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Bride of the Mistletoe

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Reproduction of the original: Bride of the Mistletoe by James Lane Allen


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Reproduction of the original: Bride of the Mistletoe by James Lane Allen

32 review for Bride of the Mistletoe

  1. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl Sailor

    More than anything, The Bride of the Mistletoe is a tragedy at its core. The author blends the tragedy with lush descriptions of nature, particularly trees and of course his native state of Kentucky. The story involves two middle aged people in a Kentucky farm house who have had children, have had deaths in the family and have intimately shared each others lives and thoughts for decades. The tragedy comes wrapped on Christmas eve, also significantly their wedding anniversary, in a gift from the h More than anything, The Bride of the Mistletoe is a tragedy at its core. The author blends the tragedy with lush descriptions of nature, particularly trees and of course his native state of Kentucky. The story involves two middle aged people in a Kentucky farm house who have had children, have had deaths in the family and have intimately shared each others lives and thoughts for decades. The tragedy comes wrapped on Christmas eve, also significantly their wedding anniversary, in a gift from the husband to his wife. It is the story of his research of her question the previous year about the origin of the holiday tree. While he reads some of it aloud and winds around the passages of time, she awaits with one and only one very, very important concern. Her answer is found first in the sacrifice of ancient druidic virgins to the lust of priests under the mistletoe. Secondly her answer is found in her husband's utter silence in answer to her queries and ends in her, "--waiting" for something that would never come.

  2. 4 out of 5

    D'ipanjenah Ali

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. What begins as a poetic, exceptionally romantic Christmas story takes the most unexpected turn midway. I wasn't expecting it to go back and draw on the history behind every kind of ornament we put on a Christmas tree. After that surprising elaboration of traditions, the story gets pretty confusing. To me it felt as if dreams and memories were being superimposed on the characters' reality. I couldn't fully comprehend the last part of the book but in essence, it felt like a tragedy. Perhaps a seco What begins as a poetic, exceptionally romantic Christmas story takes the most unexpected turn midway. I wasn't expecting it to go back and draw on the history behind every kind of ornament we put on a Christmas tree. After that surprising elaboration of traditions, the story gets pretty confusing. To me it felt as if dreams and memories were being superimposed on the characters' reality. I couldn't fully comprehend the last part of the book but in essence, it felt like a tragedy. Perhaps a second read will bring in more clarity.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sherry Chandler

    Set aside the racism ("frolicking servants"), sexism (a wife whose world revolves around her husband), and purple prose style, this is an odd little Christmas tale in which Allen seems to be trying to make a parallel between a modern marriage and a legend that ancient druids sacrificed a mistletoe bride to the god of the oak tree. As you may gather, it seems to be a species of horror story. Allen is considered Kentucky's local colorist. Mark Twain is the only writer who rose above that genre. Alle Set aside the racism ("frolicking servants"), sexism (a wife whose world revolves around her husband), and purple prose style, this is an odd little Christmas tale in which Allen seems to be trying to make a parallel between a modern marriage and a legend that ancient druids sacrificed a mistletoe bride to the god of the oak tree. As you may gather, it seems to be a species of horror story. Allen is considered Kentucky's local colorist. Mark Twain is the only writer who rose above that genre. Allen does not. I didn't read this edition but what may have been the original, checked out of the library. I wanted to get a feel for period life and attitudes. I guess it was okay for that. It was readable. Just very dated. And a little embarrassing.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Enjoyable reading. “A handful of some of the green things of winter lay before her picture: holly boughs with their bold, upright red berries; a spray of the cedar of the Kentucky yards with its rosary of piteous blue.”

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    Verbosity that would rival Dickens. Strange mixture of philosophy and folklore.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jacqueline

    Very old fashioned writing, but has lasting value as insight into the nineteenth century.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mashell

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dave

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra

  10. 4 out of 5

    Margaret Mary

  11. 5 out of 5

    Joanne

  12. 4 out of 5

    Diane

  13. 4 out of 5

    Crickett

  14. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  15. 4 out of 5

    BookishDreamer

  16. 5 out of 5

    Firdia Rizky

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sachuri Asuma Ki

  19. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin Smith

  20. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

  21. 5 out of 5

    Beverly Motter morgan

  22. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin M

  23. 5 out of 5

    Yomna Muhammad

  24. 4 out of 5

    Viktor Shchedrin

  25. 5 out of 5

    Diane

  26. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Simoneau

  27. 5 out of 5

    Crickett

  28. 4 out of 5

    bindu v nair

  29. 4 out of 5

    Stacy

  30. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Foy

  31. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Robertson

  32. 4 out of 5

    David Chinoy

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