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From international bestseller Mario Escobar comes a story of escape, sacrifice, and hope amid the perils of the second World War. Jacob and Moses Stein live with their aunt in Paris until the great raid against foreign Jews is unleashed in August 1942. Their parents, well-known German playwrights, have been hiding in France, but before their aunt manages to send them south, From international bestseller Mario Escobar comes a story of escape, sacrifice, and hope amid the perils of the second World War. Jacob and Moses Stein live with their aunt in Paris until the great raid against foreign Jews is unleashed in August 1942. Their parents, well-known German playwrights, have been hiding in France, but before their aunt manages to send them south, the gendarmes stop the boys and take them to the Velodromo de Invierno, where more than 4,000 children, 5,000 women, and 3,000 men had to subsist without food or water. Jacob and Moses manage to flee, but the road will not be safe or easy. This novel by internationally bestselling author Mario Escobar follows two brave young Jewish boys as they seek refuge in the French town of Le-Chambon-sur-Lignon and eventually Argentina.


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From international bestseller Mario Escobar comes a story of escape, sacrifice, and hope amid the perils of the second World War. Jacob and Moses Stein live with their aunt in Paris until the great raid against foreign Jews is unleashed in August 1942. Their parents, well-known German playwrights, have been hiding in France, but before their aunt manages to send them south, From international bestseller Mario Escobar comes a story of escape, sacrifice, and hope amid the perils of the second World War. Jacob and Moses Stein live with their aunt in Paris until the great raid against foreign Jews is unleashed in August 1942. Their parents, well-known German playwrights, have been hiding in France, but before their aunt manages to send them south, the gendarmes stop the boys and take them to the Velodromo de Invierno, where more than 4,000 children, 5,000 women, and 3,000 men had to subsist without food or water. Jacob and Moses manage to flee, but the road will not be safe or easy. This novel by internationally bestselling author Mario Escobar follows two brave young Jewish boys as they seek refuge in the French town of Le-Chambon-sur-Lignon and eventually Argentina.

30 review for Children of the Stars

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay - Traveling Sisters Book Reviews

    2.5 stars. A light, hopeful wartime story. Moses and Jacob Stein are two young Jewish brothers who flee their aunts’ home in war-torn Paris in search of their parents who left to find safety. Moses and Jacob encounter many strangers along their journey. My biggest issue with this novel was how unrealistic the boys journey seemed. For me, there were far too many close calls and coincidental opportunities. While I do believe there were countless situations where people were saved by the kindness of 2.5 stars. A light, hopeful wartime story. Moses and Jacob Stein are two young Jewish brothers who flee their aunts’ home in war-torn Paris in search of their parents who left to find safety. Moses and Jacob encounter many strangers along their journey. My biggest issue with this novel was how unrealistic the boys journey seemed. For me, there were far too many close calls and coincidental opportunities. While I do believe there were countless situations where people were saved by the kindness of strangers during these devastating times, this felt over the top. Additionally, although I generally love stories revolving around children, I did not feel a connection or investment in Moses and Jacob. The story lacked emotional depth. I believe my high expectations also negatively affected my enjoyment of this novel. After loving the authors heart-wrenching, powerful previous WWII novel, The Auschwitz Lullaby, I expected the same caliber of emotional connection and intensity with this. For me, this didn’t even come close. This was more of an easy, light, hopeful, feel-good exploration into wartimes. Overall, this novel wasn’t for me. I would recommend it to anyone wanting to read a lighter, feel-good wartime story without getting into the true devastation and reality of war. Thank you to NetGalley for my review copy!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Paige

    Falling somewhere between an odyssey and a saga, this is a tale of exile reminding us that kindness and humanity will radiate in the season of sorrow. 1942: The parents of Jacob and Moses have sent the boys to live with their aunt in Paris since the war is getting worse. On the streets, the boys get swept away in the Velodrome d’Hiver roundup in Paris. Choosing to escape, Jacob and Moses return to their aunt’s home, discover old letters from their parents, and decide to go find them. Through Jac Falling somewhere between an odyssey and a saga, this is a tale of exile reminding us that kindness and humanity will radiate in the season of sorrow. 1942: The parents of Jacob and Moses have sent the boys to live with their aunt in Paris since the war is getting worse. On the streets, the boys get swept away in the Velodrome d’Hiver roundup in Paris. Choosing to escape, Jacob and Moses return to their aunt’s home, discover old letters from their parents, and decide to go find them. Through Jacob and Moses’ journey to reunite with their parents, we see an assortment of people with their own ethnicity, history, ideals, and stories. The variety of people they encounter leave you seeing the variations of WWII through an array of lenses. I really enjoyed that it centered around the viewpoint of children; two boys holding on to what remains of childhood. The relationship between Jacob and Moses is so sweet and childlike though war attempts to blockade their innocence. “Observing the happiness of others always makes the world make a little more sense all of a sudden, makes suffering a little more bearable, makes grief a little less suffocating.” “When you’re young, you dream about making the world a better place, overturning injustice and inequality. But within time you just settle for getting by.” “Don’t ever change. Sometimes the world can turn us into something we shouldn’t be.” “Humans are nothing more than the sum of their affections and the connections they make in life. When those ties break, loneliness destroys what little is left in an uninhabited heart.” The author confirms the brothers, Jacob and Moses, are fictitious. However, they represent the real children who traveled across Europe as refugees during WWII. Historically, Mario Escobar gracefully blends facts with fiction. He addresses areas in Europe that are commonly suppressed amid a defying WWII history. Several authentic historical characters are involved that include Andre Trocme, Daniel Trome, and Edouard Theis. Rating explained: While tender and touching, there were some implausible situations and cliché conditions. Also, their voyage to find their parents continued relentlessly, so I always knew what to expect to happen…they would keep going to find their parents. Overall, it is a feel-good novel that takes you across Europe with two children during war. There is a lot of historical content and I found myself Googling a lot of the names and places. There is mild violence, no vulgar language, and no sex. I received a complimentary copy of this book. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own. More on this topic: Andre and Magda Trocme Le Chambon-sur-Lignon Phillipe Petain and the Vichy puppets Jewish children hidden in Le Chambon: Jewish and non-Jewish refugee children sheltered in Le Chambon:

  3. 5 out of 5

    Brenda ~Traveling Sisters Book Reviews

    Children of the Stars is a lighter read that didn't really pull me into the story and I struggled with keeping my focus while reading this. I had a hard time connecting with the characters here. I think would make a great read for someone looking for a lighter hopeful read. I received a copy from the publisher on NetGalley Children of the Stars is a lighter read that didn't really pull me into the story and I struggled with keeping my focus while reading this. I had a hard time connecting with the characters here. I think would make a great read for someone looking for a lighter hopeful read. I received a copy from the publisher on NetGalley

  4. 4 out of 5

    Karren Sandercock

    Thanks to NetGalley, Thomas Nelson Fiction, and Mario Escobar for my advanced copy of his new book: Children of The Stars. 1942, Jacob and Moses Stein, two young Jewish brothers are staying with their Aunt Judith in Paris during the Nazi occupation and are trying to keep a low profile. Eleazar and Jana Stein the boy’s parents are German actors they have left the brothers with Judith while they try to find somewhere safe for the whole family to live. On the first morning of summer school holidays, Thanks to NetGalley, Thomas Nelson Fiction, and Mario Escobar for my advanced copy of his new book: Children of The Stars. 1942, Jacob and Moses Stein, two young Jewish brothers are staying with their Aunt Judith in Paris during the Nazi occupation and are trying to keep a low profile. Eleazar and Jana Stein the boy’s parents are German actors they have left the brothers with Judith while they try to find somewhere safe for the whole family to live. On the first morning of summer school holidays, the boys have an early breakfast, decide to leave the shelter of the tiny apartment and visit the synagogue. The boys have no idea the Nazi's have ordered the local police to round up Jewish citizens and take them to the Velodrome d'Hiver. The Boys are spotted leaving the apartment building; they try to get away and are eventually caught. Jacob and Moses manage to escape the Velodrome, they return to their aunt’s apartment, she has gone missing, while searching the apartment for any clues as to what happened to their aunt, the boys find letters from their parents and they notice the envelopes have a return address is in the South of France. The brothers decide to try to find their parents and the boy’s flight from Paris begins! They travel through France by van, train, truck and they also have to walk through the dangerous French countryside. Along their journey, they meet members of the French resistance and complete strangers who are willing to help the boys; they provide shelter, food, a hot bath, clean clothes and a safe place for them to hide. They put themselves at risk of being arrested to protect the boys and some do pay the ultimate price for helping them. The boys eventually make it to the village of Le Chambon-sur-Ligon, here Pastor Andre Trocme finds homes for them, they go to school, Jacob has his first crush on a girl called Anna and life in the village is peaceful for a few months. But the threat of the Nazi's return, they know Jewish people are being hidden in the small valley and they start looking for them and arrests begin. The boys are on the runs again, they have no choice but to take the risk of trying to get to safety in Spain and eventually try to be reunited with their parents who they hope have made it to South America! I enjoyed reading Children Of The Stars, it’s a story about the strong bond between two loving brothers, how families had to make the difficult choices during WW II, parents would do anything to keep their children safe during such a dangerous time in history and about two boys who manage to go on a long crazy journey through war torn Europe, how they try to find their parents who are desperately fleeing the Nazi's and being sent to a concentration camp. I gave the book four stars, I have read Mario's previous book Auschwitz Lullaby and I loved it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rose

    This book of the holocaust, is an important historical fiction story told by author Mario Escobar. It is about the struggles of two brothers who have been separated from their parents, and the journey through war times to find them. It takes them through many counties, and in and out of many families lives and homes All books about this topic are very important, and must be read. I have read a great many books about the holocaust, and feel many of them were more enjoyable of a read for me. The sto This book of the holocaust, is an important historical fiction story told by author Mario Escobar. It is about the struggles of two brothers who have been separated from their parents, and the journey through war times to find them. It takes them through many counties, and in and out of many families lives and homes All books about this topic are very important, and must be read. I have read a great many books about the holocaust, and feel many of them were more enjoyable of a read for me. The story was just not believable, and I think it lost a bit in the translation. I received a complimentary copy of this book. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own." I thank NetGalley, the author and publisher for my advanced copy to review

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tammy

    5 ☆ Mario Escobar has written a touching story from the perspective of two Jewish brothers’ harrowing escape during WWll from France to Spain on the quest to find their parents. The kindness and encouragement of the people they meet along their journey tugged at my heartstrings, with good triumphing over evil time and time again. Children of the Stars is a story of bravery, love of family, and the endurance of human spirit. I was completely absorbed in this book staying up late to finish. This i 5 ☆ Mario Escobar has written a touching story from the perspective of two Jewish brothers’ harrowing escape during WWll from France to Spain on the quest to find their parents. The kindness and encouragement of the people they meet along their journey tugged at my heartstrings, with good triumphing over evil time and time again. Children of the Stars is a story of bravery, love of family, and the endurance of human spirit. I was completely absorbed in this book staying up late to finish. This is a keeper, one you don’t want to miss. This story was inspired by a trip to Le Chambon-sur-Lignon, France where the author took his family to visit. Excerpt from https://encyclopedia.ushmm.org/conten... "Nobody asked who was Jewish and who was not. Nobody asked where you were from. Nobody asked who your father was or if you could pay. They just accepted each of us, taking us in with warmth, sheltering children, often without their parents—children who cried in the night from nightmares." —Elizabeth Koenig-Kaufman, a former child refugee in Le Chambon I received a complimentary copy of this book. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Karren Sandercock

    Thanks to NetGalley, Thomas Nelson Fiction, and Mario Escobar for my advanced copy of his new book: Children Of The Stars. 1942, Jacob and Moses Stein, two young Jewish brothers are staying with their Aunt Judith in Paris during the Nazi occupation and are trying to keep a low profile. Eleazar and Jana Stein the boys parents, are German actors they have left the brothers with Judith while they try to find somewhere safe for the whole family to live. On the first morning of summer school holidays, Thanks to NetGalley, Thomas Nelson Fiction, and Mario Escobar for my advanced copy of his new book: Children Of The Stars. 1942, Jacob and Moses Stein, two young Jewish brothers are staying with their Aunt Judith in Paris during the Nazi occupation and are trying to keep a low profile. Eleazar and Jana Stein the boys parents, are German actors they have left the brothers with Judith while they try to find somewhere safe for the whole family to live. On the first morning of summer school holidays, the boys have a early breakfast, decide to leave the shelter of the tiny apartment and visit the local synagogue. The boys have no idea the Nazi's have ordered the local police to round up Jewish citizens and take them to the Velodrome d'Hiver. The boys are spotted leaving the apartment building, they try to get away and are eventually caught. The conditions inside the Velodrome are terrible, it's over crowded, hot, stuffy, and full of desperate people trying to find their family members who they had been separated from during the chaos of being loaded into buses. Jacob and Moses manage to escape the Velodrome, they return to their aunts apartment, she has gone missing, while searching the apartment for any clues as to what happened to their aunt, the boys find letters from their parents and they notice the envelopes have a return address, it's in the south of France. The brothers decide to try to find their parents and the boys flight from Paris begins! They travel through France by van, train, truck and they also have to walk through the dangerous French countryside. They need to be one step ahead of the authorities, stay hidden, keep calm, pass undetected through check points, not slip up, it's very hard to know who they can trust and they have a few close calls. Along their journey, they meet members of the French resistance and complete strangers who are willing to help the boys, they provide shelter, food, a hot bath, clean clothes and a safe place for them to hide. They put themselves at risk of being arrested to protect the boys and some do pay the ultimate price for helping them. The boys eventually make it to the village of Le Chambon-sur-Ligon, here Pastor Andre Trocme finds homes for them, they go to school, Jacob has his first crush on a girl called Anna and life in the village is peaceful for a few months. But the threat of the Nazi's return, they know Jewish people are being hidden in the small valley and they start looking for them and arrests begin. The boys are on the run again, they have no choice but to take the risk of trying to get to safety in Spain and eventually try to be reunited with their parents who they hope have made it to South America! I enjoyed reading Children Of The Stars, its a story about the strong bond between two loving brothers, how families had to make the difficult choices during WW II, parents would do anything to keep their children safe during such a dangerous time in history and about how two boys manage to go on a long crazy journey through war torn Europe, how they try to find their parents who are desperately fleeing the Nazi's and being sent to a concentration camp. I have shared my review on Goodreads, Twitter, NetGalley, Edelweiss, Kobo and my blog. https://karrenreadsbooks.blogspot.com/ I gave the book four stars, I have read Mario's previous book Auschwitz Lullaby and I loved it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Aga Durka

    Children of the Stars is an important tale of two Jewish brothers and their journey across Europe and later across the Atlantic Ocean in a search of their parents. It is a heartbreaking but full of hope story of survival, love, and sacrifice during the harrowing times of WW2 and Holocaust. I think any story about Holocaust is an important story to know. Even though both main characters, Jacob and Moses, are fictional, their courageous journey tells a story of many children during WW2 and their s Children of the Stars is an important tale of two Jewish brothers and their journey across Europe and later across the Atlantic Ocean in a search of their parents. It is a heartbreaking but full of hope story of survival, love, and sacrifice during the harrowing times of WW2 and Holocaust. I think any story about Holocaust is an important story to know. Even though both main characters, Jacob and Moses, are fictional, their courageous journey tells a story of many children during WW2 and their struggle to survive and reunite with their families. However, reading this book I found myself a little distracted and not as emotionally affected, as I would hope so. Yes, I rooted for Jacob and Moses, but I did not feel emotionally connected to them. Something was missing it the way both characters where presented in this story, and maybe if the author spend more time on developing his characters than on the plot itself, which was moving quite fast in my opinion, I would have been able to “feel” more and to build an emotional attachment to them. This is my second book by Mario Escobar, and I am definitely looking forward to reading more books by him. Thank you NetGalley, Thomas Nelson publisher, and the author for providing me with an ARC copy of this book in exchange for my honest opinion.

  9. 5 out of 5

    linda hole

    This. is The story about two Young jewish Boys during Ww2 and their Journey to reunite with their parents. It was. an ok book for me. Just ok. why? compared to fiction books from this era it was tame. It. did not touch my heart. with that being said I did appreciate that The book showed us that Even under The darkest times there are heroesthat Will stand up for you. There are always sunrays shining through Even in The darkest time. and the book reminds us. to always fight evil. never let evil wi This. is The story about two Young jewish Boys during Ww2 and their Journey to reunite with their parents. It was. an ok book for me. Just ok. why? compared to fiction books from this era it was tame. It. did not touch my heart. with that being said I did appreciate that The book showed us that Even under The darkest times there are heroesthat Will stand up for you. There are always sunrays shining through Even in The darkest time. and the book reminds us. to always fight evil. never let evil win. Thank you to Netgalley for this digital copy in exchange for an honest review

  10. 4 out of 5

    Deanne Patterson

    Though fictional this book is actually based upon factual historical events happening in the character's lives. Jacob and Moses are brothers and the children of famous well-known German playwrights. Sent by their parents for their safety into their aunts care the children are taken captive by a roundup and arrested before they are able to escape and reunite with their parents. The French gendarmes, under direct Nazi order take the boys to Vélodrome d’Hive, a structure in Paris where thousands of Fr Though fictional this book is actually based upon factual historical events happening in the character's lives. Jacob and Moses are brothers and the children of famous well-known German playwrights. Sent by their parents for their safety into their aunts care the children are taken captive by a roundup and arrested before they are able to escape and reunite with their parents. The French gendarmes, under direct Nazi order take the boys to Vélodrome d’Hive, a structure in Paris where thousands of France’s Jews are being forcibly detained. Knowing they must escape and fearing for their lives, knowing if they don't they may never see their parents again the story follows the harrowing trek the boys make trying to find their parents when they have very little to go on besides a set of letters sent from the South of France. These brothers have only each other to rely on as they face the grim reality of not knowing who they can trust and who will turn them in . Faced with hunger,desperation,fear and uncertainty is it really feasible to continue this journey to find their parents? You will meet the people who go out of their way putting their own lives in danger to help these young brothers, some paying the ultimate price. Though tragic the human spirit shines through the darkness as we come into the light of human goodness once again. Highly recommended for historical fiction loves who enjoy learning something from what they are reading. Pub Date 25 Feb 2020 I was given a complimentary copy of this book. Thank you. All opinions expressed are my own.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Aga Durka

    Children of the Stars is an important tale of two Jewish brothers and their journey across Europe and later across the Atlantic Ocean in a search of their parents. It is a heartbreaking but full of hope story of survival, love, and sacrifice during the harrowing times of WW2 and Holocaust. I think any story about Holocaust is an important story to know. Even though both main characters, Jacob and Moses, are fictional, their courageous journey tells a story of many children during WW2 and their s Children of the Stars is an important tale of two Jewish brothers and their journey across Europe and later across the Atlantic Ocean in a search of their parents. It is a heartbreaking but full of hope story of survival, love, and sacrifice during the harrowing times of WW2 and Holocaust. I think any story about Holocaust is an important story to know. Even though both main characters, Jacob and Moses, are fictional, their courageous journey tells a story of many children during WW2 and their struggle to survive and reunite with their families. However, reading this book I found myself a little distracted and not as emotionally affected, as I would hope so. Yes, I rooted for Jacob and Moses, but I did not feel emotionally connected to them. Something was missing it the way both characters where presented in this story, and maybe if the author spend more time on developing his characters than on the plot itself, which was moving quite fast in my opinion, I would have been able to “feel” more and to build an emotional attachment to them. This is my second book by Mario Escobar, and I am definitely looking forward to reading more books by him. Thank you NetGalley, Thomas Nelson publisher, and the author for providing me with an ARC copy of this book in exchange for my honest opinion.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Asheley

    This is an extraordinary novel. The story features two young brothers, Jacob and Moses Stein, as they search for their parents in 1942. The brothers’ parents left them in the care of their aunt about a year ago while they went looking for a safe place to move their family. The boys’ parents are somewhere, maybe in France, looking for a safe place for their family to wait out the war, as they were German playwrights and Jewish. One day, the French law enforcement begins rounding up all of the loca This is an extraordinary novel. The story features two young brothers, Jacob and Moses Stein, as they search for their parents in 1942. The brothers’ parents left them in the care of their aunt about a year ago while they went looking for a safe place to move their family. The boys’ parents are somewhere, maybe in France, looking for a safe place for their family to wait out the war, as they were German playwrights and Jewish. One day, the French law enforcement begins rounding up all of the local Jews, and they are transported to Velodrome d’Hiver for detainment. The boys are also captured but soon realize that the only way to reunite with their parents is if they escape and try to find them on their own. So that’s what they do. I can’t really remember reading a WWII story quite like this one. The perspectives of the young boys is quite different than that of the leads in most of the other wartime stories. Moses is just 8 years old, and his brother Jacob is only a few years older. For the boys to have the fortitude and grit to make such a huge decision-to escape and look for their mom and dad-is tremendous. They’re so brave. And their ability to persevere along the way then things get really hard for them is astounding. They’re also just children, so I love that I was able to see their vulnerability and their exhaustion throughout this story. I felt so deeply for them because they just don’t fully understand all that is happening around them. The boys come across people on their journey that are kind and willing to help, but they also cross paths with some Nazi sympathizers and people that treat them as less-than because they are Jewish. They are encouraged by the people that are risking their own lives to help move them toward their parents, and they are aware that getting caught probably means the worst for them. Mario Escobar writes beautifully. There are some beautiful turns-of-phrase in here and quite a few sentences and paragraphs that I want to make sure to remember. Readers that enjoy WWII novels will likely enjoy this one, and I also think that teens and some younger readers can pick it up and enjoy it. It’s a hopeful story, which is not always the case with stories about WWII-era novels. I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. Thank you, Thomas Nelson Books! Find this review and more like it on my blog, Into the Hall of Books!

  13. 4 out of 5

    MicheleReader

    I’m compelled to read books about WWII. There are so many stories written about this horrible time in history and I continue to seek books where I can find something new to learn and told from a new perspective. It is so important to never forget. I was heartbroken by Mario Escobar’s last book Auschwitz Lullaby which made Children of the Stars a must-read. It is 1942 and we meet Moses and Jacob Stein, two brothers ages eight and twelve, separated from their parents. They are living with their au I’m compelled to read books about WWII. There are so many stories written about this horrible time in history and I continue to seek books where I can find something new to learn and told from a new perspective. It is so important to never forget. I was heartbroken by Mario Escobar’s last book Auschwitz Lullaby which made Children of the Stars a must-read. It is 1942 and we meet Moses and Jacob Stein, two brothers ages eight and twelve, separated from their parents. They are living with their aunt in Paris while their parents seek a safe place for the family to live as the world around them is falling apart. Under a false sense of security, the boys decide to walk to synagogue one day unaware that the Nazi's have started to round up and deport all Jews. The brothers find themselves alone and on the run as they try to reunite with their family. They leave Paris with clues as to where they might find their parents. By now, their aunt is missing. They undertake a dangerous journey meeting brave members of the French Resistance who risk their lives to help the brothers. The brothers reach the town of Le Chambon-sur-Lignon where they discover that they are not the only Jews being hidden and protected. It will only be a matter of time before the Nazis discover what is occurring. The book is a work of fiction but the brave people of Le Chambon-sur-Lignon, who helped refugees and hid Jews during the war, were real. The author includes some of the actual heroes as characters in the book. You'll want to learn more about them. This is a story about love, hope and courage. Many thanks to Edelweiss, Thomas Nelson Publishers and Mario Escobar for an advance copy of this moving book which will be published February 25, 2020. Review posted at MicheleReader.com

  14. 5 out of 5

    Loraine

    Set in France during the Holocaust of World War 2, starring Jacob and Moses Stein, young Jewish brothers age 12 and 8. They are unforgettable protagonists in this incredibly well written story. Living with their aunt in Paris after their parents move to Vichy France to avoid the round up of Jewish adults, they are left as orphans when their aunt commits suicide during her capture by the Nazis. Narrowly escaping, the boys immediately set off in search of their parents with an address found on the Set in France during the Holocaust of World War 2, starring Jacob and Moses Stein, young Jewish brothers age 12 and 8. They are unforgettable protagonists in this incredibly well written story. Living with their aunt in Paris after their parents move to Vichy France to avoid the round up of Jewish adults, they are left as orphans when their aunt commits suicide during her capture by the Nazis. Narrowly escaping, the boys immediately set off in search of their parents with an address found on the last letter their aunt had received. Their journey takes them throughout France, across to Spain, and finally across the Atlantic to Argentina. The trials and tribulations these boys underwent along with the heroic and amazing heroes and heroines they encountered along their trek that kept them safe, provided food and money, and transport when needed could only bring tears to my eyes. Based on factual historical records with immense research, Escobar creates a story that vividly paints the horrors and atrocities that young children were exposed to in Europe throughout World War 2. This is a novel that will warm your heart at the same time that it breaks it. Top notch World War 2 fiction. **I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley. Opinions are mine alone. I was not compensated for this review

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nursebookie

    I enjoyed this amazing heart wrenching story of brotherhood, family, hope and resilience in the midst of the horrors and perils of the second World War. It is the summer of 1942 when brothers Jacob and Moses Stein are with their aunt in Paris during the Nazi occupation. Their parents in Germany are famous playwrights who are trying to reunite the family. The children end up forcible detained at the Vélodrome d’Hiver. They escaped the harrowing conditions of that place and returns to their aunts I enjoyed this amazing heart wrenching story of brotherhood, family, hope and resilience in the midst of the horrors and perils of the second World War. It is the summer of 1942 when brothers Jacob and Moses Stein are with their aunt in Paris during the Nazi occupation. Their parents in Germany are famous playwrights who are trying to reunite the family. The children end up forcible detained at the Vélodrome d’Hiver. They escaped the harrowing conditions of that place and returns to their aunts apartment but she is no longer there. With only a postmarked letter with an address for the south of France, the boys’ determination and strength are tested as they struggle to survive through their journey. The story of their ordeal through their journey in hopes of reconciling with their parents was both intense and also inspiring to see how people will go to lengths of helping others. This was a powerful read that tests the human spirit through the darkest of times. This novel truly inspired me and brought hope in this must read, heart warming story

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bev Walkling

    I received a complimentary copy of this book from #NetGalley and #ThomasNelsonFiction. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own. I was interested in reading this book for a number of reasons. I knew that story centred around WW2 which is always of interest to me and the cover captivated me. My congratulations go out to the artist who captured the idea of two young boys on the run. Lastly, I have read another book by this author Auschwitz Lullaby and very much enjoyed it. The author I received a complimentary copy of this book from #NetGalley and #ThomasNelsonFiction. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own. I was interested in reading this book for a number of reasons. I knew that story centred around WW2 which is always of interest to me and the cover captivated me. My congratulations go out to the artist who captured the idea of two young boys on the run. Lastly, I have read another book by this author Auschwitz Lullaby and very much enjoyed it. The author is from Spain and the version that I have read is a translation. I believe that Gretchen Abernathy did an excellent job in her translation. For some reason when I started reading this book I did not immediately make the connection that the stars referred to in the title were the yellow stars that all Jewish people living under Nazi control were forced to wear. Apparently, they were called “children of the yellow star”. The following quote stood out to me: “ To Moses, stars were the lights that God had created so that night would not swallow everything up. Yet the world now seemed orphaned of stars, dark and cold like the wardrobe where he would hide to trick his parents and from which he always jumped out as soon as possible so the immense blackness did not devour him completely.” This particular story was set in France for a good part of the novel and was inspired by a trip that the author took with is family to the town of Le Chambon-sur-Lignon. This town was known as one that did all that it could to rescue refugees and to hide the Jewish people who came to their doorsteps. The trip impressed upon the author the value of human life and the importance of never giving up. As I write this, I can’t help but think of all the refugees currently on the road to somewhere and wonder if people today would be willing to do what the people of this town chose to do during the war. Many of the people mentioned in the book from this area did indeed exist and documentation supports the actions described in the story. The two main characters, brothers Jacob and Moses Stein, were fictional but represent the experiences of real children who were forced to fend for themselves in travels across wartime Europe in order to survive. The story begins as Eleazar and Jana Stein bid a tearful farewell to their two young sons Jacob and Moses leaving them in the care of their aunt Judith. Judith was too old to leave and Eleazar and Jana believed that they needed to seek out a safe place for the boys before taking them on the road. They thought that Paris would be safe. They were wrong. Jacob was the elder, ready to be studying for his bar-mitzvah although his family had not been religious until they arrived in Paris and began living with their aunt. Moses was only eight years old and still very dependant on his mother’s care. Jacob took on the role of caregiver in her absence and always did his best to look out for his brother. In July of 1942, buses arrived at their apartment building with the local French gendarmes to round up all the Jewish people and transport them to the Vel D’hiv, a velodrome well known to the people of Paris. Thus begins the journey of these two boys. Their journey was not an easy one, with multiple challenges along the way as the boys did their best to find and reach their parents. There were moments though when I felt it was easier than what people would have actually faced at the time. It does though show that there were many people who defied the laws of the time to assist those in need in making their way to safety. It also points out the importance of family and the desire that each individual faces to be with their own people – even if it means going with them to face inevitable death. My hope would be that this book would capture the interest of readers and lead them to do some more research to learn the stories of the real people in this book and others like them. There are so many refugees in the world today. They may be fleeing from different evils than these boys faced but it still seems so hard for many of them to achieve a place of safety in the arms of their families.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Vonda

    A good story about 2 brothers that escape the Nazis. The story was a good story and that's pretty much all it was. No fact checked history to be found here and not even a believable story. Every time the boys get in trouble or need help someone magically appears to help them on their way. It's a read in a day book that does flow quickly. Nice poolside read. A good story about 2 brothers that escape the Nazis. The story was a good story and that's pretty much all it was. No fact checked history to be found here and not even a believable story. Every time the boys get in trouble or need help someone magically appears to help them on their way. It's a read in a day book that does flow quickly. Nice poolside read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Meghan

    I received a complimentary copy of this book from Thomas Nelson through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own. I could not stop crying after I read this book! The heartwarming relationship between Jacob and Moses was so kind to see that it brought tears to my eyes. I have read a lot of Holocaust Historical Fiction and have loved every one of them but this one really does a number on you mostly because it focuses on the relationship between the two brothers and the str I received a complimentary copy of this book from Thomas Nelson through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own. I could not stop crying after I read this book! The heartwarming relationship between Jacob and Moses was so kind to see that it brought tears to my eyes. I have read a lot of Holocaust Historical Fiction and have loved every one of them but this one really does a number on you mostly because it focuses on the relationship between the two brothers and the strong relationship and sense of family. The bond they had to survive this terrible event was so inspiring and really opened my eyes how strong and powerful that can be. This book definitely made me count my blessings and be thankful for the love I have for my family and how that can help me get through anything. We will consider adding this title to our Historical Fiction collection at our library. That is why we give this book 5 stars.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Robyn Markow

    An affecting story about two Jewish brothers,Jacob & Moses Stein,who are living in Paris w/their aunt until their parents can get them out of Nazi-occupied northern part of the country into the "Vichy"(unoccupied southern part of France).When their aunt suddenly disappears & the boys are rounded up & sent to Paris' Velodrome w/thousands of other Jewish emigrants(the brothers are originally from Germany)They somehow escape & then decide to head south in hope of finding their parents. Along the wa An affecting story about two Jewish brothers,Jacob & Moses Stein,who are living in Paris w/their aunt until their parents can get them out of Nazi-occupied northern part of the country into the "Vichy"(unoccupied southern part of France).When their aunt suddenly disappears & the boys are rounded up & sent to Paris' Velodrome w/thousands of other Jewish emigrants(the brothers are originally from Germany)They somehow escape & then decide to head south in hope of finding their parents. Along the way,They are assisted by many kind people who are against the Gestapo's reign of terror.The writing is a bit heavy-handed at times(it was originally translated from Spanish) however,it's heart is in the right place & leaves you feeling hopeful that good people & things can be found even in the darkest of times.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    I feel like we’ve come to a point where it’s very hard to write a story about WWII that hadn’t already been told. Escobar’s book turned out to be a unique surprise for me, because it was exactly that: a WWII story I hadn’t already heard. A story of two young boys making their way through war-torn and Nazi-filled countries in a desperate attempt to reunite themselves with their parents. As I always say, I’m a huge fan of character-driven novels, and stories about families and sibling relationship I feel like we’ve come to a point where it’s very hard to write a story about WWII that hadn’t already been told. Escobar’s book turned out to be a unique surprise for me, because it was exactly that: a WWII story I hadn’t already heard. A story of two young boys making their way through war-torn and Nazi-filled countries in a desperate attempt to reunite themselves with their parents. As I always say, I’m a huge fan of character-driven novels, and stories about families and sibling relationships. So I especially appreciated the bond between Jacob and Moses. Their dedication to each other, and to finding their parents, was both heartwarming and heartbreaking (WWII). There were plenty of instances, both good and not so good, when I was reading with my heart in my throat. I have to admit to being surprised at how hopeful and inspirational this story was. There were so many nuggets of wisdom peppered throughout the story, life lessons important for everyone to hear. Normally I approach a WWII story expecting to be in a near constant state of anxiety as I make my way through the story, but that wasn’t what happened here. It was a refreshing experience. One other aspect worth mentioning: this is a translation from the original Spanish, and it read flawlessly. I’ve read some less than stellar translations, and this was not one of them. I didn’t even realize it had been translated until after I’d read it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    This story was a disappointment to me. The narrative was clunky and uneven—I couldn’t tell if the writing or the translation or both was the issue. It would go from choppy to lyrical with a suddenness that left me frequently dizzied. The voice wasn’t consistent throughout. The narration is in an omniscient POV that can’t seem to focus on the same characters very long. I generally really enjoy omniscient narrations but this was the most jarring I’ve ever read as we’d get deep into one character’s This story was a disappointment to me. The narrative was clunky and uneven—I couldn’t tell if the writing or the translation or both was the issue. It would go from choppy to lyrical with a suddenness that left me frequently dizzied. The voice wasn’t consistent throughout. The narration is in an omniscient POV that can’t seem to focus on the same characters very long. I generally really enjoy omniscient narrations but this was the most jarring I’ve ever read as we’d get deep into one character’s thoughts and then be surprised by something another character was thinking in the same paragraph. Another thing that really bugged me was that the author’s philosophical wanderings were most likely to occur in the thoughts of the twelve-year-old boy. Had it been presented as a truism from the narrator at all times, I’d not have found it jarring, but to think of a boy on the run stopping to think these transcendent thoughts felt very unlikely and made it harder for me to connect with Jacob as a character. The story is mainly clean, with bad language mostly limited to vulgarities, but does include some episodes of graphic violence. It is marketed as Christian fiction but it isn’t; the MCs are Jewish. Thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for a free reading copy. A favorable review was not required.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ângela

    Jacob and Moses are two brothers searching for their parents. That wouldn't be a big thing if they weren't 8 and 11 year old Jews, living in Paris in 1942. Their parents, famous German dramatists, left them with their aunt Judith until they could find a safe haven. But before they have the chance to get them, the boys are arrested and taken to the Vélodrome d'Hiver. They knew that they couldn't stay there so they manage to flee and initiate a dangerous and scary journey to be reunited with their pa Jacob and Moses are two brothers searching for their parents. That wouldn't be a big thing if they weren't 8 and 11 year old Jews, living in Paris in 1942. Their parents, famous German dramatists, left them with their aunt Judith until they could find a safe haven. But before they have the chance to get them, the boys are arrested and taken to the Vélodrome d'Hiver. They knew that they couldn't stay there so they manage to flee and initiate a dangerous and scary journey to be reunited with their parents once more. Although their characters are fictional, they represent real Jewish children who travelled all cross Europe as refugees during the WWII. In my opinion the author successfully managed to combine historical facts with fiction. He also used some of the authentic historical characters such as the amazing Andre Trocme and Edouard Theis. For me this was a story about courage, perseverance, family and above all Love 💜

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    This tale of two brothers and their journey during the war was beautifully crafted and full of emotion! I was completely caught up in their story. The storyline moved from heartbreaking to hopeful seamlessly and had me by the heartstrings. The people they meet on their journey was a fabulous representation of humanity. While I did not love this book as much as I loved the authors previous book, Auschwitz Lullaby, it was an emotional tale and one not to miss! Thank you to the publisher for the ad This tale of two brothers and their journey during the war was beautifully crafted and full of emotion! I was completely caught up in their story. The storyline moved from heartbreaking to hopeful seamlessly and had me by the heartstrings. The people they meet on their journey was a fabulous representation of humanity. While I did not love this book as much as I loved the authors previous book, Auschwitz Lullaby, it was an emotional tale and one not to miss! Thank you to the publisher for the advance reader in exchange for my honest review.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Faye

    3.5 An incredible story of two brothers and the brave people who risked everything to help the boys escape. Set in France during the WWII, this story follows brothers Jacob and Moses as they fight for their survival and a chance to reunite with their playwright parents. I loved how this book tells of the many men and women who sacrificed everything to stand up to oppression and help the children on their way. This book is rich in history, well researched it brings the dangers, betrayals, and sacri 3.5 An incredible story of two brothers and the brave people who risked everything to help the boys escape. Set in France during the WWII, this story follows brothers Jacob and Moses as they fight for their survival and a chance to reunite with their playwright parents. I loved how this book tells of the many men and women who sacrificed everything to stand up to oppression and help the children on their way. This book is rich in history, well researched it brings the dangers, betrayals, and sacrifices to life. This is an inspiring tale, compelling, yet at times it lagged in pace, feeling more "tell" than "show," and it felt very episodic. Overall, it's a book that I am glad to have read. There is much to admire and appreciate about this story of brotherly love, survival, and the kindness of strangers. I received a complimentary copy of this book. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Bonnye Reed

    I received a free electronic copy of the ARC of this historical novel from Netgalley, Mario Escobar, and Thomas Nelson Publisher. Thank you all for sharing your hard work with me. I have read this novel of my own volition, and this review reflects my honest opinion of this work. I am adding Mario Escobar to my favorite authors. He writes a brisk, compelling tale with factual historical backgrounds and sympathetic protagonists. And Children of the Stars is an excellent WWII historical. We begin w I received a free electronic copy of the ARC of this historical novel from Netgalley, Mario Escobar, and Thomas Nelson Publisher. Thank you all for sharing your hard work with me. I have read this novel of my own volition, and this review reflects my honest opinion of this work. I am adding Mario Escobar to my favorite authors. He writes a brisk, compelling tale with factual historical backgrounds and sympathetic protagonists. And Children of the Stars is an excellent WWII historical. We begin with a prolog dating back to May 23, 1941, when Jewish German immigrant parents Eleazar and Jana Stein, actors by profession, take a train from Paris to seek a safe new home for their family further south. Paris has become dangerous and non-French Jews are being returned to German workhouses. Their children, brothers Jacob and Moses are left in Paris with their Aunt Judith, the older widowed sister of Eleazar and a long-time resident of Paris who took in her brother and family six years ago when they had to flee from Germany. Judith is not registered as Jewish and the boys should be safe with her in Paris until Eleazar and Jana can establish a safer home and send for them. Their ultimate destination would eventually be in South America. Paris, in the spring of 1942, basic supplies and foods are exhausted, scooped up by German soldiers, and even those French residents with ration cards and ready cash can find little to eat. By the summer of 1942, Paris was under direct German rule and on July 6, 1942, French police officers began a mass arrest of 13,152 Jews, whom they held at the Winter Velodrome before deportation to Auschwitz. Thousands of Jewish families, including native French Jews, were imprisoned there for days without food, water, medical assistance, or hope. Many were ill from the unrelieved heat and dehydration. All were enveloped in fear. The Stein boys were turned into the police by the doorwoman of Aunt Judith's apartment on day one while Judith was at work. They did not know if Judith was entrapped as well but were not able to find her in the Velodrome. Jacob, twelve years old, Moses, eight, team up with a youngster about Jacob's age named Joseph, also looking for family members in the crowded Velodrome. They managed to find their way into the basement area, and eventually, following the sound of water flowing in the sewer pipes, they were small enough to escape back under the streets of Paris and eventually to the apartment house of their Aunt. Finding no sign of Judith, the boys go with Joseph to his home. Joseph discovers that his family is interred at Drancy, and he chooses to join them there. First, they return to Judith's apartment, gathering necessities that will fit in their backpacks along with letters from their parents and their own passports. And find out from Margot, their downstairs neighbor, and friend, that their Aunt Judith had committed suicide, jumping from the roof of the apartment complex. Judith knew what happened to her father, taken to Dachau in 1937. She couldn't live knowing the German's had captured her nephews. On their own, Jacob and Moses accompany Joseph as close as they can safely get to the gates of the internment camp and watch as he is reunited with his parents behind the gates of Drancy before making their way to the Gare de Lyon train station, and slipping onto the train without being stopped. In Versailles, they will be met by Margot's friend Raoul Leduc, an art restorer who is allowed to travel freely, who will help them get to their parent's last letter's address. Their next reunion destination will be a tiny town, Place de la Liberte, Valence, France, south of Lyon in unoccupied France. Or so they hope. And thus begins their journey to find their parents. With common sense and luck, the help of strangers and the French resistance and the Catholic church, the boys work their way across France, missing their parents by weeks and then days. This is an excellent story. It will give you hope and break your heart in turn, but it is a story of courage and human goodness and will fill your heart with joy, as well. pub date Feb 25, 2020 Thomas Nelson Publisher Reviewed on February 27, 2020, at Goodreads, Netgalley, AmazonSmile, Barnes&Noble, BookBub, Kobo, and GooglePlay.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne (The Bookish Libra)

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Mario Escobar's Children of the Stars is a compelling work of historical fiction that focuses on two young Jewish brothers, Jacob and Moses Stein, who become separated from their parents when the Nazis invaded France during WWII. They are staying with their aunt until their parents can find a safe place out of the country for them all to live. Things don't go according to plan, however, and the Jacob and Moses end up on their own. Determined to reunite with their parents, the boys end up in a se Mario Escobar's Children of the Stars is a compelling work of historical fiction that focuses on two young Jewish brothers, Jacob and Moses Stein, who become separated from their parents when the Nazis invaded France during WWII. They are staying with their aunt until their parents can find a safe place out of the country for them all to live. Things don't go according to plan, however, and the Jacob and Moses end up on their own. Determined to reunite with their parents, the boys end up in a secluded town in the mountains of France and have to rely on the kindness of strangers to escape being rounded up by the Nazis. I found this story absolutely riveting. It's an inspiring tale of determination, strength, faith, and resiliency. I was in awe of how brave the boys were and I loved seeing the French resistance in action as they helped the boys travel through France and hopefully to safety. If you're interested in WWII historical fiction, Children of the Stars is definitely worth reading. Note: I received a complimentary copy of this book from Netgalley. All opinions are my own.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Toni Osborne

    “Children of the Stars” set in 1942 is the story of Jacob and Moses Stein, two Jewish brothers ages 12 and 8, who cross Nazi-occupied France in the hope of reuniting with their parents. It opens with the boys being caught in a raid and taken to the Vel’d’Hiv velodrome, a repurposed detention camp housing thousands of Jews. They manage to escape and thus begin their life on the run. This is their story.…. This fictional tale highlights the value, courage and decision making of the two children as “Children of the Stars” set in 1942 is the story of Jacob and Moses Stein, two Jewish brothers ages 12 and 8, who cross Nazi-occupied France in the hope of reuniting with their parents. It opens with the boys being caught in a raid and taken to the Vel’d’Hiv velodrome, a repurposed detention camp housing thousands of Jews. They manage to escape and thus begin their life on the run. This is their story.…. This fictional tale highlights the value, courage and decision making of the two children as well as the kindness and humanity amid the perils of the Second World War. Although, the brothers are a figment of the author’s imagination, they represent thousands of children who travel across Europe as refugees during WW11. This is about their journey and the people they meet along the way. Many risked their life to help the boys. With a simple and poetic style, Mario Escobar leaves small pearls for each chapter that make us reflect on the wonderful and brave people who fight against invaders and help those fleeing by welcoming them at the risk of their own life. But, this tender and sad story seemed so unreal. The boys are too mature for their ages, they think like adults. Parents abandoning children for a better life in Argentina does not resonate well with me. How can they leave their little ones behind during the Nazi occupation? If so, it must have been heartbreaking for the parents…. Although based on historical facts, this story was unlikely because of the age of the protagonists and the very difficult course they take. This novel reads as if segments of different young lives are played out by these two young boys. This story is all about hope, heart and faith in humanity. “I received a complimentary copy of this book. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own."

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tammy

    5 ☆ Mario Escobar has written a touching story from the perspective of two Jewish brothers’ harrowing escape during WWll from France to Spain on the quest to find their parents. The kindness and encouragement of the people they meet along their journey tugged at my heartstrings, with good triumphing over evil time and time again. Children of the Stars is a story of bravery, love of family, and the endurance of human spirit. I was completely absorbed in this book staying up late to finish. This i 5 ☆ Mario Escobar has written a touching story from the perspective of two Jewish brothers’ harrowing escape during WWll from France to Spain on the quest to find their parents. The kindness and encouragement of the people they meet along their journey tugged at my heartstrings, with good triumphing over evil time and time again. Children of the Stars is a story of bravery, love of family, and the endurance of human spirit. I was completely absorbed in this book staying up late to finish. This is a keeper, one you don’t want to miss. This story was inspired by a trip to Le Chambon-sur-Lignon, France where the author took his family to visit. Excerpt from — https://encyclopedia.ushmm.org/conten... "Nobody asked who was Jewish and who was not. Nobody asked where you were from. Nobody asked who your father was or if you could pay. They just accepted each of us, taking us in with warmth, sheltering children, often without their parents—children who cried in the night from nightmares." —Elizabeth Koenig-Kaufman, a former child refugee in Le Chambon I received a complimentary copy of this book. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Hallie Szott

    3.5 Jewish brothers Jacob and Moses Stein have been staying with their aunt in Paris, while their parents search for a safe place to live. Yet, a detainment in the Vélodrome d’Hiver proves the city is no longer safe. They determine to find their parents before it is too late, and a dangerous journey through France—and beyond—brings them encounters and experiences they never expected. Mario Escobar’s Children of the Stars is a WWII story about family, hope, and perseverance, full of both harrowing 3.5 Jewish brothers Jacob and Moses Stein have been staying with their aunt in Paris, while their parents search for a safe place to live. Yet, a detainment in the Vélodrome d’Hiver proves the city is no longer safe. They determine to find their parents before it is too late, and a dangerous journey through France—and beyond—brings them encounters and experiences they never expected. Mario Escobar’s Children of the Stars is a WWII story about family, hope, and perseverance, full of both harrowing and heartfelt moments. It is a touching story, but at times, the author bogs down the narrative with more “telling” than “showing,” leaving me feeling slightly bored. Still, it is an interesting piece of historical fiction, and fans of the genre could enjoy it. This review is also posted on Hallie Reads. I received a complimentary copy of this book and the opportunity to provide an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review, and all the opinions I have expressed are my own.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Robyn

    CHILDREN OF THE STARS is in many ways an amazing book. The first thing that I noticed about this book was that the main characters were children and everything was from their viewpoint and about them. I have read many books about children and victims of the holocaust, but none quite like this… there were no parents to provide protection, thus while more vulnerable, this vulnerability seemed to have played a major factor in the success in their trip. Maybe being little boys and no protective adul CHILDREN OF THE STARS is in many ways an amazing book. The first thing that I noticed about this book was that the main characters were children and everything was from their viewpoint and about them. I have read many books about children and victims of the holocaust, but none quite like this… there were no parents to provide protection, thus while more vulnerable, this vulnerability seemed to have played a major factor in the success in their trip. Maybe being little boys and no protective adult, made them more likely to be protected by those that helped them. The story is about two Jewish brothers who cross Nazi-occupied France to find their parents. The story starts in 1941, when Jacob and Moses—12 and eight years old, had been left with their aunt Judith while their parents tried to find a new home. After being picked up in a raid and taken to a detention camp one brother, Moses, is nearly beaten to death, but the little boys know they must escape France and find their parents. Thus, the children travel from place to place, family to family, and come face to face with a great many hardships and dangers, yet they continue with the help of many. In 1943 they find their parents in Argentina. So in what way was this book not amazing? It is like WWII lite in many ways… perhaps because it is told by children and about children, there is much they would not have noticed or known. This is asked of the children early in the book if they understood what was going on and they answered they did not really. I don’t know exactly what I expected, but it just lacked some substance of other books about this time. Am I happy I read it… yes. 4 stars Happy Reading!

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