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Truths We Confess: A Systematic Exposition of the Westminster Confession of Faith

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The Westminster Confession of Faith is one of the most precise and comprehensive statements of biblical Christianity, and it is treasured by believers around the world. Dr. R.C. Sproul has called it one of the most important confessions of faith ever penned, and it has helped generations of Christians understand and defend what they believe.In Truths We Confess, Dr. Sproul The Westminster Confession of Faith is one of the most precise and comprehensive statements of biblical Christianity, and it is treasured by believers around the world. Dr. R.C. Sproul has called it one of the most important confessions of faith ever penned, and it has helped generations of Christians understand and defend what they believe.In Truths We Confess, Dr. Sproul introduces readers to this remarkable confession, explaining its insights and applying them to modern life. In his signature easy-to-understand style and with his conviction that everyone’s a theologian, he provides valuable commentary that will serve churches and individual Christians as they strive to better understand the eternal truths of Scripture. As he walks through the confession line by line, Dr. Sproul shows how the doctrines of the Bible—from creation to covenant, sin to salvation—fit together to the glory of God. This accessible volume is designed to help you deepen your knowledge of God’s Word and answer the question, What do you believe?


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The Westminster Confession of Faith is one of the most precise and comprehensive statements of biblical Christianity, and it is treasured by believers around the world. Dr. R.C. Sproul has called it one of the most important confessions of faith ever penned, and it has helped generations of Christians understand and defend what they believe.In Truths We Confess, Dr. Sproul The Westminster Confession of Faith is one of the most precise and comprehensive statements of biblical Christianity, and it is treasured by believers around the world. Dr. R.C. Sproul has called it one of the most important confessions of faith ever penned, and it has helped generations of Christians understand and defend what they believe.In Truths We Confess, Dr. Sproul introduces readers to this remarkable confession, explaining its insights and applying them to modern life. In his signature easy-to-understand style and with his conviction that everyone’s a theologian, he provides valuable commentary that will serve churches and individual Christians as they strive to better understand the eternal truths of Scripture. As he walks through the confession line by line, Dr. Sproul shows how the doctrines of the Bible—from creation to covenant, sin to salvation—fit together to the glory of God. This accessible volume is designed to help you deepen your knowledge of God’s Word and answer the question, What do you believe?

56 review for Truths We Confess: A Systematic Exposition of the Westminster Confession of Faith

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Farley

    R.C. Sproul's "Truths We Confess" is an exposition of the Westminster Confession of Faith. Originally published as a 3-volume set in 2006-2007, it has now been combined and re-released in this one-volume edition. Though the 720 pages of theologically-rich material may seem daunting, I challenge you to consider a slow and thorough reading of this book. In his foreword, Dr. Sinclair Ferguson explains the importance of the Westminster Confession to the everyday Christian. "The Westminster Confession R.C. Sproul's "Truths We Confess" is an exposition of the Westminster Confession of Faith. Originally published as a 3-volume set in 2006-2007, it has now been combined and re-released in this one-volume edition. Though the 720 pages of theologically-rich material may seem daunting, I challenge you to consider a slow and thorough reading of this book. In his foreword, Dr. Sinclair Ferguson explains the importance of the Westminster Confession to the everyday Christian. "The Westminster Confession of Faith was written not to be dissected by academics but to guide the church and to instruct Christians and help them grasp the structure of the gospel. It does for us what, sadly, is no longer done as a matter of course either in the church or in the educational system: it teaches us first principles, and it shows us how to think through everything in light of them." Sproul writes, "The Westminster Confession is the most precise and accurate summary of the content of biblical Christianity ever set forth in a creedal form." He goes on to explain the 33 tenets of the confession in a format that is accessible to the lay reader. Each tenet is listed at the beginning of a chapter, then broken down and further explained throughout the chapter. Appendices contain the full content of both the larger and shorter Westminster Catechism. It is important to note that Sproul writes from a Reformed background, explaining a Reformed confession. While I do not agree with the view of baptism presented, most other chapters were consistent with my Baptist/Bible church beliefs. This very thorough book is best taken in small sections. This might best be read as a reference when studying different doctrines, or a challenge to read one chapter a week over the course of time. In full transparency, I am not yet finished reading this book myself. My survey thus far has given me confidence to recommend this book and to finish reading it in the future.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Matt Crawford

    Being such a big book you would think that this would be like a greatest hits album. You might think if you’ve read chosen by God or better yet Holiness of God. Perhaps you’ve seen Ligonier teaching series and think you know Sproul. That’s a very poor introduction to the deep well offered here. Each chapter offers a brief overview than an in depth exposition of each paragraph. Even the chapters on baptism and covenant theology, I as a baptist gleaned heavily from. It’s a great corpus and will be Being such a big book you would think that this would be like a greatest hits album. You might think if you’ve read chosen by God or better yet Holiness of God. Perhaps you’ve seen Ligonier teaching series and think you know Sproul. That’s a very poor introduction to the deep well offered here. Each chapter offers a brief overview than an in depth exposition of each paragraph. Even the chapters on baptism and covenant theology, I as a baptist gleaned heavily from. It’s a great corpus and will be an essential part of my library.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Chad Warner

    A helpful commentary on the Westminster Confession of Faith (WCF), but it doesn't reference the Bible as often as I had expected. It doesn't help that it doesn't include the WCF proof texts. Each chapter quotes a chapter of the WCF, then explains and comments on that chapter in plain language for the layman. Sproul also includes some historical context for why the Westminster Assembly worded things the way it did, as well as some history about how Reformed Christians have handled certain section A helpful commentary on the Westminster Confession of Faith (WCF), but it doesn't reference the Bible as often as I had expected. It doesn't help that it doesn't include the WCF proof texts. Each chapter quotes a chapter of the WCF, then explains and comments on that chapter in plain language for the layman. Sproul also includes some historical context for why the Westminster Assembly worded things the way it did, as well as some history about how Reformed Christians have handled certain sections of it. Sproul has great respect for the WCF, but he's not afraid to point out the few places where he disagrees with it, on Scriptural grounds. The book is a bit repetitive. This wasn't as helpful as the other two commentaries I've read on the WCF, by G.I. Williamson and by A.A. Hodge. There were a couple points where I disagreed with Sproul, though perhaps I misunderstood him. He says the 10 Commandments are part of the Mosaic law and that "As Christians, we are not bound by the Ten Commandments since they are part of the old covenant." It's not clear if he means they're merely part of the Mosaic law. The Bible presents them as applicable to all people for all time; they were delivered at Sinai, but not first established there. Fortunately, Sproul says that "We are still morally obligated to keep the moral law of God [Ten Commandments]." (See fuller quote below.) In another chapter, Sproul says, "When we have a burden to pray for someone, that is usually a pretty good indication that God is working. If God has laid that burden upon us, he will bring that person to salvation." Maybe he's making a distinction between God placing a burden on us to pray for a person, versus our putting that burden on ourselves, but that's not stated. The Bible doesn't give us warrant to believe that God will save each person we pray for Him to save. Sproul's high regard for the WCF is clear throughout. He says, The Westminster Confession is the most precise and accurate summary of the content of biblical Christianity ever set forth in creedal form … no historic confession surpasses in eloquence, grandeur, and theological accuracy …The appendices include the Westminster Larger and Shorter Catechisms, without proof texts. Notes 2. Of God, and of the Holy Trinity "Without passions" means God doesn't experience mood swings or depression, not that He has no emotions.God knows not only all the realities but also all the possibilities. He knows all the contingencies … God never has to wait for the possibilities to become actualities before He knows what will happen.3. Of God's Eternal Decree Although God ordains all that happens, He's not responsible for anyone's sin, because He doesn't force anyone to sin. God is the primary (ultimate) cause of everything, but as secondary causes, humans are still responsible for their actions. What the Bible calls "hardening" of hearts involves 1) a poetic justice of God giving people over to their already evil inclinations (Rev 22:11) and 2) God withholding His grace.If God ordains to save some people and not all, then obviously there exists another group of people who are not elect. That means there must be a flip side to election. If we embrace predestination at all, and are not universalists, we must embrace some form of double predestination.4. Of Creation 1st chapters of Genesis are historical narrative. The names Adam and Eve appear in later genealogical accounts. 2 of the named rivers near Eden are known to be real. The writing isn't metered or rhythmic, as Hebrew poetry usually is. Image of God: Adam and Eve were created rational, with minds, wills, affections, righteousness, holiness, dominion over creation. After Fall, we still bear God's image in material sense: we're still thinking, volitional beings. But after Fall, we no longer bear God's image in formal sense: ability to obey God and thereby reflect His image. Regeneration restores image in formal sense, so that we can reflect God's character to some degree. 5. Of Providence There's concurrence or confluence between divine and human wills. Instead of overruling sinful desires, God transcends them and brings good out of evil, yet sinners remain culpable for sin.In the final judgment, every blessing unbelievers have received at the hands of a benevolent God becomes the foundation of their curse. So for believers, there are no tragedies, and for unbelievers, there are ultimately no blessings.Without God ordaining Fall, it couldn't have happened. "This does not mean that He made them do it and then blamed them for it but that He gave them the capacity to do it and ordered the events around them so that they would do it." "… the common grace He gives to everyone becomes an exercise of His judgment, because the wicked resist even that." A "miracle" is a visible act of God that goes against the normal laws of nature. Only God can do miracles. "Special providence" refers to things God does through ordinary, natural means, in an extraordinary way. 6. Of the Fall of Man When Bible says people don't do "good" (Rom 3:10-12; Ps 14:1-3; Luke 18:18), it refers to acts that are good and motivated by desire to please God. 7. Of God's Covenant with Man Covenant of grace doesn't annul covenant of works. It ensures that we don't perish under covenant of works, because Christ fulfills covenant of works for us. 10. Effectual Calling Sinners resist grace to an extent, but grace is irresistible in sense that God's saving work overcomes any resistance in the elect. If you love Christ as He appears in the Bible, you can be assured of your salvation, because only a regenerated heart can love Christ. The question isn't, "Why has God given only one way to be saved?" but "Why has God given any way to be saved?" 13. SanctificationIf the Old Testament moral law reveals to us what is pleasing to God, and the new covenant commands us to live in a way that pleases God, that tells us that we must give serious attention to the Old Testament law.15. Repentance When David says, "against You, You only have I sinned" (Ps 51:5), he's speaking in ultimate categories; all sin is ultimately against God. Heb 6:9 shows that a true Christian won't commit the blasphemy warned of in Heb 6:4-6. 1 John 5:16 doesn't say we're commanded not to pray for that person; it says we're not commanded to (we don't have to). Sproul says many assume the sin unto death is blasphemy against the Spirit, but he says he doesn't know what it is. 16. Good Works When Jesus told the rich young ruler to sell his possessions (Luke 18:22), it wasn't a universal precept; it was a test for that man. There are at least 25 NT passages that say we'll be rewarded in heaven for our works.The formula for the Reformed faith on this point is, 'Justification is by faith alone, but our reward in heaven will be according to our works'—though not because those works merit or deserve any reward whatsoever. … That God does reward them is, as Augustine said, God crowning his own gifts.17. Perseverance of the SaintsThe Bible nowhere uses the expression 'unconditional love.' … It is true that God love the elect unconditionally, but he works in them to meet certain conditions for salvation. He creates faith in people and brings them to repentance.2 Pet 3:9 means that Jesus hasn't returned because He isn't willing that any of the elect ("us") should perish before coming to faith. When we sin, we displease God. We incur His corrective wrath, which is different than His punitive wrath, because it's the discipline of a loving Father. 18. Assurance of Grace and Salvation Marks of assurance: genuine faith; true belief in Christ; sincere love for Christ; endeavoring to walk in a good conscience before Him. Imposters and the devil can't do miracles, only clever tricks. If unbelievers could do miracles, then miracle-working wouldn't authenticate Christ (John 3:1-2), Moses, or other agents of God. The Holy Spirit bears witness with our Spirit (Rom 8:16) through the Word.If God never bestowed another blessing upon me for the rest of my days, I would still have every reason to be joyful for the blessings he has already poured out on me. We have an insatiable appetite for more and more blessings before we can be joyful. If we are poverty-stricken or unemployed, if we are doubled over in pain from a chronic or an acute illness, we will still be blessed people because our names are written in the Lamb's Book of Life. That is the most wonderful thing for which anyone could rejoice.19. The Law of God If Sabbath is creation ordinance, and state is called by God to maintain God's law outside the church, then it's state's duty to legislate regarding Sabbath. "Since the Old Testament came from God, who is holy and righteous, we should not be offended by any laws that we read there. If we are offended by them, it is because our thinking has been distorted by a secular perspective …"In the Old Testament law, the Ten Commandments were delivered to Israel as part of their terms of the covenant that God made through Moses. We call that the Mosaic covenant, the Sinaitic covenant, or the old covenant, as distinguished from the new covenant. As Christians, we are not bound by the Ten Commandments since they are part of the old covenant … What I mean is that I am not under the damnation, the bondage, the power of the law. Nor am I under covenantal obligation to the Old Testament law. … I am under the law in the sense that its instructions and guidelines are a revelation of what is pleasing to God … 'you are saying that you are still just as much bound by the Ten Commandments as you would have been, had you lived in Old Testament times.' That is true … We are still morally obligated to keep the moral law of God. We no longer have a covenantal relationship through Moses, but we do … through our Mediator, Jesus Christ.21. Religious Worship and the Sabbath Day To pray "in faith" is to plead your case to God and leave it in His hands and trust Him (Job 13:15), not a guarantee that God will grant your request if you have enough faith. Although Bible doesn't say sacraments can only be administered by ordained elders, it's fitting because God gives elders authority over and responsibility for spiritual life of church members. Sabbath is simply 1 day in 7. Earliest Christians chose Sunday because Christ rose on that day. It became known as Lord's Day (Rev 1:10). Christ is Lord of Sabbath (Mark 2:28).The promise of heaven is communicated every Sabbath day. That is why I am convinced that there is a perpetual, ongoing, sacramental significance to the Sabbath day, at least until the final consummation of heaven and earth.Puritans inferred that recreation is forbidden on Sabbath because Isa 58:13 forbids "finding your own pleasure" on the Sabbath. But in context, "your own pleasure" refers to doing business on Sabbath, not recreation. Sproul disagrees with WCF 21.8. He says the fact that Jesus did works of mercy on Sabbath shows that we may, not that we must. "I demure whenever someone says that our whole time has to be taken up with worship and doing works of necessity and mercy. There is also time to enjoy fellowship and to rest." 22. Oaths and Vows Jas 5:12 doesn't forbid oaths and vows; it simply means we must be people whose word can be trusted. Paul frequently took vows or swore oaths (e.g., Rom 9:1-4). 24. Of Marriage and Divorce God never approved polygamy, but He patiently bore with His people despite their disobedience. Creation account and apostolic teaching show God requires monogamy. 2 legitimate grounds for divorce: adultery (Matt 19:9), desertion of believer by unbeliever (1 Cor 7:17). Innocent party may remarry. If adulterer asks for forgiveness, spouse must forgive, but doesn't have to stay married. 27. Of the Sacraments Only ordained officers may administer sacraments (Matt 28:19; 1 Cor 4:1; 11:20-23; Heb 5:4). 28. Of Baptism New covenant began at Last Supper (Matt 26:28); everything prior was old covenant (Luke 7:28; 16:16). Arguments for infant baptism • 3 of 12 of NT baptisms are household baptisms, which may have included infants. • Paul calls infants of a believing parent "holy," members of covenant community (1 Cor 7:14). • Infant baptism was universal practice of early church, with no known opposition. • In OT, sign of covenant (circumcision) was given to infants, so we'd expect an explanation fo why NT sign of covenant (baptism) shouldn't be applied to infants. • New covenant is more inclusive than old. 32. Of the State of Men after Death, and of the Resurrection of the Dead God isn't absent from hell (Ps 139:7-8). Hell isn't about God's absence, but His judgment. 33. Of the Last Judgment God's rewards to us in heaven will be gracious; according to our works, not because of them. They're God crowning His own works.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Major Ellison

    Being one of the most important confessions ever penned, R.C. Sproul comes out firing on all cylinders walking the reader through his exposition of the document. Starting with the inerrancy and inspiration of the Holy Scriptures to the Last Judgement, Sproul does a fantastic job explaining and unpacking what each sentence and phrase means. Also included in this collection are the Smaller and Larger catechisms. These are without the scriptural proofs. What I chose to do was read this book alongsi Being one of the most important confessions ever penned, R.C. Sproul comes out firing on all cylinders walking the reader through his exposition of the document. Starting with the inerrancy and inspiration of the Holy Scriptures to the Last Judgement, Sproul does a fantastic job explaining and unpacking what each sentence and phrase means. Also included in this collection are the Smaller and Larger catechisms. These are without the scriptural proofs. What I chose to do was read this book alongside the Westminster Confession of Faith. This allowed me to compare and see the scriptural proofs for each confession as this exposition did not include them. The first thing I want to mention is that if you are familiar with Sproul (his writings, lectures, and language), then be prepared to read a lot of the same verbiage in this book. You will see the same language illustrations, analogies, stories, and quotes. Some readers do not enjoy reading the same ideas over and over (as Sproul does in this book many times), but I find them to be refreshing and helpful. The repetition of thoughts allows me to properly remember and place ideas with thoughts and words. The last thing I would like to mention are the points of disagreements which include baptism and unwarranted verbiage inferences. The slight word changes that Sproul advocated for had to deal with the confession on Religious Worship, and the Sabbath Day. The Westminster Divines say: "Prayer is to be made for things lawful; and for all sorts of men living, or that shall live hereafter: but nor for the dead, nor for those of whom it may be known that they sinned the sin unto death." R.C. Sproul comments on this and explains that they are misunderstanding the scriptures by drawing unwarranted inferences from the text. While the Bible says that we do not have to pray for the dead and are not commanded to, the Westminster Divines are stating we must not pray for the dead. This is completely different. In 2 Samuel 12, before David loses his child, is earnestly praying that God saves the child. Once the child dies, however, he simply stops praying and gets up to eat. The other reference is in 1 John 5:16 where the text says that it is necessary for men to pray for a brother who is sinning the sin that does not lead to death. For the brother who is sinning the sin that leads to death, the scripture doesn’t command us not to pray. The text says, “I do not say that he should make request for this.” Meaning, you are not commanded to pray for him. The next point of controversy dealt with Baptism. Is it biblical to baptize infants? Why do we not baptize infants? Sproul argues that the New Testament never prohibits or commands the act of baptizing infants. He emphasizes that we should look at this issue in the light of toleration seeing how both sides are pulling inferences from scripture. Here are some points to consider: Against Infant Baptism: - No reference in the New Testament and the early church to infants being baptized - All references include only adults - Due to the passing away of the old covenant and the practice of circumcision, and the bringing in of the new covenant in baptism, there is no point in maintaining continuity with the Old Testament practice of marking infants. - Baptizing infants can give people a false sense of security in reference to their salvation For Infant Baptism: - Although covenants have changed, continuity between circumcision and baptism is predominant and necessary. - Three of the twelve baptisms in the New Testament use the Greek word oikos, which is the word for household. In these references, not only were the believers baptized, their entire family was. - The unbelieving spouse is made “holy” because of the believing spouse. The infants and children are members of that family and should also be considered as “holy” and set apart as a part of the new covenant. (1 Cor. 7:14).

  5. 5 out of 5

    John

    R.C. Sproul masterfully walks you through the Westminster Confession, taking time to explain, illustrate, and add color. It's a sizeable book, but we'll worth the investment of time! R.C. Sproul masterfully walks you through the Westminster Confession, taking time to explain, illustrate, and add color. It's a sizeable book, but we'll worth the investment of time!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Walter

    This book is a reasonably good summary and explanation of the Westminster Confession. The problem is it is over long, repeats itself over and over, and true to RC's style, takes a lot of philosophical side tracks that seem unnecessary to the main thrust of the text. I found myself thinking three things when reading this: 1. when will he ever move on to the next point? 2. didn't he say this about six times already? 3. is this philosophical sidetrack needed or just to impress us with Dr. Sproul's kno This book is a reasonably good summary and explanation of the Westminster Confession. The problem is it is over long, repeats itself over and over, and true to RC's style, takes a lot of philosophical side tracks that seem unnecessary to the main thrust of the text. I found myself thinking three things when reading this: 1. when will he ever move on to the next point? 2. didn't he say this about six times already? 3. is this philosophical sidetrack needed or just to impress us with Dr. Sproul's knowledge of Latin and obscure facts? There are much better books on the confession.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sean Rhoades

    This is a good read. Produced in 1647 the Westminster Confession of Faith is the crystallization of Reformed theology. In his typical fashion Sproul does a good job explaining the theological categories for the lay person. His minimal use of Greek and Hebrew too often employs the “literal” use of a word and the etymologically fallacy but that’s par for the course for popular teachers. Still a worthy read especially for those that think the “5 points of Calvinism” is a sufficient definition for R This is a good read. Produced in 1647 the Westminster Confession of Faith is the crystallization of Reformed theology. In his typical fashion Sproul does a good job explaining the theological categories for the lay person. His minimal use of Greek and Hebrew too often employs the “literal” use of a word and the etymologically fallacy but that’s par for the course for popular teachers. Still a worthy read especially for those that think the “5 points of Calvinism” is a sufficient definition for Reformed. Yes it’s a big book, but the WCF has 33 chapters so if you read one a day you could read it in a little over a month.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Luke Schmeltzer

    What an appropriate posthumous publication of Dr. Sproul! This volume is an expansive explanation of the Westminster Confession in light of the historical and philosophical debate which birthed it. Sproul, as always, is gifted in his use of language and illustration. It was also interesting to see the places where Dr. Sproul disagreed with the Westminster Divines, and even though I more often agreed with the Divines, I appreciated the points he made. I am deeply indebted to Dr. Sproul for my the What an appropriate posthumous publication of Dr. Sproul! This volume is an expansive explanation of the Westminster Confession in light of the historical and philosophical debate which birthed it. Sproul, as always, is gifted in his use of language and illustration. It was also interesting to see the places where Dr. Sproul disagreed with the Westminster Divines, and even though I more often agreed with the Divines, I appreciated the points he made. I am deeply indebted to Dr. Sproul for my theological formation, and this volume is a great example as to why.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas

    In this book, the late R.C. Sproul expounds on the Westminster Shorter Catechism. Since this is about the finest distillation of the Reformed faith ever written, Sproul has basically written a new systematic theology from the writings and understandings of the Westminster divines. Sproul is unsurpassed as a writer and teacher that can take quite complicated concepts and make them understandable and practical. Highly recommended!

  10. 4 out of 5

    David

    What we should really know Ho's depth of understanding God's word is profound. Yet, he explains it simply & clearly so all can understand & without excuse plead ignorance. We all, who are His ought to read it. We than would see how far from living God's will we actually are. And hopefully, with the help & guidance of the Holy Spirit we will take serious & put into service Roman's 12:1-2 & Hebrews 12:1-2. What we should really know Ho's depth of understanding God's word is profound. Yet, he explains it simply & clearly so all can understand & without excuse plead ignorance. We all, who are His ought to read it. We than would see how far from living God's will we actually are. And hopefully, with the help & guidance of the Holy Spirit we will take serious & put into service Roman's 12:1-2 & Hebrews 12:1-2.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Candice Forte

    We homeschool and I am learning the Westminster Shorter Catechism with my children. I did not grow up learning it. This book gave me so much more detail on the Confession of Faith in a way that was so easy to understand. Sproul was one of t he very best at this!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    As a homeschooling family who is new to reformed theology and the Westminister confession of faith this book “Truths we Confess” has been a wonderful resource. R.C. Sproul is an amazing teacher who explains things in a way even my children can understand.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mark Bennon

    Hands down one of the best books I've ever read. The Westminster Confession of Faith is one of the most succinct and clear summaries of the Christian Faith. I read it every morning for 3 months and by the end, I found myself wanting to read it at night as well. Hands down one of the best books I've ever read. The Westminster Confession of Faith is one of the most succinct and clear summaries of the Christian Faith. I read it every morning for 3 months and by the end, I found myself wanting to read it at night as well.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    An honest explanation of this important theological document. Dr. Sproul has been on of the greatest influences on my life as a follower of Christ. While I do not hold to the same views as he did on some issues (padeo-baptism in particular), he was particularly gifted with taking complex theological concepts and making them more understandable.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Joel Gass

    I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest and fair review. I affirm the 1689 London Baptist confession of faith. This WCF book does a great job explaining in detail each point. Sproul does an excellent job helping the reader understand the biblical and historical significance of each point. This book is helpful and a great resource for the reformed library. #TruthsWeConfess #NetGalley

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    Papa Sproul (posthumously) walks through one of the greatest theological documents every written: The Westminster Confession of Faith. You aren't going to agree with it fully, and you shouldn't, nor will you with Sproul (and he doesn't either!) - nevertheless - outside of Gerstner, I can't think of anyone else to hold your hand through such a thorough articulation of the Reformed tradition. Papa Sproul (posthumously) walks through one of the greatest theological documents every written: The Westminster Confession of Faith. You aren't going to agree with it fully, and you shouldn't, nor will you with Sproul (and he doesn't either!) - nevertheless - outside of Gerstner, I can't think of anyone else to hold your hand through such a thorough articulation of the Reformed tradition.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mike Jorgensen

  18. 5 out of 5

    Miles Foltermann

  19. 4 out of 5

    Danisa

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jesus Archuleta

  21. 5 out of 5

    Shuli

  22. 4 out of 5

    Barry Vavak

  23. 5 out of 5

    Claude

  24. 4 out of 5

    Timothy

  25. 4 out of 5

    John

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Long

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jim Conley

  29. 5 out of 5

    Julietta Keller

  30. 5 out of 5

    Brian

  31. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

  32. 4 out of 5

    Perry

  33. 5 out of 5

    Scott Oakland

  34. 4 out of 5

    Tony Bleything

  35. 5 out of 5

    Ethan

  36. 5 out of 5

    Chris Dunn

  37. 4 out of 5

    Stephen McDonald

  38. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Lee

  39. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

  40. 4 out of 5

    Gregg

  41. 5 out of 5

    Patrick N

  42. 5 out of 5

    Colin Ting

  43. 4 out of 5

    David Morgan

  44. 5 out of 5

    John

  45. 4 out of 5

    Craig Wilson

  46. 5 out of 5

    Mike

  47. 5 out of 5

    Marc Swan

  48. 4 out of 5

    Chris Byrne

  49. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

  50. 4 out of 5

    John

  51. 5 out of 5

    Joel Senders

  52. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Grigoletti

  53. 4 out of 5

    Scott

  54. 4 out of 5

    Mincheol Roh

  55. 5 out of 5

    Vagabond of Letters, DLitt

  56. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Yereen

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