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The dramatic true story of a handful of students who resisted the Nazis and paid with their lives, now in a stunning graphic novel. With an entire nation blindly following an evil leader, where did a handful of students find the courage to resist? The university students who formed the White Rose, an undercover resistance movement in Nazi Germany, knew that doing so could The dramatic true story of a handful of students who resisted the Nazis and paid with their lives, now in a stunning graphic novel. With an entire nation blindly following an evil leader, where did a handful of students find the courage to resist? The university students who formed the White Rose, an undercover resistance movement in Nazi Germany, knew that doing so could cost them their lives. But some things are worth dying for. The White Rose printed and distributed leaflets to expose Nazi atrocities and wake up their fellow citizens. The Gestapo caught and executed them. Sophie Scholl was twenty-one; her brother Hans, twenty-four; Christoph Probst, twenty-three; Alexander Schmorell and Willi Graf, twenty-five. But the White Rose was not silenced. Their heroism continues to inspire new generations of resisters. Now, for the first time, this story that has been celebrated in print and film can be experienced as a graphic novel. Italian artist Andrea Grosso Ciponte's haunting imagery will resonate with today's students and activists. The challenges they face may vary, but the need for young people to stand up against evil, whatever the cost, will remain.


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The dramatic true story of a handful of students who resisted the Nazis and paid with their lives, now in a stunning graphic novel. With an entire nation blindly following an evil leader, where did a handful of students find the courage to resist? The university students who formed the White Rose, an undercover resistance movement in Nazi Germany, knew that doing so could The dramatic true story of a handful of students who resisted the Nazis and paid with their lives, now in a stunning graphic novel. With an entire nation blindly following an evil leader, where did a handful of students find the courage to resist? The university students who formed the White Rose, an undercover resistance movement in Nazi Germany, knew that doing so could cost them their lives. But some things are worth dying for. The White Rose printed and distributed leaflets to expose Nazi atrocities and wake up their fellow citizens. The Gestapo caught and executed them. Sophie Scholl was twenty-one; her brother Hans, twenty-four; Christoph Probst, twenty-three; Alexander Schmorell and Willi Graf, twenty-five. But the White Rose was not silenced. Their heroism continues to inspire new generations of resisters. Now, for the first time, this story that has been celebrated in print and film can be experienced as a graphic novel. Italian artist Andrea Grosso Ciponte's haunting imagery will resonate with today's students and activists. The challenges they face may vary, but the need for young people to stand up against evil, whatever the cost, will remain.

30 review for Freiheit!: The White Rose Graphic Novel

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    It's 1942 when German students (and a professor) in Munich, who have been harbouring severe doubts (to say the least) about the ruling Nazi Party for a long time, decide to secretly write, publish and distribute anti-Nazi pamphlets under the group name of The White Rose. Probably most famous of the six are brother and sister Hans and Sophie Scholl, who also set up the group. Sadly, after publishing several leaflets, part of the group was caught, including the Scholls, and after a show trial they It's 1942 when German students (and a professor) in Munich, who have been harbouring severe doubts (to say the least) about the ruling Nazi Party for a long time, decide to secretly write, publish and distribute anti-Nazi pamphlets under the group name of The White Rose. Probably most famous of the six are brother and sister Hans and Sophie Scholl, who also set up the group. Sadly, after publishing several leaflets, part of the group was caught, including the Scholls, and after a show trial they were executed by guillotine. The graphic novel basically retells this story, with a greater eye for detail. It's an important story which reminds us how Nazi Germany was basically a authoritarian police state, with plenty of its citizens not all supporting the Nazis but living in fear. It makes the actions of The White Rose so much braver. The art is striking, nearing photo-realism, but with an added painterly feel. I'm not entirely sure if I like the art, but that maybe because of the muted colours used. The book also includes every White Rose pamphlet, translated into English, which is a very interesting addition. 3.5 stars (Picked up an ARC through Edelweiss and NetGalley)

  2. 5 out of 5

    ashes ➷

    Obligatory "I am Jewish" note. A lot of reviewers of books on the Holocaust are not Jewish. Please consider people's backgrounds and proximity to this content when reading reviews. (Thank you NetGalley for the ARC.) Alright, let's talk about this. I'm not only Jewish but have consistently gone to Jewish schools, so I have been through "the Holocaust unit" several times, with several types of media, and, yes, I have done my fair share of research on the White Rose. I watched the Sophie Scholl film Obligatory "I am Jewish" note. A lot of reviewers of books on the Holocaust are not Jewish. Please consider people's backgrounds and proximity to this content when reading reviews. (Thank you NetGalley for the ARC.) Alright, let's talk about this. I'm not only Jewish but have consistently gone to Jewish schools, so I have been through "the Holocaust unit" several times, with several types of media, and, yes, I have done my fair share of research on the White Rose. I watched the Sophie Scholl film in middle school and in high school I wrote a paper on Hans Scholl that required some digging. This is not to say I am an expert; just that I have some knowledge of Fictionalized Media About The Scholls and Actual Facts About The Scholls. In my opinion, if you are going to write a book on the Holocaust, you have got to be absolutely sure of what you are doing. There has been enough damage done with misinformation, and the presses are only too happy for trauma porn. Fortunately, this book avoids that very deep pitfall, but aspects of it make me feel that the author could have put more time and effort into telling this story, which really does deserve better coverage. As everyone probably knows by now, I love nonfiction graphic novels, and I find them a great way of spreading necessary information. One of my primary issues with the book is that it seems to not balance these elements-- nonfiction, entertainment-- very well. The book is an anthology of moments from the White Rose members at this time, and so rather than telling a really cohesive story where you get a sense for everyone's lives, it all feels a little disconnected. This makes it somewhat ineffective at conveying an entertaining narrative. The excerpts from different texts, including the White Rose leaflets, are a good idea but not integrated well enough to be interesting. At the same time, the lack of attention to details means that you won't learn much more here than you would on Wikipedia. Many important events in the lives of the members of the White Rose are glossed over, including the starting of the organization, and what is left is quite disorganized, so that you can't really put together what's going on and whether this bit is real or just an invention to get to the next plot point. Here come some very specific critiques. Firstly, of course we have one of those "look at the nice white gentile man helping the sickly little Jew" moments. There's a whole scene where Hans stops and gives a loaf of bread and a flower to a... well, a sickly little Jew. I mean, look at this. This reads very poorly. I Googled for whether this was at all true and could find nothing, though I'm willing to admit this might be buried in some research text in another language (we'll see why I don't think that momentarily.) What makes this even more frustrating is that it is based in the truth that Hans was sent to the Eastern Front and was horrified by what he saw there. There are lots of ways to portray this-- you could, for example, have him sent off and then return too horrified to discuss what he saw. Or you could have him talk about it! Frankly, I am sick of shock-value shots of dying Jews. Speaking of which, I do not like the trend of "guy runs into some Jews just sitting around" in Holocaust media. It's here, it's in Boy in the Striped Pajamas, it's probably in a lot of other things I can't think of off the top of my head. People in concentration camps, in case this needed to be said, didn't sit around doing nothing. I'll link two sources here that could easily have been read by the author: (1) (2) I just don't get it. It's possible, sure, that Hans just happened on some Jewish people lying against a fence, given that they occasionally had brief moments of 'free time', but it's so unlikely, and on top of that the scene is clearly there to paint Hans as a hero to these Poor Sickly Jews. Which turns said Poor Sickly Jews into props for Hans's hero moment. This is pretty obviously antisemitic. EDIT: Ciponte cited his source for this one, which I will reprint here verbatim: (view spoiler)[From Inge Scholl, The White Rose: 1942-1943 (1983) pag. 43 "During the transport to the front their train had stopped for a few minutes at a Polish station. Along the embankment he saw women and girls bent over and doing heavy men's work with picks. They wore the yellow Star of David on their blouses. Hans slipped through the window of his car and approached. The first one in the group was a young, emaciated girl with small, delicate hands and a beautiful, intelligent face that bore an expression of unspeakable sorrow. Did he have anything that he might give to her? He remembered his Iron Ration - a bar of chocolate, raisins, and nuts - and slipped it into her pocket. The girl threw it on the ground at his feet with a harassed but infinitely proud gesture. He picked it up, smiled, and said, "I wanted to do something to please you". Then he bent down, picked a daisy, and placed it and the package at her feet. The train was starting to move, and Hans had to take a couple of long leaps to get back on. From the window he could see that the girl was standing still, watching the departing train, the white flower in her hair." (hide spoiler)] I'll leave it up to the individual whether this means the focus was necessary and whether it had to be portrayed this way (notice that in the graphic novels, the 'workers' are not 'working'.) For me, a graphic novel like this takes a more objective viewpoint, so while I'm willing to go "eesh hope the Scholls understood the gravity of that moment" when it's someone narrating their own life, I have less leniency for a narrator/author. That's my opinion, though, and as I said earlier I feel the moments chosen were quite scattered-- so, for me, including this feels random, while it may seem very important to others. I personally do not like the scene as it is written. Now back to the rest of the review. In addition to this, the book omits one very important piece of information: Hans Scholl was gay. He stopped supporting the Nazi party after being arrested for being gay, and his siblings joined him. It's the sort of thing that seems fairly relevant to a history of the White Rose, and though it's not immediately apparent knowledge, again, with some small amount of research one could find this out. If you read more modern articles or books, you'd see discussion of this, particularly because once researchers found the original trial materials it was obvious. This is what I wrote a paper in high school on! It couldn't have been hard to find material on it if some random high schooler did a better job. EDIT: I had a vague suspicion that Ciponte worked mostly off of Inge Scholl's book, which is something I discussed outside of this review but wish I had raised as a possibility. Ciponte confirmed in his comment that this was his primary source, and it has me feeling mixed-- on the one hand, of course one would think that a book written by a family member would be the ultimate guide. Why go to historians from decades later when you could read from someone who was there? On the other hand, it happens in this instance that Inge, Hans's sister, wanted to protect him from public homophobia and therefore purposefully lied/obscured facts, which wind up telling an incomplete story. And in 2020, I would like enough research to be done to uncover more than one book's perspective... but, again, I see why Inge Scholl's book strikes most people as the best source. I wouldn't even disagree with that; it's just missing some major facts. The reason I didn't include this discussion in the original review is that I don't have a snappy point. The rest of this review is very snappy, and it seemed weird to meander for two paragraphs just to go "well I think you have to make up your own mind on whether it is fair to expect a writer to research using more than one book." I haven't even read this book... but then, I am not out here writing educational graphic novels. So, in the end, my opinion is that if you are writing a nonfiction text focusing on an event, you have to do a crazy amount of research to be absolutely certain of everything. You may not believe that, and feel free to imagine bonus stars on this review for that reason (though at that point you can imagine bonus stars on whatever you want.) (end edit.) So I had to knock stars off the book. I almost knocked all of them off, because if you're not researching or making your book entertaining, really, what are you doing? What's the point? Why are you writing, let alone about the Holocaust? What convinced me to add a single star back on was the art. It is genuinely very nice art. And I like the idea of a graphic novel with this art. The style is beautiful and unique, and if I was judging only based on that we'd have a full five stars here. But graphic novels are not just art. Nonfiction graphic novels in particular are very complex, and there just isn't much to convince me that it was worth making this one when it lacks the most important elements-- research, entertainment, and story. And it doesn't even manage to avoid antisemitism! So, well, there you are. Two stars. Go watch the Sophie Scholl film or, yes, read the Wikipedia page. I don't think this book is any better.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Erika Sarutobi

    2.5 stars I'm the kind of person who avoids reading books about WW2 (or about wars that happened in reality in general) whether nonfiction or fiction because I try to avoid reading about the horrible things that humans can do for greed and power but I decided to give this a try since it was a graphic novel and about freedom fighters. Honestly, I was disappointed with the execution because I thought it would have been more story detailed but we only get snippets of key events rather than a retelli 2.5 stars I'm the kind of person who avoids reading books about WW2 (or about wars that happened in reality in general) whether nonfiction or fiction because I try to avoid reading about the horrible things that humans can do for greed and power but I decided to give this a try since it was a graphic novel and about freedom fighters. Honestly, I was disappointed with the execution because I thought it would have been more story detailed but we only get snippets of key events rather than a retelling. We were just shown the members meeting a few times with minimal talking beyond reading the German literature that they would include in the flyers and not much about what they have done to execute the plans beyond buying stamps and mentions (not actions except for the one in the university) of throwing the flyers everywhere. Moreover, the whole graphic novel just left me confused beyond the meaning of their message since the speech bubbles made it hard to know who's speaking and most of the times, two different topics are mentioned and are often contradictory. I wasn't a fan of the blurry/air brush like artstyle, though that's personal preference more than anything. Overall, in my opinion, this book was more confusing than anything to me and could have been executed in a better way. I like my retellings to show me a linear story (or at least somewhat of the sort) since this book just shows events abruptly after the other with few ones that weren't really important. Thank you Netgalley for providing me with the digital copy for an honest review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Valéria.

    Parta študákov nenásilne protestuje proti režimu, násilí na Židoch a Hitlerovi, s pár slovami na letáčkoch. Ono by to bolo aj zaujímavé čítať a niečo nové sa naučiť, keď už sa tam čo to hovorí pravdivo, ale boha, tá kresba. Ešte mesiac budem mať nočné mory. Niektoré tie tváre/postavy sú nakreslené ako keby za minútu a to by ani nevadilo, keby to tak bolo stále. Ale potom je tam art, kedy tie ksichty sú ako vyretušované fotky z magazínu a vyzerajú desivo. Písané to je tiež mi príde vonku pod vŕbo Parta študákov nenásilne protestuje proti režimu, násilí na Židoch a Hitlerovi, s pár slovami na letáčkoch. Ono by to bolo aj zaujímavé čítať a niečo nové sa naučiť, keď už sa tam čo to hovorí pravdivo, ale boha, tá kresba. Ešte mesiac budem mať nočné mory. Niektoré tie tváre/postavy sú nakreslené ako keby za minútu a to by ani nevadilo, keby to tak bolo stále. Ale potom je tam art, kedy tie ksichty sú ako vyretušované fotky z magazínu a vyzerajú desivo. Písané to je tiež mi príde vonku pod vŕbou za jeden podvečer a som rada, že to mám za sebou. Holt, NetGalley mi vie vždy tak obohatiť môj rozhľad v komiksoch, vďačná som. 1,5/2, ale dve hviezdy tomu nedám, čítala som aj lepšie veci s tým ratingom.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    To those who know the story of Sophie Scholl and her brother and friends, who sought a major revolution against the Nazi regime in wartime Germany, this is a very eye-catching treatment of it. Her gamine looks are perfectly captured in the artworks, which have a uniquely grainy, muted, pastel approach (or if not unique, then one I've never seen taken to this extreme before), and the story pacily builds from initial thoughts, to the Nazis investigating the White Rose Movement she was a part of, t To those who know the story of Sophie Scholl and her brother and friends, who sought a major revolution against the Nazi regime in wartime Germany, this is a very eye-catching treatment of it. Her gamine looks are perfectly captured in the artworks, which have a uniquely grainy, muted, pastel approach (or if not unique, then one I've never seen taken to this extreme before), and the story pacily builds from initial thoughts, to the Nazis investigating the White Rose Movement she was a part of, to – well, that would be telling. The other side of the audience, then, those who have studied the War less and haven't met with the story, well, unfortunately they might not have such a great time. In seeking some authenticity the text of this book either quotes from the pamphlets the Movement tried to bomb everyone with, at length, or has the Nazis read them out to each other in disgust, or presents the characters as rather stilted, over-privileged quoters of Victorian-years Swiss poets. One permanently has a pipe to his mouth in an attempt at teenaged decadence. More importantly that paciness comes as a result of us just jumping through everything, speeding from naivety to conviction to, well, alright, to conviction (and the world's most galling surcharge, as we find on this evidence). So I think it's easy to say I liked some of the qualities here, especially the muted graphic elements. I didn't fully appreciate the chance, even if it was my first ever, to read a translation of some of the White Rose leaflets, for the text was full of enough of their output and to be frank it was quite haranguing. (One thing it did do with its stilted language, and cultural references, was to show how low we've gone in the world of political campaigning, from this urgent samizdat publication to a "please like and retweet". Said 19th century poet has a great quote about suppression that handily mentions a plague, but any copy of that would get a "tldr" or "you wot now?" in response.) Still, this might well connect a few dots for people, and prove there were genuinely quite a few who were anti-Hitler at that time, and either way it does act as a slightly brief but heartfelt tribute to Sophie et al and all they stood for. Three and a half stars.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bernie Gourley

    This tragic story tells the tale of a small college-centric anti-Nazi resistance group, doing so in graphic novel form. While it touches upon the story of six White Rose members who were executed, special emphasis is given to the sister-brother duo of Sophie and Hans Scholl. White Rose was largely involved in distributing leaflets to encourage others to engage in resistance activities against the Nazis. (Note: the translated text of the White Rose pamphlets is included as an appendix.) There is This tragic story tells the tale of a small college-centric anti-Nazi resistance group, doing so in graphic novel form. While it touches upon the story of six White Rose members who were executed, special emphasis is given to the sister-brother duo of Sophie and Hans Scholl. White Rose was largely involved in distributing leaflets to encourage others to engage in resistance activities against the Nazis. (Note: the translated text of the White Rose pamphlets is included as an appendix.) There is so much attention given to the truly fascinating question of how a bunch of fascist lunatics managed to run a country into such diabolical territory that it can easily be missed that there was at least some resistance within Germany. I, for one, was oblivious to the story of White Rose before reading this book. The arc of the story takes the reader from the upbeat stage during which White Rose was succeeding in distributing articulate and persuasive flyers, through some of their close calls and other frustrations (e.g. the Scholl’s father being arrested), and on to the bitter end. Much of what I’ve seen previously about resisters centered on communists. One sees in White Rose a different demographic. There are a number of religious references without the “workers of the world unite” lead that would be taken by leftist groups. I believe the author overplayed the stoicism with which the executed individuals accepted their fate. This is based upon a true story, and so this may seem an unfair criticism because perhaps that’s how it appeared in reality. However, from a storytelling perspective, it felt surprisingly devoid of emotional content [given the events provide loads of potential for it.] There is a great tragedy in young people being executed by the State for asking others to resist fascism, but as a reader I didn’t really feel an intense visceral connection to events. As I said, I suspect this had to do with the author wishing to show that the Scholls took it in all in stride, but I think some display of angst or anger might have made for a more intense reading experience. I don’t know whether it was more a textual or graphic issue that left me unmoved. All in all, the book was an interesting insight into resistance to the Nazis in an academic environment. I did find reading the pamphlet translations themselves to be insightful. The flyers give one insight into where the student-resisters were coming from, and what buttons wished to push in others. It might have been a bit more gripping, but it was an interesting telling of events. If you’re interested in learning more about Germans who resisted the fascists, this book provides a quick example of how (and by whom) it was done, and I’d recommend you give it a read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    There are many books on the resistance to the nazis, and The White Rose movement was probably important, but the way this was laid out and written, this has got to be the most boring version of resistance I have ever read. It is very text heavy, and with little context it is hard to have sympathy with the main characters and how they feel. They discuss writings and philosophy, and write pamphlets to get the people to rise up. Surely there could have been a better story here, since the story was b There are many books on the resistance to the nazis, and The White Rose movement was probably important, but the way this was laid out and written, this has got to be the most boring version of resistance I have ever read. It is very text heavy, and with little context it is hard to have sympathy with the main characters and how they feel. They discuss writings and philosophy, and write pamphlets to get the people to rise up. Surely there could have been a better story here, since the story was based on real people and real lives. Still, I'm sure it could be a good starting point for those interested in the movement, but for me, it was just hard to read. Good art though. Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine

    The White Rose was a non-violent resistance group led by Hans and Sophie Scholl. They conducted a disturbing leaflet campaign and was called for active opposition. They were arrested, faced trial and was executed. I really liked this concept of portraying a German resistance movement through a graphic novel. It was a bit hard for me to keep up with the art style, I guess. I just didn't find it much gripping. And I think this one particularly, struggled in telling its story, like some fragments he The White Rose was a non-violent resistance group led by Hans and Sophie Scholl. They conducted a disturbing leaflet campaign and was called for active opposition. They were arrested, faced trial and was executed. I really liked this concept of portraying a German resistance movement through a graphic novel. It was a bit hard for me to keep up with the art style, I guess. I just didn't find it much gripping. And I think this one particularly, struggled in telling its story, like some fragments here and some there, scattered a bit, which is a problem I find with most of the graphic novels. But this should reach more people for its core story. I'm going to recommend this to a lot of people. Thank you NetGalley and the publishers for this arc in exchange for an honest review.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Joy

    I wasn’t sold on this one for about the first third. I found the text too heavy and the artistry too muted for a graphic novel. However, I should have had more faith in the author because I was drawn in covertly, without even knowing it myself. Suddenly, I was gripped by the intensity of the situations and the incredible strength of this group of young people. The ending was certainly not unexpected, but it still struck me violently. As it should have. Thank you to Andrea Grosso Ciponte, Plough P I wasn’t sold on this one for about the first third. I found the text too heavy and the artistry too muted for a graphic novel. However, I should have had more faith in the author because I was drawn in covertly, without even knowing it myself. Suddenly, I was gripped by the intensity of the situations and the incredible strength of this group of young people. The ending was certainly not unexpected, but it still struck me violently. As it should have. Thank you to Andrea Grosso Ciponte, Plough Publishing, and NetGalley for an Advance Reader Copy in exchange for an honest review.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mimi

    Graphically an interesting take on the story of Die weiße Rose, but the telling of the story was rather disjointed, and erratic and not in a good way. The story is told in snippets, and jumps and is probably hard to follow if you are not familiar with the Scholl´s story. Visually, it had some very impactful pages, p77 had a very good, Escher-esque illustration, and is a personal favourite. Also, the use of darkness and light was visually very interesting. So, 4 stars for the art, minus 1 for sto Graphically an interesting take on the story of Die weiße Rose, but the telling of the story was rather disjointed, and erratic and not in a good way. The story is told in snippets, and jumps and is probably hard to follow if you are not familiar with the Scholl´s story. Visually, it had some very impactful pages, p77 had a very good, Escher-esque illustration, and is a personal favourite. Also, the use of darkness and light was visually very interesting. So, 4 stars for the art, minus 1 for storytelling. I received a copy for review through Netgalley, opinions are my own.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    I had heard of White Rose, a group of college students who resisted the Nazi regime by distributing pamphlets and fliers. Now that I've read the Freiheit! graphic novel, that's still about all I know. There wasn't really a coherent story presented here, just snippets or vignettes of different moments without a lot connecting them together. There was no information on how or why the group formed even! The artwork was interesting, but that's about all the good I can say here. I had heard of White Rose, a group of college students who resisted the Nazi regime by distributing pamphlets and fliers. Now that I've read the Freiheit! graphic novel, that's still about all I know. There wasn't really a coherent story presented here, just snippets or vignettes of different moments without a lot connecting them together. There was no information on how or why the group formed even! The artwork was interesting, but that's about all the good I can say here.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Bill Cass

    This felt like the Cliff Notes version of an actual story. There were no elements of a story. The was no real pacing, it was kind of haphazard and jumped around more than a kangaroo on coke. The characters had nothing memorable about them. They worked against the Nazis. Cool. Thats awesome. But thats literally all we know about them. We never get to know them at all so when they're killed (not a spoiler, it says it in the description) i didn't feel a thing. This was a really bad graphic novel and This felt like the Cliff Notes version of an actual story. There were no elements of a story. The was no real pacing, it was kind of haphazard and jumped around more than a kangaroo on coke. The characters had nothing memorable about them. They worked against the Nazis. Cool. Thats awesome. But thats literally all we know about them. We never get to know them at all so when they're killed (not a spoiler, it says it in the description) i didn't feel a thing. This was a really bad graphic novel and I feel like the people who wrote this got bored halfway through and just phoned in the rest. This story deserves a book or a movie. Not some half assed graphic novel.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Erikka

    While I felt the story lacked some of the details that make the story of the White Rose rebellion such a powerful story of strength and resistance, it was more than compensated for with the gorgeous art and the emotion conveyed by it. I honestly can't say enough about the art: it gets darker as moments get more serious, the facial expressions are so expressive and tell the story perhaps better than words can. I also love that the text (in English) of the six leaflets is at the end. If anything, While I felt the story lacked some of the details that make the story of the White Rose rebellion such a powerful story of strength and resistance, it was more than compensated for with the gorgeous art and the emotion conveyed by it. I honestly can't say enough about the art: it gets darker as moments get more serious, the facial expressions are so expressive and tell the story perhaps better than words can. I also love that the text (in English) of the six leaflets is at the end. If anything, that may be the coolest feature. I would recommend buddy reading this with White Rose by Kip Wilson and We Will Not Be Silent by Russell Freedman. By the end of that series, you'll have a pretty good story of some of the most amazing young people of the German WWII resistance. Young people can make a difference and I can't imagine the publication of these books isn't relatively timely to what's going on in our nation and world right now.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jean Huber Bookmama789

    Thank you to Ploughing Publishing and @netgalley for the ARC of Freiheit! by Andrea Grosso Ciponte. This is a great choice if you are looking to add a quick read for #nonfictionnovember This graphic novel is the dramatic true story of a group of students who resisted the Nazis and formed a group/newsletter knows as The White Rose. This graphic novel shows not only their story but also provides copies of the actual newsletters that they printed and distributed. This book was very well done and I Thank you to Ploughing Publishing and @netgalley for the ARC of Freiheit! by Andrea Grosso Ciponte. This is a great choice if you are looking to add a quick read for #nonfictionnovember This graphic novel is the dramatic true story of a group of students who resisted the Nazis and formed a group/newsletter knows as The White Rose. This graphic novel shows not only their story but also provides copies of the actual newsletters that they printed and distributed. This book was very well done and I learned a lot from reading it!⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bruce

    A rather dull version of a story I think should have showed more emotion and vigor. The grainy appearance takes you back, but overall, little more than a drawn-out history lesson

  16. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Gurinskas

    I was really excited when I first heard about “Freiheit! The White Rose Graphic Novel,” in part because it’s a part of World War II history that I’ve been interested in, but haven’t had the opportunity to read much about. I’d previously read several short articles about Sophie Scholl—one of the book’s lead protagonists—but they had been sparse with the details about her involvement with a larger group, making her seem like a lone martyr figure. I hadn’t even heard the name “White Rose” until I p I was really excited when I first heard about “Freiheit! The White Rose Graphic Novel,” in part because it’s a part of World War II history that I’ve been interested in, but haven’t had the opportunity to read much about. I’d previously read several short articles about Sophie Scholl—one of the book’s lead protagonists—but they had been sparse with the details about her involvement with a larger group, making her seem like a lone martyr figure. I hadn’t even heard the name “White Rose” until I picked up this graphic novel, which, I think, makes the book all the more important and timely given the importance of history in resisting fascism. The book is very engaging and pulls you into the story immediately right in the middle of the action with Sophie and her brother Hans dropping a stack of leaflets down from the top floor a building into the main hall, before jumping back to a flashback that shows you how everything began, how a small group of friends (Sophie and Hans Scholl, Christoph Probst, Alexander Schmorell and Willi Graf) eventually became the White Rose. The story then moves quickly, following Sophie, into her discovery of her brother’s and their other friends involvements with the White Rose, and how they continue that through their military service, until they are eventually caught. Despite how quickly things move, it doesn’t feel in anyway rushed. The book has a very artistic flow to it, there’s no real background exposition to speak of, drawing your focus to the art, dialogue the limited quotations the serve as background for various scenes. My particular favorite quotation used is the English translation of the song “Die Gedaken sind frei,” (“Thoughts are Free”), that is overlaid on a scene of Sophie working in an ammunitions factory. I will say I was a touch confused by that scene as I wasn’t entirely sure of what I was supposed to take away from it. It’s a lovely scene and gorgeously illustrated, as is the whole book, but it wasn’t clear to me if it was meant to imply that Sophie was doing sabotage work. There is discussion earlier in about encouraging sabotage in their leaflets alongside passive resistance, so I had wondered if this was tying into that, but I can’t say I know for sure since there’s no background exposition to explain the scene. I think some added points of additional exposition would have been nice, but as a narrative the story does hold up just fine without them. Something that I’ve always found true when it comes to World War II studies is how angry and upset and heartbroken I feel when presented with personal narratives, be they biographical or autobiographical. That emotional pull is something that “Freiheit!” does incredibly effectively. There is an incredible amount of characterization for such a short book, we see Sophie living her life as a regular student, we see Christoph with his wife and children, we see the Scholl family’s response to their father being arrested, and you know through all of it how it’s going to end. Arrest and execution. But the book doesn’t leave you on a sad note, it ends on a hopeful one, with the fact that the British took the final pamphlet produced by the White Rose and used airplanes to drop 5 million copies across German cities. This drives home that what the White Rose did mattered and, especially in todays day and age, that activism matters. Not everyone can make the sort of sacrifices that the White Rose did, but what they preached, passive resistance against a terrible “norm” is something anyone can do. Crossposted from Snap Book Reviews blog.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Firdaus

    My thanks to NetGalley and the publishers, Plough Publishing House, for sending me this graphic novel for review We are informed in a Preface, that the Nazis have been in power for the last ten years and the knowledge of the concentration camps is well-known to all. No dissent is tolerated and the young girls and boys have been brainwashed with Nazi Ideology. But what Ciponte fails to provide us with any background information about “The White Rose” movement. Not many people will be aware that it My thanks to NetGalley and the publishers, Plough Publishing House, for sending me this graphic novel for review We are informed in a Preface, that the Nazis have been in power for the last ten years and the knowledge of the concentration camps is well-known to all. No dissent is tolerated and the young girls and boys have been brainwashed with Nazi Ideology. But what Ciponte fails to provide us with any background information about “The White Rose” movement. Not many people will be aware that it was an anti-Nazi group formed in Munich in 1942, by youngsters, many of whom were students, and who were trying to advocate non-violent resistance against the regime. They did this by distributing pamphlets; they published six, which are included at the end of the book as an appendix. Andrea Grosso Cipont is the author as well as the artist. The narrative shifts from one period of time to another and from the point of view of the students to that of the Nazis which makes it very confusing to a first-time reader even if he has adequate knowledge about the regime and the persecution of the Jews. Somehow Ciponte does not really develop the character of these protagonists and fails to really interest us emotionally in the fates of these individuals. Some of the information is given in a direct and rather didactic manner and often the philosophical snippets once again seem out of place. The illustrations are sombre keeping mind the subject matter of the text. I don’t think that the book does adequate justice to the subject; in fact, I did not feel motivated to learn m0ore about the White Rose Movement after reading the novel. At the end of the novel, I felt disappointed and a bit short-changed; so much more could have been done to bring to life and create an interest in this lesser-known aspect of the Nazi Regime.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Panda Incognito

    I greatly admire the Scholl siblings and their friends, and was intrigued to see that there is an upcoming graphic novel about them. I enjoyed reading it, and appreciated the accurate likenesses and atmospheric, grainy art style. However, the story jumps around in a way that may confuse someone who is new to this story, and because the author leaves out several significant details and key points of context, readers who are already knowledgeable about and invested in the White Rose Movement's his I greatly admire the Scholl siblings and their friends, and was intrigued to see that there is an upcoming graphic novel about them. I enjoyed reading it, and appreciated the accurate likenesses and atmospheric, grainy art style. However, the story jumps around in a way that may confuse someone who is new to this story, and because the author leaves out several significant details and key points of context, readers who are already knowledgeable about and invested in the White Rose Movement's history may find aspects of this book disappointing. I hope that this book will make people more aware of these historical events and inspire them to read some of the sources from that time. This book includes the text of the White Rose leaflets in both German and English at the end, but for greater context, I would encourage people to check out At the Heart of the White Rose: Letters and Diaries of Hans and Sophie Scholl and secondary source titles. I received a temporary digital copy through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    This is a beautifully drawn graphic novel. Simplistic in color, and design, but effective to tell the story of a group of German resisters during WWII. The written story however, felt like it was missing quite a bit of detail. With so many characters involved it would have been nice to flesh them out some more. I would have also liked more detail on the White Rose leaflets within the graphic novel, namely what they were, how the group came up with the decision to make them, and the reaction to t This is a beautifully drawn graphic novel. Simplistic in color, and design, but effective to tell the story of a group of German resisters during WWII. The written story however, felt like it was missing quite a bit of detail. With so many characters involved it would have been nice to flesh them out some more. I would have also liked more detail on the White Rose leaflets within the graphic novel, namely what they were, how the group came up with the decision to make them, and the reaction to them. A longer, more detailed story would have greatly benefited this work overall. The most impactful part of the whole novel was the inclusion of the text of all White Rose leaflets at the end of the story. Reading them in their entirety really gives a sense of what a severe risk these individuals were taking, and the call to action they were nearly begging the German population to undertake. This addition greatly elevated my feeling of understanding of the story being told. After reading the leaflets I now want to learn even more about the White Rose. **I received a copy of this title from NetGalley in exchange for a honest review.**

  20. 5 out of 5

    Carro Herdegen

    Language: G (0 swears, 0 “f”); Mature Content: G; Violence: PG Even Germans need to be careful as Hitler reigns. Sophie feels little freedom in being coerced to live the way Hitler demands, though she knows she has to be careful because her family is being watched. But, when Sophie discovers her brother in a group opposing Hitler, she knows the right thing to do is help them. These brave activists are more than characters in a book: they are real people, people who opposed Hitler and found ways to Language: G (0 swears, 0 “f”); Mature Content: G; Violence: PG Even Germans need to be careful as Hitler reigns. Sophie feels little freedom in being coerced to live the way Hitler demands, though she knows she has to be careful because her family is being watched. But, when Sophie discovers her brother in a group opposing Hitler, she knows the right thing to do is help them. These brave activists are more than characters in a book: they are real people, people who opposed Hitler and found ways to stand up for what is right. I liked this book because, while our struggles today can seem different, the world still struggles with oppression and Sophie and the rest of the White Rose group show readers that good can win in the end, even when the enemy seems unconquerable. However, the telling of their story felt confusing and choppy. For me, this book is best read in conjunction with supplemental information. Reviewed for https://kissthebook.blogspot.com/

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lynndell

    Freheit!: The White Rose Graphic Novel by Andrea Grosso Ciponte Thanks to Plough Publishing and NetGalley for the opportunity to read this graphic novel. Based on the actual White Rose group that spread leaflets against Nazi rule and actions during World War II. Several members were arrested and quite a few of them were executed by use of a guillotine. I didn’t realize that anyone in that era was executed by any means other than shooting. A highly impactful graphic novel that sums up the growth an Freheit!: The White Rose Graphic Novel by Andrea Grosso Ciponte Thanks to Plough Publishing and NetGalley for the opportunity to read this graphic novel. Based on the actual White Rose group that spread leaflets against Nazi rule and actions during World War II. Several members were arrested and quite a few of them were executed by use of a guillotine. I didn’t realize that anyone in that era was executed by any means other than shooting. A highly impactful graphic novel that sums up the growth and activities of The White Rose and also includes the real writings on the original leaflets. Amazing strength, integrity and bravery sums up The White Rose members! A must for history buffs, 5 stars! * I received an advance reader copy of this book for volunteer review consideration and all opinions and thoughts are my own.

  22. 4 out of 5

    twiinklex

    I've never heard about the White Rose prior to this book so thank you for shedding light on their efforts. Although the content itself is scant and feels lacking in emotional depth, it gets the main gist across. I would have loved to learn more about each character and their personal lives outside of the resistance. The muted and dark colour theme also suits the tone of the book and its sombre mood. I actually felt very saddened and will be reading up more about the White Rose. Thank you to NetGa I've never heard about the White Rose prior to this book so thank you for shedding light on their efforts. Although the content itself is scant and feels lacking in emotional depth, it gets the main gist across. I would have loved to learn more about each character and their personal lives outside of the resistance. The muted and dark colour theme also suits the tone of the book and its sombre mood. I actually felt very saddened and will be reading up more about the White Rose. Thank you to NetGalley, the publisher and the author for an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    An odd yet powerful exploration of the underground resistance to Hitler. The art is dark and almost surreal while the text is formal and driven by literature and philosophy. But the urgent sense that these young people gave their lives to fight the monstrous Nazis is powerful enough to overcome weaknesses in the presentation. The letters at the end are a piece of history that should not be forgotten.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mags

    A good introduction to the aims of the White Rose organisation, although sometimes it's a little hard to tell (other than the Scholls) who is who. I do enjoy the unusual art style - half photograph, half drawing. I love that their leaflets are published at the back of the graphic novel, although I wish there was a bit of a discussion on the content and maybe some analysis into what they say. Recommended as an introduction to German resistance to the Nazis. A good introduction to the aims of the White Rose organisation, although sometimes it's a little hard to tell (other than the Scholls) who is who. I do enjoy the unusual art style - half photograph, half drawing. I love that their leaflets are published at the back of the graphic novel, although I wish there was a bit of a discussion on the content and maybe some analysis into what they say. Recommended as an introduction to German resistance to the Nazis.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    Historical Graphic Novels have become a guilty pleasure. It is such an interesting way to consume history and pieces like this are so poignant in doing so the art allows for such a more intriguing story to be told. This is a story I hadn't heard of before and found myself intrigued by, and I found myself immersed whole heartedly in this story of resistance and perseverance. The last page left goosebumps on my arms. Historical Graphic Novels have become a guilty pleasure. It is such an interesting way to consume history and pieces like this are so poignant in doing so the art allows for such a more intriguing story to be told. This is a story I hadn't heard of before and found myself intrigued by, and I found myself immersed whole heartedly in this story of resistance and perseverance. The last page left goosebumps on my arms.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Becky B

    Got 3/4 of the way through and gave up. I recommended that the publisher make some extensive edits before publication because the ARC was a bit dry, disjointed, and hard to follow. Disappointed because I think a graphic novel about the White Rose would be fantastic. I received an ARC from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rosalind

    This is a relevant book for today, with its message of speaking truth to power. The artwork is striking, and provides thoughtful portraits (literal and literary) of the characters in this inspiring true account. The color palette and the almost gritty texture are well suited to the mood of the story, and the translated pamphlets at the end are a valuable addition to the book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Laura Gorman

    This is an amazing historical graphic novel which tells one of the most interesting but less well known stories from the second world war. It recounts the journey the White Rose Movement went on to oppose the Nazi propaganda they came across. The illustrations are wonderful and the colour scheme fits the mood of the novel perfectly. Would 100% recommend this!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jodi Kryer

    This is a great book for anyone wanting to know about the White Rose. My only criticism is that the art style leaves a lot to be desired, but I understand why they went with a watercolor art style. It's just not for me. This is a great book for anyone wanting to know about the White Rose. My only criticism is that the art style leaves a lot to be desired, but I understand why they went with a watercolor art style. It's just not for me.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rolando José Rodríguez De León

    It's a good book, I learned a few things from it.The script is flatliner until the end, so don't expect much action. I did a Spanish review here: https://pananime.com/LeAn/Entries/202... It's a good book, I learned a few things from it.The script is flatliner until the end, so don't expect much action. I did a Spanish review here: https://pananime.com/LeAn/Entries/202...

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