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Muslims, Christians, and Jesus: Gaining Understanding and Building Relationships

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Based on the author's twenty-five years of first-hand experience, this engaging book reveals what Islam really teaches and how today's Muslims live and think. With practical information and personal stories, Carl Medearis shows readers how they can build life-changing bridges between the world's two largest religions--one person at a time, whether in the US or elsewhere. Based on the author's twenty-five years of first-hand experience, this engaging book reveals what Islam really teaches and how today's Muslims live and think. With practical information and personal stories, Carl Medearis shows readers how they can build life-changing bridges between the world's two largest religions--one person at a time, whether in the US or elsewhere.


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Based on the author's twenty-five years of first-hand experience, this engaging book reveals what Islam really teaches and how today's Muslims live and think. With practical information and personal stories, Carl Medearis shows readers how they can build life-changing bridges between the world's two largest religions--one person at a time, whether in the US or elsewhere. Based on the author's twenty-five years of first-hand experience, this engaging book reveals what Islam really teaches and how today's Muslims live and think. With practical information and personal stories, Carl Medearis shows readers how they can build life-changing bridges between the world's two largest religions--one person at a time, whether in the US or elsewhere.

30 review for Muslims, Christians, and Jesus: Gaining Understanding and Building Relationships

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mel

    Something I hadn't expected, was to learn a few things about Islam such as: they consider Adam, Noah, Abraham and Moses as prophets. I knew they consider Jesus (Isa) as a prophet, (and only a prophet), also, that they don't think writing should be put in the Bible, but especially not the Quran. Oddly, it felt as though the author was writing a tight rope while explaining Islam and trying to put it in the best light. How much of his errors are from trying to put the idealogy in the best light or Something I hadn't expected, was to learn a few things about Islam such as: they consider Adam, Noah, Abraham and Moses as prophets. I knew they consider Jesus (Isa) as a prophet, (and only a prophet), also, that they don't think writing should be put in the Bible, but especially not the Quran. Oddly, it felt as though the author was writing a tight rope while explaining Islam and trying to put it in the best light. How much of his errors are from trying to put the idealogy in the best light or his ignorance or something else altogether? Such as, explaining that anyone who lives in areas controlled by Islam and doesn't convert is required to pay a zakat, a form of taxation. (page 44) However, this is not the correct word. Zakat is a form of charity. What he should have said was the jizya. He does then mention (page 46) that Zakat is giving, (not a taxation for non-muslims). Things that surprised me: muslims don't think Christians pray or fast. (They aren't aware the Bible tells Christians not to be like Pharisees and announce it to the world). But that they are afraid of Christians?! Pages 66-72 the author lists the surah and aya that mentions Jesus/Isa and the Bible scripture reference verses. I wasn't able to check every aya, because my edition of the Quran doesn't have the same references as the ones the author used, but also a lot of the same ayas are used. An aspect of the ideology that was left out by the author is that Islam is all inclusive in its life: way to live, politics, religion, etc. The author does mention on page 29 that even secular Islamic states are permeated with religious devotion and/or tradition. Every public figure is a Muslim. He mentions on page 101 political islam as if it is separate from the ideology. pg 153 he dsay tif you're born in a muslim family you are muslim and you cannot just leave. You don't get a choice. If you leave you can be ostracized or worse, killed. The author explained Muslims think the Holy Spirit is Gabriel the angel. And that they take every last writing as superior to the first. (he neglected to say that means the violent surahs supersede the peaceful surahs). The author does touch on the radical muslims that follow the violent surahs, as that is their own interpretation, (as long as they can back it up with other ayas). Unlike the Bible where it is NOT for private interpretation, (2 Peter 1:20) pg 59 The author admits the Quran is confusing and even contradictory and though most muslims haven't read the Bible, they'll say it's corrupted, but this belief contradicts their holy book. So why don't they accept Jesus? He doesn't fit their belief system. (example given on page 60) So you may be asking why the low rating? Numerous reasons, but a few are: the way he comes off anti-semitic; admitting on page 104 that he my be bias. Why side with Israel and deny the Jews are God's chosen people? Actually asking (pg 104) Does God love one people at the expense of others? (has he read the Old Testament?) It also seems, he forgets that Jesus was Jewish. If you talk to Muslims he says not to mention certain words or phrases, because that will be offensive to them. I am in agreement of not being offensive on purpose, but Jesus didn't worry about being offensive. pg 77-78 He uses an example of not saying "Son of God" to Muslims, because if you mistakenly thought God had a son through a sexual relationship with Mary you'd reject it too. However, Surah 19:20 in their Quran says She said, "How can I have a boy while no man has touched me and I have not been unchaste?" So why would they be offended? It's because of the lack of explaining the Godhead and if Jesus isn't explained is he really leading Muslims to God? pg 173 he mentions "real" prayer happens with heads bowed and eyes closed. But doesn't give scripture for this assumption? Opinion? Tradition? pg 153 he says the origin of the word Christian is "little Christs". I couldn't find that anywhere and according to Strongs Concordance it means followers of Christ. On the same page claims the Bible only mentions Christian two times, but he forgot Acts 26:28. pg 156 "We are never commanded, exhorted, or encouraged to use the word Christian. It is, after all, a word, weighted with hidden meanings and historical grievances. A much better phrase, one I use myself, is "follower of Jesus." And yet, that is what Christian means. But because he's mentioned this, why does he use trinity? That is not in the Bible, but Godhead is, three times. (Godhead is not mentioned one time in this book). pg 174, the author doesn't seem to have an understanding of what the Bible says or what the Greek words mean, as is an example of baptism. And then acts as though we can cherry pick which verses to believe in calling it doctrine. (also page 156) It then follows that his personal mission was not to found a new religion called Christianity, but rather to, as he saaid, "seek and save the lost." So however we define this, we can agree that his identity, at least in his teaching and his lifestyle, was not "Christian." It's not up for private interpretation. "however "we" define this"... Is he kidding?! Obviously not. Interestingly, he doesn't claim a doctrine, but he seems to be very afraid of the word Christian, and because of his verbiage I think I have an idea of what doctrine he follows, but doesn't announce in the book. Just as the Muslims try to remain Muslim, while accepting Jesus, it seems as though the author is also having an identity crisis to be a Christian without religion. I will end on that agreement though, that the Bible doesn't mention denominations. But I would only recommend this book to people who are very knowledgable of both what the Bible says and of Islam. (I hope this review doesn't have a lot of typos, I kept having issues with my keyboard)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ramón

    I like this book a lot. Though the author is unapologetically a Christian, he actually has a substantial amount of experience in the Middle East and brings more nuance into understanding the commonalities and differences between these two religions. More importantly to me, he works hard at showing that Jesus does not rest comfortably in any religious tradition, and that the idea of following Jesus forces adherents of both religious traditions to examine their own cultural preconceptions and prej I like this book a lot. Though the author is unapologetically a Christian, he actually has a substantial amount of experience in the Middle East and brings more nuance into understanding the commonalities and differences between these two religions. More importantly to me, he works hard at showing that Jesus does not rest comfortably in any religious tradition, and that the idea of following Jesus forces adherents of both religious traditions to examine their own cultural preconceptions and prejudices about the other. Carl is a great storyteller, and writes page-turning prose. If you're looking for dense philosophical and/or theological discussions, they are not here. But, if you recognize the power of stories in conveying knowledge, then you will find few books that dig deeper than this. Highly recommended.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Brittany McDowell

    Informative and practical. Winsome and compelling. Easy to read. Many principles are applicable to all people groups.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Guy Austin

    This title, "Muslims, Christians, and Jesus" is written at just the right time. This period of current events is fraught with divisiveness. While it does take a faith-based stance on the interaction between two faiths at odds with each other for genuine reasons, the subject matter speaks to finding commonality. It was a breath of fresh air. The author shares his own first-hand experiences to build bridges and help one understand what the Muslim faith. Rather than fear he finds commonality. It is This title, "Muslims, Christians, and Jesus" is written at just the right time. This period of current events is fraught with divisiveness. While it does take a faith-based stance on the interaction between two faiths at odds with each other for genuine reasons, the subject matter speaks to finding commonality. It was a breath of fresh air. The author shares his own first-hand experiences to build bridges and help one understand what the Muslim faith. Rather than fear he finds commonality. It is filled with personal stories and shares how Muslims live and think. Whether you are a person of faith or not this subject matter is well worth your time. I only wish more persons would pick it up, especially those who do not know Muslims other than what talking heads tell them in the media that fill us with anxiety. I walk away feeling much more understanding.

  5. 5 out of 5

    John

    "Muslims, Christians and Jesus" should be required reading for any Christian -- or follower of Jesus, as Carl Medearis would say -- with an interest in being a friend to the Muslims in his world. A native of small-town Nebraska with a God-given love for Arab people, Medearis lived with his wife and children for 12 years in Beirut and then continued to devote his life to breaking down the walls between Muslims and Christians. This book is a fruit of Medearis' labors, and it's filled with practical "Muslims, Christians and Jesus" should be required reading for any Christian -- or follower of Jesus, as Carl Medearis would say -- with an interest in being a friend to the Muslims in his world. A native of small-town Nebraska with a God-given love for Arab people, Medearis lived with his wife and children for 12 years in Beirut and then continued to devote his life to breaking down the walls between Muslims and Christians. This book is a fruit of Medearis' labors, and it's filled with practical advice. (It's fine to bring a Bible to an encounter with Muslims, but it should be "clean" -- it shouldn't have any highlighted passages or notes written in it, and you absolutely should not set it on the floor. Muslims would never treat a holy book in this way, and they will be offended if you do.) I hesitate to write much about Medearis' message because he presents it so effectively and because it could easily be misunderstood. In trying to briefly describe what he says, I'm concerned that will create misunderstanding. But I think it boils down to two premises (these aren't his premises but my abridgment of what he has to say): 1. Followers of Jesus should present everything that matters to their Muslim friends. 2. The only thing that matters is Jesus. This leads to some bits of advice that you might not expect to find in a Christian book. For example: "If you don't know how to party, get help from someone who does." "Don't be defensive. You have nothing to defend. God doesn't need help with his reputation, and the Bible can stand on its own." "Discipleship is the sum of time spent with somebody. Discipleship is not about the sinner's prayer or the end result." "Always assume that the person you are speaking with has a more holy life than you do." All of this, even the bit about partying, is taken out of context. I urge you, if you're interested at all, to get this book and get the context. I think a lot of it applies to evangelism in general, and it's the sort of evangelism I think I could do. I think it's the first book I've ever read that presented a sort of evangelism I think I could do. (Although I'm not certain Medearis ever calls it evangelism.) The book includes wonderful stories of Medearis' own experiences. Some are funny. (Once, he and his children taught Arabian children a song in their language, but Medearis got a key word wrong. The Arabian children couldn't figure out why they were singing "I've got a mouse, mouse, mouse, mouse down in my heart.") Some are poignant, some are inspiring. Some are all three. Maybe you want to skip straight ahead to the story under "Thought Three: Be a-religious" starting on Page 156, and then go back to the beginning. It's such a cool story.

  6. 5 out of 5

    S.J. Munson

    Medearis' book is a quick and easy read for Christians looking for a deeper understanding of Islam. I was amazed at the number of references in the Quran to Jesus. Mohammed had a deep reverence for Jesus Christ and commanded his followers to have the same-- making a great starting point for Christians to introduce Muslim friends to Messiah. Medearis' approach to sharing the gospel is refreshingly "centered set"-- meaning he doesn't start by bludgeoning Muslims with apologetics and doctrines or b Medearis' book is a quick and easy read for Christians looking for a deeper understanding of Islam. I was amazed at the number of references in the Quran to Jesus. Mohammed had a deep reverence for Jesus Christ and commanded his followers to have the same-- making a great starting point for Christians to introduce Muslim friends to Messiah. Medearis' approach to sharing the gospel is refreshingly "centered set"-- meaning he doesn't start by bludgeoning Muslims with apologetics and doctrines or by trying to convince them to become Christians. Instead, he introduces them to the person of Christ and allows the Holy Spirit room to do what he does so well. A great book for group study. Highly recommend.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Buerger

    He has some good insights, particularly into attitudes and behaviors to adopt and avoid. He truly seems like a man of great love for God and man. However, I'm uncomfortable with the religion vs. relationship dichotomy he seems to push. I honestly feel that it trivializes and perhaps demeans the complicated history of both Islam and Christianity. While I can appreciate his aversion to ascribing to various "-isms," I think his depiction of a pure "relationship with Jesus," seemingly free of any re He has some good insights, particularly into attitudes and behaviors to adopt and avoid. He truly seems like a man of great love for God and man. However, I'm uncomfortable with the religion vs. relationship dichotomy he seems to push. I honestly feel that it trivializes and perhaps demeans the complicated history of both Islam and Christianity. While I can appreciate his aversion to ascribing to various "-isms," I think his depiction of a pure "relationship with Jesus," seemingly free of any religious, denominational, or historical ties, is overly simplistic and in fact betrays his own "tradition"—the "it's just me, Jesus, and my (Protestant) Bible" tradition.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mike B

    A really great book - helpful in the "art" of engaging with Muslims as a Christian. I don't agree with everything Mr. Medearis has to say, but he demonstrates a great heart for these people and it's a must read if you want to reach out to Muslims around you. A really great book - helpful in the "art" of engaging with Muslims as a Christian. I don't agree with everything Mr. Medearis has to say, but he demonstrates a great heart for these people and it's a must read if you want to reach out to Muslims around you.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tyrean

    Full of personal insight, practical tips, and faith, this book gets to the true heart of conversations between Muslims and Christians - Jesus. I highly recommend this book for anyone who wants to love God and love others, just as Jesus commanded us to do.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Erica

    Compared to most books about evangelism, this book is much more about understanding and appreciating the people you want to reach than arguing them into your corner. I appreciated that a lot. I read this as a counterpoint to a recent book club selection about the Christian/Muslim divide, and I liked this one much better. It gives a grounding in the basic tenents of Islam, some idea of the diversity in beliefs and practices within the Muslim world, and many stories about the experiences the autho Compared to most books about evangelism, this book is much more about understanding and appreciating the people you want to reach than arguing them into your corner. I appreciated that a lot. I read this as a counterpoint to a recent book club selection about the Christian/Muslim divide, and I liked this one much better. It gives a grounding in the basic tenents of Islam, some idea of the diversity in beliefs and practices within the Muslim world, and many stories about the experiences the author and others had visiting and getting to know Muslim people all over the world. The best part of this book was its exhortation to its intended audience of Christians in North America to actually go and talk with a Muslim without an agenda. Get to know them and make friends. Muslims are neighbors and coworkers and members of so many communities in North America that few people have to go far to encounter them. It behooves everyone - but especially those who might have an adversarial idea of them - to discover the common ground they share.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Balanced and courageous. In an age where so much is either hyped one-sidedly, or confused by anger and ignorance, this book stands out. The author speaks from hard-won experience trying to understand the worldview, values and keys into the hearts of Muslims. He understands the missed opportunities squandered by Christians who don't know how to stay focused on what we have that is the pivotal point: Jesus. Medearis speaks truth with grace and compassion, so rare. I highly recommend this piece for Balanced and courageous. In an age where so much is either hyped one-sidedly, or confused by anger and ignorance, this book stands out. The author speaks from hard-won experience trying to understand the worldview, values and keys into the hearts of Muslims. He understands the missed opportunities squandered by Christians who don't know how to stay focused on what we have that is the pivotal point: Jesus. Medearis speaks truth with grace and compassion, so rare. I highly recommend this piece for any who earnestly want to understand the Muslim heart so as to explain better the Maker of all out hearts. "The message that we carry is Jesus. Not church, not capitalism, not democracy, not doctrine, not the religion of Christianity, not Calvin, not Luther, not Democrat, not Republican." p.33 "We are not here to "build the kingdom", but rather to obey the King."p.35

  12. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Kidwell

    Muslims, Christians, and Jesus Understanding the World of Islam and Overcoming the Fears That Divide Us by Carl Medearis Bethany House Bethany House Publishers Religion & Spirituality Pub Date 07 Nov 2017 I am reviewing a copy of Muslims, Christians and Jesus through Bethany House Publishers and Netgalley: This book encourages us to not be flippant or mean when we are talking to Muslims about Christ. We are encouraged to be both genuine and patient and to speak respectfully. When we tell them about Jesu Muslims, Christians, and Jesus Understanding the World of Islam and Overcoming the Fears That Divide Us by Carl Medearis Bethany House Bethany House Publishers Religion & Spirituality Pub Date 07 Nov 2017 I am reviewing a copy of Muslims, Christians and Jesus through Bethany House Publishers and Netgalley: This book encourages us to not be flippant or mean when we are talking to Muslims about Christ. We are encouraged to be both genuine and patient and to speak respectfully. When we tell them about Jesus terms like Jesus the Christ and Messiah are acceptable terms. The author encourages us not to treat the Muslims faith with disregard. We are reminded too that we should not judge all Muslims by the acts of extremists. We are encouraged to show them Jesus Loves by example. I give Muslims, Christians and Jesus four out of five stars! Happy Reading!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sarah - All The Book Blog Names Are Taken

    I probably should have paid better attention to the second part of the sub-title. This was a great and relevant book, I was just expecting it to be more of a look at how Christianity and Islam mesh and can come together through Jesus than a how-to for talking to Muslims about Jesus. The former was also covered, I was just looking for something more in-depth. I don't have the fear of Muslims that others do, so that part was less applicable to me, although I am almost embarrassed to admit that it I probably should have paid better attention to the second part of the sub-title. This was a great and relevant book, I was just expecting it to be more of a look at how Christianity and Islam mesh and can come together through Jesus than a how-to for talking to Muslims about Jesus. The former was also covered, I was just looking for something more in-depth. I don't have the fear of Muslims that others do, so that part was less applicable to me, although I am almost embarrassed to admit that it never occurred to me to visit a Mosque or Islamic Center here. It would be such a great educational experience.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dwayne A Milley

    I read another blog book by Medearis entitled, “Speaking of Jesus”, which made me excited to read this book. As a Christian, I found it refreshing for someone like me to look at the Muslim faith and help me understand how much we have in common. For some, me typing that might make me sound like I’m suggestion there are no differences, which isn’t the point. Medearis shares some very practical insights from his own experience living in Muslim communities around the world that not only helped to d I read another blog book by Medearis entitled, “Speaking of Jesus”, which made me excited to read this book. As a Christian, I found it refreshing for someone like me to look at the Muslim faith and help me understand how much we have in common. For some, me typing that might make me sound like I’m suggestion there are no differences, which isn’t the point. Medearis shares some very practical insights from his own experience living in Muslim communities around the world that not only helped to deepen my faith, but also helped me understand the richness of interfaith community and the value of friendships across faith lines.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    There's a lot of good stuff in here, it would be an excellent companion to one of my favorite books about sharing Jesus's love (Get Real). Though I initially struggle with a few of Medearis's methods, they have given me a lot to ponder. I think this is an eye-opening read and really positive/encouraging. For a deeper insider perspective on this topic, I recommend Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus. There's a lot of good stuff in here, it would be an excellent companion to one of my favorite books about sharing Jesus's love (Get Real). Though I initially struggle with a few of Medearis's methods, they have given me a lot to ponder. I think this is an eye-opening read and really positive/encouraging. For a deeper insider perspective on this topic, I recommend Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Austyn Harris

    After the events of 9/11 one can expect to have some strong emotion and prejudice towards the Middle East and the Islam faith but their is no room for that in the kingdom of God. This book does a phenomenal job of demolishing the false and negative perspectives that we have built up about Muslims and helps rebuild the beauty of people that we, as Americans have failed to love and welcome.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Todd Hudnall

    When it comes to wisdom on reaching Muslims, this book is a slam dunk 5-star work. I gave it four stars in that I felt his analysis and assessment of the Islamic religion was far rosier and much more appealing to western Christians than reality. Yet, it is an inspiring and helpful challenge to reach our Muslim neighbors.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Elis

    I really enjoy Carl Medearis. Read this more for that reason rather than because I needed to know more about building relationships ... although I certainly learned a lot about that. I think my favorite thing is how, no matter what, Carl's first and foremost message is "JESUS" and I want to learn that for myself. Besides, his story narrative voice is just a delight XD I really enjoy Carl Medearis. Read this more for that reason rather than because I needed to know more about building relationships ... although I certainly learned a lot about that. I think my favorite thing is how, no matter what, Carl's first and foremost message is "JESUS" and I want to learn that for myself. Besides, his story narrative voice is just a delight XD

  19. 4 out of 5

    Luke

    Carl does a really good job of forcing you to deal with the difference between being a follower of Jesus and being a Christian. He has a lot of practical advice and stories a out how to share Jesus with Muslims without forcing Christianity.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    This was an eye opening, and sometimes eyebrow raising, book. I read it as part of preparation for refugee outreach in my local neighborhood. I thought I knew quite a bit about the subject already, but clearly I have more to learn, and some of the issues are in no way clear at all. I don't really know what to think at this point, having not yet begun the actual outreach work. I will have to come back to this a little later. This was an eye opening, and sometimes eyebrow raising, book. I read it as part of preparation for refugee outreach in my local neighborhood. I thought I knew quite a bit about the subject already, but clearly I have more to learn, and some of the issues are in no way clear at all. I don't really know what to think at this point, having not yet begun the actual outreach work. I will have to come back to this a little later.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dawn Quarles

    Moving to Cairo in August and this book really helped me understand how not to be offensive in discussing my Christian faith with others in that part of the world. Very informative.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

    This was a great practical book on how to share Jesus with our Muslim friends. I found a lot of great advice that would pertain to relating to anyone, regardless of their beliefs.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Paul Wheeler

    What a beautiful book. If you are interested in inter-faith dialog but don't know much about Islam, this is a very practical book. What a beautiful book. If you are interested in inter-faith dialog but don't know much about Islam, this is a very practical book.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Crioni Love

    Invaluable insight

  25. 5 out of 5

    Giedra

    I read this book immediately after reading Medearis' other book, Speaking of Jesus, which is newer. It's really the exact same book, including many of the same anecdotes, but with a narrower focus. This book is designed to help Christians understand how to share their faith in Jesus with Muslims, in part by understanding more about Islam in general. As such there is information about the history of Islam, comparisons of the stories that the Koran and the Bible tell about various prophets of the b I read this book immediately after reading Medearis' other book, Speaking of Jesus, which is newer. It's really the exact same book, including many of the same anecdotes, but with a narrower focus. This book is designed to help Christians understand how to share their faith in Jesus with Muslims, in part by understanding more about Islam in general. As such there is information about the history of Islam, comparisons of the stories that the Koran and the Bible tell about various prophets of the book (pointing out that the only prophet that Islam and Christianity don't have in common is Muhammed, etc.), significant quotes from the Koran that are useful to be aware of, etc. A lot of the information is also practical. For example, he discusses whether and how to pray with a Muslim (don't close your eyes and bow your head; don't be surprised if after praying spontaneously for God to bless a friend, that the friend ask you to "do that thing you do again" and not recognize it as prayer) and how to treat the Bible in the presence of a Muslim (don't write in it or set it on the floor; keep it as pristine as possible to show reverence!). The larger message in the book is that given the history of Christianity and Islam, perhaps it is better to characterize ourselves as followers of Jesus rather than as Christians, when talking to Muslims. I believe that after having written this book, Medearis must have realized that this larger message is applicable to all of Christian life and not just to interactions with Muslims....and this is what led him to write the later book. So, if you've read Speaking of Jesus, you've absorbed the main point of this book too, and this one is only interesting inasmuch as it provides more information about Islam.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

    The subtitle is really the key to this book. Gaining understanding and building relationships are a common focus that unifies the many thoughts running throughout it. I initially expected Medearis's book to highlight the differences between Muslim and Christian perspectives on Christianity and life in general. While it did delve into some issues, Medearis chose to emphasize how we as Christians should treat Muslims and their views instead of how we as Christians should think about Muslims and th The subtitle is really the key to this book. Gaining understanding and building relationships are a common focus that unifies the many thoughts running throughout it. I initially expected Medearis's book to highlight the differences between Muslim and Christian perspectives on Christianity and life in general. While it did delve into some issues, Medearis chose to emphasize how we as Christians should treat Muslims and their views instead of how we as Christians should think about Muslims and their views. Unfortunately, that tended to lead to a vague impression from his moments in question-and-answer format. I would have appreciated notes on how to admit truly not knowing (or struggling with) what the Bible says about a certain issue or how Jesus would have responded. Perhaps reading the comparisons between the Qur'an (Qu'ran? [I'm not sure if I'm punctutating correctly here]) and the Bible that Medearis list would help. Regardless, much of what Medearis is truly helpful. I really aprreciated the discussions of Middle Eastern vs. Western culture and how Christians can avoid confusing or unintentionally offending Muslims with their actions.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Monica

    This book was assigned by my church as a part of my team's preparation for a short-term mission trip to a Muslim population. It gave a great introduction to Islam and how Christians can share Jesus with Muslims. Medearis is in the school of thought that uses similarities between the Quran and the Bible to build bridges, using absolute truth found in the Quran to point to Jesus. However, our local host on the trip (who was a Muslim himself) staunchly believed the opposite. As a result, much of wh This book was assigned by my church as a part of my team's preparation for a short-term mission trip to a Muslim population. It gave a great introduction to Islam and how Christians can share Jesus with Muslims. Medearis is in the school of thought that uses similarities between the Quran and the Bible to build bridges, using absolute truth found in the Quran to point to Jesus. However, our local host on the trip (who was a Muslim himself) staunchly believed the opposite. As a result, much of what our host advised us to share with Muslims contradicted the teachings of this book. I believe that this book provides an eye-opening starting point for Christians wanting to reach Muslims, but we should all be aware of the specific contexts and needs we work within.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    I appreciate the heart behind this book: point to Jesus, not self or religion. Mr. Madearis offers practical advice for doing this, and his personal stories model the advice. Furthermore, he promotes respect between the cultures, from the paradigm of something like, both faiths aim to model their lives after Jesus the Christ, so focus on that common ground. It's a quick read, so I don't expect it to address all of the issues that could arise; it does what it aims to do and offers direction for de I appreciate the heart behind this book: point to Jesus, not self or religion. Mr. Madearis offers practical advice for doing this, and his personal stories model the advice. Furthermore, he promotes respect between the cultures, from the paradigm of something like, both faiths aim to model their lives after Jesus the Christ, so focus on that common ground. It's a quick read, so I don't expect it to address all of the issues that could arise; it does what it aims to do and offers direction for deeper learning. Great read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Steve Watson

    Really helpful short primer, for Christians, about Muslims, Islam, and how to have great relationships with Muslims. Carl's a friend, and he's lived the stuff he writes about, as evidenced by his many personal stories in the text. In a couple of points, Carl assumes a more conservative Christianity than I see uniformly practiced in my world. But that's nit-picking. Overall, he's clear, honoring of Muslims and the culture, and really encouraging followers of Jesus to live with less fear, more lov Really helpful short primer, for Christians, about Muslims, Islam, and how to have great relationships with Muslims. Carl's a friend, and he's lived the stuff he writes about, as evidenced by his many personal stories in the text. In a couple of points, Carl assumes a more conservative Christianity than I see uniformly practiced in my world. But that's nit-picking. Overall, he's clear, honoring of Muslims and the culture, and really encouraging followers of Jesus to live with less fear, more love, and more focus on Jesus.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jill Boyd

    This book reminds me that I have a lot to learn. Jesus in the Quran? How has it taken me this long to know that? The author attempts to give an abbreviated lesson on what Muslims and Christians have in common and how they can be friends. I enjoyed the book. It was recommended from three isolated sources, one of who is a Christian missionary in Africa. If you want a book to mull over, here it is.

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