web site hit counter Still Life With Chickens: Starting Over in a House by the Sea - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Still Life With Chickens: Starting Over in a House by the Sea

Availability: Ready to download

In this beautifully written and frequently funny memoir, Catherine Goldhammer, newly separated, along with her twelve-year-old daughter, starts life anew in a cottage by the sea, in a rustic town where live bait is sold from vending machines. Partly to please her daughter and partly for reasons not clear to her at the time, she begins this year of transition by purchasing In this beautifully written and frequently funny memoir, Catherine Goldhammer, newly separated, along with her twelve-year-old daughter, starts life anew in a cottage by the sea, in a rustic town where live bait is sold from vending machines. Partly to please her daughter and partly for reasons not clear to her at the time, she begins this year of transition by purchasing six baby chickens?whose job, she comes to suspect, is to pull her and her daughter forward out of one life and into another. An unforgettable story filled with hope and grace, Still Life with Chickens shows how transcendent wisdom can be found in the most unlikely of places.


Compare

In this beautifully written and frequently funny memoir, Catherine Goldhammer, newly separated, along with her twelve-year-old daughter, starts life anew in a cottage by the sea, in a rustic town where live bait is sold from vending machines. Partly to please her daughter and partly for reasons not clear to her at the time, she begins this year of transition by purchasing In this beautifully written and frequently funny memoir, Catherine Goldhammer, newly separated, along with her twelve-year-old daughter, starts life anew in a cottage by the sea, in a rustic town where live bait is sold from vending machines. Partly to please her daughter and partly for reasons not clear to her at the time, she begins this year of transition by purchasing six baby chickens?whose job, she comes to suspect, is to pull her and her daughter forward out of one life and into another. An unforgettable story filled with hope and grace, Still Life with Chickens shows how transcendent wisdom can be found in the most unlikely of places.

30 review for Still Life With Chickens: Starting Over in a House by the Sea

  1. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    This memoir is about Catherine Goldhammer's journey from newly divorced, broke,big house owner, parent of a pre-teen to scaled-down home buyer of a fixer-upper and parent to a finicky teenager. What I liked: *I found it delightful and read it in a couple of sittings. It has small pages and short chapters, so this is not difficult. * I was able to relate well to her. I liked her individuality, honesty and persistence. * Her willingness to get in and get her hands dirty while building the chicken run This memoir is about Catherine Goldhammer's journey from newly divorced, broke,big house owner, parent of a pre-teen to scaled-down home buyer of a fixer-upper and parent to a finicky teenager. What I liked: *I found it delightful and read it in a couple of sittings. It has small pages and short chapters, so this is not difficult. * I was able to relate well to her. I liked her individuality, honesty and persistence. * Her willingness to get in and get her hands dirty while building the chicken run, etc. The example she set for her daughter in that regard impressed me. * People who are comfortable in their own skin intrigue me, and her learning to not worry about living up to the standards of her previous hoity-toity town impressed me. Why I didn't give it 5 stars: * The first couple of times she referred to the hoity-toity town as Hearts-Are-Cold, I chuckled. By the end of the book she was still calling it that and I was groaning. * Although her story is unique and her writing good, there isn't anything that makes it against-all-odds or extraordinary such as climbing Mount Everest during blizzard conditions or feeding a village in Africa. I would recommend this book to anyone who likes to read about women who face difficulty and win.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    There should be an option for "hated it" on goodreads. I can't even go into all the things I disliked about this book because I'm still full of rage. I'll go into this though, it is NOT written well. I understand she was going for a poetic feel but between giving things stupid names (If I ever hear the term "hearts-are-cold" again I will kill someone, I'm not joking) and bringing up unrelated thoughts out of no where I wonder how someone really gave this book an OK to be published. There are part There should be an option for "hated it" on goodreads. I can't even go into all the things I disliked about this book because I'm still full of rage. I'll go into this though, it is NOT written well. I understand she was going for a poetic feel but between giving things stupid names (If I ever hear the term "hearts-are-cold" again I will kill someone, I'm not joking) and bringing up unrelated thoughts out of no where I wonder how someone really gave this book an OK to be published. There are parts that quite actually MAKE NO SENSE. She'll say that a chicken laid it's first egg in one sentence and then three sentences later explain about how soon the chickens will be laying eggs AS IF SHE DIDN'T JUST TELL US THAT THE FUCKING CHICKEN LAID A FUCKING EGG. The last time I read a book so poorly written was when I read Twilight ironically. And I'm not talking about the subject of the books here, I'm talking about how the quality of the words being formed into sentences. Don't read this book unless you want your brain to melt.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    The author had me at: "This is the story of my foray into the salvation of one sorry house and garden and one slightly tattered soul." That sounded so familiar, and the writing was so poetic and at the same time so down to earth that I knew I was going to like this book. And it didn't disappoint. I recommend it primarily for women who are going through any kind of a major life transition and are looking for that proverbial rope to pull them forward. This book is a great reminder that humans are m The author had me at: "This is the story of my foray into the salvation of one sorry house and garden and one slightly tattered soul." That sounded so familiar, and the writing was so poetic and at the same time so down to earth that I knew I was going to like this book. And it didn't disappoint. I recommend it primarily for women who are going through any kind of a major life transition and are looking for that proverbial rope to pull them forward. This book is a great reminder that humans are more resilient than we sometimes give ourselves credit for, and that the people and causes that can inspire us to keep going are often right under our noses. And, for anyone who has ever adopted a house, or a pet -- or both -- to get through one of those major life transitions, this book will strike many familiar chords. "I had thought I was renovating a house. I didn't know that in the process I would also rebuild my life." Make a cup of tea and spend an afternoon with this little book. You'll be laughing, crying and saying "amen sister," all the way to the end.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Yvonne

    For some reason, even though I've read this twice before courtesy of the Free Library of Philadelphia, I just HAD to run out to Borders, buy it, and read it again. It's quick read, and I love the author's wry humor and playful way with words that never becomes too twee. It's one of those "after the divorce/single mama with child" memoirs, as my boss said when he spotted me carrying it, but it's never run of the mill. Goldhammer and daughter did indeed have six, count 'em, six very colorful chick For some reason, even though I've read this twice before courtesy of the Free Library of Philadelphia, I just HAD to run out to Borders, buy it, and read it again. It's quick read, and I love the author's wry humor and playful way with words that never becomes too twee. It's one of those "after the divorce/single mama with child" memoirs, as my boss said when he spotted me carrying it, but it's never run of the mill. Goldhammer and daughter did indeed have six, count 'em, six very colorful chickens, and once you read all the sturm und drang of caring for chickens (especially in the city), you'll never look at an egg the same way again. A good read for those interested in housing rehab nightmares, living a Schlitz life in a Champagne neighborhood, motherhood, wild children, urban farm fantasies, forging a family out of neighbors, beloved friends, exes you love but just can't be married to, and, of course, chickens.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Katharine Holden

    Parts of this book are interesting. The overall effect is damaged, however, when you realize that the author presents herself as working with diminished resources when she is not, not really. So the "brave little me" tone in parts of the book kind of fell flat for me when I realized that she can buy a new house without having sold the old first, hire a veritable army of workmen to repair the new house from top to bottom, live quite well without a paying job, do all of the things she used to do, Parts of this book are interesting. The overall effect is damaged, however, when you realize that the author presents herself as working with diminished resources when she is not, not really. So the "brave little me" tone in parts of the book kind of fell flat for me when I realized that she can buy a new house without having sold the old first, hire a veritable army of workmen to repair the new house from top to bottom, live quite well without a paying job, do all of the things she used to do, invite her friends and daughter's friends over without embarrassment (new house can't be too bad, can it), and quit the part-time job she does finally get without giving notice and without having another one lined up. I felt suckered in by this book. It's dishonest at the core.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Joanne

    This book was fun to read, I laughed out loud at the decription of the thoughts chickens have. I had a difficult time when she wrote about financial difficulty. She bought a house at the beach ! It reminded me of an old joke. A little rich girl is given a writing assignment, to write about a poor family. She started out, " Once there was a poor family. The parents were poor, the kids were poor, the butler was poor, the cook was poor. Everybody was poor." This book was fun to read, I laughed out loud at the decription of the thoughts chickens have. I had a difficult time when she wrote about financial difficulty. She bought a house at the beach ! It reminded me of an old joke. A little rich girl is given a writing assignment, to write about a poor family. She started out, " Once there was a poor family. The parents were poor, the kids were poor, the butler was poor, the cook was poor. Everybody was poor."

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jenn Estepp

    post-divorce, middle-aged woman w/daughter recovery sort of book. quick and entertaining, but there was something a little too cloying about it/goldhammer that sort of bugged me. sorry, i can't put a better finger on it. when i am middle-aged and recovering from life, i am far more likely to want to buy a house by the ocean and restore it and raise chickens than other options presented by memoirs, and yet ... post-divorce, middle-aged woman w/daughter recovery sort of book. quick and entertaining, but there was something a little too cloying about it/goldhammer that sort of bugged me. sorry, i can't put a better finger on it. when i am middle-aged and recovering from life, i am far more likely to want to buy a house by the ocean and restore it and raise chickens than other options presented by memoirs, and yet ...

  8. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    This is a quiet book about starting over, but don't expect excitement or revelation. The author has an amicable divorce, if left with plenty of money to hire workers to renovate her new neglected cottage with the beautiful view. The best part is the scenery, the Northeast weather, and the wonderful details of raising chickens. This is a quiet book about starting over, but don't expect excitement or revelation. The author has an amicable divorce, if left with plenty of money to hire workers to renovate her new neglected cottage with the beautiful view. The best part is the scenery, the Northeast weather, and the wonderful details of raising chickens.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    When I got to the end of this book I cried. I was expecting a sort of funny little story about a divorced women and her kid who got chickens as a way of getting through the divorce and move and all. I wasn't expecting a book that would have meaning. When I got to the end of this book I cried. I was expecting a sort of funny little story about a divorced women and her kid who got chickens as a way of getting through the divorce and move and all. I wasn't expecting a book that would have meaning.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    I would have read this book simply for the title, but one of our book club members chose it and I'm glad she did. The writing's lovely. It could not be easy to describe chickens in such an enchanting way. I also liked the author's honesty. I would have read this book simply for the title, but one of our book club members chose it and I'm glad she did. The writing's lovely. It could not be easy to describe chickens in such an enchanting way. I also liked the author's honesty.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Fun, easy read book about a woman finding meaning in life when she goes from an affluent lifestyle to a more simpler way of living. Quick read and worth the time. Plus there are chickens!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Well, that was fine. I’m not sure what I needed from a book where a woman starts over in a small house by the ocean, but it was maybe a bit more than that.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Barbara M

    I found this little book charming and delightful to read. It's a quick, light, fun read. The author is a poet and it is well written - poetic. She is also humorous and I smiled a lot reading it! This is a true story about a woman who following a divorce sells her grand home in a prestigious part of town. She moves to a more humble home - by the water - in desperate need of renovations. In order to get her 12 year old daughter interested in moving, she agrees to allow her to raise chickens (someth I found this little book charming and delightful to read. It's a quick, light, fun read. The author is a poet and it is well written - poetic. She is also humorous and I smiled a lot reading it! This is a true story about a woman who following a divorce sells her grand home in a prestigious part of town. She moves to a more humble home - by the water - in desperate need of renovations. In order to get her 12 year old daughter interested in moving, she agrees to allow her to raise chickens (something her daughter always wanted to do). I knew nothing about raising chickens before I read this book. As a "city person" I actually thought you just go in and throw them some seed in the morning and pick up the eggs. The book describes all the work involved in caring for chickens in amusing detail. I actually learned a lot about raising chickens reading this book! I have a new appreciation for how challenging it is and how much work is involved. I was surprised to see so many negative reviews on Goodreads for this book. Although I enjoyed the book myself, I can understand that some people reading it may not have had life so easy following a divorce and/or have had to "start over" following other problems in their lives. This particular woman had the resources and freedom to do a lot of things other women who are divorced and raising a child may not have the time or money to do. What I liked: the book was light and easy to read it was a fun read - parts of it were really funny I learned a lot about chickens - something I knew nothing about What I didn't like: some of her humor in the book - was used repeatedly and wore out a bit ex. her references to her former well to do neighbor as "Hearts are Cold." I found it funny the first few times - but tired of it by the end of the book Although she had negative feelings toward her former"well to do" neighborhood and the people in it - she herself appeared to have lots of time and resources. There are others who have had much more challenging experiences following divorce than raising chickens. All in all, I recommend the book if you'd like to read something quick, funny and different. I was glad I read it!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lucy Wightman

    Susan Ovans, the publisher of the Hull Times, and a Goodreads member (her reviews are often better than those found in the NYT Book Review) suggested I read this small, unassuming book. Its unassuming narrator, Catherine Goldhammer, narrates from Hull, or “Six Mile Beach.” Goldhammer, newly separated, chronicles her perspective through a common lifestyle transition, and symbolically informs her readers by using one of earth’s most common creatures: the chicken. Her challenges multiply exponentia Susan Ovans, the publisher of the Hull Times, and a Goodreads member (her reviews are often better than those found in the NYT Book Review) suggested I read this small, unassuming book. Its unassuming narrator, Catherine Goldhammer, narrates from Hull, or “Six Mile Beach.” Goldhammer, newly separated, chronicles her perspective through a common lifestyle transition, and symbolically informs her readers by using one of earth’s most common creatures: the chicken. Her challenges multiply exponentially when she and her 12 year-old-daughter move away from a wealthy but disconnected suburban town. Goldhammer relocates to a gritty, wind-shaped peninsula and a run down house affectionately named Dragonfly Farm. It needs work, a lot of work, but it is enchanting. At the intellectual and tenacious requests of her daughter, Goldhammer begrudgingly acquires six baby chickens. The bathroom and bathtub are lovingly prepared to house the birds until moving day. Goldhammer’s enchantingly humble account of this life’s chapter can do nothing else but delight the reader. Early on in the book, we must like the narrator, feel for her challenges and simple accomplishments, and smile along with her. I found myself cheerleading the chickens through the coop-building, town meetings, neighbor-placating, seasonal hazards and egg-laying. The writing is elegantly understated, a fine example of “show, don’t tell” writing. I appreciated the reminder of how any small thing can be filled with dimension and color. Likening chickens to Zen monks in walking meditation, the simplicity is fascinating and calming to Goldhammer.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Eva

    In the midst of getting divorced, selling her home, and buying a smaller home in a less wealthy neighborhood, Catherine finds herself deadlocked with her 12 year old daughter who refuses to move, refuses to stop pouting, refuses to give her mom a break. So, she does what every parent knows not to do, but most of us do anyway when faced with a difficult situation and an obstructive child. She bribes her daughter. Now this daughter loves animals, so the perfect bribe was six fluffy chicks. Unfortun In the midst of getting divorced, selling her home, and buying a smaller home in a less wealthy neighborhood, Catherine finds herself deadlocked with her 12 year old daughter who refuses to move, refuses to stop pouting, refuses to give her mom a break. So, she does what every parent knows not to do, but most of us do anyway when faced with a difficult situation and an obstructive child. She bribes her daughter. Now this daughter loves animals, so the perfect bribe was six fluffy chicks. Unfortunately, said daughter went right to work to become an expert on chickens and announced they had to be purchased in the Spring. Moving was scheduled for July. Catherine gamely set about cleaning every day for potential house buyers while hiding and raising six fluffy chicks in the bathtub. I'm in awe. This was a lovely little book. Catherine shares the small details of her year of loss, of coping, of regaining her hope.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sheila

    The author says "I did not have a year in Provence or a villa under the Tuscan sun. I did not have a farm in Africa. It turned out that my life was not someone else's book." This was a delightful little book, only 178 pages, and a paperback-sized hardback. She tells about her life throughout about 2 years, as she recovers from a divorce, is forced to sell her home, lives with a 13-year-old and renovates a ramshackle cottage. She promised her daughter chickens, and they are the theme throughout t The author says "I did not have a year in Provence or a villa under the Tuscan sun. I did not have a farm in Africa. It turned out that my life was not someone else's book." This was a delightful little book, only 178 pages, and a paperback-sized hardback. She tells about her life throughout about 2 years, as she recovers from a divorce, is forced to sell her home, lives with a 13-year-old and renovates a ramshackle cottage. She promised her daughter chickens, and they are the theme throughout the book. How are the chickens doing? how are the humans doing? A very enjoyable read, especially if you have ever had or wanted to have chickens.

  17. 5 out of 5

    planetkimi

    I enjoyed the adventures with the chickens, but I could not relate to her "diminished resources." I realize that the author found her circumstances bewildering and stressful, but I think she should be grateful that she had the resources to buy a house, renovate it, and not work full time. That sounds like a blessing to me. If I could afford to renovate my house, that would be a cause for celebration, not rumination on how poor I am. Also, if I wasn't working full time, I'd probably have time to I enjoyed the adventures with the chickens, but I could not relate to her "diminished resources." I realize that the author found her circumstances bewildering and stressful, but I think she should be grateful that she had the resources to buy a house, renovate it, and not work full time. That sounds like a blessing to me. If I could afford to renovate my house, that would be a cause for celebration, not rumination on how poor I am. Also, if I wasn't working full time, I'd probably have time to build lots of chicken coops.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Cherie In the Dooryard

    This is a quick read, and for me it didn't hold much meat. The author, despite trying really, really hard to frame this as a complete life-shift and give great meaning to the chickens of the title, never convinced me of it. The whole thing was very flat and if it were a novel I'd say, "No character development." The daughter is interesting. If she wrote a memoir, I'd read it. This is a quick read, and for me it didn't hold much meat. The author, despite trying really, really hard to frame this as a complete life-shift and give great meaning to the chickens of the title, never convinced me of it. The whole thing was very flat and if it were a novel I'd say, "No character development." The daughter is interesting. If she wrote a memoir, I'd read it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lexie

    A good "starting-over" memoir. Normally I don't like this kind of book (i didn't get past page 30 in Eat Pray Love) but I liked this one. And I learned a lot about chickens. A good "starting-over" memoir. Normally I don't like this kind of book (i didn't get past page 30 in Eat Pray Love) but I liked this one. And I learned a lot about chickens.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Elaine

    After reading this book, I cannot fathom why (a) anyone would want to raise chickens, (b) why anyone would want to live in a place like Six Mile Beach, especially in the winter, and (c) why some people make their lives so hard.

  21. 5 out of 5

    John

    Interesting, well-written book about starting over as a sigle parent.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mollie

    I loved the way this book wasn't a sob story. She's getting a divorce and starting over--it could have been quite the dram. Instead, she offers beautiful language and restraint. I loved the way this book wasn't a sob story. She's getting a divorce and starting over--it could have been quite the dram. Instead, she offers beautiful language and restraint.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ida

    This book has it's moments. If you are a chicken lover and owner (like myself) you will appreciate the book even more. It's short and sometimes cute but not a "must read". This book has it's moments. If you are a chicken lover and owner (like myself) you will appreciate the book even more. It's short and sometimes cute but not a "must read".

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ann

    Small, uncomplicated, lovely. Reading this book was like carrying around a long letter from a friend you love hearing from.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Shelby *trains flying monkeys*

    Just a cute, feel good book. But then I love my chickens too

  26. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    This was an absolutely delightful book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    Every page in this little book (176 pages) shines with wit, intelligence, insight, simplicity, grace, and a pragmatism that every woman, married or single, can appreciate. Catherine is a woman other women would like to get to know. Starting over in one’s 50s is daunting. Starting over in one’s 50s with a precocious 12-year-old daughter in tow is enough to send any woman into terminal panic-attack mode. When Catherine’s marriage ended, she realized she would have to put her house on the market and Every page in this little book (176 pages) shines with wit, intelligence, insight, simplicity, grace, and a pragmatism that every woman, married or single, can appreciate. Catherine is a woman other women would like to get to know. Starting over in one’s 50s is daunting. Starting over in one’s 50s with a precocious 12-year-old daughter in tow is enough to send any woman into terminal panic-attack mode. When Catherine’s marriage ended, she realized she would have to put her house on the market and move her daughter away from her childhood home. Her daughter was NOT happy about this turn of events, but was bright enough to recognize an opportunity when she saw one. All Catherine wanted to do was “sit still in a quiet room for a few months”. Sounds reasonable enough. What doesn’t sound either reasonable or feasible is being pressured by one’s daughter to adopt a brood of baby chicks, to raise as pets, while in the midst of relocating to and renovating a ramshackle residence in a nearby salty, soggy, seaside town. Reasonable it might not have been, but the chicken-care-taking learning curve became the arch that helped Catherine transition from her old, familiar life to her new one, full of unknowns. While Catherine renovates the house with the help of several skilled workmen, she reinvents herself, re-establishes her relationship with her daughter, and rebuilds her life. Literally. The woman learned to use power tools! Throughout the book Catherine includes tidbits of information worthy of note – things she was learning herself along the way: everything from carpentry to poultry ailments on through the unusual ramifications of beach storms. This book was a delight from start to finish. Passed this one to a special friend who has pet chickens.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    When I started reading this book, I enjoyed the quick writing and lighthearted tone of the story. And I was looking forward to the insights Goldhammer might offer about her triumphs and struggles in remodeling her life. About halfway through the book, however, I became exhausted from the jagged writing style and poor attempts at humor and realized that this book was more about remodeling her HOUSE rather than remodeling her life. The endless details about her renovation projects became extremely When I started reading this book, I enjoyed the quick writing and lighthearted tone of the story. And I was looking forward to the insights Goldhammer might offer about her triumphs and struggles in remodeling her life. About halfway through the book, however, I became exhausted from the jagged writing style and poor attempts at humor and realized that this book was more about remodeling her HOUSE rather than remodeling her life. The endless details about her renovation projects became extremely boring. I wanted the book to end when she finally finished the remodels on the house, but we got dragged through the final quarter of the book with even more pointless anecdotes about things her friends said or little experiences she had with quirky, quick-humored acquaintances or her daughter. Many of which I had trouble believing were true. The worst one? When she writes of a cantaloupe that cross-pollinated with a squash and had no flavor...that’s botanically impossible. That would only effect the seeds in the cantaloupe, not the developing cantaloupe’s flesh. That lie was the last straw for me, and it really ruined the whole book up until that point. That being said, the last few chapters were my favorite parts of the book, when Goldhammer actually does get philosophical and writes about something other than her daily interactions and conversations. Even though I did pull a few nice quotes from the last pages and was able to bring my review up one star, this did not make up for the drudgery of the first 150 pages. I really like watching chickens too and wanted to like this book. But I didn’t feel much connection to Goldhammer.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Adi

    Entertaining, if you're able to forget that her ramshackle fixer-upper is probably a million-dollar bit of land and her can-do attitude is borne of tremendous privilege and resources. Something's wrong? Of course we can all throw money at it! Nine-foot dream window around which you have to reroute all electrical wiring? YOU are the only magical creative genius who could conceive of it! Everyone else isn't practical—they're without vision! Being a privileged white middle-class woman myself, I fin Entertaining, if you're able to forget that her ramshackle fixer-upper is probably a million-dollar bit of land and her can-do attitude is borne of tremendous privilege and resources. Something's wrong? Of course we can all throw money at it! Nine-foot dream window around which you have to reroute all electrical wiring? YOU are the only magical creative genius who could conceive of it! Everyone else isn't practical—they're without vision! Being a privileged white middle-class woman myself, I find it all too easy to lose myself in narratives like this. Who wouldn't want to live by a salt pond in a house you've renovated top to bottom to your exact specifications and gather a rainbow of fresh eggs every morning? If it had been fiction it would have been an easier sell, though I still would have tremendous problems with the quality of writing. Did anyone else feel like she had a friend at the publishing office? It was okay. I enjoyed parts. I'm just not sure we needed another narrative about a rich white bootstrapping middle-aged divorceé finding herself, even if it's in chickens instead of cultural appropriation.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Joanna

    What a sweet book!! Having trudged through Under the Tuscan Sun a few years ago, Still Life is what that more famous book should have been. What a delight to read and though I doubt we'll ever see a movie of this book, its story is charming and will leave you wondering 'who knew?' when it comes to the intricacies of raising baby chicks. Catherine Goldhammer has done a masterful job of creating a memoir that will make you laugh, cry, and fret with her and her daughter along the way to finding her What a sweet book!! Having trudged through Under the Tuscan Sun a few years ago, Still Life is what that more famous book should have been. What a delight to read and though I doubt we'll ever see a movie of this book, its story is charming and will leave you wondering 'who knew?' when it comes to the intricacies of raising baby chicks. Catherine Goldhammer has done a masterful job of creating a memoir that will make you laugh, cry, and fret with her and her daughter along the way to finding her life after divorce. A wonderfully, readable book - there is just enough detail to keep the story moving and interesting, while not so much as to bore you and have you wondering 'why did I really need to know that?' When your life suddenly takes a turn and you're not sure exactly what direction to head, sometimes when you least expect it - something comes along that whispers 'this way' and while it seems to make no sense, once you're on the path, if you just keep moving, you'll find all the answers you need and more ... A delightful, quick read for a lazy post-holiday afternoon!!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.