web site hit counter Of Literature and Lattes - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Of Literature and Lattes

Availability: Ready to download

Katherine Reay returns to the cozy and delightful town of Winsome where two people discover the grace of letting go and the joy found in unexpected change. After fleeing her hometown three years earlier, Alyssa Harrison never planned to return. Then the Silicon Valley start-up she worked for collapsed and turned her world upside down. She is broke, under FBI investigation, Katherine Reay returns to the cozy and delightful town of Winsome where two people discover the grace of letting go and the joy found in unexpected change. After fleeing her hometown three years earlier, Alyssa Harrison never planned to return. Then the Silicon Valley start-up she worked for collapsed and turned her world upside down. She is broke, under FBI investigation, and without a place to go. Having exhausted every option, she comes home to Winsome, Illinois, to regroup then move on as quickly as possible. Yet, as friends and family welcome her back, Alyssa begins to see a place for herself in this small Midwestern community. Jeremy Mitchell moved from Seattle to Winsome to be near his daughter and to open the coffee shop he’s been dreaming of for years. Problem is, the business is bleeding money—and he’s not quite sure why. When he meets Alyssa, he senses an immediate connection, but what he needs most is someone to help him save his floundering business. After asking for her help, he wonders if something might grow between them—but forces beyond their control soon complicate their already complex lives, and the future they both hoped for is not at all what they anticipated. With the help of Winsome’s small-town charm and quirky residents, Alyssa and Jeremy discover the beauty and romance of second chances.


Compare

Katherine Reay returns to the cozy and delightful town of Winsome where two people discover the grace of letting go and the joy found in unexpected change. After fleeing her hometown three years earlier, Alyssa Harrison never planned to return. Then the Silicon Valley start-up she worked for collapsed and turned her world upside down. She is broke, under FBI investigation, Katherine Reay returns to the cozy and delightful town of Winsome where two people discover the grace of letting go and the joy found in unexpected change. After fleeing her hometown three years earlier, Alyssa Harrison never planned to return. Then the Silicon Valley start-up she worked for collapsed and turned her world upside down. She is broke, under FBI investigation, and without a place to go. Having exhausted every option, she comes home to Winsome, Illinois, to regroup then move on as quickly as possible. Yet, as friends and family welcome her back, Alyssa begins to see a place for herself in this small Midwestern community. Jeremy Mitchell moved from Seattle to Winsome to be near his daughter and to open the coffee shop he’s been dreaming of for years. Problem is, the business is bleeding money—and he’s not quite sure why. When he meets Alyssa, he senses an immediate connection, but what he needs most is someone to help him save his floundering business. After asking for her help, he wonders if something might grow between them—but forces beyond their control soon complicate their already complex lives, and the future they both hoped for is not at all what they anticipated. With the help of Winsome’s small-town charm and quirky residents, Alyssa and Jeremy discover the beauty and romance of second chances.

30 review for Of Literature and Lattes

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sandy *The world could end while I was reading and I would never notice*

    EXCERPT: 'What does Andante even mean?' Jeremy blinked. Those were not words he expected to hear at his grand opening. The older man looked around the store, his face pursed as if Jeremy's beans had burned or pulled sour and were stinking up the place. 'What was wrong with the Daily Brew? I liked it just fine. What have they done to the place? It doesn't feel like home any more.' Jeremy looked around the coffee shop, frantic to find something good to counteract the clench in his chest. He'd studie EXCERPT: 'What does Andante even mean?' Jeremy blinked. Those were not words he expected to hear at his grand opening. The older man looked around the store, his face pursed as if Jeremy's beans had burned or pulled sour and were stinking up the place. 'What was wrong with the Daily Brew? I liked it just fine. What have they done to the place? It doesn't feel like home any more.' Jeremy looked around the coffee shop, frantic to find something good to counteract the clench in his chest. He'd studied, dreamed, and planned for this moment for twenty years. Five minutes ago he'd been fired up, still nervous enough to throw up in the tiny back bathroom, but satisfied with the remodel and confident in his decision to move across the country to Winsome and open it. He thought about all that came with both the shop and the move. He now lived near his daughter. She knew his name and his face. She called him 'Daddy.' He had an apartment she could stay in, one with two bedrooms and a view of Winsome's Centennial Park. No . . . no way could he have afforded any of this in Seattle. This was the life and the home he wanted and there was no room for regret, doubt, or naysayers. ABOUT THIS BOOK: After fleeing her hometown three years earlier, Alyssa Harrison never planned to return. Then the Silicon Valley start-up she worked for collapsed and turned her world upside down. She is broke, under FBI investigation, and without a place to go. Having exhausted every option, she comes home to Winsome, Illinois, to regroup then move on as quickly as possible. Yet, as friends and family welcome her back, Alyssa begins to see a place for herself in this small Midwestern community. Jeremy Mitchell moved from Seattle to Winsome to be near his daughter and to open the coffee shop he’s been dreaming of for years. Problem is, the business is bleeding money—and he’s not quite sure why. When he meets Alyssa, he senses an immediate connection, but what he needs most is someone to help him save his floundering business. After asking for her help, he wonders if something might grow between them—but forces beyond their control soon complicate their already complex lives, and the future they both hoped for is not at all what they anticipated. With the help of Winsome’s small-town charm and quirky residents, Alyssa and Jeremy discover the beauty and romance of second chances. MY THOUGHTS: This was a sweet, but not particularly memorable story of a family in a small town, their relationships, trials and tribulations. Although I liked most of the characters, Alyssa being the notable exception, I failed to become involved in the story. I think it was the lack of depth to the characters that was my major stumbling block. Most of them seemed as if they probably were interesting, if we could get to know them a little better. I do note that this is the second book set in this town, so perhaps the first gave us a more in depth introduction to the characters. But I don't know as I haven't read it, and it wasn't immediately apparent when I requested this that it was the second book in a series. There is a fractured family, and I am talking multigenerational fractures, a young woman running away from a failure in her life, and a man trying to connect with his daughter and realise a lifelong dream. Of Literature and Lattes is a quick read, is interesting to a point but, for me, wasn't an immersive and memorable reading experience. 😊😊😊 #OfLiteratureandLattes #NetGalley The only stable thing in life is change...and no, you don't get used to it. After taking a wrong turn, travelling further down the (same) road doesn't get you any closer to your destination. You have to go back in order to go on. THE AUTHOR: Katherine Reay is the national bestselling and award-winning author of several novels and one full length non-fiction work. Katherine holds a BA and MS from Northwestern University and is a wife, mother, rehabbing runner, former marketer, and avid chocolate consumer. She lives outside Chicago, IL. DISCLOSURE: Thank you to Thomas Nelson - Fiction via NetGalley for providing a digital ARC of Of Literature and Lattes by Katherine Reay for review. All opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own personal opinions. For an explanation of my rating system please refer to my Goodreads.com profile page or the about page on sandysbookaday.wordpress.com This review and others are also published on Twitter, Amazon, Instagram and my webpage https://sandysbookaday.wordpress.com/...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Rachel McMillan

    With Reay's customary flavour of intelligent romance, cast of unique and memorable characters and to-die-for Mitford-esque setting, "Of Literature and Lattes" is an ode to the spaces in which we forge family and friendship, the corners of our world where great discussion transcends the problems of our every day. Told with vignette-like resonance, "Of Literature and Lattes" once again firmly plants Reay in the spirit of high concept classical tropes: for while the coffee flows freely, so do the l With Reay's customary flavour of intelligent romance, cast of unique and memorable characters and to-die-for Mitford-esque setting, "Of Literature and Lattes" is an ode to the spaces in which we forge family and friendship, the corners of our world where great discussion transcends the problems of our every day. Told with vignette-like resonance, "Of Literature and Lattes" once again firmly plants Reay in the spirit of high concept classical tropes: for while the coffee flows freely, so do the literary references that have long delighted her readers ( and were culminated ten fold in last year's bestseller "The Printed Letter Bookshop." Like many heroines before, Alyssa is lost in a high power job until she finds the root of her heart in a small literary-infused circumstance. Therein, her financial problems and her rift the family ties fraying at her seams are made whole through brilliant discussion, in between worn pages and caffeine and most manifest in the figure of Jeremy who matches Alyssa in wit, intellect and pursuit of love. Another escape that makes you want to steal into the nearest bookshop, Of Literature and Lattes continues Reay's brand of infusing the old-fashioned into our every day: where moral conundrums are found in classics and love stories are merged much as they were a hundred years ago--- timeless and soul searching, realized in the quirks and foibles of the brilliant everyday.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Wolf

    Rounding up from 3.5 stars. Of Literature & Lattes is Katherine Reay’s follow-up to The Printed Letter Bookshop, which I finally read and reviewed just last week. In this new novel, we return to the town of Winsome, Illinois — home of an amazing bookstore, lots of cute shops, and people who get what community is all about. The story follows two main characters: Alyssa, returning with dread to her hometown after a disastrous stint in Silicon Valley, and Jeremy, a grown-up with a sad childhood behin Rounding up from 3.5 stars. Of Literature & Lattes is Katherine Reay’s follow-up to The Printed Letter Bookshop, which I finally read and reviewed just last week. In this new novel, we return to the town of Winsome, Illinois — home of an amazing bookstore, lots of cute shops, and people who get what community is all about. The story follows two main characters: Alyssa, returning with dread to her hometown after a disastrous stint in Silicon Valley, and Jeremy, a grown-up with a sad childhood behind him, looking to spend more time with his daughter and investing everything in a new coffee shop. For Alyssa, nothing has worked out as intended, and she seems like the walking embodiment of someone having baggage. After her parents’ divorce three years earlier, she sided with her father, cut her mother out of her life, and moved as far away as she could get. Alyssa’s magic with numbers and coding landed her a great job at a medical start-up — but her world crashes down sudddenly when it turns out that the company was nothing but a fraud, and what’s worse, provided false information to people about future diagnoses of awful illnesses. Wracked by guilt and totally broke, Alyssa has no choice but to head home — where nothing is as expected. Alyssa’s mother is Janet, one of the main characters in The Printed Letter Bookshop, and Janet has changed dramatically. Alyssa expects to be able to hide out at her father’s apartment, but instead, he forces her to face her mother. As Janet and Alyssa spend time together, they form new understandings and realize that they have a lot of work to do to overcome the harmful patterns of their past, if they ever hope to have a relationship in the future. Meanwhile, life for Jeremy is complicated too. His 7-year-old daughter Becca lives nearby, and he’s relocated from Seattle to be with her. Jeremy invested all his savings into buying the local coffee shop from its retiring owner, dreaming of turning it into a modern, successful business. The problem is, the locals don’t share his vision — and as he transforms the cozy, shabby coffee shop into something sleek and streamlined, the daily traffic plummets. Jeremy is a good guy and his heart is in the right place, but he has to learn to step back and understand what community is all about if his business is going to survive — and if he’s serious about creating a new home for himself and for Becca. There’s a lot to love about Of Literature & Lattes. First of all, the town of Winsome is just as charming as in the previous book. It’s an idealized version of small-town homey-ness, and wouldn’t we all love to find a place like that to belong? The people here seem to really care about one another, and while yes, they are all up in each other’s business a little more than I’d personally care for, this connection comes out in all sorts of ways that are heart-warming and important. Alyssa and Janet spend a lot of this book at odds, and it’s messy and a little terrible, but also feels real. Their dynamic goes back years, and has as much to do with Janet’s feelings of inadequacy and dissatisfaction as with their actual relationship. It’s not easy for them to sort out all the ways in which they’ve hurt and misunderstood one another, but over the course of their months together, they make major strides — and find that they both truly want to make things better. For Jeremy, the relationship with his ex Krista is difficult, and his business isn’t going as he’d hoped. He starts off very focused on his own vision — an outsider who thinks he knows what the town needs. It’s only when he allows himself to admit that he needs to learn that he starts to connect with the community in a real way, realizing that a coffee shop that’s perfect but lacks heart just isn’t going to cut it. Once again, I really enjoyed the author’s way of weaving personal stories into a bigger picture of a community. I enjoyed seeing the familiar characters from the previous story, as well as meeting Alyssa and Jeremy and seeing how they fit into the greater whole. While Of Literature & Lattes could work as a stand-alone, I’d recommend reading The Printed Letter Bookshop first. I’m glad I did! OL&L is touching and lovely, but it’s so much richer when set into the context of the larger story, and I think without the previous book, many of the connections would have gone right by me without leaving an impression. Another heart-warming story from author Katherine Reay — and yes, plenty of book talk too! With thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the review copy!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Melike

    I am sad that this book did not work for me. I usually love small-town romances especially when coffee shops and book stores are involved. I really can't resist them. I struggled with this book mainly because I could not warm up to Alyssa at all, and most of the rest of the characters were boring to me. I only cared about Jeremy and his adorable daughter Becca. Another thing I did not like was the number of characters, there were simply too many to keep track of. Even though this book did not wo I am sad that this book did not work for me. I usually love small-town romances especially when coffee shops and book stores are involved. I really can't resist them. I struggled with this book mainly because I could not warm up to Alyssa at all, and most of the rest of the characters were boring to me. I only cared about Jeremy and his adorable daughter Becca. Another thing I did not like was the number of characters, there were simply too many to keep track of. Even though this book did not work for me I will seek out this author's older books in the future especially the Printed Letter Bookshop which does take place in the same small town as Of Literature and Lattes. Thank you to Netgalley and Thomas Nelson for a chance to read this complimentary advanced reader’s copy of this book. All views are my own.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Fareya

    A quick, charming read set in a picturesque small town of Winsome, IL, Of Literature and Lattes by Katherine Reay is a book about second chances, family, friendship and forgiveness. There's also a whiff of romance. Small personal stories combine together as a story of the whole community. Although, I highly recommend reading The Printed Letter Bookshop before picking this up, because in my humble opinion it's not a standalone but a sequel to the former. There is plenty of character overlap, some A quick, charming read set in a picturesque small town of Winsome, IL, Of Literature and Lattes by Katherine Reay is a book about second chances, family, friendship and forgiveness. There's also a whiff of romance. Small personal stories combine together as a story of the whole community. Although, I highly recommend reading The Printed Letter Bookshop before picking this up, because in my humble opinion it's not a standalone but a sequel to the former. There is plenty of character overlap, some stories are continued and as a reader one will gain a lot more perspective if the first book is read prior to this one. Overall, a heartwarming read that's bound to delight. **Thank you Booksparks for my free gifted copy as part of Summer Reading Challenge #SRC2020**

  6. 4 out of 5

    Melindam

    Katherine Reay writes really enjoyable books, using some trusted formulas, but it just didn't like as much as her The Printed Letter Bookshop. Possibly because of the main character Alyssa, whom I practically disliked in "Bookshop" because of the "bitchy" attitude she showed to her mother. And as she starts on with that note in this book as well .... I mean, the shock is understandable that your parents are human beings like the rest of us, when you are 14, not so much when you produce the same c Katherine Reay writes really enjoyable books, using some trusted formulas, but it just didn't like as much as her The Printed Letter Bookshop. Possibly because of the main character Alyssa, whom I practically disliked in "Bookshop" because of the "bitchy" attitude she showed to her mother. And as she starts on with that note in this book as well .... I mean, the shock is understandable that your parents are human beings like the rest of us, when you are 14, not so much when you produce the same childish, immature behaviour at the age of 32. Despite my original aversion to the MC, this was still a heartwarming book to read and I was happy to discover "old" acquaintances I have grown to care for in the Bookshop novel. "I received a complimentary copy of this book by the Publisher via Netgalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own."

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nursebookie

    Of Literature and Lattes is a sweet and thoughtful contemporary romance read, featuring characters from The Printed Letter Bookshop though works well as a stand alone. I read both the print and listened to the audio which was narrated so beautifully in a British accent. It really had a small town feel and the introduction of the characters in Winsome will make you wish that the town was real and visit the bookstore and the coffee shop. Though Alyssa’s current issue seem very heavy with the FBI i Of Literature and Lattes is a sweet and thoughtful contemporary romance read, featuring characters from The Printed Letter Bookshop though works well as a stand alone. I read both the print and listened to the audio which was narrated so beautifully in a British accent. It really had a small town feel and the introduction of the characters in Winsome will make you wish that the town was real and visit the bookstore and the coffee shop. Though Alyssa’s current issue seem very heavy with the FBI investigation, it stayed very light and fun to read. Seeing the community and the characters help each other just when you want to just give up, the story will make you believe in hope and second chances. Katherine Reay is one of my favorite authors and this book was worth the wait. This is simply the BEST!! I love this book and the writing is impeccable.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Yels

    I thought that this book was going to be everything that I like. Small town, romance, book, and coffee. What I got was characters I couldn't relate to, fights between ex's, teenage angst, and cheap christianity. I was not aware that this book is christian fiction and I would have avoided it like the plague but alas, here we are. Alyssa has moved back to her hometown after her company is raided by the FBI. She has to live with her estranged mom. They get into these weird angsty fights because Aly I thought that this book was going to be everything that I like. Small town, romance, book, and coffee. What I got was characters I couldn't relate to, fights between ex's, teenage angst, and cheap christianity. I was not aware that this book is christian fiction and I would have avoided it like the plague but alas, here we are. Alyssa has moved back to her hometown after her company is raided by the FBI. She has to live with her estranged mom. They get into these weird angsty fights because Alyssa's mom cheated a few years ago and her parents ended up getting a divorce. I understand being upset that your parent cheated but why all the angst? Parents are adults and you don't know what happened during the marriage. I wasn't prepared for the constant fights and was over them fast. Jeremy moved to the small town to be closer to his daughter but just ends up fighting with his ex. More fights!!! I did like the scenes with Becca but that is not what I expected from a romance book. Someone needs to tell Jeremy and Alyssa that being tall and liking coffee does not make a personality. The book has these weird transitions that follow anyone and anything so we can keep up with the small town. One transition follows the town stray cat which was weird but I wasn't mad at it. I was mad that I had to keep up with all the residents of the town. Shout out to NetGalley for allowing me to read this book in advance in exchange for an honest review.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kara

    Yay for a new Katherine Reay story! I anticipate the next one just as soon as I finish the last one and this time was no different. I love all the literary references she casually (and not so casually) weaves into her plot. I love how her writing flows along and draws me in immediately (especially when I’m “only going to read a couple chapters right now” and suddenly two hours have flown by ;). I love how her characters are always complex and real, they feel like friends by the end. In short? I Yay for a new Katherine Reay story! I anticipate the next one just as soon as I finish the last one and this time was no different. I love all the literary references she casually (and not so casually) weaves into her plot. I love how her writing flows along and draws me in immediately (especially when I’m “only going to read a couple chapters right now” and suddenly two hours have flown by ;). I love how her characters are always complex and real, they feel like friends by the end. In short? I just really love Katherine Reay books! This one drew me in like her previous ones. I was intrigued by Alyssa’s problems and wanting so badly to make her relationship with her mother all better. After growing to know and love Janet dearly in The Printed Letter Bookshop, I was hoping for everyone else around her to be witness to her awesomeness and growth. However, it is perfectly understandable that a fraught relationship is rarely healed overnight. Thus no matter my impatience at times, I truly appreciated the nuanced and natural feel of how they began to slowly understand one another again. I do think their relationship was my favorite among all the possibilities within the story! I also rather enjoyed Jeremy’s relationship with his daughter, Becca. I was not expecting things to end up the way they did and my heart ached for all the emotions he had to process through. But what a beautiful lesson that came out of it! Seriously. Like I said, I love how Ms. Reay so skillfully handles complex characters and gives their story arcs such depth and feeling. I will have to confess to feeling some slight disappointment, however. As much as I have adored all of Ms. Reay’s books thus far, this is the first one which I closed with a tinge of bittersweetness. This has nothing to do with her writing, more it has to do with where a couple plots ended up going. Ms. Reay has beautifully written a story in which choices were made which I did not enjoy as much as I wanted. Also, while I liked getting several different perspectives on scenes, the multiple points of view got a tad overwhelming at times, since I never knew when I'd jump into someone else's head suddenly. However! These choices are not enough to make me wish I hadn’t read it. To the contrary, I especially loved a certain conversation between Luke and Chris which just made me grin. The fact that they had this same basic conversation again at the end of the book only made my grin bigger! (On that note, Ms. Reay. I’d REALLY love to see the results of those convos played out in an epilogue of sorts! Pretty please? ;) So! The bottom line? Katherine Reay is quite skilled with the pen and I think you should absolutely read her books! Though this one isn’t perfect, it still has some good lessons to be learned and imperfect characters with whom to fall in love. And! Did I mention all the literary references? You should be intrigued for those alone. What are you waiting for? Go read her books and be entranced as much as I! **I received a complimentary copy via Netgalley. All opinions expressed are my own.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amy Layton

    Cute!!!!  I'd never read any romance before, as it's not usually my preferred genre, but with a title such as Of Literature and Lattes?  Well, sign me up!  Of the bat, I was immediately impressed with the way in which Reay could create worlds that were utterly believable.  Alyssa worked as a data analyst writing algorithms and doing all sorts of other important number work for a company that went under thanks to unethical decisions and an FBI case.  Do I understand numbers or the reason Alyssa w Cute!!!!  I'd never read any romance before, as it's not usually my preferred genre, but with a title such as Of Literature and Lattes?  Well, sign me up!  Of the bat, I was immediately impressed with the way in which Reay could create worlds that were utterly believable.  Alyssa worked as a data analyst writing algorithms and doing all sorts of other important number work for a company that went under thanks to unethical decisions and an FBI case.  Do I understand numbers or the reason Alyssa was analyzing them?  Nope.  Was it believable?  Yes.  As for Jeremy, he opened Andante, putting a spin on the town's old center square cafe.  Did I understand the mechanics behind that?  Yes.  Was it believable?  Also yes!  The way that Reay writes about coffee was both intoxicating and totally accurate. But Alyssa and Jeremy's story wasn't the be-all end-all either!  Jeremy struggles to find equal footing with his ex-wife, and Alyssa's own parents got divorced just a few months earlier.  Alyssa and her mother dislike each other, and her mother and grandmother even moreso.  But hey, what's romance without a little drama? Overall, I just adored this book.  It wasn't something I'd usually go for but it was something that I just loved.  Cute points were off the charts, and I'd be more than interested to see what else Reay has written. Review cross-listed here!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Cassie

    4.5 stars. “To try to make a home in the world, a spot that’s truly yours, yet still yearn for approval and acceptance, that was tough stuff.” Of Literature & Lattes returns readers to the small town of Winsome, and explores the lives of many of the people who live in this tight knit community. I was so intrigued by the premise of this novel: a woman who is under FBI investigation, and a man new to town struggling to start a coffee shop. I mean, a intriguing mystery, a small town, and coffee —wha 4.5 stars. “To try to make a home in the world, a spot that’s truly yours, yet still yearn for approval and acceptance, that was tough stuff.” Of Literature & Lattes returns readers to the small town of Winsome, and explores the lives of many of the people who live in this tight knit community. I was so intrigued by the premise of this novel: a woman who is under FBI investigation, and a man new to town struggling to start a coffee shop. I mean, a intriguing mystery, a small town, and coffee —what’s not to like about that premise??? I always enjoy Katherine Reay’s writing style, so I was easily sucked into this story, as we learned more about the complexities of each character’s life and how that affected their interactions with their neighbors in this small town. It gave an honest glimpse into the sometimes difficult or uncomfortable interactions we face when engaging with the people in our lives and how lives intersect. It also reveals the beauty of learning and growing and moving forward amidst that struggle. This book was about relationships and forgiveness and reconciliation. It was beautiful. I have to add, the way the book title is tied into the book made me so happy. The reveal doesn’t come until the end, and I was happily delighted. 📚 ☕️ I always find myself recommending Katherine Reay, and this novel gets my wholehearted approval, too! I hope you decide to check it out!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tamara

    Of Literature and Lattes was a novel of second chances and knowing what and where your community (friendship) is. This story felt cozy and partly it was because I was familiar with many of the characters who had been in The Printed Letter Bookshop, even though it doesn’t say it is a series, it helps to have read it. It gave me a bit of understanding for some of the dynamics of the relationships, but it does stand on its own. I really enjoyed Of Literature and Lattes, it reminded me of the season Of Literature and Lattes was a novel of second chances and knowing what and where your community (friendship) is. This story felt cozy and partly it was because I was familiar with many of the characters who had been in The Printed Letter Bookshop, even though it doesn’t say it is a series, it helps to have read it. It gave me a bit of understanding for some of the dynamics of the relationships, but it does stand on its own. I really enjoyed Of Literature and Lattes, it reminded me of the season of fall even though it wasn’t set in that season, but it gave me a sense of renewal and beginnings all at the same time. My gratitude to Thomas Nelson and NetGalley. All opinions expressed are my own.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Melissa (LifeFullyBooked)

    2.5 stars rounded up This is a pleasant second book featuring the people from the small town of Winsome, IL. It is a good story about figuring our your place in the world and about forging a family in many different ways. There are themes of forgiveness and starting over that will connect with readers, and you get to reconnect with people from The Printed Letter Bookshop It's not necessary to read the first book in the series, but it helps with character background. There was quite a bit of head h 2.5 stars rounded up This is a pleasant second book featuring the people from the small town of Winsome, IL. It is a good story about figuring our your place in the world and about forging a family in many different ways. There are themes of forgiveness and starting over that will connect with readers, and you get to reconnect with people from The Printed Letter Bookshop It's not necessary to read the first book in the series, but it helps with character background. There was quite a bit of head hopping and it didn't flow as well as it could have because of that. I never connected with any of the characters because I didn't know whose head I would be in next, and some of them were for a page or so and then never again. There were also some threads that just went nowhere, I don't know if they will be brought up in future books in the series or if they are finished, but it seemed like a bit of a lack of editing with all of the loose ends. I also never warmed to Alyssa, I thought she was a whiny baby who needed to grow up and worry about herself rather than judging everyone else (especially Janet). I was extremely thrilled when her mom called her out on it, but then that just fizzled without any true evidence of growth. I generally love Reay's books, so I will continue to read them in the future. This one was sweet but not really memorable. I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book, all opinions are my own.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sherry Deatrick

    I really did enjoy this book. I enjoyed that is was not predictable as many are and that it had a lot going on. I did not have any trouble following along even though I have not read The Printed Letter Bookshop (which I will remedy soon). I loved the book had a small town setting, emphasized the importance of community and rebuilding relationships. There was a lot of talk about coffee (but not too much) which I liked. But I saw very little Christian talk or influence of which I would have preferr I really did enjoy this book. I enjoyed that is was not predictable as many are and that it had a lot going on. I did not have any trouble following along even though I have not read The Printed Letter Bookshop (which I will remedy soon). I loved the book had a small town setting, emphasized the importance of community and rebuilding relationships. There was a lot of talk about coffee (but not too much) which I liked. But I saw very little Christian talk or influence of which I would have preferred more. I even found myself inserting words of faith at certain points that I felt the character could have said. I have not always enjoyed Ms. Reay's books but I would certainly recommend this one! I received a complimentary copy of this book from NetGalley (thank you). . Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Carlene Inspired

    I will admit, Of Literature and Lattes was nearly a DNF for me, the initial start of this complex chick lit almost lost me. It was apparent right away that this book shouldn't be read as a standalone and then on top of it one of the main characters isn't all that likable, but I pushed on. My need to finish books outweighed my lack of enjoyment and soon I found myself halfway through the book and invested. Katherine Reay has created a lovely community in Winsome, Illinois, a community of characte I will admit, Of Literature and Lattes was nearly a DNF for me, the initial start of this complex chick lit almost lost me. It was apparent right away that this book shouldn't be read as a standalone and then on top of it one of the main characters isn't all that likable, but I pushed on. My need to finish books outweighed my lack of enjoyment and soon I found myself halfway through the book and invested. Katherine Reay has created a lovely community in Winsome, Illinois, a community of characters who love the small town they reside in. They all know one another's drama, they all meddle a bit too much, and somehow they're all likable. They work together, spend their free moments together, and push one another to create romance stories like the one we get in Of Literature and Lattes. Focused mainly on Jeremy and Alyssa, OLAL is the second book in the charming small town about families and love. Jeremy's come to Winsome to put his life together, to be there for his daughter, while Alyssa's back with her tail between her legs desperate to leave her mess of a family the minute she pulls into town. Of course, it wouldn't be an interesting story if things just worked out that way. With true to life scenarios, Katherine Reay takes her characters on a journey of family, friendship, forgiveness, and, well, forever. The two learn what they really want out of life, what they really need for themselves, and along the way readers are treated to secondary character's side plots that really bring the Winsome world together. ARC provided.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Chinnici

    After having read and loved Katherine Reay’s The Printed Letter Bookshop, I was excited to discover Of Literature and Lattes, which isn’t exactly a sequel but the second book to take place in this universe. And I’m happy to have read this heartwarming tale as well. The main plot here follows two characters: Alyssa, who is returning to her hometown after the Silicon Valley startup she worked for collapsed; and Jeremy, who moved to be close to his daughter and is now fulfilling his dream of openin After having read and loved Katherine Reay’s The Printed Letter Bookshop, I was excited to discover Of Literature and Lattes, which isn’t exactly a sequel but the second book to take place in this universe. And I’m happy to have read this heartwarming tale as well. The main plot here follows two characters: Alyssa, who is returning to her hometown after the Silicon Valley startup she worked for collapsed; and Jeremy, who moved to be close to his daughter and is now fulfilling his dream of opening a coffee shop. There are quite a few subplots and secondary characters in this novel, and as some of these characters narrate some sections the story becomes a bit muddied, especially in some cases where the point of view switches mid chapter with no warning. I suspect some of these elements are planted to root future books, but this particular book would have felt tighter without them. While Of Literature and Lattes is a romance, there is a lot more going on in these pages. It explores many types of relationships, from employer/employee to friendship and parent/child and more. I particularly liked the exploration of mother daughter dynamics and found much of it to be incredibly realistic and insightful. In the end, I enjoyed reading Of Literature and Lattes, just not as much as I loved The Printed Letter Bookshop. I don’t think I’d reread this particular book but if more are written in this universe I will definitely check them out! *I received a complimentary copy of this book. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Cara Putman

    I really enjoyed the audiobook of this novel. It's a sweet story that brings in characters from the Printed Letter Bookshop -- should probably be read in order -- and I'd love to walk the streets of Winsome if it were a real place. The narrator had a British accent for the non-dialogue and then did dialogue wihtout the accent. It worked, but was interesting since it's set in Illinois. Glad I listened :-) I really enjoyed the audiobook of this novel. It's a sweet story that brings in characters from the Printed Letter Bookshop -- should probably be read in order -- and I'd love to walk the streets of Winsome if it were a real place. The narrator had a British accent for the non-dialogue and then did dialogue wihtout the accent. It worked, but was interesting since it's set in Illinois. Glad I listened :-)

  18. 4 out of 5

    E-Reader Addict

    I did it. I FINALLY finished Of Literature and Lattes. It took me two weeks, and I read three other books, but I persevered and made it all the way through. Finally. There was a lot going on in this book. Maybe too much…??? Alyssa has fled Palo Alto, California for her childhood home in Winsome, Illinois after being investigated by the FBI for her part in a medical research company scam. She has an extremely tumultuous relationship with her mother, who she is forced to live with when her father wo I did it. I FINALLY finished Of Literature and Lattes. It took me two weeks, and I read three other books, but I persevered and made it all the way through. Finally. There was a lot going on in this book. Maybe too much…??? Alyssa has fled Palo Alto, California for her childhood home in Winsome, Illinois after being investigated by the FBI for her part in a medical research company scam. She has an extremely tumultuous relationship with her mother, who she is forced to live with when her father won’t let her live with him. Jeremy has moved to Winsome from Seattle to be closer to his seven year old daughter and recently opened a coffee shop, which he runs with a good friend - until that relationship becomes strained. He’s also having problems with his ex-wife, who wants to move to another state just a few months after he’d moved across the country so he could help raise their daughter. There’s sweet, elderly George who is dealing with his wife’s terminal illness. Father Luke and his brother Chris, who quite frankly I’m not sure why they were even in the book (except to maybe set something up for another book)… And also Seth and Janet, Alyssa’s parents, who are rekindling their love after divorcing three years ago. This is a “companion” book with The Printed Letter Bookshop - almost a sequel really, since it has a lot of the same characters, and the main storyline - with Alyssa, her mother, and her parents’ marriage - is a continuation of what happened in The Printed Letter Bookshop. The trouble with this book though is that all the different characters and all the different storylines are a bit of a jumbled mess this time. I think it was easier to keep the three main characters in The Printed Letter Bookshop straight because that book was told in first person narratives, whereas this one is third person (which is actually my preferred way to read a story, but this time that technique seemed to work against it). I also had a hard time with Alyssa. She held an awful lot of animosity for her mother for the relationship they had while she was growing up, but mostly for the demise of her parents’ marriage. (Sidenote: I don’t even remember exactly what went down between Seth and Janet, and the author sadly didn’t do readers the favor of giving even a cursory recap, further solidifying my confusion as to why their daughter was so bitter). Were Alyssa a teenager, I’d get her anger and lashing out. But a woman in her 30s should know there’s two sides to a story, and it’s her parents’ business to wade through - which they are, since mom and dad are dating again - and not hers. Mostly I had trouble getting through this book because the pacing in the first half of the book was glacially slllooooowww. I remembered The Printed Letter Bookshop starting off really slow as well, so I kept at it, trudging through page after page, hardly able to figure out why this book wasn’t working for me. Then Alyssa has coffee with Lexi, her childhood best friend, who tells her ”And once again, you’ve been in your head too long.” And I thought AHA! That’s exactly it. We’re too much in everyone’s heads and none of them is a great place to be hanging out. I was about to call it quits on the book when a bit of a mystery with Jeremy’s coffee shop pulled me in by a hair, and by the time that situation was resolved (a bit too quickly if you ask me) things had started picking up and I was able to finish the book. That’s not to say I think the rest of the story was good...it was just readable. As I said, there was a lot going on and several of the mini-storylines introduced - such as an issue with Jeremy’s daughter potentially having dyslexia, and alluding to Father Luke having some kind of crisis of the “who am I and what is my purpose” type - aren’t fully developed or given resolution. And once again, for a book labeled as “romance” there’s not a whole lot of focus on the hero and heroine as a couple - their relationship seems more of a side-plot. My husband always asks me about the book I’m reading. He asked what the point of the story was...and I couldn’t initially tell him. I was unable to pinpoint one overall theme in Of Literature and Lattes. Even the event the title of the book comes from is a mere blip in the story which, once again, reinforces my thought that this book is a jumbled mess of good ideas the author didn’t follow through with. I’d like to say this book is about complicated mother-daughter relationships and finding yourself when you find what you’re good at, but even that is a reach. Will I read Katherine Reay again? Eh, I’m not sure. There were plenty of hints in this book that there’s more to come for the people in Winsome. I’m just not sure I’ll be there for it. * thank you to NetGalley and Thomas Nelson for providing an ARC in exchange for an honest review

  19. 4 out of 5

    Courtney Clark

    With Of Literature and Lattes, Katherine Reay has penned another contemporary blend of romance and women’s fiction in her picturesque Illinois town of Winsome. Nods to literature abound within this story of returning and working toward a worthy goal, with deeper themes of reconciliation and a bright secondary cast. Readers who enjoyed The Printed Letter Bookshop will be delighted with glimpses of familiar characters and perspective (once again!) from Janet, Alyssa’s mother. To borrow a concept fr With Of Literature and Lattes, Katherine Reay has penned another contemporary blend of romance and women’s fiction in her picturesque Illinois town of Winsome. Nods to literature abound within this story of returning and working toward a worthy goal, with deeper themes of reconciliation and a bright secondary cast. Readers who enjoyed The Printed Letter Bookshop will be delighted with glimpses of familiar characters and perspective (once again!) from Janet, Alyssa’s mother. To borrow a concept from Janet’s character, this story is very much about moving through forgiveness after one has let go of the past. While the friendship and romance between Alyssa and Jeremy is a major part of the story, another significant portion of it includes perspective on parenting, both with Janet and with Jeremy’s own experiences and his precious daughter, Becca. I appreciate the way this draws attention to concepts of people’s complexity, motives, relationships, and the way parents should intentionally be supportive for the hard and the good things in life. The point of view changes employed in this novel echo a clever device used in The Printed Letter Bookshop, with multiple POV and tense shifts. But here, secondary characters sometimes have the narration. This device works and adds dimension, but sometimes I feel that it is abrupt and detracts from page time with the main few characters and deepening their connection with the reader. Maybe I just need a few more pages and time with these characters to feel the ending more fully “settled” with me. Overall, I really enjoyed this return to Winsome and the themes these characters wrestle with. The Happy Ending is there, with all the bookish talk! I particularly liked the way children’s books are discussed and recognized as an important influence on childhood. I wouldn’t mind a future novel set in Winsome, especially if it has more of Chris and his brother’s conversations (Printed Letter favs!), or Jeremy’s daughter, Becca! Thank you the the publisher and Netgalley for the review copy. This is my honest review.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    When it is snowy and cold outside (and my car is buried under 2ft of ❄️ ), superspeed readers like me can read 150 - 200+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book… and many more today. LOL I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. Katherine Reay returns When it is snowy and cold outside (and my car is buried under 2ft of ❄️ ), superspeed readers like me can read 150 - 200+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book… and many more today. LOL I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. Katherine Reay returns to the cosy and delightful town of Winsome where two people discover the grace of letting go and the joy found in unexpected change. After fleeing her hometown three years earlier, Alyssa Harrison never planned to return. Then the Silicon Valley start-up she worked for collapsed and turned her world upside down. She is broke, under FBI investigation, and without a place to go. Having exhausted every option, she comes home to Winsome, Illinois, to regroup then move on as quickly as possible. Yet, as friends and family welcome her back, Alyssa begins to see a place for herself in this small Midwestern community. Jeremy Mitchell moved from Seattle to Winsome to be near his daughter and to open the coffee shop he’s been dreaming of for years. Problem is, the business is bleeding money—and he’s not quite sure why. When he meets Alyssa, he senses an immediate connection, but what he needs most is someone to help him save his floundering business. After asking for her help, he wonders if something might grow between them—but forces beyond their control soon complicate their already complex lives, and the future they both hoped for is not at all what they anticipated. With the help of Winsome’s small-town charm and quirky residents, Alyssa and Jeremy discover the beauty and romance of second chances. Books and lattes (whether coffee or tea-lattes) are my favourite things year-round and this book's title is as charming as its contents and characters. The storyline is well crafted and I don't think that Winsome is a bad place to move to as it is a typically charming small town .. mind you, if I lived in Seattle, I would find an excuse to never live anywhere else. If you are looking for a charming book, this is the pick to take with you on Memorial Day or Victoria Day with you to your first weekend away for summer 2020. With an iced-latte. As always, I try to find a reason to not rate with stars as I love emojis (outside of their incessant use by "🙏-ed Social Influencer Millennials/#BachelorNation survivors/etc. " on Instagram and Twitter... Get a real job, people!) so let's give it ☕☕☕☕☕

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    3.5 stars "She stopped at the intersection and pondered the conundrum that was Winsome." Alyssa Harrison had climbed to the top of the highest peak, only to plummet into the depths of the deepest sea; figuratively speaking, of course. Naturally, her only recourse was to limp home; broke, unemployed, under a cloud of suspicion, driving a car subject to a major breakdown and bereft of personal belongings that were stolen along the way. To make matters worse . . . .much worse . . . her father insist 3.5 stars "She stopped at the intersection and pondered the conundrum that was Winsome." Alyssa Harrison had climbed to the top of the highest peak, only to plummet into the depths of the deepest sea; figuratively speaking, of course. Naturally, her only recourse was to limp home; broke, unemployed, under a cloud of suspicion, driving a car subject to a major breakdown and bereft of personal belongings that were stolen along the way. To make matters worse . . . .much worse . . . her father insists that she stay with her mother. Jeremy Mitchell thought that opening an up-scale coffee shop in Winsome would solve all of his problems . . . or most of them, anyway. He could live closer to his young daughter, thus being able to spend quality time with her, and he could make a living selling something that he knew an awful lot about . . . coffee. But even though the small town is incredibly friendly and inviting, its residents are also resistent to change . . . . and "Andante" is a gigantic change from the "Daily Brew". . . . . ooops? There is so much to like about this story; which is both its strength and its weakness. Readers may find it incredibly difficult to choose who or what to concentrate on first, even though many of the characters are already pleasantly familiar from the author's first excursion into Winsome. Curiously, Jeremy's last name is listed differently throughout the book; first as Miller and then as Mitchell. Even though the name confusion is surely an editorial gaffe, it was quite distracting; Jeremy is a main character. Ultimately of course, "Of Literature and Lattes" exhibits a great deal of proverbial wisdom; terribly damaged relationships take huge steps forward when those involved honestly and lovingly "try to understand each other". And it works beautifully! Enjoy your visit back to a most beloved place!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Chanel

    Although Of Literature and Lattes can be read as a standalone, I recommend reading The Printed Letter Bookshop first. I think the more emotionally connected readers are to Winsome, the more impactful this novel’s themes of community and perspective will resonate. Additionally, readers will get to see and recognize familiar faces from the previous book. The narration of this book was slightly difficult for me to adjust to, since the point of view shifted between multiple characters - sometimes in Although Of Literature and Lattes can be read as a standalone, I recommend reading The Printed Letter Bookshop first. I think the more emotionally connected readers are to Winsome, the more impactful this novel’s themes of community and perspective will resonate. Additionally, readers will get to see and recognize familiar faces from the previous book. The narration of this book was slightly difficult for me to adjust to, since the point of view shifted between multiple characters - sometimes in the same ongoing scene. However, in the end, I appreciated this style of storytelling and thought it gave a nice reprieve when I felt the main characters, Jeremy and Alyssa, were stuck in attitudes I didn’t like. At first, I struggled to connect with Jeremy because of his relationship with his friend, Ryan. However, his growth and humility as the story progressed really endeared me to him and his story arc was a great illustration of the beauty of forgiveness and second chances. I also enjoyed Jeremy’s relationship with his daughter, Becca, and his commitment to be present in her life. Unfortunately, I didn’t relate or empathize with Alyssa with as much ease. Her tendency to pick fights rather than try to understand another person’s point of view was frustrating, especially with her mom consistently trying to pursue peace and reconciliation. Her struggle is learning to forgive, let go of the past, and accept that people can change. Sadly, I was left wanting more with the resolution of this story arc, even if it wasn't incomplete. Lastly, I thought the romance between Jeremy and Alyssa was kind of sudden – not in an insta-love type of way, but I didn’t think their relationship was built to the place where it wouldn’t take me by surprise. Once I adjusted to it though, I thought their romance was a perfect complement to the story and it added a good dose of sweetness and levity. Overall, Of Literature and Lattes is a decent read filled with small-town charm, community, and second chances. *I received a complimentary copy of this book from NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tracy Greer- Hansen

    After a couple of heavy reads I needed something light and carefree. This book was the perfect read. It has an “At Home in Mitford” flavour to it and this small town really came to life. I grew up in a little town so I appreciate the stories where neighbours become friends and everyone knows your name. 3.5 🌟🌟🌟✨stars!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Suzie Waltner

    I always look forward to Katherine Reay’s unique story voice. The way she infuses literature with the journeys her characters take is second to none, and Of Literature and Lattes met every one of my expectations. Reay excels in writing characters who form a community. In this particular book, that community is Winsome (which was introduced in The Printed Letter Bookshop). There are familiar faces and some new ones. Alyssa has a lot going on between her work, her money issues, and her fractured fam I always look forward to Katherine Reay’s unique story voice. The way she infuses literature with the journeys her characters take is second to none, and Of Literature and Lattes met every one of my expectations. Reay excels in writing characters who form a community. In this particular book, that community is Winsome (which was introduced in The Printed Letter Bookshop). There are familiar faces and some new ones. Alyssa has a lot going on between her work, her money issues, and her fractured family relations. Jeremy is an easy character to root for, especially when he interacts with his daughter. Of Literature and Lattes is about friendships—old and new—and family and community. It shines a spotlight into the space where we choose to lean on those who know us best. Disclosure statement: I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book and was not required to write a positive review. All opinions are my own.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Erin Wilson

    I received a complimentary copy of this book. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own. Okay so, I really wanted to love this book. I thought I was entering into a cute small town romance, and I’m not sure what this was, but it wasn’t that. It also had a lot more scripture than I was expecting...and I was expecting none, so.. First off, it’s my own personal preference - but I hate it when there’s no character description. The author throws like 15 characters at the reader with barel I received a complimentary copy of this book. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own. Okay so, I really wanted to love this book. I thought I was entering into a cute small town romance, and I’m not sure what this was, but it wasn’t that. It also had a lot more scripture than I was expecting...and I was expecting none, so.. First off, it’s my own personal preference - but I hate it when there’s no character description. The author throws like 15 characters at the reader with barely a mention of hair colour. It’s so difficult to visualize something if you don’t know what you’re seeing. Second, I understand that the author had set a previous book in this little town with a few of the same characters - but if they’re going to advertise it as a stand alone it needs to stand on its own. Right off the bat I felt as if I had missed 6 chapters and was rushing to catch up. There were too many characters and too many story lines and it was far too melodramatic in my opinion. Maybe it’s because I was expecting something different, but the story just didn’t vibe with me. I had a very hard time connecting or caring about the characters or their stories.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kav

    Absolutely love that cover! I am such a shallow reader because I instinctively judge a book by its cover and this one promises so much. Did it deliver? Absolutely! As usual, Reay scraped my emotions raw and then poured salt over my wounds and I loved every agonizing minute of it! Be prepared for a angst and drama and the tumultuous relationships of broken people trying to find their way to a better future. There's a strong message about forgiveness that plays to varying degrees in the lives of m Absolutely love that cover! I am such a shallow reader because I instinctively judge a book by its cover and this one promises so much. Did it deliver? Absolutely! As usual, Reay scraped my emotions raw and then poured salt over my wounds and I loved every agonizing minute of it! Be prepared for a angst and drama and the tumultuous relationships of broken people trying to find their way to a better future. There's a strong message about forgiveness that plays to varying degrees in the lives of multiple characters. In fact, this novel is told from many points of view. I don't think I've read a book with so many viewpoints! Some are fleeting -- only a scene or two -- while others, like Jeremy and Alyssa, have more page time. So, if you're not a fan of multiple POV, this might not be the book for you. I found it really drew on the sense of community and I was quite captivated by all the voices clamoring in my head. :-) Readers were introduced to Winsome in The Printed Letter Bookshop and you'll definitely get more out of this novel if you've read that one first. Especially when it comes to Alyssa's relationship with her mother. Linda was one of the main characters in the first book so readers of TPLB have the benefit of experiencing her miraculous transformation. Because of that, I understood how difficult growing up as Linda's daughter would have been so I was more sympathetic to Alyssa's volatile reactions to her mother. But other readers were turned off by her. The author does a great job of bringing insight into this challenging mother/daughter relationship throughout the course of the story so if this is your first visit to Winsome, give Alyssa the benefit of the doubt and I guarantee you'll find compassion and understanding by the end. I listened to the audible edition narrated by Laura Kirman. She did an excellent job but I have to admit that it took me about an hour of listening before I became accustomed to hearing her British accent in an American setting. Only the dialogue was spoken with a mid-western twang while the rest of the narration was all Brit.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jantine

    I received a free copy through Netgalley in return for an honest review. It took a couple of days reading a lot to get into this book. The plot needed some time to get going. The positive side to that is, that the characters and their backstories were fleshed out really well, and they were quite realistic. I must admit that I did not really like Alyssa that much, again especially at the start of the book. I warmed to her when I read on, but I had much difficulty getting over how she seemed very s I received a free copy through Netgalley in return for an honest review. It took a couple of days reading a lot to get into this book. The plot needed some time to get going. The positive side to that is, that the characters and their backstories were fleshed out really well, and they were quite realistic. I must admit that I did not really like Alyssa that much, again especially at the start of the book. I warmed to her when I read on, but I had much difficulty getting over how she seemed very shallow and easy to break contact with and run from her mother. I get it, some things can seem life shattering, but breaking contact over that, with your own mom? Really? I could very much relate to the whole 'oh shit, I effed up this bit of my career, how am I ever going to find a job and build a life again?' (For me it was dropping out of university, but it had kind of the same effect: it is almost impossible to get hired) On the other hand, I rooted for Jeremy so much! No, correct that, I rooted for his daughter most of all, and I hoped very much that she would get all the love and help she deserved.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    I really enjoyed this book. I thought both Alyssa and Jeremy were well-rounded characters . . . characters who believed in God, but still needed to learn and grow in grace . . . even grace towards themselves. I appreciated that there were no easy, pat answers, and the reminder that no matter how hard you try, sometimes things fall flat and you have to pick yourself up, dust yourself off, determine what your dream is, and try again (according to God's plans for you). I think that I appreciated the I really enjoyed this book. I thought both Alyssa and Jeremy were well-rounded characters . . . characters who believed in God, but still needed to learn and grow in grace . . . even grace towards themselves. I appreciated that there were no easy, pat answers, and the reminder that no matter how hard you try, sometimes things fall flat and you have to pick yourself up, dust yourself off, determine what your dream is, and try again (according to God's plans for you). I think that I appreciated the relationship between Alyssa and Janet even moreso than the romance (though that was sweet, for sure!). Mother-daughter relationships can be really HARD, especially if there's further generational dysfunction and hurt. My relationship with my own 'birth mother' was a difficult one, but this gave me some food for thought about the underlying causes of why that might have been. I loved the setting in Winsome so much! There's just something 'cosy' about reading about a small town where everyone knows who you are and tries to have your back.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Patricia Bello

    This book. I gave up. Read till halfway then read the end. That’s it. It’s one thing to read Jeremy’s and Alyssa’s, but we started with Eve,., David, Janet and Luke too. Why? Lots of books, good books focuses on the protagonist’s POV. This one has to have the lead and secondary characters talking too. Which apparently includes the cat. And Alyssa, didn’t really like her. She’s vile to her mom, then regrets it and then she and her mom talk and the cycle repeats itself again. Jeremy is ok but doesn This book. I gave up. Read till halfway then read the end. That’s it. It’s one thing to read Jeremy’s and Alyssa’s, but we started with Eve,., David, Janet and Luke too. Why? Lots of books, good books focuses on the protagonist’s POV. This one has to have the lead and secondary characters talking too. Which apparently includes the cat. And Alyssa, didn’t really like her. She’s vile to her mom, then regrets it and then she and her mom talk and the cycle repeats itself again. Jeremy is ok but doesn’t seem to have it quite together yet. Should I go on with the secondary characters too?? Nope. I kept checking the blurb to find out who the story is really about. Thanks anyway for the book Thomas Nelson.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lani

    Just okay. Random characters, hard to tell which person's head you were in at times. Some of the characters seem thrown in without any reason and we don't hear from them again. In that way, I found it a bit disjointed. Some of the relationships also lacked realism for me. I should say that I didn't realize this was the second book in a series, so I hadn't read the first one. Maybe that would have made a difference, I don't know. Just okay. Random characters, hard to tell which person's head you were in at times. Some of the characters seem thrown in without any reason and we don't hear from them again. In that way, I found it a bit disjointed. Some of the relationships also lacked realism for me. I should say that I didn't realize this was the second book in a series, so I hadn't read the first one. Maybe that would have made a difference, I don't know.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.