web site hit counter Zara Hossain Is Here - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Zara Hossain Is Here

Availability: Ready to download

Zara's family has waited years for their visa process to be finalized so that they can officially become US citizens. But it only takes one moment for that dream to come crashing down around them. Seventeen-year-old Pakistani immigrant, Zara Hossain, has been leading a fairly typical life in Corpus Christi, Texas, since her family moved there for her father to work as a ped Zara's family has waited years for their visa process to be finalized so that they can officially become US citizens. But it only takes one moment for that dream to come crashing down around them. Seventeen-year-old Pakistani immigrant, Zara Hossain, has been leading a fairly typical life in Corpus Christi, Texas, since her family moved there for her father to work as a pediatrician. While dealing with the Islamophobia that she faces at school, Zara has to lay low, trying not to stir up any trouble and jeopardize their family's dependent visa status while they await their green card approval, which has been in process for almost nine years. But one day her tormentor, star football player Tyler Benson, takes things too far, leaving a threatening note in her locker, and gets suspended. As an act of revenge against her for speaking out, Tyler and his friends vandalize Zara's house with racist graffiti, leading to a violent crime that puts Zara's entire future at risk. Now she must pay the ultimate price and choose between fighting to stay in the only place she's ever called home or losing the life she loves and everyone in it. From the author of the "heart-wrenching yet hopeful" (Samira Ahmed) novel, The Love and Lies of Rukhsana Ali, comes a timely, intimate look at what it means to be an immigrant in America today, and the endurance of hope and faith in the face of hate.


Compare

Zara's family has waited years for their visa process to be finalized so that they can officially become US citizens. But it only takes one moment for that dream to come crashing down around them. Seventeen-year-old Pakistani immigrant, Zara Hossain, has been leading a fairly typical life in Corpus Christi, Texas, since her family moved there for her father to work as a ped Zara's family has waited years for their visa process to be finalized so that they can officially become US citizens. But it only takes one moment for that dream to come crashing down around them. Seventeen-year-old Pakistani immigrant, Zara Hossain, has been leading a fairly typical life in Corpus Christi, Texas, since her family moved there for her father to work as a pediatrician. While dealing with the Islamophobia that she faces at school, Zara has to lay low, trying not to stir up any trouble and jeopardize their family's dependent visa status while they await their green card approval, which has been in process for almost nine years. But one day her tormentor, star football player Tyler Benson, takes things too far, leaving a threatening note in her locker, and gets suspended. As an act of revenge against her for speaking out, Tyler and his friends vandalize Zara's house with racist graffiti, leading to a violent crime that puts Zara's entire future at risk. Now she must pay the ultimate price and choose between fighting to stay in the only place she's ever called home or losing the life she loves and everyone in it. From the author of the "heart-wrenching yet hopeful" (Samira Ahmed) novel, The Love and Lies of Rukhsana Ali, comes a timely, intimate look at what it means to be an immigrant in America today, and the endurance of hope and faith in the face of hate.

30 review for Zara Hossain Is Here

  1. 5 out of 5

    Larry H

    Zara Hossain Is Here , Sabina Khan's newest YA novel, is a poignant, powerful story about the racism and prejudice faced by immigrants, even within their own religions and cultures. “My presentation in class today has reminded me that I exist in a sort of no-man’s-land. I wasn’t born here, but I don’t remember much of Pakistan and I can’t imagine what my life would be like if I still lived there. But I know how a lot of people here feel about immigrants. So...where do I belong?” As the only Mus Zara Hossain Is Here , Sabina Khan's newest YA novel, is a poignant, powerful story about the racism and prejudice faced by immigrants, even within their own religions and cultures. “My presentation in class today has reminded me that I exist in a sort of no-man’s-land. I wasn’t born here, but I don’t remember much of Pakistan and I can’t imagine what my life would be like if I still lived there. But I know how a lot of people here feel about immigrants. So...where do I belong?” As the only Muslim in her conservative Texas Catholic high school, Zara Hossain stands out—and not for the reasons she wants to. Every day she faces abuse—vicious stares and comments about terrorism, especially from football player Tyler Benson and his friends. But when she dares to challenge him in front of his friends, he vandalizes her locker, which sets off a chain of events that leads to tragedy and upheaval. Zara’s parents contemplate moving back to Pakistan, but that will upend Zara’s life. She won’t be able to get as good of a college education there, and being bisexual, she’ll face even more prejudice from her own people. But how can she stay in the U.S. if her parents go? I thought Zara Hossain Is Here was a really good, thought-provoking read about an all-too-familiar experience immigrants face. It’s also particularly timely given the recent rise in violence against Asians. This is the first book of Sabina Khan’s I’ve read, although her first book, The Love and Lives of Rukhsana Ali , is on my TBR as well. I love how she captured both the racial prejudice immigrants face and the judgment faced in their own communities for things like not being “devout enough.” It was great to be part of the tour for this book. Storygram Tours, IReadYA, and Sabina Khan provided me with complimentary copies of both of Khan's books in exchange for an unbiased review. Thanks for making them available! Check out my list of the best books I read in 2020 at https://itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com/2021/01/the-best-books-i-read-in-2020.html. Check out my list of the best books of the last decade at https://itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com/2020/01/my-favorite-books-of-decade.html. See all of my reviews at itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com. Follow me on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/the.bookishworld.of.yrralh/.

  2. 5 out of 5

    nitya

    Thank you so much to the author for the ARC! Content warning: racism/bullying, Islamophobia, gun violence, biphobia (from one character) RTC.

  3. 5 out of 5

    anya

    Update: November 10 2020 now Does anyone have a time machine? If so plz contact me ASAP I need a quick journey to a bookstore on July 7 2020 thx

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tova

    Some things, like Fawad Khan and Zara Hossain, are worth staying up until nearly 2 am reading! RTC in April, when all of you can read this fabulous book! My sincerest thanks to the author, Sabina Khan for providing me with an ARC. This book hit shelves April 6th, 2021. --- And the holidays came early because I won an ARC of this book!!!!! I am so excited Update: This is now releasing in April 2021, and its sad because I just want to read this book right now! When I said this: I am a simple woman, I Some things, like Fawad Khan and Zara Hossain, are worth staying up until nearly 2 am reading! RTC in April, when all of you can read this fabulous book! My sincerest thanks to the author, Sabina Khan for providing me with an ARC. This book hit shelves April 6th, 2021. --- And the holidays came early because I won an ARC of this book!!!!! I am so excited Update: This is now releasing in April 2021, and its sad because I just want to read this book right now! When I said this: I am a simple woman, I see a Sabina Khan book ready to emotionally devastate me and possibly reference Fawad Khan, I like. I hit want to read. I was hoping that this would be what would come of this book. Little did I know that I was actually correct. First of all the main character is BISEXUAL (brown, bisexual & Muslim, we stan) and there will be lots (according to the author) of Fawad Khan references. If you know me, ya girl is thriving!!!!! But that November 10th, 2020 release date has me thriving a little let. But it's okay, November will come, this is just 370 days away.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Janna

    i am absolutely in love with zara hossain. we've got a bisexual mc and a lesbian love interest and we even got discussions about their individual struggles! there's trans inclusive feminism, curvy main characters and a lesbian teacher. there are literally so many important discussions in this one about white privilege, racism, xenophobia and gun violence. this is so crucial bc ya is accessible for so many and young people will learn so much from this! our love interest struggles with having homop i am absolutely in love with zara hossain. we've got a bisexual mc and a lesbian love interest and we even got discussions about their individual struggles! there's trans inclusive feminism, curvy main characters and a lesbian teacher. there are literally so many important discussions in this one about white privilege, racism, xenophobia and gun violence. this is so crucial bc ya is accessible for so many and young people will learn so much from this! our love interest struggles with having homophobic christian parents, whereas our Muslim mc is supported wholeheartedly by her parents. i could cry because this representation was so good. this book is fast paced, features likeable characters and a cute romance and more importantly, the message that white supremacists can fuck off already. (bonus points for the freddie mercury references, my queen loving heart was smiling so much) please. read this book. i know you'll love it as much as me. thanks to edelweiss i received an arc in exchange for an honest opinion.

  6. 4 out of 5

    fanna

    October 07, 2020: I mean, I'm pretty sure I would love this. October 07, 2020: I mean, I'm pretty sure I would love this.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Toya (the reading chemist)

    CW: racism, Islamophobia, xenophobia, gun violence, homophobia, biphobia, bullying Zara Hossain is Here is one of those books that I think should be required reading for young people. There are a lot of heavy topics and themes discussed in this book (see content warnings above), but Sabina Khan brilliantly examines the struggles of being a Pakistani and Muslim immigrant in the US. Zara is a high school senior in Corpus Christi, TX at a wealthy private high school thanks to her dad’s job as a pedia CW: racism, Islamophobia, xenophobia, gun violence, homophobia, biphobia, bullying Zara Hossain is Here is one of those books that I think should be required reading for young people. There are a lot of heavy topics and themes discussed in this book (see content warnings above), but Sabina Khan brilliantly examines the struggles of being a Pakistani and Muslim immigrant in the US. Zara is a high school senior in Corpus Christi, TX at a wealthy private high school thanks to her dad’s job as a pediatrician at the local hospital. Life at school isn’t exactly smooth sailing since she has to deal with the head jock’s (Tyler) constant racist and Islamophobic remarks. Zara has always just tried to push through to keep her parents from worrying until Tyler’s antics escalate. Now everything that Zara and her family has worked for is in jeopardy, and of course, the Brown immigrants are the ones who stand to lose everything. Zara is a phenomenal character. First off, she’s bisexual, which is addressed on page. There are several conversations surrounding Zara’s sexuality being at odds with her religious identity, and that even though her parents are 100% supportive, Zara would have to hide that aspect of her in Pakistan. She would not have the privilege of being out as she is in the US. This is stark contrast to Zara’s girlfriend Chloe, who is a white Catholic American girl with parents who are unwilling to accept that their daughter is lesbian. I love that Khan showed this dichotomy and even addresses that the assumption that it’s always the parents within Muslim communities that do not accept queerness when in this case, it’s the opposite. The insight into just how complicated and messy the immigration system was much appreciated. I think that there’s this ideology in the US specifically that as long as you enter the country legally (as is the case here with employer sponsored visas) that everything will proceed without any hiccups. The way Khan challenged this naive notion and highlighted how flawed the system truly is was eye-opening. I want to quickly comment on the side characters of this book. I absolutely loved Zara’s parents and their unwavering love and support for their daughter no matter what avenues she wanted to pursue. Zara’s two best friends, Nick and Priya were also really well done. Some of my favorite moments in the book was seeing how seamlessly Nick was incorporated into Zara’s family and traditions. Nick is Mexican American, but when he’s at Zara’s house, he uses the traditional honorifics when addressing Zara’s family. Overall, this is a brilliant coming of age novel that provides raw insight into the struggles of being an immigrant while also highlighting the importance of remembering that the meaning of home may not always be the land your from but the people that you surround yourself with especially in times of strife. Thank you to Scholastic Inc (I Read YA) for providing a copy for review. This did not influence my review. All opinions are my own.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sabreena - Books and Prosecco

    Apparently, this book has a lot of people obsessing about Fawad Khan... so I'm in. Apparently, this book has a lot of people obsessing about Fawad Khan... so I'm in.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jen Petro-Roy

    Fantastic.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kara Jorgensen

    I received this ARC from Ms. Khan through a social media giveaway. I loved THE LOVE AND LIES OF RUKHSANA ALI, and I loved ZARA HOSSAIN IS HERE. Zara is a force to be reckoned with who loves her friends, her parents, and wants to leave the world a better place. This is a story of a young woman trying to take on racism and prejudice and fight them with all she has at her disposal. At the same time, the book is also about family, found family, community, and figuring out what is truly right or what I received this ARC from Ms. Khan through a social media giveaway. I loved THE LOVE AND LIES OF RUKHSANA ALI, and I loved ZARA HOSSAIN IS HERE. Zara is a force to be reckoned with who loves her friends, her parents, and wants to leave the world a better place. This is a story of a young woman trying to take on racism and prejudice and fight them with all she has at her disposal. At the same time, the book is also about family, found family, community, and figuring out what is truly right or what battles to take on to find true safety and happiness. The overall story was amazing, and I absolutely loved Ammi and Abbu, they are fantastic parents. I was also consistently hungry through the book, which is always a plus. The only thing I didn't love was that I felt like a lot of scenes that could have been important were sort of glossed over and that we lost some threads of the story in favor of others, which was slightly annoying as I wanted to know what happened. Overall though, the ending is satisfying while still leaving room for potentially more or for the reader to fill in. Make sure you pre-order a copy as ZARA HOSSAIN IS HERE comes out in April 2021!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sanah

    Thank you to the publisher for sending me an arc. I really enjoyed this; Zara was a relatable and strong mc with very real struggles. I loved the family dynamic and exploration of what really matters in life. There were so many important topics covered in the story such as prejudice, islamophobia, homophobia, racism, and more, and I think the author handled them all very well and wove them into the story in a natural and impactful way. I do have a few issues, thought they're slight and don't aff Thank you to the publisher for sending me an arc. I really enjoyed this; Zara was a relatable and strong mc with very real struggles. I loved the family dynamic and exploration of what really matters in life. There were so many important topics covered in the story such as prejudice, islamophobia, homophobia, racism, and more, and I think the author handled them all very well and wove them into the story in a natural and impactful way. I do have a few issues, thought they're slight and don't affect the overall story much. First off, the characters seemed a lot younger than they actually were, they're all around seventeen but when I first started reading I thought they were 14/15 until I read the part about them driving. Also, the ending was rushed in my opinion. The way things tie up so quickly didn't quite match the long list of issues, and the way they were stretched out for so many pages. The representation of culture was so enjoyable to read, and I think the themes explored in the story are important overall. I loved Zara's friend group and her support system, and I loved how she was so selfless and thoughtful as a character. She always considered how her actions would make people feel before she went through with them, and it was a really engaging quality of her character. Would definitely recommend, especially to readers who feel they could relate to the character. Thanks again to the publisher for sending this arc to me, and everyone make sure to read this when it releases! [3.5 stars]

  12. 4 out of 5

    Salma19 (High Lady of the Dawn Court)

    Well... I loved The love and lies of Rukhsana Ali. Of course this is one of my most anticipated releases! :D. I want to see my dear Muslim heroines rising up in YA.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Thanks to Scholastic Press for the ARC of Zara Hossain is Here. This is my first novel to read by Khan and I was quite impressed. I enjoyed her mixture of cultural foods, language, movies, music, and so much more with enough context to understand and learn, not just drop a hint of an idea and move on. Khan tackles the tough issues, racism and immigration, without holding punches. Showing the legal battles many immigrants go through on their path to citizenship and how even the smallest of errors Thanks to Scholastic Press for the ARC of Zara Hossain is Here. This is my first novel to read by Khan and I was quite impressed. I enjoyed her mixture of cultural foods, language, movies, music, and so much more with enough context to understand and learn, not just drop a hint of an idea and move on. Khan tackles the tough issues, racism and immigration, without holding punches. Showing the legal battles many immigrants go through on their path to citizenship and how even the smallest of errors (whether legitimate or not) can throw the whole process off track. Her example of home and belonging throughout the story from both an immigrant and an LGBTQ perspective help all readers find a place to see themselves in the story.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Iriah

    I am thankful to the author and publishers for the free ebook. The author has written about a very serious and sensitive issue. The muslims, particulary Pakistani muslims are always misunderstood. People need to understand that the actions of one muslim don't speak for the whole nation. This book tells us the same thing. The unfairness to muslims is at peak everywhere around the world. People need to educate themselves about Islam, Pakistan and muslims. Zara's story opened my eyes to something tha I am thankful to the author and publishers for the free ebook. The author has written about a very serious and sensitive issue. The muslims, particulary Pakistani muslims are always misunderstood. People need to understand that the actions of one muslim don't speak for the whole nation. This book tells us the same thing. The unfairness to muslims is at peak everywhere around the world. People need to educate themselves about Islam, Pakistan and muslims. Zara's story opened my eyes to something that I never thought about. Being outsider, the sense of being looked as an immigrant first and other things rather than being treated as human is something so common and Zara's life was same. She was lucky to have friends like Nick and Priya. I doubt everyone gets so lucky in real life. What I liked the most was the everlasting support of Zara's parents for her. That's what people take for granted when they have been given this support so freely. I liked the fact that they didn't try to enforce what they thought was right for Zara. They always stood up for her. They sacrificed so much for her future, it brought tears to my eyes. Also,I am glad Zara loved her parents and wasn't selfish enough to let them suffer even more. Glad that she was a good daughter. I liked her. I am relieved that the author mentioned the fact that everyone observes Islam differently. So we can't judge one muslim for entire muslim community. I am not saying I agree with Zara's view about her religion and the way she led her life, but that was her choice. Muslims usually don't live that way and Zara might be wrong about many things so people might want to keep it on their mind while reading it. Also, I'm glad Zara loved her country and her religion regardless of how she led her life. I guess religion is something personal and is between the person and God. I enjoyed this book. The injustice to Zara's family and other immigrants broke my heart. I hope that would change one day.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Geter

    Thank you to the publisher, HearOurVoices booktours, and edelweiss for gifting me a copy. All opinions are my own and this is an honest review~ This is my first Sabina Khan read and it definitely won't be my last! There is a lot to unpack in this book as the author touches on a lot of important topics. From the social commentary on immigration reformation, to the discussions on religion and the LGBTQIA+ community, Khan focuses on each subject diligently while also weaving a heartfelt story about l Thank you to the publisher, HearOurVoices booktours, and edelweiss for gifting me a copy. All opinions are my own and this is an honest review~ This is my first Sabina Khan read and it definitely won't be my last! There is a lot to unpack in this book as the author touches on a lot of important topics. From the social commentary on immigration reformation, to the discussions on religion and the LGBTQIA+ community, Khan focuses on each subject diligently while also weaving a heartfelt story about love, the power of friendship, and strong family dynamics. I am not Muslim or from Pakistan so I cannot speak for that community but I will say I loved reading about the different dishes there were and learning about Bollywood films & actors. I felt like I got this little slice of life from Pakistan and it was an enthralling experience. I appreciated how loving and supportive Zara's family were about her sexuality. They let her be unapologetically her and it was refreshing to witness. My only nitpick about this book is that I felt the ending was a little rushed and too neatly wrapped up; however, I still highly recommend this book. The discussions and events that Khan highlights in this book are impactful. TW: racism, bomb threat, homophobia, assault, slurs against the MC, gun violence, hatred against immigrants, etc.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Gargee | Sapphire Bubble

    I am ready for Sabina Khan to wreck me again like she did with The Love & Lies of Rukhsana Ali And by that I mean, I am not ready I am ready for Sabina Khan to wreck me again like she did with The Love & Lies of Rukhsana Ali And by that I mean, I am not ready

  17. 4 out of 5

    ~em~

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. 2.5 STARS i could’ve been harsher and i could’ve done more with my rational thoughts and rated 𝙕𝙖𝙧𝙖 𝙃𝙤𝙨𝙨𝙖𝙞𝙣 𝙄𝙨 𝙃𝙚𝙧𝙚 with 2 stars, but i’m not. (in this case, 2.5 stars is not bad. i just didn’t see my life being really, REALLY being affected by this story). if you’re looking for more on a the reality of how someone’s life can be changed under quick, unfortunate circumstances, this might be for you. Zara Hossain has lived in Corpus Christi, Texas since she was a young toddler. Her parents came to t 2.5 STARS i could’ve been harsher and i could’ve done more with my rational thoughts and rated 𝙕𝙖𝙧𝙖 𝙃𝙤𝙨𝙨𝙖𝙞𝙣 𝙄𝙨 𝙃𝙚𝙧𝙚 with 2 stars, but i’m not. (in this case, 2.5 stars is not bad. i just didn’t see my life being really, REALLY being affected by this story). if you’re looking for more on a the reality of how someone’s life can be changed under quick, unfortunate circumstances, this might be for you. Zara Hossain has lived in Corpus Christi, Texas since she was a young toddler. Her parents came to the U.S. to provide her with a better life and giver her more opportunities. Zara is a queer Muslim who’s from Pakistan, and her peers at her Catholic school are giving her trouble just because of her beliefs and where she of from. overall, i liked this book and it’s very important and representative of the United State’s immigration system. it shows how unfair it is for people of color from other countries, and how they are treated differently. heck, people who are BORN HERE are treated differently. people who come to the U.S. LEGALLY are punished for things they do not do. read this, especially in light of the Asian hate around our country. or the migrant people fleeing from Mexico and coming through the border on foot just hoping for a better life. the culture of Zara’s family was very inviting. i would get into researching and keep researching, and be delighted to get back to the book. Zara’s parents were probably my favorite characters of the whole book. they are understanding of Zara’s sexuality and they just want her to be happy and keep her safe. 𝑺𝒑𝒐𝒊𝒍𝒆𝒓𝒔- Zara is not an unlikeable character, but sometimes, to me, she’d just come off the wrong way. otherwise, she is very real and has to deal with all of these unfortunate situations that are uprooting her life. i was kind of just along for the ride when it came to Chloe and Zara’s relationship. most of the time, i felt it was really surface level. they’d have the opportunity to go really into depth about some situations, and it’s not that they wouldn’t... it’s just i would want more. i just feel like they went to La Paletera, Scoopz, and Cole Park way too much. but they are cute. Zara’s friends are basically there for Zara to vent. they were also there for just the daily life parts, but weren’t there for huge events. although, Nick and Zara and getting married at the very end probably would’ve made this book funnier and more enjoyable, because i needed a good laugh. it was fun being able to imagine everything going on, because since i basically live in CC, TX, every single reference made sense. Sabina Khan even mentioned my favorite, underrated place to get kolaches. just to be clear, i do recommend 𝙕𝙖𝙧𝙖 𝙃𝙤𝙨𝙨𝙖𝙞𝙣 𝙄𝙨 𝙃𝙚𝙧𝙚 :) my expectations just weren't met, because they were really high. —————————————————————————————— (months earlier) I saw this on Instagram, looked it up on GR, read the description and once I saw Corpus Christi, Texas I immediately hit “Want to Read.” I live in CC and have only read one book that takes place here. (Also, it seems like a very intriguing book).

  18. 5 out of 5

    Siofra

    Thank you from the bottom of my heart, Sabina Khan & Scholastic Press for my advanced Arc! Fans of 'The Hate you give' & 'From a whisper to a rallying cry' will love this book. Zara Hossain's family move to America to give her the best future and have gone through everything to give themselves an amazing life. But when Tyler, a racist classmate starts a domino effect that leads Zara's father in the hospital; life, comfort and safety are called into question with Zara & her family. Speaking as an im Thank you from the bottom of my heart, Sabina Khan & Scholastic Press for my advanced Arc! Fans of 'The Hate you give' & 'From a whisper to a rallying cry' will love this book. Zara Hossain's family move to America to give her the best future and have gone through everything to give themselves an amazing life. But when Tyler, a racist classmate starts a domino effect that leads Zara's father in the hospital; life, comfort and safety are called into question with Zara & her family. Speaking as an immigrate, I felt the hardship of the immigration policies because I know how hard it is, but I benefit from being white and was never attack for that. Like Zara, I am also Bisexual, but I dealt with Chloe's family reaction to coming out, unlike Zara. This book gave me so many insights and connection that cannot be ignored - it struck me in the best way. I wish this could only be a story but I know that Muslims and POC have to face the worse every day and more books that show this will help more people release that we need to stand and find for rights being taken. This book is a must-read for school and readers out there. I will be requesting copies for my store and recommending this to school librarians before this book can be for anyone 9 and up (Even younger if their reading level is there). Encompassing the hardship of immigration, racism, culture, Lgbtq+ rights and stigma/bullying!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ele

    You know what I loved about this book? We've got a non-religious Muslim girl who doesn't judge does who ARE religious, a bi girl who doesn't spend her time experiencing homo/biphobia 24/7. I liked this book much better than The Love & Lies of Rukhsana Ali. I am not a Muslim, so I cannot speak for how good it is as rep. What I will note is that while Rukhsana dwelled so much in Islam-induced suffering and often had very negative energy towards Bangledesh in general, that was not the case here. No You know what I loved about this book? We've got a non-religious Muslim girl who doesn't judge does who ARE religious, a bi girl who doesn't spend her time experiencing homo/biphobia 24/7. I liked this book much better than The Love & Lies of Rukhsana Ali. I am not a Muslim, so I cannot speak for how good it is as rep. What I will note is that while Rukhsana dwelled so much in Islam-induced suffering and often had very negative energy towards Bangledesh in general, that was not the case here. No culture-bashing to be seen here! Content Warnings: Shooting, bullying, intense racism, homo/biphobia ------- No. It's even worse. It's been delayed til April How do I live without this cover? ------- No. No. No no no no no. NOOOO. THIS BOOK WAS SUSPENDED TILL NOVEMBER. *cries*

  20. 4 out of 5

    Artemis

    I love this small, precious YA book that can be kept in your pocket and read in a day. It is about the truths of America. It is about the exhaustive, frustrating, corrupt and broken immigration process in the US, and the devastating impact of the many, many kinds and layers of racism - passive, ignorant, microaggressions, and overt hatred and violence - and how it's all linked to systematic racism in western society. 'Zara Hossain Is Here' is told through the eyes of Zara Hossain, a seventeen-year I love this small, precious YA book that can be kept in your pocket and read in a day. It is about the truths of America. It is about the exhaustive, frustrating, corrupt and broken immigration process in the US, and the devastating impact of the many, many kinds and layers of racism - passive, ignorant, microaggressions, and overt hatred and violence - and how it's all linked to systematic racism in western society. 'Zara Hossain Is Here' is told through the eyes of Zara Hossain, a seventeen-year-old Pakistani American Muslim, whose immigrant parents are still awaiting their green cards after fourteen years of living in a Texas town, Corpus Christi. Her father is a skilled paediatrician. Zara is smart, strong willed, a green belt in tae kwon do, and she loves sour and gummy bear/worm froyos, and her dog Zorro. Her ambition is to work in law. She is also bisexual and, along with everything else that's going on in her hard life that's taking a tragic turn, she is getting into a relationship with a white Catholic girl, Chloe. In a refreshing take, author Sabina Khan made Zara's parents more liberal, progressive, and supportive than Muslim adults are typically depicted in every media there is. They know about Zara's sexuality, and they accept her and love her. They even encourage her to be openminded and make her own choices when it comes to their religion. Basically, Zara is agnostic, and doesn't follow many Islamic traditions, routines and practices. She is aware of how lucky and "free" she is when compared to others in her position, and when living in America; it's mainly racist school bullies (her school is predominantly white), other, more conservative Muslim relatives, and the backwards US immigration laws that make her life hellish and oppressive...and a racist attack involving a shooting that will change everything. While 'Zara Hossain Is Here' is decidedly "laidback" in its representation of the Muslim religion and culture, like in Sabina Khan's previous book, 'The Love and Lies of Rukhsana Ali', so much food from the Middle East is lovingly and deliciously described - and eaten - constantly! It's fantastic. The Bollywood references are especially affectionate. There is a lot to learn here in terms of modern Muslim, Pakistani and Middle Eastern culture, as well as the myriad of ways in which racism and Islamophobia (and sexism and homophobia) still plague our society to this day. It's a never ending war, but we must never stop fighting for freedom and equality. For love and peace. One particularly progressive and original thing about 'Zara Hossain Is Here' is: in this story, when Zara's main hideous, racist white school bully (who doesn't deserve to be named here) might be feeling guilty and like a human being after an incident goes too far ('cause who knew that guns and attempted murder might result from racist rhetoric, right?), and after he gives his half-arsed apologies that are only made to make himself feel better and free from blame, guess what happens? Nothing. Neither Zara nor the book forgive him, no matter what any character says about "moving on" from anger; about "overreacting"; and about "refusing to see his side" when the poor fragile racist baby "couldn't see what's right and what's wrong". He was only following his privileged parents' example, you see, and he "doesn't know any better"! No. Fuck no. As Zara points out, he's not a child, and that excuse doesn't hold water. Not when, literally, lives are at stake. Near the end of the book, the bully is pushed aside, never to be seen again. He is not given the time of day. Because he doesn't deserve any acknowledgement. It is Zara's story, and the story of millions of other Muslims, immigrants and dark-skinned people. Fuck white guilt and rich white privilege. Hurting people because of your deep-seated prejudices and insecurities - killing people because of your deep-seated prejudices and insecurities - is wrong. It's evil. Don't do it. Don't be a bigot. Don't be horrible to people. It's as simple as that, living that way. (An additional PSA: gun control and restrictions are vital, as is saving lives.) Other diversity representation includes Zara's family lawyer, Shireen Khala, and Zara's two best friends: Nick Garcia, who is Mexican American, and Priya, who is a Keralan. And there's Ms. Talbot, a social studies teacher and Social Justice Club founder, who is a married lesbian and practically a superhuman. I am so glad that there are in fact people like Ms. Talbot and Zara and the other great characters in 'Zara Hossain Is Here' who exist in reality. There's also a female POC liberal senator who will be running for president! This is the real world, and it is still full of hope. 'Zara Hossain Is Here' - it is right up there alongside 'The Love and Lies of Rukhsana Ali' and 'Internment' as one of the most relevant YA novels about the discrimination, violence and deadly suffering and abuse of Muslims, Muslim Americans, and immigrants in general. No matter who you are, where you come from, what you look like, and who you love, you deserve to exist. You are human. You matter. You have value and validation. You are welcome. You are wanted. You are loved. Final Score: 4.5/5

  21. 5 out of 5

    Siena

    This was an enjoyable and important novel that addresses immigration and racism towards Muslims in America through the viewpoint of a queer Muslim teenager, Zara Hossian. The characters were my favorite part of this book, they were likable, and the relationships between them, particularly between Zara and her family and friends were wholesome. They were all very close and supported each other, which I thought was sweet and made the characters themselves more likable. I loved Zara’s parents, they This was an enjoyable and important novel that addresses immigration and racism towards Muslims in America through the viewpoint of a queer Muslim teenager, Zara Hossian. The characters were my favorite part of this book, they were likable, and the relationships between them, particularly between Zara and her family and friends were wholesome. They were all very close and supported each other, which I thought was sweet and made the characters themselves more likable. I loved Zara’s parents, they were really supportive of Zara and just generally open-minded and lovable characters. I liked Zara too, she was a strong and realistic character, who unfortunately faces a lot of racism and prejudice from people because she is Muslim. I liked Zara’s girlfriend, Chloe. She was a well-developed character, and the book gives her more depth by discussing some of her problems with her homophobic parents not accepting the fact that she is a lesbian. I think that this made her a more complex and compelling character. Additionally, due to the length of the book and the many events that happen in it, there is limited time given to showing her relationship with Zara, so this allowed for her to still be a complex character despite that. One of the book’s main topics is immigration. Zara and her parents are still waiting for their green cards after nine years in America, and it is a source of worry for them. I think that this book did a good job of showing how long and tedious the immigration process in America can be, and how unfair it can be as well. It’s a very relevant topic today, so I think it was an excellent topic to include. This book was also more fast-paced, so it was a rather quick read. I prefer slower-paced books, so for me, it wasn’t an aspect of the book that I loved, but it’s definitely a matter of personal preference. The main issue I had with this book, and the reason why it wasn’t a four-star read is that it felt rushed, especially towards the end. There were many events that happened too quickly, and I think that the book needed more time to expand on them. The book should have been longer so it could expand more on those parts, particularly the ending because it moved very quickly and was a bit illogical and odd as a result. I want to briefly talk about the ending, so if you don’t want spoilers I would suggest skipping over this paragraph. But, to sum it up, the ending, Zara finds a wedding invitation from her cousin in Canada and thinks that Canada is a great place to move to. She then tells her parents and they all decide to move to Canada. This is strange for several reasons, but mainly because Zara’s parents had pretty much formally decided to move back to Pakistan so they could be with their family and in their own culture. I thought it was odd that they decided to move to Canada with no apparent reason and it directly contradicted what they had previously wanted to do. Overall, I would recommend this novel, it’s not a perfect read but it does have very likable characters and it discusses many important issues!

  22. 4 out of 5

    LGBT Representation in Books

    I voluntarily reviewed this after receiving a free e-ARC on Edelweiss from Scholastic Inc! Zara Hossain is Here by Sabina Khan Recommendation: 9/10 Trigger Warnings: Islamophobia, racism, bullying, xenophobia, hate crime, homophobia, violence, hospital, court Representation: POC (Muslim, Pakistani, Indian, Taiwanese, Mexican America), Immigrants/immigration, Bisexual, Lesbian Zara Hossain is Here is a queer, contemporary YA novel, in which main character, Zara tries to fly beneath the radar in Texas I voluntarily reviewed this after receiving a free e-ARC on Edelweiss from Scholastic Inc! Zara Hossain is Here by Sabina Khan Recommendation: 9/10 Trigger Warnings: Islamophobia, racism, bullying, xenophobia, hate crime, homophobia, violence, hospital, court Representation: POC (Muslim, Pakistani, Indian, Taiwanese, Mexican America), Immigrants/immigration, Bisexual, Lesbian Zara Hossain is Here is a queer, contemporary YA novel, in which main character, Zara tries to fly beneath the radar in Texas because she is an immigrant, Muslim, and bisexual. When her high school bully takes things too far, Zara fears for her future in the States and what will happen to her only known home. Overall, I felt this was an easy read book, definitely appropriate for middle and high school teens. The main character was relatable with her longing to belong and feelings of frustration with our current political climate. Zara often seems younger than a high school senior but has certain qualities that make her seem wise beyond her years. I loved her passion for doing what’s right, as well as her consideration for others before making decisions. I felt the discussion about immigration was very real and went into great depths explaining the problems with the system and how backlogged everything is. The author emphasizes how the family has been waiting 8 years for their green cards and could still be waiting some time. She touches on so many important topics for anyone interested in immigration, as well as for anyone who wants to be more educated and a better ally. I also think these topics were included in a natural way, rather than shoving the information down our throats. Zara’s parents are different than other members of their community. I loved all of the details regarding their culture. I think the author provided a nice balance between culture, Zara’s storyline, and the found family/community that the main character and her parents built in their town. I also loved how accepting her parents were, in general, and in comparison to another character’s Christian parents. Besides my comment about Zara’s age, my only other critique is the ending. While I loved the resolution, it felt quite rushed. Most of the book flows from day to day, but the last few pages time jumps and feels like it could have been stretched out a bit more. I’m not positive that the ending is missing anything, but instead just feels rushed. I would definitely recommend this book!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lu

    Thank you so much to Edelweiss and the publisher for the chance to read and review this book! TW: racism, Islamophobia, homophobia, biphobia Zara Hossain is the only Muslim student at her High school in Corpus Christi. She's "used" to microaggession, while trying not to show her anger and true feelings, because she and her family are waiting for their green card and she's afraid seeking justice would jeopardize that goal. But one day her tormentor, a star football player, Tyler Benson, takes thing Thank you so much to Edelweiss and the publisher for the chance to read and review this book! TW: racism, Islamophobia, homophobia, biphobia Zara Hossain is the only Muslim student at her High school in Corpus Christi. She's "used" to microaggession, while trying not to show her anger and true feelings, because she and her family are waiting for their green card and she's afraid seeking justice would jeopardize that goal. But one day her tormentor, a star football player, Tyler Benson, takes things too far and get suspended. Tyler and his racist friends so decide to vandalize Zara's house with racist graffiti, leading to a violent crime and a consequences that could jeopardize their lives and Zara's future. Zara is forced to fight between staying in the place she considers her home, while her parents don't feel safe anymore, or losing the life she knows coming back to Pakistan. Zara Hossain is here is a heart-wrenching novel about what it means to be an immigrant in America, the struggles Zara and her family face, the Islamophobia, the racism, the feeling of don't belong. It was so intense reading this book and it filled me with rage and sadness realizing how people can be so ignorant and hateful. The author talks about white privilege and the acute difference in the way the justice treats and considers white people and people of color. Sabina Khan also addresses issues like homophobia and biphobia and how religions are used as excuses to ignorant and hurtful behaviour. I love the tight bond between Zara and her parents, who would do anything for her and her future and between Zara and her friends, Nick and Priya. Zara and her family are surrounded by a wonderful and tight community and it was so amazing to read, how supported and helped they were during these crazy times. Zara is a strong main character, stubborn, loving, ready to fight for the right thing. She's smart and passionate and I really love her energy and her bonds with her family, biological and found. I really enjoyed reading this book. It's the kind of book that hurt my heart and made me think about how unfair are things in America, how spread are the double standards and the white privilege, how money can buy things and people. And also how important is to fight for the right thing, not to be silent and to seek justice and fairness. It's a book about unjustices and racism, but also about family, endurance of hope, fighting for justice and against hate. It's heart-wrenching and hopeful at the same time and I loved Zara and her family.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kristel Greer

    I was sent a copy of this book for review. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~. Zara Hossain attends high school in Texas and has experienced persistent Islamophobia from students particularly Tyler, a popular football player. She usually lays low as her family are immigrants from Pakistan awaiting the final decision on their Green Cards and she doesn’t want to jeopardise their application. While Zara deals with the harsh reality of racism in her town she keeps active in a Social Justice Club. At I was sent a copy of this book for review. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~. Zara Hossain attends high school in Texas and has experienced persistent Islamophobia from students particularly Tyler, a popular football player. She usually lays low as her family are immigrants from Pakistan awaiting the final decision on their Green Cards and she doesn’t want to jeopardise their application. While Zara deals with the harsh reality of racism in her town she keeps active in a Social Justice Club. At a meeting, she meets new member Chloe and they quickly become friends. Zara helps Chloe deal with her religious parents and their homophobia. As Zara opens up about her experiences with being bisexual, the pair grow closer and a budding romance begins. When Tyler sprays racist graffiti on her locker, a complaint is made to the Principal and Tyler is suspended. This sets in motion a series of events that leads to a violent attack which jeopardises not only the life of her father but their plans to remain in the US and may lead to Zara leaving everyone she loves. This 🌟🌟🌟🌟 story deals with xenophobia, islamophobia, homophobia and the issues with immigration programs. Zara's father is a well-respected Paediatrician, the family are active in their community and Zara works hard in school yet they are treated differently and unfairly by the society they are trying very hard to fit into. It shows that microaggressions affect non-white people daily and that this form of racism needs to be addressed just as much as the systemic kind. I loved seeing Zara's family as accepting and supportive of Zara's sexuality as it shows that not all religious people, regardless of their faith, discriminate against their LGBTQA+ children. Zara was caring, intelligent and determined to seek equality in the world. She wanted to be part of the tide of change and at 17 that was an incredible mindset to have and a valuable message to portray. The plot was interesting and well-paced but the ending did seem rushed and left some storylines unresolved. Overall a important book that discusses many prevalent issues which are faced in everyday life

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lazyfeline89

    Reposted from Instagram @lazyfeline89. Thanks to , edelweiss, scholasticcda and Sabina Khan for the e-arc and for having me on the Booktour. Synopsis: Zara Hossain is the daughter of Pakistani immigrants in USA, who has left their home to secure a bright future for themselves and their daughter. As she is about to finish her schooling, the star football player in her school gives her an awful time and she and her family encounters racism and Islamophobia like never before. Everything they've wor Reposted from Instagram @lazyfeline89. Thanks to , edelweiss, scholasticcda and Sabina Khan for the e-arc and for having me on the Booktour. Synopsis: Zara Hossain is the daughter of Pakistani immigrants in USA, who has left their home to secure a bright future for themselves and their daughter. As she is about to finish her schooling, the star football player in her school gives her an awful time and she and her family encounters racism and Islamophobia like never before. Everything they've worked for in the past 9 years for a green card is now overlooked and this incident changes their lives forever. The good: Muslim Representation in YA contemporary is very much the need of the hour and an urban muslim representation is almost accurately done. Bisexual and Queer people , though amongst us , are mere objects for teasing in mainstream movies and to have books showcasing their side of the story is quite enlightening. The life of immigrants as it is ; i.e, the difficulties of brown skinned people not quite fitting in foreign nations, the hatred towards such communities and Islamophobia is well dealt with. The MC is quite a fighter and a real sassy queen.Her relationship with parents and friends is quite adora ble. I was overwhelmed by the incorporation and accurate representation of a Keralite in a book with Pak protagonist. Much love and warm regards from a Keralite. The mention of shared love for Bollywood movies, spicy food and of course Fawad Khan across the cold war sparring Indo -Pak border made my day. The feeling of being reduced to a terrorist whenever a criminal with a Muslim name commit a crime is what almost every muslim experience. After overcoming hurdles of competitive exams and VISA ,and despite working hard ; many immigrant Asians face hate on a daily basis. This book made me laugh and cry at many places - my reactions varied from lmao to reduced to tears. If you need a book with LGBTQ and Islamic representation , you should definitely try this out. What could have been better: I felt the ending was a bit rushed. Rating: 4.8/5

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jayati

    Zara Houssain is Here is a powerful story exploring race, immigration, and gun violence. It follows Zara, a bisexual high school student who has faced a lot of bullying and hateful comments over the years due to her race and religion. When things get to an extreme level, she is forced to take a stand and fight back, if not for herself but for another student whose position she has been in and empathises with. Taking a stand is never easy, and it isn't so for Zara either. As things progress and Zara Houssain is Here is a powerful story exploring race, immigration, and gun violence. It follows Zara, a bisexual high school student who has faced a lot of bullying and hateful comments over the years due to her race and religion. When things get to an extreme level, she is forced to take a stand and fight back, if not for herself but for another student whose position she has been in and empathises with. Taking a stand is never easy, and it isn't so for Zara either. As things progress and get much much worse, she is forced to live through some of the worst things that can happen to a person. Her story is full of hardships and reading it is a powerful experience. Zara's parents are fierce and protective of her and I absolutely adored them and how much they loved her! They've been waiting 8 years to get a green card and it looks like things are about to work out soon but no matter what, they are there for Zara, protecting her even if it could lead to many other problems for them. These stories represent the truth of the everyday lives of many people belonging to these communities and all the discrimination and vile comments they are forced to experience every day and are unable to speak up against many times, due to the possible effects which were effectively portrayed by this book. On a lighter note, there is a lovely queer romance featured in the book which absolutely warmed my heart! Chloe is the daughter of conservative Christian parents who are unable to look past their homophobic views to accept her sexuality. She's in a hard place when she meets Zara and I love seeing how the two support each other and are there for each other! I also loved Zara's friends, Nick and Priya and how they are always there for her, supporting her and giving her love and comfort in any way they possibly can. It was nice to see how their families also banded together to provide support because community is an integral part in South Asian cultures and I loved how that was displayed through these families being there for Zara's. Overall, this book was important and dealt with some hard topics and I absolutely loved how it explored them all!

  27. 5 out of 5

    smalltownbookmom

    A queer, Muslim coming of age story that sheds a humanizing light on the immigration crisis in America. Zara is a bisexual, 17-year-old Pakistani immigrant living in Texas and waiting for her and her family to get their permanent resident cards. She moved to America as a young child when her father got a job working as a Pediatrician but an Islamophobic hate crime drags their family's immigration status into question and Zara is forced to choose between a future in America alone or a life with h A queer, Muslim coming of age story that sheds a humanizing light on the immigration crisis in America. Zara is a bisexual, 17-year-old Pakistani immigrant living in Texas and waiting for her and her family to get their permanent resident cards. She moved to America as a young child when her father got a job working as a Pediatrician but an Islamophobic hate crime drags their family's immigration status into question and Zara is forced to choose between a future in America alone or a life with her family in a country that does not tolerate people like her. This story sheds an important light on the shortcomings of the American immigration system in an accessible way for teens and is also an important look at the struggles faced by immigrant families, queer teens and all those dealing with racism on a daily basis. Highly recommend! Favorite quotes: "I exist in a sort of no man's land. I wasn't born here but I don't remember much of Pakistan and I can't imagine what my life would be like if I still lived there." "We can do everything the right way, follow all the rules, work hard but ultimately it all comes down to hoping things will work out - hoping that the next ignorant racist doesn't do even more damage. Somehow I cannot allow myself to hope that things will always be like this. They have to change - I have to make sure of it." "I come from a culture that can be ultra conservative about certain things, and a country where being bisexual could land me in jail or worse. But my parents have never made me feel that I've disappointed or embarrassed them in any way. What they have done is accepted me unconditionally and I truly believe they do this because they themselves were shunned for choosing each other and know exactly how it feels to be judged and discriminated against because of who you love." CW: Islamophobia, hate crimes, gun violence

  28. 4 out of 5

    Allison Renner

    Thanks to @kidlitexchange and @sabina_writer for sharing the ARC of this book with me. It’s out TODAY from @scholasticinc! Zara was born in Pakistan and moved to Texas with her parents when she was three. Now she’s seventeen, with college on the horizon. But she has to make it through her senior year first, and it seems like one classmate, in particular, has it out for her. Tyler keeps leaving racist notes and saying racist remarks when she walks by. When he graffitis Zara’s house, her dad stand Thanks to @kidlitexchange and @sabina_writer for sharing the ARC of this book with me. It’s out TODAY from @scholasticinc! Zara was born in Pakistan and moved to Texas with her parents when she was three. Now she’s seventeen, with college on the horizon. But she has to make it through her senior year first, and it seems like one classmate, in particular, has it out for her. Tyler keeps leaving racist notes and saying racist remarks when she walks by. When he graffitis Zara’s house, her dad stands up for his family. Things get twisted around and her dad ends up hurt and charged with a crime, leaving Zara’s family’s green card in the balance. This is an interesting book based on the subject matter alone, and I especially love that it goes into detail about how the family has been waiting for their green cards for years, even though Zara’s father’s employer sponsored them. I didn’t know a lot of the ins and outs of the process, so it was very eye-opening. I think it’s easy for teens to empathize with Zara because she’s on the cusp of being “free” for college, but this stands in her way to completely throw her life off track. I especially like how it’s framed as being the only country Zara has really known, while her mother is missing her own home country, so there’s this complex pull for both of them. This might be nit-picky, but I think the LGBTQIA aspect of the book was a little over the top. It’s fine that Zara is bi, and I know some of the focus was that her parents were more accepting of it than other parents, but all of the scenes with her girlfriend seemed rushed. I don’t think the relationship was as well-developed as it could have been. I would either prefer the relationship to step up and balance the story more, or be taken out and those words used more for the injustice behind green cards, racism, etc.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    Well, this was a disappointment. I had loved The Love & Lies of Rukhsana Ali and had been waiting for Zara Hossain Is Here for what felt like forever with high expectations (too high, possibly). The first half of the book was all right, all the ingredients you expect in such a book were there: a great MC with a strong personality, loving family, adorable friends, terrible foes, etc. To be honest, it felt like something was missing, it felt a little flat. Yes, Zara is dealing with racism and that' Well, this was a disappointment. I had loved The Love & Lies of Rukhsana Ali and had been waiting for Zara Hossain Is Here for what felt like forever with high expectations (too high, possibly). The first half of the book was all right, all the ingredients you expect in such a book were there: a great MC with a strong personality, loving family, adorable friends, terrible foes, etc. To be honest, it felt like something was missing, it felt a little flat. Yes, Zara is dealing with racism and that's awful, but still it felt like nothing much was happening in the rest of her life, or, in the secondary characters' lives (I thought for a very long time Nick had some secret somewhere, but no he's just a goofy puppy of a best friend. That's a bit short IMO). Then suddenly, Zara's father gets shot (I don't consider it a spoiler as it's written in the blurb although it happens about halfway through the book) and of course, everything changes. But the book doesn't become more interesting, it just becomes less credible. Zara's parents' reactions were hard to follow from that point on and even Zara's behavior got totally contradictory by the end of the book. I HATED the ending. It makes no sense whatsoever and honestly, it paints Canada as a paradise free of racism. I know the author is a WOC from Canada so she knows what's she's talking about but, still, the mind boggles. I had to force myself to keep going because honestly, it still felt uneventful and I was bored. One great thing was Zara and Chloe's relationship, they were so cute together, I really liked everything about them but again, that ending kind of ruined it for me. One last thing (good or not, I'll let you decide), Zara Hossain Is Here made me crave for South Asian food and frozen yogurt. They eat SO MUCH in this book!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Zara is your typical American high school kid. Except according to a few she doesn't belong because she's Muslim from Pakistan. Her father is a well loved pediatrician and they have a great community around them. After a series of events that starts with Zara helping someone from a racist boy she becomes the target. She has her locker graffitied then their house vandalized. This all results in a bigger event that somehow becomes trespassing. Ugh I hate the buddy buddiness of law enforcement, lega Zara is your typical American high school kid. Except according to a few she doesn't belong because she's Muslim from Pakistan. Her father is a well loved pediatrician and they have a great community around them. After a series of events that starts with Zara helping someone from a racist boy she becomes the target. She has her locker graffitied then their house vandalized. This all results in a bigger event that somehow becomes trespassing. Ugh I hate the buddy buddiness of law enforcement, legal system, corporate America that perpetuates these peoples racist actions. Since when can't you go to someones house to complain about their kid vandalizing your house? Well I'm white.. but I'm also scared of these types of white people. I don't know what it's like but I'm always here to dm or to walk with you. I loved that Zara never gave up and kept trying to find a way to stay after their world started to crumble. The life that her parents built to make her life better. They wanted to go back to Pakistan but she would have to live her life in private or else she would feel unsafe. Her parents are fully supportive of her relationship choices and her personal choices and even stand up for her against a family member. In the end they find an option that would benefit them all but in the end it sucks that they had to change everything. Why didn't Tyler's father get a harsher punishment? I know the answer, its basically rhetorical but as a society it's so upsetting. And I can't believe Sabina's authors note that there was a clerical error so she had to leave. Who is running this horrible system? I definitely recommend this book I loved the flow and the romance was sweet. Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐💫 Thank you Scholastic Press and I read YA for my gifted copy for my honest and voluntary review.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.