web site hit counter Illegal - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Illegal

Availability: Ready to download

What does it mean to be illegal in the United States? Life in Mexico is a death sentence for Emiliano and his sister Sara. To escape the violent cartel that is after them, they flee across the border, seeking a better life in the United States and hoping that they can find a way to bring their pursuers to justice. Sara turns herself over to the authorities to apply for asylum What does it mean to be illegal in the United States? Life in Mexico is a death sentence for Emiliano and his sister Sara. To escape the violent cartel that is after them, they flee across the border, seeking a better life in the United States and hoping that they can find a way to bring their pursuers to justice. Sara turns herself over to the authorities to apply for asylum. Emiliano enters the country illegally, planning to live with their father. But now Sara is being held indefinitely in a detention facility, awaiting an asylum hearing that may never come, finding it harder every day to hold on to her faith and hope. Life for Emiliano is not easy either. Everywhere he goes, it's clear that he doesn't belong. And all the while, the cartel is closing in on them... Emiliano sets off on a tense and dangerous race to find justice, but can he expose the web of crimes from his place in the shadows? Award-winning author Francisco X. Stork's powerful follow-up to Disappeared delves into the corruption and racism that hides under the guise of the law in the United States. With an unsparing look at the asylum process and the journey to find a new life in the US, this is a timely and moving story


Compare

What does it mean to be illegal in the United States? Life in Mexico is a death sentence for Emiliano and his sister Sara. To escape the violent cartel that is after them, they flee across the border, seeking a better life in the United States and hoping that they can find a way to bring their pursuers to justice. Sara turns herself over to the authorities to apply for asylum What does it mean to be illegal in the United States? Life in Mexico is a death sentence for Emiliano and his sister Sara. To escape the violent cartel that is after them, they flee across the border, seeking a better life in the United States and hoping that they can find a way to bring their pursuers to justice. Sara turns herself over to the authorities to apply for asylum. Emiliano enters the country illegally, planning to live with their father. But now Sara is being held indefinitely in a detention facility, awaiting an asylum hearing that may never come, finding it harder every day to hold on to her faith and hope. Life for Emiliano is not easy either. Everywhere he goes, it's clear that he doesn't belong. And all the while, the cartel is closing in on them... Emiliano sets off on a tense and dangerous race to find justice, but can he expose the web of crimes from his place in the shadows? Award-winning author Francisco X. Stork's powerful follow-up to Disappeared delves into the corruption and racism that hides under the guise of the law in the United States. With an unsparing look at the asylum process and the journey to find a new life in the US, this is a timely and moving story

30 review for Illegal

  1. 4 out of 5

    Richie Partington

    Richie’s Picks: ILLEGAL by Francisco X. Stork, Scholastic Press, August 2020, 304p., ISBN: 978-1-338-31055-9 “The Smithsonian National Museum of American History is considering adding pictures drawn by immigrant children in detention centers...The children who had been recently released from Texas detention centers made drawings done in black and dark green...Each drawing depicts bars...” -- Michelle Cruz Gonzales, from “The Smithsonian is Preserving A Part of Our Most Shameful History by Exhibiti Richie’s Picks: ILLEGAL by Francisco X. Stork, Scholastic Press, August 2020, 304p., ISBN: 978-1-338-31055-9 “The Smithsonian National Museum of American History is considering adding pictures drawn by immigrant children in detention centers...The children who had been recently released from Texas detention centers made drawings done in black and dark green...Each drawing depicts bars...” -- Michelle Cruz Gonzales, from “The Smithsonian is Preserving A Part of Our Most Shameful History by Exhibiting Drawings From Children in Cages” July 2019 “The United States has undermined its credibility in the global drive to end human trafficking by giving itself top marks in its annual report on the crime despite dwindling prosecutions and protection for foreign victims, advocates said on Monday… Several anti-trafficking organizations questioned how the United States could maintain the top ranking despite having acknowledged a decline in prosecutions and victim protection--two of three key factors upon which countries are assessed. ‘When the United States upgrades undeserving countries and fails to honestly assess its own shortcomings, it loses credibility and the ability to persuade other countries to do better,’ the foundation Humanity United said in a statement.” -- Christine Murray, Reuters (6/29/20) SARA “‘Maybe the whole image I had of the asylum process was wrong, naive somehow.’ ‘How so?’ ‘I imagined that all I had to do was show the authorities the evidence of actual persecution, of actual threats, as in people machine-gunning our house in Juárez. I had all that hard evidence I had collected in that flash drive I gave to your father. They would see my articles in El Sol about the Desparecidas, the e-mails threatening my life, the work I did to rescue my friend Linda and the other girls being held by Hinojosa. I imagined I could bring lots of witnesses to testify on my behalf--Special Agent Durand, the FBI agent who helped me, the neighbors who witnessed the shooting of my house. I saw my case as fitting within the legal reasons for asylum under the laws of the United States. Was I wrong about the United States?’” EMILIANO “I knew by the bulk of the envelope that it contained money. Could it be that I had judged Abe Gropper wrong, that underneath the orneriness, there was generosity? I searched the man’s face for kindness, but there was none. ‘Go on. Open it.’ The envelope was not sealed. I opened it and saw the hundred-dollar bills. ‘Five thousand dollars. All yours. There’ll be another five thousand when you do what I ask.’ ‘Do what?’ Abe grinned, like he knew I would bite and ask that very question. I tried to swallow, but my mouth was dry. My heart beat uncontrollably and there was nothing I could do to slow it down. ‘It’s very simple,’ Abe continued. ‘Bring me the phone.’” ILLEGAL is the sequel to Francisco X. Stork’s DISAPPEARED, which was published in 2017. The two books are eye-opening, edge-of-your-seat reads. I advise reading DISAPPEARED before starting ILLEGAL. As we learn in DISAPPEARED, Sara is a young Mexican investigative reporter who has been writing about hundreds of girls disappearing from the streets of Ciudad Juárez. Sara’s best friend Linda Fuentes was among the missing. A threatening email is sent to Sara’s editor. designed to stop Sara from any further digging. But an expert successfully follows the electronic trail back to the sender leading to the rescue of Linda and some other young victims. Before she is freed, Linda succeeds in sending Sara the cell phone of her enslaver, a Mexican crime boss. The phone presumably contains information about many other young Mexican women who have been kidnapped and spirited into the U.S. to be sold as sex slaves. Sara, Emilano, and their mom are fortunate to escape their ramshackle house before it is machine-gunned by the bad guys. But Sara and Emiliano are as good as dead if they remain in Mexico. The resulting plan: head north. DISAPPEARED concludes with the siblings barely surviving their escape across the U.S. border and through the desert. Sara intends to seek asylum and is incarcerated in a Trump-era school-turned-detention center. Meanwhile, Emiliano takes possession of the cell phone and nearly dies in the desert. Recovering, thanks to kind strangers (and an ornery horse) who find him, Emiliano desperately needs to make contact with trustworthy authorities who can retrieve and act upon the contents of the phone. But who can he trust? It turns out that there are people with US governmental ties who are part of the kidnapping web. Both DISAPPEARED and ILLEGAL are narrated, in alternating chapters, by the two siblings. They are exciting and nail-biting tales that tie into current issues. What moved me most about the two books is the conscious decision making in which Emiliano repeatedly engages. Emiliano had been an angry adolescent. The siblings' father had previously left the family to sneak across the U.S. border, and was supposed to earn enough money to send a bunch back and make the family’s life more bearable. Instead, their father abandoned the family, initiated a long-distance divorce, married an American woman in the Midwest, and started another family. Angry at his father, and having been engaged in a series of self-destructive acts, Emiliano was saved from himself by Brother Patricio. He and Emiliano subsequently founded the Jiparis, a Scout-like organization designed to help other at-risk teens. Learning by teaching is a powerful tool. Throughout the saga, we see Emiliano being guided by moral principles he’d learned during his time with Brother Patricio. Emiliano had, in turn, been teaching these ethical pillars to the Jiparis. We see him thinking about the right thing to do, and pondering how it might feel if his young charges back in Juarez learned he was acting in a way contrary to what he’d taught them. Dare I ask for another sequel? There is a satisfying conclusion to ILLEGAL, but plenty of loose ends to continue exploring. Richie Partington, MLIS Richie's Picks http://richiespicks.pbworks.com https://www.facebook.com/richiespicks/ [email protected]

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Hannah

    I think it's a huge mistake to title this book Illegal, both because I don't like promoting pejoratives and also because Undocumented would speak to the importance of documentation in this story--documentation of all kinds, not just immigration status but paper, records, recordings, memories, human lives. I'll save the rest of my opinions for later.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Thanks to Scholastic Press for an ARC! I like how the author switched to first person for this novel, rather than the third person he used in the first book. It felt more personal. It’s a timely subject to write a book about and the fast-paced plot will pull readers along. It’s not necessary to read the first book to understand this one, but I highly recommend it! By reading the first book this one seemed like Season 2 of my favorite tv show.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lesley

    Francisco Stork's 2017 novel Disappeared takes place in Juarez, Mexico, and depicts sex trafficking, the cartel, murder, poverty, betrayal, abandonment. Sara Zapata, a young reporter for a local paper, is committed to finding and saving the young women she learns are being kidnapped, including her best friend Linda, despite the warnings of her boss and the threats to herself and her family. Sara’s younger brother Emiliano, whose life has been affected by his father’s abandonment—of the family and Francisco Stork's 2017 novel Disappeared takes place in Juarez, Mexico, and depicts sex trafficking, the cartel, murder, poverty, betrayal, abandonment. Sara Zapata, a young reporter for a local paper, is committed to finding and saving the young women she learns are being kidnapped, including her best friend Linda, despite the warnings of her boss and the threats to herself and her family. Sara’s younger brother Emiliano, whose life has been affected by his father’s abandonment—of the family and his native Mexico—is looking for a better life, for ways to make money to pay the family bills and win the love of his wealthy girlfriend. The siblings find in following their consciences, helping others, and making moral choices, they need to do what is right—not what is easy or even safe, and must sacrifice, or revise, their personal goals. To save their lives, Sara and Emiliano escape to the United States to find a better life and to bring the cartel who is trafficking the women to justice. They cross the border and are attacked in the dessert. And that is where this 2020 sequel begins. Sara turns herself over to the authorities, certain that she meets the requirements for asylum but, as her time in the detention facility grows longer and she observes women being mistreated and deported for no reason, she questions her assumptions. “I imagined that all I had to do was show the authorities the evidence of actual persecution, of actual threats, such as people machine-gunning our house in Juarez.… I saw my case as fitting within the legal reasons for asylum under the law of the United States. Was I wrong about the United States?” (31) As her stay lengthens, she observes, “The whole process of who gets asylum and who gets detained, who gets a bond and who gets released, who gets a visa and who gets deported. I mean, it’s not as rational as I imagined it would be.” (34) Meanwhile Emiliano has entered the country illegally and goes to Chicago with his father, planning to turn Linda’s evidence against the cartel over to the proper authorities. He also finds America to be less than welcoming. As he tells his new friend Aniela, “I think that in Mexico I feel like I belong all the time. I never feel not wanted like I do here sometimes. Here I’m always looking over my shoulder even when no one is there.…knowing that you belong and are wanted is major.” (251) When Sara’s attorney is killed and she is placed in solitary confinement and Emiliano finds he can not trust his father, tensions escalate. A study of government corruption and the asylum process, Illegal is a thriller that will hook the most reluctant adolescent reader. Enough background is given that it may not be completely necessary to read Disappeared first, but it would surely enhance the reading.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Gallman

    Set to release in August, Francisco X. Stork’s follow-up to Disappeared does not disappoint. ⁣ ⁣ Brother and sister Emiliano and Sara are in the United States after crossing the border, desperately fleeing for their lives. With them is a cell phone carrying valuable evidence to bring down a dangerous cartel. To give her brother a chance and turning the phone over to the right people, Sara turns herself in to a border detention center to apply for asylum. One there, she realizes she shouldn’t have Set to release in August, Francisco X. Stork’s follow-up to Disappeared does not disappoint. ⁣ ⁣ Brother and sister Emiliano and Sara are in the United States after crossing the border, desperately fleeing for their lives. With them is a cell phone carrying valuable evidence to bring down a dangerous cartel. To give her brother a chance and turning the phone over to the right people, Sara turns herself in to a border detention center to apply for asylum. One there, she realizes she shouldn’t have trusted the U.S. government as much as she thought. Does her life even matter in the border camp? Emiliano, rescued by a horse after crossing, has found a local he trusts and has been doing work for him, but now it’s time to get the cell phone in the right hands, and the only way to do that is to go to Chicago with his father with whom he has no relationship or trust. ⁣ ⁣ Chapters alternate between Sara and Emiliano which fuels the fast-paced dual narratives as readers hold their breaths for Sara and Emiliano’s safety. Checkpoints and intimidating guards leave readers tense and hopefully give them a sense of what migrants feel as they enter the United States for a better, safer life. ⁣ ⁣ Illegal is perfect for teens who love action as the book almost leaves you breathless and turning the pages for more!⁣

  6. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    Sequel to Disappeared I listened to the audiobook and appreciated the aunticity added by the Spanish accents of the voices and that there was a male and female narrator Sara is a journalist who has been investigating the disappearances of girls from her hometown in Mexico. She and her family have been threatened, forcing her and her brother Emiliano to flee to the US. While crossing the border, things go horribly wrong and Sara turns herself in and requests asylum. Emiliano, however, flees and tri Sequel to Disappeared I listened to the audiobook and appreciated the aunticity added by the Spanish accents of the voices and that there was a male and female narrator Sara is a journalist who has been investigating the disappearances of girls from her hometown in Mexico. She and her family have been threatened, forcing her and her brother Emiliano to flee to the US. While crossing the border, things go horribly wrong and Sara turns herself in and requests asylum. Emiliano, however, flees and tries to seek protection with his father. However, the people pursuing them are determined and do not give up easily. Emiliano must figure out a way to protect himself, his family, help his sister, and get the information they smuggled out to the right people. Lots of action and adventure. Kept me on the edge of my seat (figuratively). Such important issues; a great discussion book. CW: violence, drugs, sex/human trafficking. (I can't remember if there was swearing) Grades 8 and up

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Chandler

    Stork is good at killing his readers softly, but there is none of that in this book. Well, maybe some of that. But there are also high speed journeys down the dark alleys of the human heart and few punches that land hard. I was expecting a smart, well-crafted story. I'm not sure I was expecting a thriller that grabbed me by the heart strings. The characters are complex and authentic, but that doesn't mean they are safe. No one is safe in a world where the rules are arbitrary and barbed with the Stork is good at killing his readers softly, but there is none of that in this book. Well, maybe some of that. But there are also high speed journeys down the dark alleys of the human heart and few punches that land hard. I was expecting a smart, well-crafted story. I'm not sure I was expecting a thriller that grabbed me by the heart strings. The characters are complex and authentic, but that doesn't mean they are safe. No one is safe in a world where the rules are arbitrary and barbed with the worst elements of human nature. This is not an anti-anything book however. It shows that there are many sides of this conflict. There are good and terrible people in every corner of the world. I guess the only precaution I would give with this book is to take the day off when you pick it up. You're going to be busy.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shirley Freeman

    This is a page-turner for teens. Brother and sister, Emiliano and Sara, have crossed the border from Mexico into the US because they are being hunted. They are carrying a cell phone that their friend stole when she escaped from a human trafficking 'bad guy'. The information in the phone could bring down a widespread trafficking ring engineered by people on both sides of the border - including some highly placed government officials. Sara has turned herself in at the border in order to give Emili This is a page-turner for teens. Brother and sister, Emiliano and Sara, have crossed the border from Mexico into the US because they are being hunted. They are carrying a cell phone that their friend stole when she escaped from a human trafficking 'bad guy'. The information in the phone could bring down a widespread trafficking ring engineered by people on both sides of the border - including some highly placed government officials. Sara has turned herself in at the border in order to give Emiliano a chance at disappearing inside the US and getting the phone into the right hands.The story covers Sara's experiences in a detention facility and Emiliano's as an undocumented teen. Great story with some nuance in points of view. I had not read Disappeared, #1 and it didn't matter. I predict there will be a third book in the series

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ruben Degollado

    It’s not often that you find a sequel as good as (or even better in some ways) the first book in a series, but Francisco X. Stork has done it! Here is a new genre, the YA political thriller. Stork infuses immigration issues and corruption, the crime and horror of human trafficking, a budding love story, with a touching meditation on the definition of family and the kindness of strangers. This is one of the most important YA books I’ve read in a long time. I can’t say enough good things about thi It’s not often that you find a sequel as good as (or even better in some ways) the first book in a series, but Francisco X. Stork has done it! Here is a new genre, the YA political thriller. Stork infuses immigration issues and corruption, the crime and horror of human trafficking, a budding love story, with a touching meditation on the definition of family and the kindness of strangers. This is one of the most important YA books I’ve read in a long time. I can’t say enough good things about this book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kim Van

    Like a great TV series, this book made me sad to finish it. I came to care so much about these characters. Stork said that this is the only sequel he will write, but I wish that he would take the story of Sara and Emiliano another step into another book. Where do I start with my praise? The complexity of the characters, the complexity of institutions (like law enforcement), the scene creation/authentic dialogue, the moral musings that never sound preachy, the insight into what happens to vulnera Like a great TV series, this book made me sad to finish it. I came to care so much about these characters. Stork said that this is the only sequel he will write, but I wish that he would take the story of Sara and Emiliano another step into another book. Where do I start with my praise? The complexity of the characters, the complexity of institutions (like law enforcement), the scene creation/authentic dialogue, the moral musings that never sound preachy, the insight into what happens to vulnerable people. Thank you, Francisco, for yet another gift to the YA canon.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    Scary.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Chacha Centeno

    This book directly speaks of MMIW, amongst so many other social, political, cultural, inter-generational and historical components. #nohumanisillegalonstoleland

  13. 5 out of 5

    Janine King

    I haven't read another book that dealt with so many contemporary immigration topics in such a thorough way, bringing many aspects to light without making the story seem too contrived.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Britt

    Read and reviewed for School Library Journal (issue 2020-08-01). Full text TK: https://www.slj.com/?reviewDetail=ill... Read and reviewed for School Library Journal (issue 2020-08-01). Full text TK: https://www.slj.com/?reviewDetail=ill...

  15. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    A powerful book that shows the dark side of immigration detention centers and the asylum process. A real page-turner. I put aside many other things because I got so involved in this book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alex Richey

    Roxana Ortega and Christian Barillas return to narrate the conclusion to Stork's first book, Disappeared. Having escaped the cartel in Mexico and illegally entered the United States, Sara, voiced by Ortega, has applied for asylum and awaits in a detention facility for a decision on her status. Ortega conveys Sara's frustration as her faith in the U.S. justice system wanes with each passing day. Her brother, Emiliano, voiced by Barillas, manages to evade U.S. authorities but is being pursued by t Roxana Ortega and Christian Barillas return to narrate the conclusion to Stork's first book, Disappeared. Having escaped the cartel in Mexico and illegally entered the United States, Sara, voiced by Ortega, has applied for asylum and awaits in a detention facility for a decision on her status. Ortega conveys Sara's frustration as her faith in the U.S. justice system wanes with each passing day. Her brother, Emiliano, voiced by Barillas, manages to evade U.S. authorities but is being pursued by the cartel because he has evidence that proves their trafficking activities. Brutal worlds are revealed as the siblings risk everything to secure better lives. An intense, action-packed listen. A.K.R. © AudioFile 2020, Portland, Maine [Published: SEPTEMBER 2020] From my AudioFile Review of the audiobook performance.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Adam Sockel

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sara Young-Armstrong

  19. 5 out of 5

    Christina

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten McDonald

  22. 4 out of 5

    MsVS

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jumpsinpuddles41

  24. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

  25. 5 out of 5

    Fanona

  26. 4 out of 5

    Teddie

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jose Ignacio

  28. 4 out of 5

    Summer

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Jacobs

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bertila Kola

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.