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Alternate cover version of 1548692336 PURE. UNPLANNED. PERFECT. Those were Nick’s summer plans before Sasha stepped into the picture. With the collateral damage from his parents’ divorce still settling and Dani (his girl of the moment) up for nearly anything, complications are the last thing he needs. All that changes, though, when Nick runs into Sasha at the beach in July. Alternate cover version of 1548692336 PURE. UNPLANNED. PERFECT. Those were Nick’s summer plans before Sasha stepped into the picture. With the collateral damage from his parents’ divorce still settling and Dani (his girl of the moment) up for nearly anything, complications are the last thing he needs. All that changes, though, when Nick runs into Sasha at the beach in July. Suddenly he’s neck-deep in a relationship and surprised to find he doesn’t mind in the least. But Nick’s world shifts again when Sasha breaks up with him. Then, weeks later, while Nick’s still reeling from the breakup, she turns up at his doorstep and tells him she’s pregnant. Nick finds himself struggling once more to understand the girl he can’t stop caring for, the girl who insists that it’s still over.


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Alternate cover version of 1548692336 PURE. UNPLANNED. PERFECT. Those were Nick’s summer plans before Sasha stepped into the picture. With the collateral damage from his parents’ divorce still settling and Dani (his girl of the moment) up for nearly anything, complications are the last thing he needs. All that changes, though, when Nick runs into Sasha at the beach in July. Alternate cover version of 1548692336 PURE. UNPLANNED. PERFECT. Those were Nick’s summer plans before Sasha stepped into the picture. With the collateral damage from his parents’ divorce still settling and Dani (his girl of the moment) up for nearly anything, complications are the last thing he needs. All that changes, though, when Nick runs into Sasha at the beach in July. Suddenly he’s neck-deep in a relationship and surprised to find he doesn’t mind in the least. But Nick’s world shifts again when Sasha breaks up with him. Then, weeks later, while Nick’s still reeling from the breakup, she turns up at his doorstep and tells him she’s pregnant. Nick finds himself struggling once more to understand the girl he can’t stop caring for, the girl who insists that it’s still over.

30 review for I Know It's Over

  1. 4 out of 5

    Aj the Ravenous Reader

    I Know It’s Over is a very straightforward YA novel with the genuine voice of a 16 year old boy resolute on telling the reader about a well planned summer of careless fun and playing around but instead ended up telling a story of falling in love for the first time, getting hurt and eventually breaking up. Stories like this are quite common in the world of YA contemporary but reading it from the guy’s perspective was quite refreshing and undeniably intriguing and entertaining at the same time. Th I Know It’s Over is a very straightforward YA novel with the genuine voice of a 16 year old boy resolute on telling the reader about a well planned summer of careless fun and playing around but instead ended up telling a story of falling in love for the first time, getting hurt and eventually breaking up. Stories like this are quite common in the world of YA contemporary but reading it from the guy’s perspective was quite refreshing and undeniably intriguing and entertaining at the same time. The author seems to know exactly what’s going on inside a teenage boy’s head because the writing is spot on while unabashedly tackling some serious issues teenagers go through. Perhaps my only complaint is that it’s too honest that it needed just a bit censoring. It’s true that events in the story happen all the time but I just personally think that they could have been handled with a bit more caution so as not to appear like encouraging teens to do whatever they want just because they’re teens. I know I’m sounding like my uptight self again, but my conservative upbringing just have to think and talk out loud. I know teens have sex all the time. I’ve long accepted this worldwide fact. Some parents have even resigned to the fact that there is nothing they can do to stop their teenage kids from doing it and have just resorted to teaching their kids “safe” sex. The Department of Health in our country is even proposing to distribute condoms to high school kids. Regardless, I wouldn’t go to the extent of approving and encouraging kids to just go ahead and do it because they can and they’re free. You’re free to jump off a cliff too. You know what I’m saying? I still believe in complete readiness when it comes to physical involvement and if any teenager would ask my advice (although I doubt they would), I’d say you must be emotionally, physically, financially, psychologically and even spiritually ready before committing yourself to another person. See the repercussions in this story when you don’t. ;)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I did not like this book. In fact, this book made me angry. Two sixteen year olds, Nick and Sasha, begin dating and eventually become pregnant. Sasha does not want to continue the relationship prior to discovering the pregnancy and keeps to that decision after discovering the pregnancy. To her credit, she does tell Nick that she is pregnant. However, Nick really cares for Sasha and tells her that he will support her in whatever decision she makes. He has no voice in that decision and is the only c I did not like this book. In fact, this book made me angry. Two sixteen year olds, Nick and Sasha, begin dating and eventually become pregnant. Sasha does not want to continue the relationship prior to discovering the pregnancy and keeps to that decision after discovering the pregnancy. To her credit, she does tell Nick that she is pregnant. However, Nick really cares for Sasha and tells her that he will support her in whatever decision she makes. He has no voice in that decision and is the only character that shows any regret about Sasha's decision to end her pregnancy, which is supported by her parents. The problem I had with the book was that I didn't feel that it was a realistic portrayal of the situation. Yes, she got pregnant but the only options discussed in the book were having the baby or aborting it. There was no discussion about adoption which is a viable option. Sasha did not come across as being particularly upset about aborting the baby--Nick was the only character who felt any sympathy or compassion for the baby and he had no say in what decision was made and those feeling were never voiced to anyone. The other issue I had with this book was that the reactions of the parents were not realistic either. Nick's father gave him $100 for condoms prior to the pregnancy and when everyone's parents were made aware of the situation the general reaction was that it was unfortunate that this happened but that life goes on. Sasha's father was the only parental figure who showed any strong emotion as he was angry with both Sasha and Nick and wouldn't speak to his daughter for a period of time. I think this is it for me and realistic fiction for awhile because this story is one that happens all too often and while this is being touted as realistic fiction, it really wasn't realistic in the emotions involved or the choices available.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cory

    I came into this book with high expectations. Having read excerpts of Martin's other novels, I could tell that I'd enjoy her books. I've been dying to read, The Lighter Side of Life and Death. As I was unable to find a copy of it, I decided to settle for I Know It's Over. Canadians know how to write YA. Ok, so maybe I've only read four books by Canadian authors. But the few Canadian and Australian YA authors out there are putting out much better books than the majority of American authors. This I came into this book with high expectations. Having read excerpts of Martin's other novels, I could tell that I'd enjoy her books. I've been dying to read, The Lighter Side of Life and Death. As I was unable to find a copy of it, I decided to settle for I Know It's Over. Canadians know how to write YA. Ok, so maybe I've only read four books by Canadian authors. But the few Canadian and Australian YA authors out there are putting out much better books than the majority of American authors. This was a solid 3.5 star read. Nick was an interesting narrator. His voice rang true. While his family was a bit underdeveloped, the romance aspect made up for that. Sasha and Nick had chemistry. What a pleasant surprise. This isn't a book about teen issues. I think that's what some reviewers are missing. This isn't preaching that abortion is the right thing to do. It isn't preaching anything. It's just a story about two teens who fall in love--and they aren't broadcasting it to the world, or each other, every other page. If anything, I was a bit disappointed with Nathan, the gay best friend. I liked him, but at times he felt like a plot device. You know how it is, the gay characters always have more chemistry with the heroine than the protagonist. Jillian, the other love interest, also showed potential. I hate that so many books are afraid to give the protagonist more than one love interest. And I don't mean a love triangle. I want characters to break up and move on from their 'everlasting' love. You life will go on if you break up with your true love. It's not to say that your first love is any less true. I liked that Martin gave Nick a push in the right direction. This is probably one of the best teen books I've read in a while. I will definitely be on the look out for more books by C. K. Kelly Martin.

  4. 4 out of 5

    V. L.

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. To say that I was disappointed by this book is putting it mildly. It started out with Sasha announcing to Nick that she's pregnant ... As we go through their relationship through the eyes of Nick I kept thinking and wondering if Sasha was playing a cat and mouse game with him ... She was in, she was out, she didn't seem to know what she wanted and he couldn't seem to figure out that she was probably going to end up breaking his heart in the end. If that was the only problem it could have past... To say that I was disappointed by this book is putting it mildly. It started out with Sasha announcing to Nick that she's pregnant ... As we go through their relationship through the eyes of Nick I kept thinking and wondering if Sasha was playing a cat and mouse game with him ... She was in, she was out, she didn't seem to know what she wanted and he couldn't seem to figure out that she was probably going to end up breaking his heart in the end. If that was the only problem it could have past... But My main problem with the book is that we start the book and Nick is heartbroken ... and the books end and the character is at the same place as he was before ... Nothing has really changed during the book, Nick is still heartbroken, Nathan's father is still not accepting his son's sexual orientation, Holland's still not talking to her father, And Nick's father is still a selfish bastard. As for Sasha... we can only suppose that she still doesn't know what she wants... The writer brings us all sorts of situation that could have made this book a monster book of change... except you're left with unresolved issues from A to Z ... It's unfortunate because the book could have been so much better!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Wardrip

    Reviewed by Breanna F. for TeensReadToo.com Nick plans on having a long, carefree summer with no distractions and no problems. What with his parents' divorce and his father's new girlfriend, Nick needs all the downtime he can get. Even the girl he's seeing (Dani) is starting to get to him. The girl is up for anything, but for some reason Nick just doesn't seem that in to it anymore. But Nick's summer plans of carefree go out the window when Sasha shows up. She's been going to school with him for Reviewed by Breanna F. for TeensReadToo.com Nick plans on having a long, carefree summer with no distractions and no problems. What with his parents' divorce and his father's new girlfriend, Nick needs all the downtime he can get. Even the girl he's seeing (Dani) is starting to get to him. The girl is up for anything, but for some reason Nick just doesn't seem that in to it anymore. But Nick's summer plans of carefree go out the window when Sasha shows up. She's been going to school with him for as long as he can remember. They've just never really talked to each other. One day they do, and suddenly something starts. Sasha is totally different than Dani and isn't about to do anything sexual quite so fast. But Nick and Sasha start getting hot and heavy by the time fall rolls around. And then Sasha breaks it off, saying that she wants to be able to concentrate on school and getting into the best college. Nick is crushed, but there's not much he can do. Then, on Christmas Eve, Sasha shows up out of nowhere and tells Nick that she's pregnant. Sure, they were always careful and used protection, but one time something happened. Neither one of them thought much about it at the time, but now they're over-analyzing the night. Sasha is hesitant about her decision regarding the baby. After she tells her parents, she decides on an abortion, and doesn't really let Nick have much say. Nick, being so mixed up about the whole situation, really wishes Sasha would talk to him more and let him be involved. But the truth is that they could never really have a relationship again, even with the baby. With the help of his gay best friend (Nathan) and his other best friend (Keelor), Nick manages to make it through this whole fiasco. But will he ever have another chance with Sasha? And what will Sasha's final choice about the baby be? First off, I wouldn't recommend this book to anyone under the age of seventeen due to the sexual scenes and the topic of pregnancy and all. That said, though, this was such a great read. I loved how it was told from the guy's point of view, which we hardly ever get to see. I felt so bad for Nick from the very beginning. Of course, my heart went out to Sasha, as well. C.K. Kelly Martin is such a strong writer and this was an amazing book. Her words just jumped off the page to me. I loved Nick's attitude and actions, along with Sasha's. And Nick's younger 14-going-on-30 sister was great. Basically, I loved everything about this book except for the ending. It was okay; I just kind of wanted it to end differently! But anyway, definitely pick up a copy of this book when it's released. I'm sure you won't be disappointed. And I really hope the author writes another book soon!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Abbie

    Actual rating - 2.5 The characters it this were okay, but I didn't love any of them. This wasn't a bad read, but I couldn't get interested in the story. The second half wasn't as bad for me as the first half, but I still didn't enjoy it very much. Overall, Okay read, but didn't hold my interest very well. Actual rating - 2.5 The characters it this were okay, but I didn't love any of them. This wasn't a bad read, but I couldn't get interested in the story. The second half wasn't as bad for me as the first half, but I still didn't enjoy it very much. Overall, Okay read, but didn't hold my interest very well.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Brianne

    I shouldn’t review this book. All I want to say is: FDKJHKFSDX IT’S SO GOOD, GUYS. SO GOOD. PLEASE READ IT SO YOU CAN EXPERIENCE ITS AWESOMENESS. Which isn’t the most (or, believe it or not, the least) coherent thing I’ve ever said. However, I’m going to try to write a semi-useful review, because guys, this book is so good! I read both of Martin’s other novels before I read this one, and while I enjoyed them, I didn’t get her the way other authors and reviewers I respect did. I get it now. Nick’s vo I shouldn’t review this book. All I want to say is: FDKJHKFSDX IT’S SO GOOD, GUYS. SO GOOD. PLEASE READ IT SO YOU CAN EXPERIENCE ITS AWESOMENESS. Which isn’t the most (or, believe it or not, the least) coherent thing I’ve ever said. However, I’m going to try to write a semi-useful review, because guys, this book is so good! I read both of Martin’s other novels before I read this one, and while I enjoyed them, I didn’t get her the way other authors and reviewers I respect did. I get it now. Nick’s voice is probably the most realistic voice I’ve ever read in YA. He can be profound, but it’s never pretentious. His insights are always associated with his situation (in other words, he’s never staring at the sky and contemplating life for the heck of it), and he still sounds like a sixteen-year-old boy as opposed to a philosopher when he says them. I didn’t always like Nick, but I always understood his actions, and did I ever ache for him as the novel progressed. I love how many stereotypes Martin shattered by telling this story from a male’s perspective. On a similar note, though this book deals with a serious subject, it never feels melodramatic. It feels real. I mostly read contemporary YA, and I can’t remember the last time I read a book this realistic. It’s brilliant. Finally, on a personal note, the only books I’ve read prior to this one that felt Canadian were ones assigned to me in school about miners in the Maritimes, none of which I enjoyed. This book felt Canadian, and though I can’t pinpoint why, I know it goes beyond the inclusion of hockey (though that definitely helped!) It’s nice to read a book that reminds me of home.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    damn.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cornmaven

    This is a very complex book. Opening scene is the 16 year old male protagonist being told by his ex-girlfriend (she dumped him about one month earlier) that she's pregnant. On Christmas Eve. What I liked about this book was the digging into the adolescent psyche. It's pretty strong stuff. A lot of scenes relating to sex in this book. The overall theme, which you would hope teens would get, is that casual sex is not a good idea, that even the most well-intended kids slip up, and then there's a pri This is a very complex book. Opening scene is the 16 year old male protagonist being told by his ex-girlfriend (she dumped him about one month earlier) that she's pregnant. On Christmas Eve. What I liked about this book was the digging into the adolescent psyche. It's pretty strong stuff. A lot of scenes relating to sex in this book. The overall theme, which you would hope teens would get, is that casual sex is not a good idea, that even the most well-intended kids slip up, and then there's a price to pay. But, the kicker is that Martin shows you so well how teenagers just don't think, period, that you wonder if the message would get through. that's part of the complexity. I think the portrayal of a certain portion of the teenage world was pretty accurate, and teens involved in that world just would not normally recognize that what they are doing is pretty immature. Most of the teens in this book make a huge distinction between a full sexual encounter, and fooling around naked with each other, or other sexual acts that aren't THE ACT. This confirms what a lot of articles say, that teens don't think it's sex unless it's THE ACT, that anything BUT THE ACT is OK, when in fact there's much esteem and relationship damage involved in that kind of thinking. So, perhaps laid out in black and white, one or two might see their world for the folly that it is. The 16 year old Nick is torn up by the situation. Sarah, the girl, is just swept up the whole mess, and lets her mother handle it. Nick is the more mature of the two, not that either of them is mature. Another complex part of the tale is the reality that a lot of kids won't go to their parents (even good parents) with the situation, when that should be their first stop. I also found the portrayal of the decision making process Sarah goes through as pretty accurate: very little real counseling, mother takes charge and basically decides for her, adoption is not considered or mentioned, the boy is left out of the picture. This is unfortunate and would make for a good discussion amongst teens, whether how it played out was right for all parties involved. There's enough here to make a reader think. There's also enough for some to be squeamish about the story, or about letting teens read it. But I think for high school kids it might hit some nerves. And parents might learn a few teenage tricks - like how they tell the parents they are staying at the girlfriend's house overnight, but really are at the unsupervised free for all party several blocks over. Makes you want to run right out and put instant GPS on the kid's cellphone with alerts to your computer. ;-) One thing I thought of as I read. The average age for marriage is now around 26. Sexual urges kick into high gear around 15 or so. So basically kids are being asked to control those urges for 9-10 years, if we ascribe to the notion that sex should stay within marriage. 30-50 years ago, they were only being asked to control them 3-5 years. Big difference. This begs the question - how do we help kids navigate this minefield? This book shows that they are trying to do it on their own, and not doing a very good job of it at that. And how would teens answers that question?

  10. 5 out of 5

    Isamlq

    3.5/5 Here we have a kid who’s just a kid and doesn’t know what he’s supposed to do when faced with a big thing. The good thing: he doesn’t pretend otherwise. Whatever it is he does happen to feel, he does…no false bravado on his part. You’d think him whiny self centered kid, who’s got too much of everything.. And perhaps, he is that, but there’s no denying that with each page, you know whatever his feelings were for whatever was going on at that moment, be it anger, confusion, lust… and yes, con 3.5/5 Here we have a kid who’s just a kid and doesn’t know what he’s supposed to do when faced with a big thing. The good thing: he doesn’t pretend otherwise. Whatever it is he does happen to feel, he does…no false bravado on his part. You’d think him whiny self centered kid, who’s got too much of everything.. And perhaps, he is that, but there’s no denying that with each page, you know whatever his feelings were for whatever was going on at that moment, be it anger, confusion, lust… and yes, confusion again. There’s a lot of confusion here for him and knee jerk reactions, too. Reactions that have him saying the most thoughtless of things. All those things could have made him grade-A asshole, but he didn’t end up thus in my mind. Instead, he’s just a kid. End of. The great thing: It’s not his story alone. The side stories of how his friends have choices to make are there too. Then all those (non) relationships with certain others that built him up to someone even more true. The events in this are so authentically daily with everything happening tinged with possibility that somewhere somehow someone else is going through the exact same thing he is. All made even more real with the fact that he’s no angel, not at all perfect…as he’d say the wrong things, apologize for the same, try to do better then screw up again… all very, very true, don’t you think? I like how this reminds of 500 Days of Summer. Much like the, I KNOW IT’S OVER reveals all aspects of a relationship: how what you love turns into something to you can’t stand. Because here Nicholas allows us to see it all unfold, from the unexpectedly sweet start, the slow movement from next stage to next stage, then how he’s so utterly taken by surprise by decisions of others… and then the best of the best thing: the fact that things don’t end there. There’s the after, too: where he’s an asshole and does then says some of the most awful things, and all the while those around him offer words of truth that it isn’t all on him, nor all about him. That were it an issue of blame, plenty of that could and should go around. However, upon with a closer look, and it’s obvious: it really isn’t a matter of blame rather a matter of doing what’s right for both of them. I love this story. Of a dad who’s trying, a mother who’s doing so as well, and a sister who’s all go with the flow. Then there’s the little bonus his friends represented; they’re all dealing with their own thing. Perhaps it’s their part in all this that I loved the most: how he and his friends call things as they are… Nathan especially, but better are those times when nothing need be said and still there’s this connection among them.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Carla

    I am pretty certain that Martin is some kind of mastermind. A mastermind of WORDS! I have never read a book before that dealt with teen pregnancy from the boys perspective and I don't even know what I was expecting, but I wasn't expecting THIS. Her ability to weave some seriously heavy shit into a story that manages to be both quiet and loud is so extraordinary it makes my head spin. This is one of those books that under all the details there is a message; a message that will probably piss a lot I am pretty certain that Martin is some kind of mastermind. A mastermind of WORDS! I have never read a book before that dealt with teen pregnancy from the boys perspective and I don't even know what I was expecting, but I wasn't expecting THIS. Her ability to weave some seriously heavy shit into a story that manages to be both quiet and loud is so extraordinary it makes my head spin. This is one of those books that under all the details there is a message; a message that will probably piss a lot of people off, but that's just the way Martin rolls and I LOVE HER for it. And this was her debut novel. My brain can't even HANDLE THAT SHIZZ. What makes a book that could easily be cast aside as one of those "issue books" different is the way the story is told to us as the reader. We don't get thrown into the story with hardly any information, we're slowly immersed into the lives of BOTH Nick and Sasha, pre and post pregnancy. We get to see the good times, the amazing times and even the horrifically bad times. Their relationship is as much a part of the story as is the decisions thay have Nick. Oh Nick. THIS IS WHY I LOVE MALE POV THE BEST. He hands down makes me want to cry. He's frustrated and scared and annoyed and moody and funny and sweet and REAL. Damn, it's hard enough being a teenager coping with high school and part times jobs and hobbies, let alone a girlfriend thats pregnant. And that's what Martin shows us (shows, not tells, authors take note), she show's us how accidents can come back to completely take over your life. I'm not a boy and i'm not a teenager (YAY) but I still managed to feel like I knew Nick like I know myself because he was JUST THAT WELL WRITTEN. And I love Martin for not being afraid to tackle something a lot of other people would think was a crazy subject. I love her for showing that pregnancy affects the boy just as much as the girl. It was devastating and raw, unrelentless and insightful. When Sasha made her decision, it was like she was making the decision for ME, that it was going to affect ME in some way, and when she did, Nick completely stole the show. Mind. Blown.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ivy

    I Know It’s Over is a book with deep and interesting concepts, sex and homosexuality. Sex and homosexuality is one of many things that some teens go through. I haven’t read a book where you are reading in the male’s perspective when it comes down to sex and pregnancy. Typically, sex and pregnancy are in a female’s point of view, but not in I Know It’s Over. I really like the fact that we get to read what the guy thinks about sex and his sexual encounters. To me, Nick seems like a person who would I Know It’s Over is a book with deep and interesting concepts, sex and homosexuality. Sex and homosexuality is one of many things that some teens go through. I haven’t read a book where you are reading in the male’s perspective when it comes down to sex and pregnancy. Typically, sex and pregnancy are in a female’s point of view, but not in I Know It’s Over. I really like the fact that we get to read what the guy thinks about sex and his sexual encounters. To me, Nick seems like a person who would do the right thing. He is nice and caring. He is a very curious person. Who’s not at their teenage years? He was willing to try. However, he, like any typical guy, would pressure girls. Something about him knows where the limit stands and knows when he should stop pressuring even though he thinks about it a lot. Although I don’t agree with the Nick’s ex-girlfriend’s decision of the outcome of her pregnancy, I feel that sometimes it may be the best for her. I, however, would choose a different route. I don’t think that I can live with myself if I did what she did. There is a lot to consider when someone is that young and pregnant. I do understand the decision she had made. Homosexuality discussed in this book seems to be how everyone will feel if they came out of the closet. I feel like that’s what everyone would act if they knew the one they love are homosexuals. However, those who are homosexuals does have it hard on them too because they are made fun of and not taken seriously. I really enjoy this book because it conveys something in the bigger picture. It’s a wonderful read and I recommend this to those who are and aren’t aware about sex, pregnancy, and homosexuality.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Awkward. If I had to pick one word to describe I Know It's Over, it would be just that -- awkward. It's not the situation that is entirely awkward for me, especially since I was intrigued by the idea of a novel about an unexpected pregnancy and following abortion from the male teen's point-of-view. But the characters are awkward, the dialog is awkward, the interactions are awkward. The necessary details just aren't there, and the ones that are involved more telling than showing. There's a heavy Awkward. If I had to pick one word to describe I Know It's Over, it would be just that -- awkward. It's not the situation that is entirely awkward for me, especially since I was intrigued by the idea of a novel about an unexpected pregnancy and following abortion from the male teen's point-of-view. But the characters are awkward, the dialog is awkward, the interactions are awkward. The necessary details just aren't there, and the ones that are involved more telling than showing. There's a heavy reliance upon flashbacks and a character telling you the back story. I prefer it when details are inserted subtly rather than a giant block of information dropped into the reader's lap, and as the story began I was wondering when Martin would just get on with the story. And when she does, it's unrealistic and unfocused. The unrealistic part stems from the parents' reactions. which really bother me. Nick doesn't tell his mother until after the fact, but once he does, she just seems to nod her head and move on to the next topic. There's no reaction, and the only parent that does react is knocked down to a reference. There's no discussion of what to do amongst the teens or the parents; Sasha's decision is just an automatic reaction with no one even discussing keeping the baby or putting it up for adoption. I wasn't bothered by the decision, but I was bothered by how Sasha and Nick reached that decision. There were bits and pieces of this novel that I liked -- the premise, Nick's reaction to Sasha's decision -- but Sasha doesn't react, which ultimately killed this novel for me.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Wow, I am choosing some real winners lately. GRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR!!!! This book actually made me physically ill. I wanted to scream the entire time about how selfish the characters were and how idiotic their parents are. The parents are so unrealistic and amoral that they are completely unbelievable as characters. Nick's Dad just assumes that Sasha will have an abortion and when Nick finally tells his mom she merely nods her head and tells him he can talk to her. Sasha's supposedly strict Wow, I am choosing some real winners lately. GRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR!!!! This book actually made me physically ill. I wanted to scream the entire time about how selfish the characters were and how idiotic their parents are. The parents are so unrealistic and amoral that they are completely unbelievable as characters. Nick's Dad just assumes that Sasha will have an abortion and when Nick finally tells his mom she merely nods her head and tells him he can talk to her. Sasha's supposedly strict and religious parents seem to just want to "take care" of the problem and the father merely ignores her daughter; which may be the only plausable reaction in the book. I can not believe that we live in a world where abortion is the first thought...almost the only thought when a girl gets pregnant. The only redeeming quality I found in this book was the way that the author tried to give a new view to abortion and its effects. It is very unusual to read a book about pregnancy from the male point of view. I liked that she showed that Nick actually had feelings and that he felt pain when he knew Sasha was feeling pain. BUT overall this book promoted abortion, promiscuity, and selfishness. I hope this was not the author's intent, but it reads as such.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Savannah (Books With Bite)

    What I really like is getting to see it from a boys pov and the things he went through. I like the way Ms. Martin showed the emotions. Not only the emotionally toll of the relationship but also the psychical toll as well. Nick does his best when it comes to supporting his ex-girlfriends and I admire him for that. He did whatever choice she made. What I didn't like is that Nick didn't really have a choice in the matter. While I was glad that he supported Sasha, Sahsha didn't support him. It was a What I really like is getting to see it from a boys pov and the things he went through. I like the way Ms. Martin showed the emotions. Not only the emotionally toll of the relationship but also the psychical toll as well. Nick does his best when it comes to supporting his ex-girlfriends and I admire him for that. He did whatever choice she made. What I didn't like is that Nick didn't really have a choice in the matter. While I was glad that he supported Sasha, Sahsha didn't support him. It was all about her. Nick was going through some pretty heavy things too and no one did anything but give him grief about it. It was both their problem and both should have a decision. I was glad that Nick had a great support system of friends. He had good friends he was able to talk to and lean on. Even Nick with all that he went through, Nick still helped out his friends whenever they needed him as well. Nick is loyal to those he loves. This book contain sex, homosexuality, and lots of drama. Its also a good book to share with teens in my opinion about the stress and consequences in sex. You see the characters go through a lots of stressful moments, in learning in the decisions that they have to make.

  16. 4 out of 5

    ɑƨħŵɑɡ ♥Team Magnus Damora FOREVER♥

    Mostly, in YA Romances, We always get the girl's POV about falling in love and the hardship of breakups. This time, C.K. Kelly Martin, tells you the story from a guy's perspective. Nick, or Nicholas, was on his way to spend his Christmas with his dad when his girlfriend Sasha calls him to tell him that she's pregnant. That's the bottom line people. What will this young couple do with such dilemma. I found this really as I expected it if not more. It was emotional, touching and just interesting. I Mostly, in YA Romances, We always get the girl's POV about falling in love and the hardship of breakups. This time, C.K. Kelly Martin, tells you the story from a guy's perspective. Nick, or Nicholas, was on his way to spend his Christmas with his dad when his girlfriend Sasha calls him to tell him that she's pregnant. That's the bottom line people. What will this young couple do with such dilemma. I found this really as I expected it if not more. It was emotional, touching and just interesting. I remember I read some preview chapters and I REALLY wanted to get my hands on it. Now that I did, I find that I am completely satisfied. For once, I get to read about a boy's perspective of how to deal with this kind of emotional experience. And the guy is not all too sweet neither too much of jerk, he's just a teenager under a LOT of stress. More importantly, I liked that Nick wasn't written as a jerk, he's as much in love with Sasha as the first day he met her. And even with her trying to blow him off, he didn't give up on her. It was really touching.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Costa

    I'm still not sure if I liked this book. A lot happened, but yet at the same time nothing happened. I mean it seems like all the characters stayed the same. Just plain weird. I'm still not sure if I liked this book. A lot happened, but yet at the same time nothing happened. I mean it seems like all the characters stayed the same. Just plain weird.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

    CLICK HERE TO READ MORE REVIEWS AT READING, EATING AND DREAMING I WAS BLAIR WALDORF I Know It’s Over by C.K. Kelly Martin is a moving young adult drama that reveals some of the complications, choices and consequences that result from an unwanted, unplanned teen pregnancy. I immensely enjoyed this novel, and the only reason I didn’t rate it higher was because it wasn’t a novel I would want to re-read. When I rate a book 4 or 5 STARS it means I loved it so much I would want to revisit it down the ro CLICK HERE TO READ MORE REVIEWS AT READING, EATING AND DREAMING I WAS BLAIR WALDORF I Know It’s Over by C.K. Kelly Martin is a moving young adult drama that reveals some of the complications, choices and consequences that result from an unwanted, unplanned teen pregnancy. I immensely enjoyed this novel, and the only reason I didn’t rate it higher was because it wasn’t a novel I would want to re-read. When I rate a book 4 or 5 STARS it means I loved it so much I would want to revisit it down the road. While I am grateful for the experience of reading this novel, I wouldn’t ever feel compelled to read it again. I Know It’s Over stood out from other young adult novels. For one thing, it’s told from a male’s point of view. The majority of the novels I read are told from the female’s perspective, if not solely than mainly. Reading from Nick’s perspective was realistic and fascinating. Martin gives you a front-row seat to Nick’s thoughts and emotions. And let me tell you, his emotions are all over the place. At the start of this novel, Nick is single and casually “hooking up” with Dani. His unfiltered thoughts and carefree actions were just like your stereotypical 16-year-old boy. He was almost desperate at times, always taking whatever he could get from Dani, and not interested in a monogamous relationship. Are all teenage boys like Nick? No, but I would guess there are a lot like him out there. When Nick and Sasha start hanging out, it’s one emotion after another: pleasure, happiness, anger, betrayal, sadness, frustration, etc. The relationship between Nick and Sasha is true-to-life; it’s not a fairy tale. I really appreciate the way Martin portrayed their first time together. She kept things real. This book has a lot of great characters, especially Nick and Nathan, Nick’s best friend who is struggling with his sexuality. I was not, however, a huge fan of Sasha and Keelor, Nick’s other best friend. For the life of me, I couldn’t understand what Nick saw in Sasha. Even his memories from the beginning of their relationship paint her poorly. She came across as sort of bitchy, sort of judgmental, and extremely selfish. She breaks up with Nick with a stupid, selfish reason. She ignores him and shuts him out. She also doesn’t really include Nick in any of the decision-making. I am all for female power, but Sasha never considers Nick’s feelings or opinions. That made her selfish. I gave I Know It’s Over by C.K. Kelly Martin 3 STARS (3.5 STARS). I recommend this novel to all young adults. If you are looking for a happy, feel-good book then this probably isn’t the book for you. It’s not a complete downer, but it’s a realistic take on teen pregnancy…so it’s not a fairy tale. -XOXO READING, EATING AND DREAMING

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    C.K. Kelly Martin's story of a teenage couple's rise, fall and the consequences of the choices they made together. Nick is an ordinary enough teenage boy, dating the girls who allow him to fool around but never quite let him go all the way. He then meets Sasha, who he finds himself falling for and sharing an entirely different kind of connection with, leading to his becoming faithful to her and pursuing a summertime romance together. Nick begins to push Sasha for more from their relationship on C.K. Kelly Martin's story of a teenage couple's rise, fall and the consequences of the choices they made together. Nick is an ordinary enough teenage boy, dating the girls who allow him to fool around but never quite let him go all the way. He then meets Sasha, who he finds himself falling for and sharing an entirely different kind of connection with, leading to his becoming faithful to her and pursuing a summertime romance together. Nick begins to push Sasha for more from their relationship on a physical side, eventually ended up in the two becoming sexually active and an unintended pregnancy. Sasha discovers this a month after she decides to take a break from Nick to allow her to focus on school and other aspects of her life. Told from the first-person perspective of Nick, the story is a fascinating and frightening one all at the same time. Nick's voice is an authentic one and it will ring true to any of us who have been a hormonally imbalanced teenager. The story is one of two people who are forced to grow up early because of their decisions and, on that level, it works fairly well. The story may be frightening to parents of teens when the attitudes toward the physical side of a teenage romance are revealed. It's certainly eye opening and it could create some interesting conversations. However, the book falls apart because while Nick and Sasha are well drawn, the rest of the supporting cast is a bit too cliched and familiar. Nick's estranged parents, his sister and Sasha's family are only here to serve one role and rarely become more than simple caricatures for one viewpoint or another. Nick's father's casual attitude toward his son's increasing sexual activity is that he gives Nick money for condoms and then is upset later that Nick didn't follow his advice. It seems a bit cavalier from Nick's father and doesn't make the character come off well.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dottie

    This book tackles sex, pregnancy, and abortion head on, but it is essentially a story of the end of a relationship told from the point of view of sixteen year old Nick Severson. Nick, a popular and good looking high school hockey player, finds himself completely shaken by the news that his ex-girlfriend is pregnant. This forces him to come to terms with the consequences of his actions and his lingering feelings for Sasha. C.K. Kelly Martin's writing reminds me of Courtney Summer's in Cracked Up t This book tackles sex, pregnancy, and abortion head on, but it is essentially a story of the end of a relationship told from the point of view of sixteen year old Nick Severson. Nick, a popular and good looking high school hockey player, finds himself completely shaken by the news that his ex-girlfriend is pregnant. This forces him to come to terms with the consequences of his actions and his lingering feelings for Sasha. C.K. Kelly Martin's writing reminds me of Courtney Summer's in Cracked Up to Be and Some Girls Are and Jenny Valentine's in Broken Soup. She does not sugarcoat anything, nor does she romanticize her characters' thoughts and feelings. There is hardly any room for thought provoking introspection or flowery language. This is a stripped down Sarah Dessen or Deb Caletti book. This could be a John Green novel with the unflinching honesty but toned down humor. It does not concern itself with long-winded exposition, and the result is this story of a very confused boy with Holden Caulfield tendencies who can break your heart with thoughts like, "Her eyes are red and I think I want to make her cry. She could cry over me at least twice. Anybody is worth that." That's it. What most writers would go on about for an entire paragraph, C.K. Kelly Martin wrote in three sentences. As someone who is often guilty of over explaining, I admire that. If you've read Melina Marchetta's Jellicoe Road, this line should be familiar: "Maybe that's why humans find it so hard getting over love affairs. It's not the pain they're getting over, it's the love." Reading I Know It's Over drives home this point.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    It was ok, for all the hype I've heard about it. The book follows the relationship of Nick and Sasha, two 16-year-olds embarking on their first love. They end up losing their virginity to each other, and as things get more complicated, Sasha decides she's not ready for this type of relationship and breaks up with Nick. Devastated, Nick tries to get on with his life, only to find Sasha on his doorstep Christmas Eve telling him she's pregnant. The first half of the book, talking about Nick and Sasha It was ok, for all the hype I've heard about it. The book follows the relationship of Nick and Sasha, two 16-year-olds embarking on their first love. They end up losing their virginity to each other, and as things get more complicated, Sasha decides she's not ready for this type of relationship and breaks up with Nick. Devastated, Nick tries to get on with his life, only to find Sasha on his doorstep Christmas Eve telling him she's pregnant. The first half of the book, talking about Nick and Sasha getting together and breaking up, was really boring to me. It's the same story of boymeetsgirl, boyfallsforgirl, boyhassexwithgirl, girlandboybreaukup. The only real interesting part is that it's told from Nick's perspective, but that almost makes it less sentimental, as the author clearly sends the message that Nick is a pig-headed male obsessed with sex until Sasha makes him want a relationship. The second part, although more sentimental, almost read like a textbook at times, describing abortion and health effects of pregnancy. The book does address a very important topic well, and also emphasized the importance to talking to your parents, using birth control, and the emotional health of teenagers in relationships; however, the slow pace of the book and the textbook-like description of medicine (as well as the relationship, come to think of it) make it a less than enthralling read. I wasn't really rooting for the characters, which lost this book an entire star.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ringo The Cat

    I Know It’s Over is a very rare YA read in that this is a book about a teen relationship that has ended (I know It’s Over) but gets complicated all over again, but uncharacteristically from a male point of view. Not only is this very refreshing in YA-land, C.K. Kelly Martin also writes believably and convincingly from 16-year-old Nick’s point of view, not just a male POV for the sake of a male POV. On Christmas Eve Nick finds out that his ex-girlfriend Sasha is pregnant. Through a series of flas I Know It’s Over is a very rare YA read in that this is a book about a teen relationship that has ended (I know It’s Over) but gets complicated all over again, but uncharacteristically from a male point of view. Not only is this very refreshing in YA-land, C.K. Kelly Martin also writes believably and convincingly from 16-year-old Nick’s point of view, not just a male POV for the sake of a male POV. On Christmas Eve Nick finds out that his ex-girlfriend Sasha is pregnant. Through a series of flashbacks we get to experience the intense relationship between the two all over again, up until the point where Nick tells his father (Nick’s parents are separated) to go back so he can talk with Sasha about what has happened and what will happen between them now. Much like in Courtney Summers’ novels, C.K. Kelly Martin’s writing is extremely fluent, yet to the point and without any form of sentimentalizing or sugarcoating things, making this way more emotional than you might have bargained for in the beginning. And C.K. Kelly Martin addresses a lot of things in this fairly short novel: teen love and lust, teen pregnancy, drug use, abortion, yet with such an unflinching honesty that it’s hard to resist this book: PURE, UNPLANNED, PERFECT is what Nick wanted, but definitely didn’t get. Instead the reader gets a very realistic, honest book about teen relationships and making the tough decisions.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Gabrielle Prendergast

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Reading these reviews I can see how problematic the topic of abortion is for fiction writers, especially those writing YA. Many reviewers who rated this book low had problems with the abortion theme, some specifying that it was treated too lightly! God! My main complaint in this otherwise fine book was that such a big deal was made of it all. I mean sometimes that's how it is, I guess, but so many young women just face up to this sort of mishap bravely and sensibly. I KNOW THIS FROM EXPERIENCE HAV Reading these reviews I can see how problematic the topic of abortion is for fiction writers, especially those writing YA. Many reviewers who rated this book low had problems with the abortion theme, some specifying that it was treated too lightly! God! My main complaint in this otherwise fine book was that such a big deal was made of it all. I mean sometimes that's how it is, I guess, but so many young women just face up to this sort of mishap bravely and sensibly. I KNOW THIS FROM EXPERIENCE HAVING WORKED INA CLINIC so don't try to argue with me. Just once I'd like to see abortion treated as the relatively banal occurrence that it often is. This also is another book wherein teenage male sexuality is viewed as a harmful and deadly toxin instead of the healthy and natural thing that it is. Poor Nick got his heart stomped into the dirt for wanting to bonk a girl that he loved. Not that he wasn't treated sympathetically by the author, he was, but lord how she made him SUFFER. I'm OK with suffering in books, but this felt like punishment for his desire. Meanwhile the girl, Sasha was excused her terminal and downright cruel wishy-washyness I guess because girls who are pressured into having sex always lose their minds or something? The moral - dare to have sex and you will lose everything? Not cool.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    I appreciate what the author was trying to do with this book but, for me, it was kind of meandering and, quite honestly, just poorly written. There was way too much reliance on dialogue and not enough actual writing and character development. Nick and Sasha and the rest of the supporting cast felt flat. The story was purely plot-driven and I thought it lacked the entire emotional side of teen pregnancy. The best thing about this book, for me, was that it actually presented abortion as an option I appreciate what the author was trying to do with this book but, for me, it was kind of meandering and, quite honestly, just poorly written. There was way too much reliance on dialogue and not enough actual writing and character development. Nick and Sasha and the rest of the supporting cast felt flat. The story was purely plot-driven and I thought it lacked the entire emotional side of teen pregnancy. The best thing about this book, for me, was that it actually presented abortion as an option (that was ultimately taken). In a world where movies like Juno and Knocked Up have been praised as examples of teens "doing the right thing," and I feel like abortion has become even more villainized and less talked about then ever before. And it's sad, really, because it's an option and it needs to be talked about, especially with teens who get pregnant. So I was glad that the author ended up going that route with her characters. But the rest of the book just fell short of my expectations.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    My heart is still aching for Sasha and Nick. I Know It's Over is such a wonderful honest tale of teenage pregnancy. yet it never screems Teenage Public Service announcement I loved that the POV came from Nick. At times I wanted Sasha's POV but overall I think the dialouge driven book does well capturing her feelings as well. I found this book very relative to today's teens with the "friends with benefits" and "hooking up". When Nick meets Sasha he finds that things can get much more complicated My heart is still aching for Sasha and Nick. I Know It's Over is such a wonderful honest tale of teenage pregnancy. yet it never screems Teenage Public Service announcement I loved that the POV came from Nick. At times I wanted Sasha's POV but overall I think the dialouge driven book does well capturing her feelings as well. I found this book very relative to today's teens with the "friends with benefits" and "hooking up". When Nick meets Sasha he finds that things can get much more complicated with a girl you acutually care for and seeing him try and balance his teen hormones and feelings is really quite interesting. I also loved Nicks realationship with his two best friends. I loved I Know It's over and think that you will too.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    I absolutely love C.K. Kelly Martin`s writing. She has such a talent of speaking through teenagers minds and this book was no exception. The situation that Nick and Sasha find themselves in is a very serious, heart-breaking matter and when reading this book, you feel all of their emotions. I felt terrible for Nick because he seemed so in love with Sasha, but I just feel like she never really gave him what he deserved and that she was only looking out for herself. Dealing with being pregnant at s I absolutely love C.K. Kelly Martin`s writing. She has such a talent of speaking through teenagers minds and this book was no exception. The situation that Nick and Sasha find themselves in is a very serious, heart-breaking matter and when reading this book, you feel all of their emotions. I felt terrible for Nick because he seemed so in love with Sasha, but I just feel like she never really gave him what he deserved and that she was only looking out for herself. Dealing with being pregnant at sixteen is not really something anyone plans on doing, but I feel that Martin captured it beautifully and painfully real. I felt my heart breaking through the whole second half of this book and I love when an author is able to capture your attention like that.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ria

    Not really fan of the whole story but it does really makes a mark in my heart. I felt the pain of their relationship and love. I wished things goes differently and that their love was enough. But they are still so young and many things may happen. I know that that was really the ending but in my mind I picture them getting back together after the long long years of separation. I am really a fan of Sasha and Nick and I am hoping and wishing for the very best for the both of them. So if you are re Not really fan of the whole story but it does really makes a mark in my heart. I felt the pain of their relationship and love. I wished things goes differently and that their love was enough. But they are still so young and many things may happen. I know that that was really the ending but in my mind I picture them getting back together after the long long years of separation. I am really a fan of Sasha and Nick and I am hoping and wishing for the very best for the both of them. So if you are reading this C. K. Kelly Martin, i don't mind a sequel with this plot and I just have the perfect title: Maybe We Thought Wrong. Lol. A girl can dream right?

  28. 4 out of 5

    Loretta Nyhan

    Stunning. The book I want my son to read when he hits the teen years, though it isn't at all an afterschool special-ish issue-driven book. I Know It's Over made me think while I was reading it, really think--about the first time life hits a person upside the head, and the emotions that come on so strong they're almost unmanageable. Nick's experience is personal and universal and engaging and shattering. I couldn't put this book down. Stunning. The book I want my son to read when he hits the teen years, though it isn't at all an afterschool special-ish issue-driven book. I Know It's Over made me think while I was reading it, really think--about the first time life hits a person upside the head, and the emotions that come on so strong they're almost unmanageable. Nick's experience is personal and universal and engaging and shattering. I couldn't put this book down.

  29. 4 out of 5

    TheSaint

    It's so rare to find a YA novel that addresses the holy trinity of lust/love/relationships from the male perspective. And even more rare to to find the voice utterly true, and the characters utterly real, warts and all. Too bad guys don't read much realistic fiction. My male students who read (mostly adventure and dystopian) could very likely learn to really like this one, but frankly, I'm a little hesitant to offer it. It's so rare to find a YA novel that addresses the holy trinity of lust/love/relationships from the male perspective. And even more rare to to find the voice utterly true, and the characters utterly real, warts and all. Too bad guys don't read much realistic fiction. My male students who read (mostly adventure and dystopian) could very likely learn to really like this one, but frankly, I'm a little hesitant to offer it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    julieta

    I was expecting something else. Half of it was just flashbacks which annoyed the hell out of me---it could have been bits of it WHILE the story develops not all of it together-- and when it got to the part I wanted it was disappointing.

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