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Heavily influenced by Doyle's growing belief in Spiritualism after the death of his son, brother, and two nephews in World War I, the book focuses on Edward Malone's at first professional, and later personal interest in Spiritualism. Heavily influenced by Doyle's growing belief in Spiritualism after the death of his son, brother, and two nephews in World War I, the book focuses on Edward Malone's at first professional, and later personal interest in Spiritualism.


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Heavily influenced by Doyle's growing belief in Spiritualism after the death of his son, brother, and two nephews in World War I, the book focuses on Edward Malone's at first professional, and later personal interest in Spiritualism. Heavily influenced by Doyle's growing belief in Spiritualism after the death of his son, brother, and two nephews in World War I, the book focuses on Edward Malone's at first professional, and later personal interest in Spiritualism.

30 review for The Land Of Mist: The Best Story for Readers (Annotated) By Arthur Conan Doyle.

  1. 4 out of 5

    Evgeny

    DNF. Professor Challenger became fascinated with Spiritualism (and you should too). The whole book feels like promotion of this belief (and you should promote it too). I just reread what I wrote and realized that it worked in my case, DNF or not. The novel feels completely different from the first two. It is told in third person and of the original four characters only Professor Challenger and Edward Malone are present. The book is too busy being excited about Spiritualism to bother about such tr DNF. Professor Challenger became fascinated with Spiritualism (and you should too). The whole book feels like promotion of this belief (and you should promote it too). I just reread what I wrote and realized that it worked in my case, DNF or not. The novel feels completely different from the first two. It is told in third person and of the original four characters only Professor Challenger and Edward Malone are present. The book is too busy being excited about Spiritualism to bother about such trivialities as interesting plot or characters. I lasted for two chapters; I was stupid enough to read a footnote for the second one; this sealed my reading's fate: I could not DNF it fast enough. Lately a significant number of authors began destroying great series and characters in order to deliver the Great Message to us, the unwashed masses. I am looking at you, Lois McMaster Bujold. I will never forgive you for what you did to Aral Vorkosigan in a poor excuse for a book called Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen. If you think this only happens in speculative fiction let me introduce Pretty Broken Dolls. This is a last book of a romance series and it left lots of fans of the genre very angry - and for a good reason. I thought this is a recent development, but reading The Land of Mist convinced me that this phenomenon (disaster?) was known as early as 1926 when this book was published. Let me put it this way. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle created the best-known character in literature ever: Sherlock Holmes. His Professor Challenger was the proof that he can create another equally good character. In this book he destroys the guy in the worst possible way: not by killing him physically, but by killing him as a character. Luckily the Spiritualism fell out of vogue a long time ago. For this reason all the drama of the book feels highly artificial. Why the author decided to write this book at all? I can only speculate that by the time he got old his mental facilities started to degenerate. This could be the only excuse for this waste of paper (or electrons if you read an ebook).

  2. 4 out of 5

    Hanne

    This is pure tripe. If it hadn't been about Challenger I would never have finished it. I can't look past the blatant nonsensical propaganda and the agenda Doyle had when he wrote this. He used his character to promote his own cause, forcing his own on them. Bad form and misuse! I disapprove heartily. This is pure tripe. If it hadn't been about Challenger I would never have finished it. I can't look past the blatant nonsensical propaganda and the agenda Doyle had when he wrote this. He used his character to promote his own cause, forcing his own on them. Bad form and misuse! I disapprove heartily.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dave T

    "As you can see, like all newcomers to a religion, he was intoxicated by his conversion, and, in headlong rush to join, he went too far." Victor Hugo, Les Miserables. Marius was the subject of the above quote but it kept springing to my mind while I was reading 'The Land of Mist'. Arthur Conan Doyle wrote this (the third book to feature the great Professor Challenger) after great bereavements and whilst he was increasing his involvement and devotion to spirituality. Doyle is a great story teller a "As you can see, like all newcomers to a religion, he was intoxicated by his conversion, and, in headlong rush to join, he went too far." Victor Hugo, Les Miserables. Marius was the subject of the above quote but it kept springing to my mind while I was reading 'The Land of Mist'. Arthur Conan Doyle wrote this (the third book to feature the great Professor Challenger) after great bereavements and whilst he was increasing his involvement and devotion to spirituality. Doyle is a great story teller and snippets of that still shine through from time to time here, but that is only the real positive I can conjure from this book. Written in third person unlike the other outings of Professor Challenger's existence, this feels like a very different book and there's no real reason for that character to be used here as we see so little of him he's almost redundant. But the real failing of this book is that it simply comes across as anti-science pro-spirituality propaganda. Conventional science, which Doyle has praised in the past, is slandered and painted as an incredibly negative and misguided vice whilst seance's are passed over as real fact. While this book was written at another time when there could have been doubts to the fraudulence of "professional" mediums, that it's thankfully not the case today and while I dislike judging an old book on today's standards in some cases, when certain practices are put on pedestals, it's sadly unavoidable. DT 22/02/2013

  4. 5 out of 5

    Joeri Ryckaseys

    A magnificent story about the supernatural. A.C. Doyle, a famous supporter of the spiritualist movement, defends his ideas by putting them in a nove, where he combines sciense with spirituality. Since I am interested in spiritualism I particulary liked to get a view on how things worked in the spiritualist movement in the early 21th century. Verry interesting to read about Doyle's experiences with certain phenomena. I really enjoyed it, and even if you don't believe, it's a great novel anyway :) A magnificent story about the supernatural. A.C. Doyle, a famous supporter of the spiritualist movement, defends his ideas by putting them in a nove, where he combines sciense with spirituality. Since I am interested in spiritualism I particulary liked to get a view on how things worked in the spiritualist movement in the early 21th century. Verry interesting to read about Doyle's experiences with certain phenomena. I really enjoyed it, and even if you don't believe, it's a great novel anyway :)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rikke

    As just about every other Arthur Conan Doyle books, this is a very well written book. The topic of this book, however, could not be further apart from a traditional ACD book. Personally, I didn't like the story. It lacked the depth and extraordinary imagination that can usually be found in his story. The only interesting part of this book, is how this dramatic change in writing style reflects the great effect the death of his wife had on Arthur Conan Doyle. As just about every other Arthur Conan Doyle books, this is a very well written book. The topic of this book, however, could not be further apart from a traditional ACD book. Personally, I didn't like the story. It lacked the depth and extraordinary imagination that can usually be found in his story. The only interesting part of this book, is how this dramatic change in writing style reflects the great effect the death of his wife had on Arthur Conan Doyle.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Brown

    I don't know if I have ever read such a biased book in my life. This is one of many examples of a false religion that strives to portray itself as Christianity. And it is much, much worse to teach a false Gospel than teach a different religion, for you are blaspheming the name of the Lord. Here are some quotes from the book, from a conversation between a raised spirit and it's 'good medium'(apparently there are such things): "Is it right that you can come back?"(medium) "Would God allow it if it w I don't know if I have ever read such a biased book in my life. This is one of many examples of a false religion that strives to portray itself as Christianity. And it is much, much worse to teach a false Gospel than teach a different religion, for you are blaspheming the name of the Lord. Here are some quotes from the book, from a conversation between a raised spirit and it's 'good medium'(apparently there are such things): "Is it right that you can come back?"(medium) "Would God allow it if it were not right? What a wicked man you must be to ask!"(Since when does God only allow things that are right? Never says that anywhere in the scriptures.) "What religion are you?"(medium) "We were Roman Catholics" "Is that the right religion?"(medium) "All religions are right if they make you better"(WHAT. If that isn't blatant Universalism, then I don't know what it is. "Then does it matter?"(medium) "It is what people do in daily life, not what they believe."(uhhh...?) And it went on and on. Did manage to find two quotes: "You never know who are your friends. They slip away like water when it comes to the pinch." "One thing we have learned, is that two souls, where real love exists, go on and on without a break through all the spheres. Why then, should you and I fear death, or anything which life or death can bring?"

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    Professor Challenger and Malone return for a third adventure, this time exploring the spiritual world. Malone, along with Challenger's daughter Enid, starts investigating spiritualist meetings for his newspaper. Initially a skeptic, he soon discovers that the spiritualists are right. But can he convince Professor Challenger of the same thing? This is an odd story as it is essentially Doyle's attempt at making his readers believe in spiritualism. He was an avid believer and much of the contents h Professor Challenger and Malone return for a third adventure, this time exploring the spiritual world. Malone, along with Challenger's daughter Enid, starts investigating spiritualist meetings for his newspaper. Initially a skeptic, he soon discovers that the spiritualists are right. But can he convince Professor Challenger of the same thing? This is an odd story as it is essentially Doyle's attempt at making his readers believe in spiritualism. He was an avid believer and much of the contents here is based on "real" events that Doyle either witnessed or read about. It's almost a spiritualist piece of propaganda. Whatever you think about the spiritualism, this isn't really a great novel. For the most part it's Malone going to seances interspersed with linking scenes and the odd other ghost story. It doesn't really feel like a coherent story in it's own right. After a few seances I was beginning to get bored of them. It also means the book isn't really character driven and for much of the book the characters are fairly passive, simply watching things happening. Still, Professor Challenger is a wonderful character and though he is largely absent in this book he does have some excellent moments towards the end, including a rather lively public debate. When Doyle breaks out of the ghost stuff here he does give us some great character scenes, it's just that they are few and far between. It's also well written- Doyle could always tell a good story but this is the latest work of his I've read and it is even better. It's a little more modern in style which makes it easier to read and I enjoyed the conversational tone of the narration and the descriptions that brought chapters to life. It's a shame really that Doyle took his excellent characters and brilliant writing style and gave them this awful plot. In summary, I feel this was a book with too many spirits yet not enough spirit, if that makes sense...

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ember

    This is the one stinker SACD has. It's written in third person, which takes away much of the character and scenery descriptions. It felt more like propaganda with known characters vaguely scattered throughout. Summerlee is dead. Challenger's wife is dead. Challenger has a daughter, who is the love interest of Malone, not that anything is ever mentioned about it, which is another reason it felt more like propaganda. At times I wondered if it was really him who wrote it, it was that unlike him and This is the one stinker SACD has. It's written in third person, which takes away much of the character and scenery descriptions. It felt more like propaganda with known characters vaguely scattered throughout. Summerlee is dead. Challenger's wife is dead. Challenger has a daughter, who is the love interest of Malone, not that anything is ever mentioned about it, which is another reason it felt more like propaganda. At times I wondered if it was really him who wrote it, it was that unlike him and his style. Since Summerlee is dead, and Roxton doesn't come in until halfway through, and the third person telling, I felt like the "dream team" had fallen apart. Years had gone by, as Malone is now "fully grown" (even though he'll always be the naive "kid" to me) and Challenger's got some grey going on. There isn't the sense of adventure and life and death uncertainty anywhere in this story. Absolute 180 from The Lost World. Spoiler alert, Challenger is a believer by the end. I was very disappointed. That's about all I can say without reiteration. I don't recommend this for anyone who is looking for the continuation of the "dream team".

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rose-Ellen

    This had characters from the Professor Challenger series, and that provided additional interest. Primarily, Arthur Conan Doyle wrote this after he had begun his explorations of Spiritualism. There is a mix of fictional and historic characters. The book revolves around Edward Malone (a reporter for the Daily Gazette), Professor Challenger, and Challenger's daughter Enid. Malone has been writing a weekly column about various religions, and now he endeavors to write about Spiritualism. We are presen This had characters from the Professor Challenger series, and that provided additional interest. Primarily, Arthur Conan Doyle wrote this after he had begun his explorations of Spiritualism. There is a mix of fictional and historic characters. The book revolves around Edward Malone (a reporter for the Daily Gazette), Professor Challenger, and Challenger's daughter Enid. Malone has been writing a weekly column about various religions, and now he endeavors to write about Spiritualism. We are presented with the characters' original views, and the process by which they accept and embrace it. Doyle used the book to evangelize this system of belief, even going so far as to claim that the Bible was misinterpreted, and he goes into non-Christian dogma that he believed in. There is a lot that as a Christian I could find objectionable.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Clea

    I read this one as part of the Professor Challenger series when I was going over the early history of Science Fiction a couple of months ago, and I managed to soldier through out of sheer stubbornness. To say that it was awful would be putting it mildly. Yes, I understand the circumstances in which this book came to be written, and I realize that it was an attempt by the author to promote his most treasured beliefs, but it basically slaughters the characters and makes the weaknesses of Conan Doy I read this one as part of the Professor Challenger series when I was going over the early history of Science Fiction a couple of months ago, and I managed to soldier through out of sheer stubbornness. To say that it was awful would be putting it mildly. Yes, I understand the circumstances in which this book came to be written, and I realize that it was an attempt by the author to promote his most treasured beliefs, but it basically slaughters the characters and makes the weaknesses of Conan Doyle's style painfully apparent.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    The ratings seemed a bit low for this book but I didn't read the first Challenger books before this. I really liked the story and love that it is by Arthur Conan Doyle. I am not a great fan of the Sherlock Holmes stories yet but this was I thought an Excellent Ghost story. A good read My ratings do give credit for books written so long ago, In all fairness the older authors did not have nearly the access to the reference material that new authors have now. The ratings seemed a bit low for this book but I didn't read the first Challenger books before this. I really liked the story and love that it is by Arthur Conan Doyle. I am not a great fan of the Sherlock Holmes stories yet but this was I thought an Excellent Ghost story. A good read My ratings do give credit for books written so long ago, In all fairness the older authors did not have nearly the access to the reference material that new authors have now.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Diego

    So far, this is the only book from Arthur Conan Doyle I have not liked. It reads more like a several hundred pages long pamphlet for spiritism than like a novel. Actually, I left it to rest for several months and just decided to finish it up the other day, and even this last bit I had left has felt like crossing the desert. I definitely would not recommend it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Polly

    This story loses its thread pretty quickly, as it's about Spiritualism, one of the things Conan Doyle became very flaky about and thus had no perspective about. I don't think I ever managed to finish it; it's a rather sad contrast to the other Challenger stories. This story loses its thread pretty quickly, as it's about Spiritualism, one of the things Conan Doyle became very flaky about and thus had no perspective about. I don't think I ever managed to finish it; it's a rather sad contrast to the other Challenger stories.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    Arthur Conan Doyle was an interesting man. His Sherlock novels are the epitome of rational and logical thinking, yet he was deeply into spiritualism, attending seances and sittings with mediums. He was a member of multiple psychic research institutes, a founding member of one of them, and he wrote dozens of books and articles on the topic. He was famously duped by the Cottingley Fairies hoax and apparently drove his once-friend Harry Houdini to anger by insisting his illusions were real. Many of Arthur Conan Doyle was an interesting man. His Sherlock novels are the epitome of rational and logical thinking, yet he was deeply into spiritualism, attending seances and sittings with mediums. He was a member of multiple psychic research institutes, a founding member of one of them, and he wrote dozens of books and articles on the topic. He was famously duped by the Cottingley Fairies hoax and apparently drove his once-friend Harry Houdini to anger by insisting his illusions were real. Many of his Sherlock plots revolve around the hint of a supernatural occurrence, only to have the true, decidedly natural, occurrence unveiled Scooby-Doo style at the end. The first couple of Professor Challenger novels were the same. They deal with problems of a more science-fiction nature, but there's always the attempt to provide a scientific answer, even if it's a real stretch. In The Land of Mist, it seems his two worlds finally collided. This entire novel is essentially just an excuse to convince his readers of the validity of mediums. It's a flimsy setup - Edward Malone, who we know from the previous books, and Professor Challenger's daughter Enid set out to research and write an article on spiritualism for the paper. They are skeptical at first but begin to come around as they witness a string of psychic phenomenon. The entire story is just one seance after the next, with disbelievers attempting to frame altruistic mediums, which could potentially lead to them being incarcerated. Most of the novel follows Edward and Enid, with very little from Professor Challenger until the end. It's a shame, as he's been one of my favourite characters since I discovered him a few years back in The Lost World . He's pompous, overbearing, violent, short-tempered and a genius. He is almost ape-like in appearance with an imposing frame, booming voice, thick chest, giant hands and head, and a long beard so black as to almost appear slightly blue. A dark-haired, slightly more refined, Brian Blessed, I guess. He's the sort of person that would be awful to be around in real life but is a blast to read about on the page. You can really see Arthur Conan Doyle manipulating the plot as you read this one. I'm usually the last person to complain about supernatural elements in stories, but the characters felt more like tools for the point he was trying to make rather than their own entities. I love Professor Challenger and this felt like a bit of a disservice to me. I think I have just come to expect Doyle's fiction to be grounded in reality, but I think it also doesn't help that I've always found the idea of real-life mediums profiting off the grief of others really disgusting. Pay my rate and I'll pretend to let you speak to your dead child. There's just something wrong with that. Despite all of this, I actually did enjoy the novel. I could see exactly what he was doing, it was impossible not to, but it didn't ruin the book for me. I enjoyed following along with the characters as they learned more about spiritualism, and Professor Challenger, while slightly neutered, still had some great moments of his old self. I think it's a testament to the author when he can write a novel with a plot like a glorified recruitment manual on a topic I don't believe in, and in some ways find really distasteful, and still keep me amused until the end. There are two short stories left in the Professor Challenger series, and I'm very curious now to see what happens in those. Book Blog | Twitter | Instagram

  15. 5 out of 5

    Adam Reid

    I wasn't aware that this book was part of a trilogy; I read it purely based on an interesting anecdote from my grandad during his time in the Navy. I am much in agreement with a lot of the other reviews, this book reads like a promotion for spiritualism. I found some of the characters to be fairly interesting and likeable and purely as a work of fiction found it to be fairly entertaining. I would say as a stand alone book it's okay but it isn't something I would ever consider re-reading. I think I wasn't aware that this book was part of a trilogy; I read it purely based on an interesting anecdote from my grandad during his time in the Navy. I am much in agreement with a lot of the other reviews, this book reads like a promotion for spiritualism. I found some of the characters to be fairly interesting and likeable and purely as a work of fiction found it to be fairly entertaining. I would say as a stand alone book it's okay but it isn't something I would ever consider re-reading. I think it should have been obvious from the beginning how this book would turn out; the character of Challenger being so arrogant and cocksure of his beliefs, only for him to be 'proven wrong' during a seance. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was a self confessed spiritualist so I feel like it was definitely obvious that this book was going to have an ever so slight agenda.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Martijn Vsho

    In this book, Challenger and Malone come across Spiritualists. Will Challenger's materialist and scientific mind accept or disprove the spiritual realm? I loved the Challenger series and thought I was going to like this one too. Some of it was good, but mostly I wasn't a fan. Not that I am a materialist, but that I just found it weird and mediocre. I am a Christian but not like they have in this book - Christians using mediums to contact the dead and speak to them. Doyle was such a spiritualist a In this book, Challenger and Malone come across Spiritualists. Will Challenger's materialist and scientific mind accept or disprove the spiritual realm? I loved the Challenger series and thought I was going to like this one too. Some of it was good, but mostly I wasn't a fan. Not that I am a materialist, but that I just found it weird and mediocre. I am a Christian but not like they have in this book - Christians using mediums to contact the dead and speak to them. Doyle was such a spiritualist and you can tell he uses this book to proclaim his cause. The main plot wasn't that well put together. There are mostly a bunch of stories of the Spiritualists and how they contact the dead, loosely put together through Malone and Challenger's search for truth. Overall it was disappointing. I gave it a 3/5 for okay.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lucy

    The joins show. The story only comes to life when the old characters, Challenger, McArdle, Malone, come on stage, and even then this Challenger is not the same Prof we knew and hated. Most of the book is a mishmash of the author's seance experiences, lightly fictionalised, and a bit of ghost stuff with a vicar who should be unfrocked, and a totally gratuitous episode about child cruelty and Jewishness. If this had been written by an unknown author, it would never have found a publisher. It would The joins show. The story only comes to life when the old characters, Challenger, McArdle, Malone, come on stage, and even then this Challenger is not the same Prof we knew and hated. Most of the book is a mishmash of the author's seance experiences, lightly fictionalised, and a bit of ghost stuff with a vicar who should be unfrocked, and a totally gratuitous episode about child cruelty and Jewishness. If this had been written by an unknown author, it would never have found a publisher. It would be a kindness to the memory of the Conan Doyle who brought us Holmes and The Lost World to forget that The Land of Mist was ever written.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ross Vincent

    Continuing my annual "Read a Sir Arthur Conan Doyle book - NOT of a Sherlock Holmes nature- in honor of ACD's Birthday" tradition. This time around, an aging Professor Challenge takes on not a deadly comet or lost dinosaurs, but the afterlife & spiritual mediums. Needless to say, the Scion of Science is not going to stand for this chicanery. However, things can change and even the most steadfast of individuals. Continuing my annual "Read a Sir Arthur Conan Doyle book - NOT of a Sherlock Holmes nature- in honor of ACD's Birthday" tradition. This time around, an aging Professor Challenge takes on not a deadly comet or lost dinosaurs, but the afterlife & spiritual mediums. Needless to say, the Scion of Science is not going to stand for this chicanery. However, things can change and even the most steadfast of individuals.

  19. 4 out of 5

    V

    An exploration of the Spiritualist movement in the early 20th century, mostly through a series of séances and other psychic phenomena observed by Malone. The inimitable Prof. Challenger does not appear very much in this book. Really, not much of a plot aside from Malone's increasing credulity. It is kind of sad that a writer of Doyle's caliber felt compelled to write this sort of propaganda. An exploration of the Spiritualist movement in the early 20th century, mostly through a series of séances and other psychic phenomena observed by Malone. The inimitable Prof. Challenger does not appear very much in this book. Really, not much of a plot aside from Malone's increasing credulity. It is kind of sad that a writer of Doyle's caliber felt compelled to write this sort of propaganda.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Beka

    To be honest, if this was the last in the series I would have skipped it since it focuses solely on spiritualism. It was somewhat interesting, a great author trying to make one his most famous scientific characters come to believe in spiritualism. But if this is the tone the rest of the Professor Challenger books take, I won't be continuing with them. To be honest, if this was the last in the series I would have skipped it since it focuses solely on spiritualism. It was somewhat interesting, a great author trying to make one his most famous scientific characters come to believe in spiritualism. But if this is the tone the rest of the Professor Challenger books take, I won't be continuing with them.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Aaron White

    I quit. It was quite obvious that Doyle was writing this book as propaganda for Spiritualism right from the very start, and I made the mistake of reading a few Goodreads reviews and decided to throw in the towel early (too many books, too little life) though I enjoyed the first two Challenger books.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Carol Palmer

    Interesting novel about the age of Spiritualism in late 19th/early 20th century England. What was interesting to me was that Doyle exposed his own personal beliefs in spirits, ectoplasm, seances, materialization of ghosts, etc. I had read that he was very caught up in the movement, and this book is essentially a stamp of approval from him.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amicus (David Barnett)

    As others have said, this is very different tale to the two preceding Challenger stories, being devoted to the subject of Spiritualism in which the author was very interested and about which he was very enthusiastic in his later years.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    Ugh. Doyles obvious obession with Spiritualism completly ruined Professor Challenger for me. It didn't seem as much of an adventure into the unknown (like the lost world, or even the poision belt) and was more a progandist peice on Spiritualism. Ugh. Doyles obvious obession with Spiritualism completly ruined Professor Challenger for me. It didn't seem as much of an adventure into the unknown (like the lost world, or even the poision belt) and was more a progandist peice on Spiritualism.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Matt Starr

    As interesting as the characters remain, the narrative suffers from the never ending explanations of the spiritualism which the book centers on. A lot of world building and very few feats accomplished.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kushnuma

    The Land of Mist is book 3 in the Professor Challenger series. This one started in third person, which I wasn't expecting and made it sound differently. The story itself surprised me as I wasn't expecting Spirituality to be portrayed in this way, or for it to be accepted by the main characters. The Land of Mist is book 3 in the Professor Challenger series. This one started in third person, which I wasn't expecting and made it sound differently. The story itself surprised me as I wasn't expecting Spirituality to be portrayed in this way, or for it to be accepted by the main characters.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dkolacinski

    A curious historical document, mostly polemic, a study of spiritualism, with Professor Challenger not making an appearance until the end of the short novel. Arthur Conan Doyle believed in spiritualism, and this book reviews the pros and cons, the real and the fraudulent of the movement.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Meh.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Joao Guimaraes

    Great writing, a not so ordinary change in Challenger’s manner is a bit surprising.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Carla

    Found it quite boring, I could only read 20 pages.

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