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An urgent analysis of global gender inequality and a passionately argued case for change by a pioneer in the movement for women's economic empowerment. 'A compelling and actionable case for unleashing women's economic power' Melinda Gates Women's economic development expert Linda Scott coined the paradigm-shifting concept of the 'double X economy' to describe both the shocki An urgent analysis of global gender inequality and a passionately argued case for change by a pioneer in the movement for women's economic empowerment. 'A compelling and actionable case for unleashing women's economic power' Melinda Gates Women's economic development expert Linda Scott coined the paradigm-shifting concept of the 'double X economy' to describe both the shocking gender inequalities that are built into our global economy, and the collective power of women that could be harnessed to combat those inequalities. Drawing on a wealth of sources including radical original research and vivid case studies, Scott reveals how economic subordination and exclusion are systemic for women in the developing and the developed worlds; and shows that by pulling women in as equal participants in the economy, we could address many of humankind's most pressing problems. Provocative, accessible and potentially game-changing, The Double X Economy is the feminist answer to Jeffrey Sach's The End of Poverty: both a work of expert analysis and an urgent call to action.


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An urgent analysis of global gender inequality and a passionately argued case for change by a pioneer in the movement for women's economic empowerment. 'A compelling and actionable case for unleashing women's economic power' Melinda Gates Women's economic development expert Linda Scott coined the paradigm-shifting concept of the 'double X economy' to describe both the shocki An urgent analysis of global gender inequality and a passionately argued case for change by a pioneer in the movement for women's economic empowerment. 'A compelling and actionable case for unleashing women's economic power' Melinda Gates Women's economic development expert Linda Scott coined the paradigm-shifting concept of the 'double X economy' to describe both the shocking gender inequalities that are built into our global economy, and the collective power of women that could be harnessed to combat those inequalities. Drawing on a wealth of sources including radical original research and vivid case studies, Scott reveals how economic subordination and exclusion are systemic for women in the developing and the developed worlds; and shows that by pulling women in as equal participants in the economy, we could address many of humankind's most pressing problems. Provocative, accessible and potentially game-changing, The Double X Economy is the feminist answer to Jeffrey Sach's The End of Poverty: both a work of expert analysis and an urgent call to action.

30 review for The Double X Economy: The Epic Potential of Empowering Women

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lou

    The Double X Economy is a leading thinker's groundbreaking examination of women's economic empowerment and although it is pretty dense and full of fascinating research, I thoroughly enjoyed it, but if you're after a light read this is not it as you need to be fully engaged the whole time in order to get the most out of it. Linda Scott coined the phrase “Double X Economy” to address the systemic exclusion of women from the world financial order. In The Double X Economy, Scott argues on the streng The Double X Economy is a leading thinker's groundbreaking examination of women's economic empowerment and although it is pretty dense and full of fascinating research, I thoroughly enjoyed it, but if you're after a light read this is not it as you need to be fully engaged the whole time in order to get the most out of it. Linda Scott coined the phrase “Double X Economy” to address the systemic exclusion of women from the world financial order. In The Double X Economy, Scott argues on the strength of hard data and on-the-ground experience that removing those barriers to women’s success is a win for everyone, regardless of gender. Scott opens our eyes to the myriad economic injustices that constrain women throughout the world: fathers buying and selling daughters against their will; husbands burning brides whose dowries have been spent; men appropriating women’s earnings and widows’ land; banks discriminating against women applying for loans; corporations paying women less than men; men treating women as their intellectual inferiors due to primitive notions of female brain development; governments depriving women of affordable childcare; and so much more. As Scott takes us from the streets of Accra, where sex trafficking is widespread, to American business schools, where women are routinely patronised, the pervasiveness of the Double X Economy becomes glaringly obvious. But Scott believes that this rampant problem can be solved. She proposes concrete actions and urges her readers to rise up and join the global movement for women’s economic empowerment that is gaining momentum by the day. This is an important and accessible read if you are willing to put the time in; the research is comprehensive and utterly shocking and there were a plethora of times where I felt my blood boiling. There were also times I became emotional at the discrimination faced by woman all over the world. As an egalitarian, I believe in equality for all so this was the perfect book to fire me up and if you're interested in the topic of equality or feminism then I implore you to pick this up. It's a tough but necessary read. It’s high time women were treated as equals and not made to feel inferior as they currently are. Many thanks to Faber & Faber for an ARC.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Martha

    I wouldn't normally write reviews for books that I DNF, but there were a couple of things I wanted to say about this one. *Content warning: sexual violence* I read c.45% of this book and my main reason for stopping was the repeated use of the phrase 'forced sex'. The first time it happened, it was a reference to a story about a woman from Kenya who was widowed, and her in-laws 'paid a herdsman to have sex with [her] against her will and without a condom'. I was incredibly uncomfortable with this I wouldn't normally write reviews for books that I DNF, but there were a couple of things I wanted to say about this one. *Content warning: sexual violence* I read c.45% of this book and my main reason for stopping was the repeated use of the phrase 'forced sex'. The first time it happened, it was a reference to a story about a woman from Kenya who was widowed, and her in-laws 'paid a herdsman to have sex with [her] against her will and without a condom'. I was incredibly uncomfortable with this use of 'sex against her will', but the formatting of the page suggested this could be a quote from another source and so I kept going. However, the next time was just part of the author's own words, and that was enough for me. There is no such thing as 'forced sex' or 'sex against her will'. If sex is forced or against someone's will, it is no longer sex, it is rape. End of story. There is no other term for it, and I found it disappointing that an academic scholar talking about the economic oppression of women (and its links with violence against women and girls) would use such terminology. This particular time it was used immediately after the phrase 'war rape' as if rape in war is rape, but rape outside of war is forced sex. The use of language is critical, particularly when it comes to sexual violence, as we have a long global history of denying the existence of rape and rape culture, so we must call it out for what it is. Linked to that, I was disappointed not to see a content warning on this book given the frequent references to sexual and physical violence - the discovery of 'widow cleansing' (an act of sexual violence) was a particularly abhorrent example that many would likely find disturbing and triggering, so more consideration should have been given to the impact of this information on the book's audience. In what I read so far, I also found the book to be quite heteronormative. Here I concede that it would be unfair of me to deem the whole book to be this way as I did not finish it and perhaps she may touch on LGBTQ women later in the book. However, in what I read so far, it felt that the automatic assumption was that women and men were paired off in all situations. For example: "In Sweden for instance, 24 per cent of women have experienced violence at home; in Afghanistan, it's 87 per cent. Certainly, 24 per cent of Swedish women enduring violence is much too many. But let's focus on the 76 per cent of Swedish men who have not hurt their partners, and indeed, have probably never been violent at all, compared with 13 per cent of Afghans we might say that about." I couldn't access the sources she referenced for this so was unable to check the data, but I don't think it's a coincidence that those statistics all add up to 100% - i.e. only 24% of Swedish women have experienced violence because 76% of Swedish men have not been violent. Aside from being a huge oversimplification (i.e. one man is violent toward one woman, when surely it's more likely that one violent man will be violent to multiple women), it also assumes that all 24% of those women had experienced violence at the hands of a man because they must have a male partner. Indeed, the concept of women's economic suppression being known as 'The Double X Economy' is problematic in itself, as it ties gender to biology and reinforces the gender binary, thereby excluding trans women and non-binary people. Indeed, a 2018 study by Crossland Solicitors found that 1 in 3 UK employers would not hire a transgender person, Vanessa Sheridan, author of The Complete Guide to Transgender in the Workplace indicates that trans unemployment in the USA is twice the national average. Therefore, any idea of women's economic empowerment that does not include trans women is problematic considering the ways in which they too are economically oppressed. Finally, I want to make clear that there is a lot of content in this book that I would believe to be a very useful and valid contribution to the work on women's economic empowerment. It is written in an accessible way and if we can bring more attention to the significant gender economic inequality that exists, that is important and a very good thing, so this book is by no means without merit. In summary, I again want to make very very clear that I did not finish this book, therefore my criticisms relating to heteronormativity and the possible exclusion of trans and non-binary people have that major caveat, and I wouldn't normally write a review like this for a book that I haven't finished. What I do stand by is the problematic use of language to describe sexual violence in this book and the lack of content warnings to alert readers to the plethora of references to violence against women that are contained in this book. I believe this is a valid criticism whether I finished the book or not, and I want to alert other readers who may not wish to read a book that contains those kinds of references. I must thank the publisher for sending me this book in exchange for an honest review, I wouldn't normally give up on a book that I have been asked to review, but in this case I just couldn't continue.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Paya

    To książka napisana z pasją, bardzo przystępnie i w sposób rzetelny prezentująca dane, które autorka wykorzystuje do przedstawienia problemu, jakim jest obecność (lub nieobecność) i podmiotowość (lub przedmiotowość) kobiet w gospodarce. Podając za przykłady zarówno własne doświadczenia jak i przedstawiając kontekst historyczny, Scott bardzo sprawnie przeprowadza czytelniczkę przez wszystkie argumenty. Na wielki plus zaliczyłabym też wstęp o sytuacji w Polsce napisany specjalnie do polskiego wyda To książka napisana z pasją, bardzo przystępnie i w sposób rzetelny prezentująca dane, które autorka wykorzystuje do przedstawienia problemu, jakim jest obecność (lub nieobecność) i podmiotowość (lub przedmiotowość) kobiet w gospodarce. Podając za przykłady zarówno własne doświadczenia jak i przedstawiając kontekst historyczny, Scott bardzo sprawnie przeprowadza czytelniczkę przez wszystkie argumenty. Na wielki plus zaliczyłabym też wstęp o sytuacji w Polsce napisany specjalnie do polskiego wydania. Poza opisywaniem sytuacji Scott proponuje również rozwiązania i mimo że ja osobiście jednak bardziej przyczepiłabym się do tego nieszczęsnego kapitalizmu, przyjmuję jej argumentację, której używa, by przekonywać o konieczności poprawiania sytuacji kobiet w obecnym neoliberalnym systemie, wykorzystując jego zasady i w ten sposób dążąc do jego poprawienia.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Marika_reads

    Kolejna książka z cyklu „po prostu musisz to przeczytać” ! Linda Scott w „Kapitał kobiet” krok po kroku skutecznie przekonuje czytelniczkę i czytelnika, że równouprawnienie wszystkim się opłaca, a większe zaangażowanie kobiet w gospodarkę zagwarantuje światu wzrost dobrobytu. Zresztą są na to badania, które pokazują związek pomiędzy aktywnością zawodową kobiet a wielkością PKB! I co ważne wykluczanie kobiet z życia gospodarczego to nie żaden zamierzchły schemat, to się dzieje tu i teraz. Spotkani Kolejna książka z cyklu „po prostu musisz to przeczytać” ! Linda Scott w „Kapitał kobiet” krok po kroku skutecznie przekonuje czytelniczkę i czytelnika, że równouprawnienie wszystkim się opłaca, a większe zaangażowanie kobiet w gospodarkę zagwarantuje światu wzrost dobrobytu. Zresztą są na to badania, które pokazują związek pomiędzy aktywnością zawodową kobiet a wielkością PKB! I co ważne wykluczanie kobiet z życia gospodarczego to nie żaden zamierzchły schemat, to się dzieje tu i teraz. Spotkanie światowych ekonomistów, Linda Scott podejmuje temat dotyczący kwestii płci. Od razu odzywają się głosy panów (dziadersów!) „że sa ważniejsze sprawy” albo „kobiety nie powinny pracować”. A jak Linda mówi, że kobiety w wielu krajach są lepiej wykształcone od mężczyzn, to od singapurskiego ekonomisty słyszy, że „w jego kraju hehe dziewczyny ida do college’u hehe tylko po to by złapać dobrego meza, hehe”. Dżizas. Kobiety stanowią połowę obywateli tego świata, a uprzedzenia żywią ludzie posiadający realną władzę na świecie... Autorka nie tylko wytyka błędy, przytacza badania swoje i innych, wskazuje źródła problemu, ale też jak na tacy podaje konkretne realne i skuteczne działania, które należy wdrożyć. (rozdział o afrykańskich kobietach, które rozkwitają mając możliwość bycia konsultantką Avonu ♥️). Nie będę Wam tu opowiadać całej książki, ale przytoczę Wam kilka moich ulubionych cytatów: „Badania wskazują, że branże zdominowane przez mężczyzn oferują wyższe wynagrodzenia, ponieważ są zdominowane przez mężczyzn”. „To nie bogate kraje stać na wyzwolenie kobiet - to wyzwolenie kobiet czyni kraje bogatymi”. „Najlepszą metodą stymulowania wzrostu gospodarczego jest wyciagniecie mężatek z kuchni”. To co, zachęciłam do przeczytania?

  5. 5 out of 5

    Josephine

    Fantastisch boek! Echt een aanrader voor iedereen!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Bormann

    Das Buch bietet nicht das, was ich erwartet hatte: Es ist keine systematische Analyse von Frauen innerhalb der Wirtschaft, sondern es handelt sich um Berichte aus der Feldforschungsarbeit Scotts, eingeordnet in die breitere wissenschaftliche Debatte. Die Erörterungen sind über weite Strecken interessant, oft auch erschreckend, aber die Struktur des Buches ist oft unübersichtlich und mäandernd. Inhaltlich störten mich die gesellschaftlichen Vergleiche mit Affen im 3. (?) Kapitel. Über das Wesen v Das Buch bietet nicht das, was ich erwartet hatte: Es ist keine systematische Analyse von Frauen innerhalb der Wirtschaft, sondern es handelt sich um Berichte aus der Feldforschungsarbeit Scotts, eingeordnet in die breitere wissenschaftliche Debatte. Die Erörterungen sind über weite Strecken interessant, oft auch erschreckend, aber die Struktur des Buches ist oft unübersichtlich und mäandernd. Inhaltlich störten mich die gesellschaftlichen Vergleiche mit Affen im 3. (?) Kapitel. Über das Wesen von Menschen sagen sie wenig aus und die Argumentationen sind zugleich anfällig für Missbrauch. Schwierig ist auch Scotts Orientierung am Wachstumsparadigma. Zwar mag die Förderung von Frauen in schwachen Volkswirtschaften als effektive Möglichkeit zur Stärkung der Wirtschaften sinnvoll sein - in den Industriestaaten des Westen beißt sich das Argument jedoch mit dem Bemühen um eine klimagerechte Gesellschaft. Die Förderung von Frauen in der Wirtschaft ist eine Frage von Gerechtigkeit und von Zufriedenheit beider Geschlechter (!). Sie sollte allerdings einhergehen mit einem ökologischen Umbau der Wirtschaft. Bei der Bewertung habe ich zunächst zu drei Sternen geneigt, insbesondere weil mich das Affenkapitel sehr geärgert hatte. Aber das Buch stellt viele interessante Zusammenhänge vor und regt dadurch zum Nachdenken an, weshalb ich am Ende bei vier Sternen gelandet bin.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Emily Vandenbroucke

    Eye-opener! Convincing story on how removing barriers to women’s success is a win for everyone, and call to action to place women on an equal footing with men in order to create a better world.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Elena Tosheva

    A highly recommended read for both men and women! Eye opening about the importance of female economic empowerment for solving social and economic issues around the world.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    3.25? / 5 This is a pretty interesting book about women's economic empowerment, how the global economy flourishes when women are enfranchised and involved in economics, and useful facts and case studies to debunk misogynistic myths about women and finance. Like I said, overall I think this is worth a read. It does help to know a little bit about the topics she talks about beforehand just so you are able to think independently and not take her word as Truth. For example, the first chapter incorpora 3.25? / 5 This is a pretty interesting book about women's economic empowerment, how the global economy flourishes when women are enfranchised and involved in economics, and useful facts and case studies to debunk misogynistic myths about women and finance. Like I said, overall I think this is worth a read. It does help to know a little bit about the topics she talks about beforehand just so you are able to think independently and not take her word as Truth. For example, the first chapter incorporates the climate crisis and goes into how giving girls in Africa a proper education and getting them into jobs would naturally stall population growth, a win for the climate crisis, supposedly. If I didn't know anything else about this topic I would have just believed her. However, such an argument is based on poor (and ethically dodgy) logic. First of all, Africa is currently consuming at the rate of 0.7 Earths, as compared to 5 Earths for the US. Africa and other countries/continents in the Global South are NOT (currently) PART OF THE PROBLEM - that would be the Global North, our extractive economies and systems of oppression (not least of the planet). We are the ones ploughing out the pollution, not countries in the Global South, so we are focusing on the wrong places in trying to blame them. Furthermore, when you think about it, trying to stop black people from having families is a bit weird, maybe even soft eugenics-y. There's actually a name for this line of thinking: eco-facism: go look it up. (And by the way everyone's fave Dave Attenborough is a proponent of this.) (Just to clarify I am 10000% in favour of protecting girls in African countries and standing with them in striving for women & girls' economic empowerment, just not when the end goal is to stop them having kids lol.) All that is to say that, this is a very interesting and well put-together book, however just go into it a bit discerning, be aware you might agree with some of the counter-arguments she takes down (though that's also useful because she gave me some different ways to see these issues, while still having women's best interests at heart). I might not have agreed with her on everything but I still learnt a lot, would just advise others to research around the stuff she's talking about!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Imme

    With a hint of being the Sapiens of women, this book goes through the history of women and their role in society from hunter gatherer societies through the agricultural revolution, from chimpanzees and bonobos to how religion exported different treatment of women. I mainly picked up this book because of its partial focus on developing countries, speaking about economic empowerment through women’s savings groups in Bangladesh and farmer cooperatives in Tanzania. The Double X Economy is based on th With a hint of being the Sapiens of women, this book goes through the history of women and their role in society from hunter gatherer societies through the agricultural revolution, from chimpanzees and bonobos to how religion exported different treatment of women. I mainly picked up this book because of its partial focus on developing countries, speaking about economic empowerment through women’s savings groups in Bangladesh and farmer cooperatives in Tanzania. The Double X Economy is based on the concept that currently (mostly women’s) unpaid work is not calculated in monetary terms, and hence deemed less important. If things like family care were included in GDP, would perception change? Whereas Invisible Women by Caroline Criado Perez changed my perspective on how the systems we live in are based more on men than on women, The Double X Economy added depth and detail.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Grrlscientist

    The truth will set you free, but first, it will piss you off. — Gloria Steinem Economic inequality surrounds us. It drags us down. It makes us poorer. It drowns us. It destroys our dreams. It destroys our lives. In this powerful and enraging book, The Double X Economy: The Epic Potential of Empowering Women (Faber and Faber; 2020), global thinker and author Linda Scott brilliantly argues that “equal economic treatment for women would put a stop to some of the world’s costliest evils, while buil The truth will set you free, but first, it will piss you off. — Gloria Steinem Economic inequality surrounds us. It drags us down. It makes us poorer. It drowns us. It destroys our dreams. It destroys our lives. In this powerful and enraging book, The Double X Economy: The Epic Potential of Empowering Women (Faber and Faber; 2020), global thinker and author Linda Scott brilliantly argues that “equal economic treatment for women would put a stop to some of the world’s costliest evils, while building prosperity for everyone.” These “costly evils” include the unequal access to education for women and girls, domestic violence, sex trafficking, the gender pay gap, the lack of child care and the gender divide in both business and land ownership. As an internationally renowned expert on women’s economic development and Emeritus DP World Professor for Entrepreneurship and Innovation at the University of Oxford, Professor Scott has seen a lot of gender-based economic inequality around the world, and is a position of authority to compare the world’s poorest nations to the richest. From the backstreets of Accra to the boardrooms in New York City, Professor Scott thoroughly investigates female economic disenfranchisement and explains how this prevents women from fully participating in society. She makes it clear that only goods and services that are exchanged for money are valued — but contends throughout most of her book that it is the work done by women, which is often unpaid, is what actually supports the global economy. But despite this, women remain economically oppressed. Professor Scott points to an uncomfortable paradox: in the United States, where women are paid less than 70 cents for every dollar earned by a white man, but they determine 67% of all consumer spending. It is similar in developing countries, where women’s work is devalued and yet is foundational to the measured economy, according to research. Additionally, real life experiments find that when women in developing economies have more control over family finances, not only do they benefit, but their children do, too. And this benefits national economies as well. But the isolation of women from money makes countries more vulnerable to financial crises, as Professor Scott explains in detail in the chapter, “Money Bullies.” Throughout her entire polemic, Professor Scott assembles a tremendous amount of scientific evidence to argue clearly and convincingly that female economic exclusion must change. She skilfully interweaves research with her first-hand experiences to explain the way things are now, highlighting how things can be improved and the social and economic results when such changes are implemented. I do have several criticisms, which I hope will not reduce the significance of this book’s important argument. First, I was bothered greatly by Professor Scott’s repeated use of the term ‘forced sex’ or ‘sex against her will’ because, in my view, nonconsensual sex is rape, plain and simple. The fact that rape is so common — in times of peace as well as during war — underscores that rape culture is globally entrenched, and using euphemisms does nothing to change this fact. I also was bothered by Professor Scott’s assertion that giving African girls a good education and good jobs would naturally stall population growth, thereby reducing the climate crisis. On one hand, yes, this is true, but on the other hand, this argument fails to recognize who the real climate change villains are: the Developed World, especially the United States, China and the European Union. These top three greenhouse gas emitters produce 41.5% of total global emissions, whilst the bottom 100 countries (which includes most African nations) only account for only 3.6%. To contend that reducing the birth rate of Black and Brown Africans will do much to reduce climate change is to miss the point. Despite my criticisms, I was greatly energized by this book’s argument as well as by its delivery. Professor Scott does not pull any punches, and nor should she. Using scientific research and describing the nuanced results from short- and long-term outcomes from real-life experiments, she hammers away at the many mundane ways — both big and small — in which women are denied economic equality, from bride burning when a woman’s husband has spent his wife’s dowry to outright denial of bank loans and savings accounts based on sex alone. Professor Scott’s writing is passionate and accessible, her research is meticulous (34 pages of notes and references), but in spite of all she has seen and experienced and read, she remains hopeful. In the epilogue, she proposes tangible solutions to rectify gender-based economic inequality and divides them into three categories: one set for the United States, because it is at an important crossroads that will determine women’s fate for many years to come, and which will also ripple out to affect women around the world; a second set for the global community; and a third for individuals. Professor Scott ends her book by calling upon everyone to ‘think creatively about your own strengths’ and how to apply them to help women achieve economic equality. Shortlisted for the 2020 Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize and longlisted for the 2020 Financial Times / McKinsey Business Book of the Year award, this provocative book is an essential call to action for women to participate equally in the global economy. NOTE: Originally published on Forbes.com on 31 January 2021.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kayleigh

    The truth will set you free, but first it will piss you off. This book made me unbelievably angry, and then it made me grateful. I consider myself lucky to have lived in a time that is relatively kind to women but this is a well reasoned, concise and excellent take which we can all use as a harsh reminder that we do still have a very long way to go to reach true equality.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Hanie Noor

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The Double X Economy by Linda Scott __ Human resource is a part of economic resource or inputs to produce goods and services. When countries exclude women, that is 49.6% of the world population, available resources are not optimised because of the gender bias and primitive beliefs that women should only be kept home and raise children. Even science proves that women have the same brain ability as men and also supported by Islamic views (do your research), which means women are able to take up profe The Double X Economy by Linda Scott __ Human resource is a part of economic resource or inputs to produce goods and services. When countries exclude women, that is 49.6% of the world population, available resources are not optimised because of the gender bias and primitive beliefs that women should only be kept home and raise children. Even science proves that women have the same brain ability as men and also supported by Islamic views (do your research), which means women are able to take up professional works as men does. Upon receiving this book, I was expecting to delve into myriad economic injustice on women’s economic involvement and areas to be harnessed in defying the inequality. Somehow the book delivers what it claimed as it also provide measures to be taken and considered by global community and individuals. My POV following the clash between pragmatic biz consideration and understanding of gender inequality, Islamic Social Finance has also been putting effort in women empowerment e.g. engaging women in microcredit which creates social protection alongside providing training and education. The research part is hands down 10/10 BUT the author might overlook on understanding other religion e.g. on hijab —refers to as men’s tool to overpower/control women which is 💯 wrong. Muslim women are not restricted by wearing hijab🧕🏻 The book appears to be a manifesto to spread awareness and a call to action. Throughout her studies she conducted interesting exercise/test to validate financial literacy e.g. what women in poverty thought to be a necessity items or luxury items, the money management exercise, etc. Explained the lens of economy with simple terms and provided interesting insights e.g. Gender-smart investing. Overall, more of a western feminism but recommended if like to know how inequality affects the economy. Plus point: extensive research, economic & cultural insights from around the world, and how much this book opened up my mind on what’s happening. Minus point: author’s ignorance on religious understanding/practice and the ineffective method to convince (facts alone does not change someone’s perspective). 🌟 3.8/5

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jan Peregrine

    The Double X Economy~~ As opposed to our current XY economy, which is run exclusively by men, The Double X Economy: The Epic Potential of Women's Empowerment by Linda Scott argues very effectively for a world economy managed more with women in mind and equally influenced by women. She says the bias begins with the universities where economics department are still hostile to women professors and students. You say economics is boring? Read this book and tell me it's still boring! Scott has traveled The Double X Economy~~ As opposed to our current XY economy, which is run exclusively by men, The Double X Economy: The Epic Potential of Women's Empowerment by Linda Scott argues very effectively for a world economy managed more with women in mind and equally influenced by women. She says the bias begins with the universities where economics department are still hostile to women professors and students. You say economics is boring? Read this book and tell me it's still boring! Scott has traveled widely to find ways to empower helpless, landless women in Africa. Her personal stories are heartbreaking. Can you imagine how terrifying it is for African girls suddenly getting their period and unable to hide the fact from tyrannical men waiting to snatch them up as slaves/wives? Scott attends international summits that barely have any women economists or discussions about improving women's empowerment. Statistics showing how robust and consistently positive economies would be with the earning potential of women are either ignored or sneered at by men. Men call data collected by women soft (like Scott's) while their armchair data is hard. That's bullshit. It's a fairly dense book as far as information goes, but disturbing as well. Especially if you are a person concerned about human rights. I suggest it's also a book for people concerned about building the economy, relieving world poverty and hunger, and focusing more on things like climate change, the environment, and domestic or family issues. She was writing this book while Trump still loomed in the picture and the 2020 election hadn't taken place. She must be relieved. But Scott says the public must voice its interest in a double x economy so that government will act. Putting the responsibility all on government will not get as much done as our buying from women-owned businesses or gender-neutral corporations and businesses. She asks that we look at the Bloomberg Gender Equality list to know where to shop. There's more tips as well. I hope you check out the book!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jordan

    I was really impressed with the content of the book. However, I felt the tone was needlessly confrontational. What's actually going on in many countries on the path to development is upsetting and fascinating, digging down into the detail on inequality within developed economy's was really helpful. It's the first book I've come across that brings together different strands of arguments and pulls it together. For example, how exactly motherhood contributes to the gender wage gap and how to fix it. I was really impressed with the content of the book. However, I felt the tone was needlessly confrontational. What's actually going on in many countries on the path to development is upsetting and fascinating, digging down into the detail on inequality within developed economy's was really helpful. It's the first book I've come across that brings together different strands of arguments and pulls it together. For example, how exactly motherhood contributes to the gender wage gap and how to fix it. The last chapter is also full of actionable steps that an individual can take to help rather than just asking you to write to your MP or sign a petition. Regarding the tone: As a self-confessed conservative I felt my choices and beliefs were being needlessly attacked by the author at times. I understand that she's angry and wants people to wake up and do something, but if you're trying to get me on-side an unnecessary remark about the stupidity that led to Brexit etc isn't helpful. This book has changed the way I look at things, but I won't be able to convince other people who are less invested in the issue to read it and feel the same way. Finally, I think there are annoying generalisations scattered throughout the text when it comes to culture. The one that stands out is a reference to the TV show Dragon's Den, it's implied the show only features male venture capitalists when each series includes at least one female VC.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alexis

    This was a fascinating and infuriating read about women's role in the economy and how we can improve it. It was a refreshing change from many feminist books because Scott uses a much wider net--she draws from countries all over the world, not just well off Western nations, for her examples. Her work in non-Western countries tends to be amongst the poorest, which makes the contrast sharp, but her theme is not that the West is better: it's that it's all variations on an ancient theme to remove wom This was a fascinating and infuriating read about women's role in the economy and how we can improve it. It was a refreshing change from many feminist books because Scott uses a much wider net--she draws from countries all over the world, not just well off Western nations, for her examples. Her work in non-Western countries tends to be amongst the poorest, which makes the contrast sharp, but her theme is not that the West is better: it's that it's all variations on an ancient theme to remove women's economic power. She cuts right through common arguments about the pay gap and education--for example, she points out that removing factors like children and care obligations proves only that women achieve equal pay if they act like men, since those factors are so heavily skewed towards women. Just as importantly she points out how much women's economics matter to the economy as a whole. Not only do women earn money, they spend it. In the US, 67% of consumer spending is determined by women. Research in developing countries has shown that giving women more control over family finances not only benefits them but their children. I would have liked a little more attention paid to the economic value of women's caring labor, instead of just talking about universal daycare (important, but not the only point). Women's economic value is systematically undervalued because their domestic labor is not included and not thought to be an economic contribution.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Anandh Sundar

    A data backed book to explain why women are lagging behind, and what can be done. Instead of relying on anecdotes and pathos, the author uses a blend of research and first hand stories to explain what can be better. I especially liked the examples of supply chain integration, Walmart, women farmers, sanitary napkins, financial inclusion etc.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Janis

    It's dense enough, but it wouldn't have to feel that way if the research and anecdotes were more obviously tied to the points. Granted, the avalanche of support for her arguments is completely in line with the intent of the book. It's artfully, purposefully written. Don't expect this to read like Steinem. There's tons of work to do... this feels fractal-like. It's rather huge. #FreeBritney It's dense enough, but it wouldn't have to feel that way if the research and anecdotes were more obviously tied to the points. Granted, the avalanche of support for her arguments is completely in line with the intent of the book. It's artfully, purposefully written. Don't expect this to read like Steinem. There's tons of work to do... this feels fractal-like. It's rather huge. #FreeBritney

  19. 5 out of 5

    Arnab

    An excellent, excellent book about the very real costs of patriarchy on our economies and societies. If I were to summarize the central argument of this book, I would take up the quote often attributed to "SJWs" or "Feminazis", "all men are bad", and amend it to "quite a lot of men, and almost all men in power, are bad". Highly recommended. An excellent, excellent book about the very real costs of patriarchy on our economies and societies. If I were to summarize the central argument of this book, I would take up the quote often attributed to "SJWs" or "Feminazis", "all men are bad", and amend it to "quite a lot of men, and almost all men in power, are bad". Highly recommended.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Millie W

    Great book. Definitely got me thinking more about these issues and the problems faced by women in developing countries. There are some sections I will refer back to again and again. Also great to meet and interview!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nora

    After reading the first few pages, I decided to skim through the rest. This book relies heavily on numbers to make its case. I believe it would be helpful as a reference when arguing for women empowerment. Other than that, it was so painful to read especially once you realize how true it is.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Elisabetta Felici

    Argomento interessante, ma scritto in maniera tremendamente noiosa. Ho già letto altri libri sul tema e sono riuscita a leggerli in poco tempo e con passione. Questo libro invece mi sono ritrovata a posarlo e riprenderlo più e più volte, per poi abbandonarlo definitivamente.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Ebling

    A very thorough explanation of how women are excluded from society through their economic disenfranchisement and a convincing case for how and why the world needs to make a change.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Darya

    The book taught me to be thankful for what I have in life in the first place. Although I am coming from a background where I had to work hard to achieve what I have, still many women do not make it and this is heartbreaking. The author has done a Great job in describing the Double C economy ruled by men. In some countries situations are extremely frustrating and in some also quite upsetting however at a different level. Worth reading.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Stefan Liljenström

    Outstanding book. Extremely important, a must-read for all regardless of gender. Empower women, empower the world!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michaela

    Outstanding book. Best chapters: chap 8 - 14, and especially The 80 Percent Christmas, Money Bullies, Owning It, Joining the Global Market

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lou

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jocelyn

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tabea Hoess

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