college to learning the trade in London’s grandest hotels. John heads to New York’s Waldorf Astoria for his first job, organising huge banquets and weddings. Chris needs a Green Card to join him in the US, so there needs to be a wedding – but their American tale is dramatically cut short. They are in Cyprus in the run-up to the Turkish invasion, then move to Jamaica, where John opens a new hotel, before another dramatic exit. John returns to England to run Grosvenor House’s apartments, a Mayfair home to wealthy widows, obscure Royals and Middle Eastern playboys, then is made Deputy Director of City of London caterers Ring & Brymer. This spell at the heart of the City in the 1970s and 1980s paints a fascinating portrait of a world of Livery Company banquets, Guildhall dinners and Downing Street functions. We see the changing face of the corporate hotel world, with Forte & Co merging with Trust Houses to form Trusthouse Forte, and the friendships made as John and Chris embrace life with a young family around the world. And so The Hole in the Wall in Bath leads to part two of Slightly Perfect: a story of a family business and a quest for perfection, as John and Chris turn a tired bed and breakfast into something altogether different. With 80-hour weeks, no holidays or even a proper home, and Chris in the kitchen as head chef, the Cunliffes constantly find new ways to add more rooms, improve food, attract new custom, grapple with computers, and develop their ‘brand’. Readers gain a real insight into the business of hospitality and what drives success. This is no Fawlty Towers memoir, but there are trials and tribulations, with ignorant banks, failed septic tanks, erratic builders, litigious staff, and a mystery fire. The customer is (nearly) always right. It’s a family story. Eldest son Barney joins the business with his wife Zoë, they search for a new chef on TV and win accolades, and younger son Ben helps steer Gilpin’s stunning developments. As John Cunliffe says: “Slightly Perfect is essentially a love story.


Compare

It’s 1987, and John and Christine Cunliffe’s first hotel, the Hole in the Wall in Bath, has turned into a disaster. Realising he was never going to be a corporate ‘yes man’, John had left a successful career in hospitality at the Forte empire, holding senior positions in hotels around the world, in charge of catering and banquets for the City of London’s most venerable ins It’s 1987, and John and Christine Cunliffe’s first hotel, the Hole in the Wall in Bath, has turned into a disaster. Realising he was never going to be a corporate ‘yes man’, John had left a successful career in hospitality at the Forte empire, holding senior positions in hotels around the world, in charge of catering and banquets for the City of London’s most venerable institutions, and organising dinners for heads of state at Number Ten. They had bought an established restaurant in a tourist hotspot popular with Americans – but it was plagued with problems. The Americans bombed Libya. Business plummeted. The roof leaked, business people stopped doing lunch, and tourists preferred pizzas and burgers. There were staff problems and the accounts were a mess. Then Chris sees a small ad in Caterer & Hotelkeeper. ‘John. Gilpin Lodge is for sale. We need to get out of this place. It’s been wrong since day one. Get up to Windermere today. Get the accounts. See the bedrooms. You’ve always wanted a hotel in the Lake District. They don’t grow on trees. You know the Lakes. It’s in your blood. Just go and get us out of this mess.’ It’s a pivotal moment in Slightly Perfect, and within weeks Gilpin Lodge, the Lake District country house near Windermere once owned by his grandmother, where John had spent childhood summers, is theirs, and so begins a 30-year project to create one of the Lake District’s most successful hotels. Slightly Perfect is John Cunliffe’s warm, entertaining and honest account of one marriage, one family, and one industry – from the 1960s to the present. Chris is ever present, from meeting at hospitality college to learning the trade in London’s grandest hotels. John heads to New York’s Waldorf Astoria for his first job, organising huge banquets and weddings. Chris needs a Green Card to join him in the US, so there needs to be a wedding – but their American tale is dramatically cut short. They are in Cyprus in the run-up to the Turkish invasion, then move to Jamaica, where John opens a new hotel, before another dramatic exit. John returns to England to run Grosvenor House’s apartments, a Mayfair home to wealthy widows, obscure Royals and Middle Eastern playboys, then is made Deputy Director of City of London caterers Ring & Brymer. This spell at the heart of the City in the 1970s and 1980s paints a fascinating portrait of a world of Livery Company banquets, Guildhall dinners and Downing Street functions. We see the changing face of the corporate hotel world, with Forte & Co merging with Trust Houses to form Trusthouse Forte, and the friendships made as John and Chris embrace life with a young family around the world. And so The Hole in the Wall in Bath leads to part two of Slightly Perfect: a story of a family business and a quest for perfection, as John and Chris turn a tired bed and breakfast into something altogether different. With 80-hour weeks, no holidays or even a proper home, and Chris in the kitchen as head chef, the Cunliffes constantly find new ways to add more rooms, improve food, attract new custom, grapple with computers, and develop their ‘brand’. Readers gain a real insight into the business of hospitality and what drives success. This is no Fawlty Towers memoir, but there are trials and tribulations, with ignorant banks, failed septic tanks, erratic builders, litigious staff, and a mystery fire. The customer is (nearly) always right. It’s a family story. Eldest son Barney joins the business with his wife Zoë, they search for a new chef on TV and win accolades, and younger son Ben helps steer Gilpin’s stunning developments. As John Cunliffe says: “Slightly Perfect is essentially a love story.

34 review for Slightly Perfect: A Lake District Love Story: One Family's Journey to Create the Perfect Hotel in an Imperfect World

  1. 4 out of 5

    john nelson

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sue Thomas

  3. 4 out of 5

    jane waterworth

  4. 4 out of 5

    VJK Hodge

  5. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Georgiou

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sara

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alex Mackenzie

  8. 5 out of 5

    Christine Waddington

  9. 4 out of 5

    David Hallett

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mrs. J. V. Rigby

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sara

  12. 4 out of 5

    Julie Williams

  13. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Kupperman

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mark Scott

  15. 5 out of 5

    K W Gibson

  16. 4 out of 5

    Gary Pargeter

  17. 5 out of 5

    Caroline McMurdo

  18. 4 out of 5

    Allie

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mr S Reay

  20. 4 out of 5

    A Rowbottom

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Redmayne

  22. 5 out of 5

    Katie Kelley

  23. 5 out of 5

    Amy Hornby

  24. 4 out of 5

    Zoe Cunliffe

  25. 5 out of 5

    Julie Bolton

  26. 4 out of 5

    Helen

  27. 4 out of 5

    Fran

  28. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

  29. 5 out of 5

    Marci

  30. 4 out of 5

    Gina Isaac

  31. 4 out of 5

    Diane Dunn

  32. 4 out of 5

    Cathryn Davey

  33. 4 out of 5

    Ellie Lundy

  34. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.