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Love After the End: An Anthology of Two-Spirit and Indigiqueer Speculative Fiction

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Love After the End is a new young adult anthology edited by Joshua Whitehead (Lambda Literary Award winner, Jonny Appleseed) featuring short stories by Indigenous authors with Two-Spirit & Queer heroes, in utopian and dystopian settings. This is a sequel to the popular anthology, Love Beyond Body Space and Time (2019 AILA Youth Honor Book), and features several of the same Love After the End is a new young adult anthology edited by Joshua Whitehead (Lambda Literary Award winner, Jonny Appleseed) featuring short stories by Indigenous authors with Two-Spirit & Queer heroes, in utopian and dystopian settings. This is a sequel to the popular anthology, Love Beyond Body Space and Time (2019 AILA Youth Honor Book), and features several of the same authors returning, along with new voices!


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Love After the End is a new young adult anthology edited by Joshua Whitehead (Lambda Literary Award winner, Jonny Appleseed) featuring short stories by Indigenous authors with Two-Spirit & Queer heroes, in utopian and dystopian settings. This is a sequel to the popular anthology, Love Beyond Body Space and Time (2019 AILA Youth Honor Book), and features several of the same Love After the End is a new young adult anthology edited by Joshua Whitehead (Lambda Literary Award winner, Jonny Appleseed) featuring short stories by Indigenous authors with Two-Spirit & Queer heroes, in utopian and dystopian settings. This is a sequel to the popular anthology, Love Beyond Body Space and Time (2019 AILA Youth Honor Book), and features several of the same authors returning, along with new voices!

30 review for Love After the End: An Anthology of Two-Spirit and Indigiqueer Speculative Fiction

  1. 4 out of 5

    Danika at The Lesbrary

    As I was reading Love after the End, I was reminded just how colonialist SFF often is as a genre, whether it’s about “conquering new worlds” and literally establishing colonies, or centring Medieval England in fantasy stories, or just holding up white, straight, cis, male protagonists as the heroes. This collection is such a refreshing change of perspective. These stories include a relationship with the land that isn’t common in science fiction stories. They assume a greater responsibility for p As I was reading Love after the End, I was reminded just how colonialist SFF often is as a genre, whether it’s about “conquering new worlds” and literally establishing colonies, or centring Medieval England in fantasy stories, or just holding up white, straight, cis, male protagonists as the heroes. This collection is such a refreshing change of perspective. These stories include a relationship with the land that isn’t common in science fiction stories. They assume a greater responsibility for protecting the Earth than I’m used to from a dystopia. The question of whether to stay on a planet that’s been destroyed by (white, wealthy) human activity is very different here than in a typical white space travel story. There’s also an m/m romance story between a teenage boy and an AI who is also a cyberengineered super-intelligent rat! (In this story, same-sex relationships are accepted, but human/AI romantic relationships were the “the sort of thing that was whispered about, something that lived in the shadows.”) Full review at the Lesbrary.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mel (Epic Reading)

    The introduction alone, to this collection, has given me a lot to think on. From questioning what defines an apocalypse (one idea: Native Americans had theirs with colonialism and today is their dystopia), to understanding a bit more about how Native cultures have non-gender roles in their traditions, and what it means to be LGBTQ+ inside Native cultures. There is a lot to learn in these stories. Story #1 - Abacus by Nathan Adler A cute little love story between an AI and a human. Story #2 - Histor The introduction alone, to this collection, has given me a lot to think on. From questioning what defines an apocalypse (one idea: Native Americans had theirs with colonialism and today is their dystopia), to understanding a bit more about how Native cultures have non-gender roles in their traditions, and what it means to be LGBTQ+ inside Native cultures. There is a lot to learn in these stories. Story #1 - Abacus by Nathan Adler A cute little love story between an AI and a human. Story #2 - History of the New World by Adam Garnet Jones A lovely story of possible migration to another planet, and the inherent destructiveness of humans. “…we must always strive for balance. Above all else, our circle must be round.” Story #3 - The Ark of the Turtle’s Back by Jayne Simpson A unique melancholy feel to this story. Really enjoyed it and the idea that leaving the Earth would be impossible for those whom are connected to the land. Story #4 - How to Survive the Apocalypse for Native Girls by Kai Minosh Pyle A touching narrative about how a lesbian native girl copes to ‘fit in’ before she realizes that maybe she can make her own world to ‘fit’ into it. Story #5 - Andwanikadjigan by Gabriel Castilloux Calderon Say that title five times fast... or you know even once. A beautiful story about passing oral stories down the generational line. I imagine having a mark for every story I know. I’d strive to be a beautiful tattooed/marked girl whose original skin colour would be hidden. 😉 Story #6 - Story for a Bottle by Darcie Little Badger A wonderful story! Reminds me of the writing style of Paolo Bacigalupi. Well paced, evenly voiced; but clever science fiction dystopia. Story #7 - The Seed Children by Mari Kurisato I wonder if so many of these stories compare the indigenous to AIs, synthetics or other non-human entities because the tribes see themselves as so starkly different from the rest of the human race (or at least the majority of us). Another brilliant story that has a happy ending which is rare in sci-fi stories. Story #8 - Nameless by Nazbah Tom Dream communication is one of the many stories I heard as a child and understood to be a skill or talent only available to some people. It was always the Indigenous tribes that live on the edge of, or near my city. I remember being envious of them then; and I’m envious of them now after this story. Story #9 - Eloise by David A. Robertson This is like an episode of Black Mirror. In fact I think they should legit take this story and make into one. Brilliant, creepy and certainly worthy of thought. Would you rather get over someone or spend 400 virtual years forgetting them? Overall In a word: Fabulous! In all the ways and meanings of the word. This is a MUST read for any LGBTQ+ reader; and certainly a great introduction to two-spirit, Indigiqueer symbolism, placement in Indigenous culture, and where today these wonderful folks fit. I’m so thankful that Joshua Whitehead chose to participating in WordFest 2020 (virtual) in Calgary. It was a pleasure to listen to him speak and learn more about his background and literature.

  3. 4 out of 5

    sarah

    this is a PERFECT anthology, there is not a single thing wrong with it. EVERYONE READ THIS

  4. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    First and foremost: I am so happy that this anthology exists. I love when underrepresented voices get the chance to be heard. The fact that it was one of the best anthologies I've read this year was just the icing on the cake. On to the stories! 1. Abacus, by Nathan Adler. This had to be one of the most creative stories I've ever read. I mean, a bio-AI rat who, via his online avatar, falls in love with another boy? So original! Sadly, there were a couple issues that I'm still puzzling through. Firs First and foremost: I am so happy that this anthology exists. I love when underrepresented voices get the chance to be heard. The fact that it was one of the best anthologies I've read this year was just the icing on the cake. On to the stories! 1. Abacus, by Nathan Adler. This had to be one of the most creative stories I've ever read. I mean, a bio-AI rat who, via his online avatar, falls in love with another boy? So original! Sadly, there were a couple issues that I'm still puzzling through. First of all, I'm not sure how old the human protagonist is, but the way things are worded, he's quite young. Maybe thirteen/fourteen(ish)? And, well, an AI is non-aged, but still very much far more “adult” than the human. There's just a big power imbalance that I couldn't quite get past to allow me to enjoy the characters in a romantic relationship. And then there's... (view spoiler)[the fact that the AI expected the human boy/teen to run away with him, even though he's now a rogue AI who must live “underground” for a while....it just didn't seem right, expecting the teen boy to go along with him. I think it should have ended differently. The AI should have left him, or something. I think the setting and feel the story had before the romance began warranted a less fluffy, “HEA” ending. (hide spoiler)] RATING: 3 stars. 2. History of the World, by Adam Garnet Jones. Wow. I was blown away by this story. So many deep and interesting themes compounded into one short story—and they all fit so perfectly! Immigration, climate change, the horrors of our consumerist society, gender and racial identity . . . there was just so much, so many layers, and all of them beautifully woven in. This is a must-read story for everyone, in my opinion. (view spoiler)[My only gripe was I felt the big event (the other wife leaving, and the family separating toward the end) was a little ham-fisted in. But that's about it, I think. (hide spoiler)] RATING: 4.75 stars. Personal favorite of the anthology! 3. The Ark on the Turtle's Back, by Jaye Simpson. I couldn't really get into this story very well. There was so much summarized, rather than shown, and since it had a similar premise to the last story (evacuation off an apocalyptic Earth), it did not shine as much as it could have. To me there were too many characters to the point where it sometimes got confusing who was who. RATING: 2.5 stars. 4. How to Survive the Apocalypse for Native Girls, by Kai Minosh Pyle. I enjoyed this story a great deal. It had an interesting structure and several fascinating characters. I do feel that the narrator's friend, Migizi, was the true protagonist, and the story might have been a little more engaging if it had been told from their POV. But it was a good story as it was. RATING: 3.5 stars. 5. Andwànikàdjigan, by Gabriel Castilloux Calderon. A lovely tale about the power of stories, which is something I can always get behind. I really liked how the dual-timeline weaved together, adding more depth and background to the central story. It was handled very well, I thought. RATING: 4 stars. 6. Story for a Bottle, by Darcie Little Badger. This one was quite unique in several ways, one of which is how the story's told, via a letter sent to the protagonist's younger sibling. It was really neat, and didn't lessen the suspense of all that the protagonist went through...which was some pretty tense stuff. I was pleased that the story ended on a somewhat positive note—I was worried there for a while. I did feel that the medium did make the protagonist seem a little more passive than I would have liked. I think if it was taking place “in real time” we could have seen more of her resistance and felt more of her fear and the like. The emotions just weren't as tightly strung as I would have preferred. Still a very good little story. RATING: 4 stars. 7. Seed Children, by Mari Kurisato. This had to be the grimmest story in this anthology. Thankfully, much of what makes it so isn't on the page. In fact, this was a quick read. A quick, frightening dunk into cold water before we're passed off to a more optimistic conclusion. RATING: 3.5 stars. 8. Nameless, by Nazbah Tom. Really didn't care for this one. There just wasn't much of a story, in my opinion. And the writing was very monotonous and dull. RATING: 2 stars. 9. Eloise, by David A. Robertson. Despite being a more “literary” story, this one packed a surprising amount of suspense. Fascinating worldbuilding, too, having to do with the dangers of tech when it becomes so omnipresent that it takes over a person's life. The plot did feel a little ham-fisted in places, but the lovely writing and other aspects helped me overlook some of that. Overall, a lush, frightening look at a future I could honestly see happening some day. RATING: 4.5 stars. 4 stars for the anthology as a whole.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    An awesome, well-paced anthology collection! Highly recommend for fans of short fiction, speculative fiction with a hopeful edge (think the opposite of Black Mirror) and tons of queer content! Loved this one.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alanna Why

    “They kissed like the world was ending, but really, wasn’t it already over, and perhaps within this kiss lay a new beginning?” Love After The End is a short anthology of nine stories of speculative fiction, all written by two-spirit and indigiqueer writers, edited by Joshua Whitehead. This was a quick read, but also one that was very bold and creative. It was also filled with a lot of heart, as all of the stories are geared towards endings with utopias both big and small for queer Indigenous peop “They kissed like the world was ending, but really, wasn’t it already over, and perhaps within this kiss lay a new beginning?” Love After The End is a short anthology of nine stories of speculative fiction, all written by two-spirit and indigiqueer writers, edited by Joshua Whitehead. This was a quick read, but also one that was very bold and creative. It was also filled with a lot of heart, as all of the stories are geared towards endings with utopias both big and small for queer Indigenous peoples living through various apocalypses. My favourite stories were “Abacus” by Nathan Adler and “Story For A Bottle” by Darcie Little Badger, which both took on the question of human relationships with AI. Big recommend if you are into non-white and non-straight perspectives in science fiction, and I would also highly recommend reading Whitehead’s extremely moving novel Jonny Appleseed if you haven’t already. Please note: I received a free digital ARC of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    2TReads

    4.5/5 stars "Kinship is a two-sided coin, Nigig. You always gotta ask yourself, who is being excluded here?"- Migizi. 🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈 What caught my attention immediately from the tone of Joshua Whitehead's introduction was the intention of this anthology to be nothing other than deliberate, clear, and personal with the representation of indigiqueerness, the exploration of indigenous people's relationship with self, AI, environment, family, beliefs, violence, and experiences. 🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳 4.5/5 stars "Kinship is a two-sided coin, Nigig. You always gotta ask yourself, who is being excluded here?"- Migizi. 🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈 What caught my attention immediately from the tone of Joshua Whitehead's introduction was the intention of this anthology to be nothing other than deliberate, clear, and personal with the representation of indigiqueerness, the exploration of indigenous people's relationship with self, AI, environment, family, beliefs, violence, and experiences. 🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈 The authors brilliantly came together using the speculative story-telling format to imagine the future, teach lessons of acceptance, exclusion, violence against queer individuals, understanding, and survival, all while keeping Two-Spirit and Indigiqueers central. 🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈 These stories take us from Earth into space and new worlds, and along the way we see the consequences, misgivings, actions, journeys that have led to the altered surface of our world as we know it. Changes that can be compared to what indigenous people's have faced and are not unfamiliar with and which they are still fighting today. 🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈 Each story resonates with the love, respect, and dedication that indigenous people have for the Earth, the land that provides for and sustains them; their connection to both and to each other, making the characters vivid and bonded to their hi/stories. It was impossible not to be affected by these narratives. 🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈 Again central to every story is family, queerness, indigiqueerness, Two-Spiritedness, Earth, future paths, and how indigenous peoples have been honouring and living in harmony with the land and all its inhabitants for generations. 🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈 A Must Read. Thank you to Arsenal Pulp for this review copy. All thoughts are our own. Go buy, borrow, gift this anthology. 🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈 This is a resonant, relevant, oh so important collection of speculative fiction that truly represents indigenous peoples, their connection to mother earth, and how their past and present informs their interactions and visions for tomorrow.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rana

    While I didn't always understand what was going on, I don't think that it's my place to understand. And like all anthologies, loved some stories and was cold on others. Overall, a brilliant idea and I would love to see more from these authors. While I didn't always understand what was going on, I don't think that it's my place to understand. And like all anthologies, loved some stories and was cold on others. Overall, a brilliant idea and I would love to see more from these authors.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kasia

    Really interesting collection of short sci-fi stories. I don’t think I’ve read a book with so many queer, non-binary, trans POC - the stories were captivating and focused on love, connection, story-telling all written by indigenous writers and edited by Joshua Whitehead. Very very good.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Emma Vossen

    A great anthology. Story For a Bottle was my fav!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Anny Barros

    Abacus by Nathan Adler - 4/5 History of the New World by Adam Garnet Jones - 4.5/5 The Ark of the Turtle's Back by Jaye Simpson - 5/5 How to Survive The Apocalypse for Native Girls by Kai Minosh Pyle - 4/5 Andwànikàdjigan by Gabriel Castilloux Calderon - 4.5/5 Story for a Bottle by Darcie Little Badger - 4.5/5 Seed Children by Mari Kurisato - 3.5/5 Nameless by Nazbah Tom - 4.5/5 Eloise by David A. Robertson - 5/5 Abacus by Nathan Adler - 4/5 History of the New World by Adam Garnet Jones - 4.5/5 The Ark of the Turtle's Back by Jaye Simpson - 5/5 How to Survive The Apocalypse for Native Girls by Kai Minosh Pyle - 4/5 Andwànikàdjigan by Gabriel Castilloux Calderon - 4.5/5 Story for a Bottle by Darcie Little Badger - 4.5/5 Seed Children by Mari Kurisato - 3.5/5 Nameless by Nazbah Tom - 4.5/5 Eloise by David A. Robertson - 5/5

  12. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    This was a really fun speculative anthology with a focus on what happens after the end of the world through a queer indigenous lens. Like all collections some of these stories worked better for me than others but over all I really enjoyed the diversity of experiences in this collection and the different angles that were taken with this focus. My favorite story was the last one, Eloise, which had a very fun black mirror energy.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Abacus by Nathan Adler - 3/5 History of the New World by Adam Garnet Jones - 5/5 The Ark of the Turtle's Back by Jaye Simpson - 4/5 How to Survive The Apocalypse for Native Girls by Kai Minosh Pyle - 3/5 Andwànikàdjigan by Gabriel Castilloux Calderon - 5/5 Story for a Bottle by Darcie Little Badger - 4/5 Seed Children by Mari Kurisato - 4/5 Nameless by Nazbah Tom - 2/5 Eloise by David A. Robertson - 3/5 Abacus by Nathan Adler - 3/5 History of the New World by Adam Garnet Jones - 5/5 The Ark of the Turtle's Back by Jaye Simpson - 4/5 How to Survive The Apocalypse for Native Girls by Kai Minosh Pyle - 3/5 Andwànikàdjigan by Gabriel Castilloux Calderon - 5/5 Story for a Bottle by Darcie Little Badger - 4/5 Seed Children by Mari Kurisato - 4/5 Nameless by Nazbah Tom - 2/5 Eloise by David A. Robertson - 3/5

  14. 4 out of 5

    Eli Poteet

    epic! amazing!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Shay

    I still don't really know what to say about this book. It was good, it was different, it defied expectations... Not the style of story I'm used to; the 4 instead of a 5 comes from my personal feeling of a lack of plot development/no building tension to any kind of climax. Which is not a critique of the quality of any of the stories, just something that kept me from enjoying them fully. The very lack of the "typical" story structure made me wonder if it's just a disconnect across cultures, if the I still don't really know what to say about this book. It was good, it was different, it defied expectations... Not the style of story I'm used to; the 4 instead of a 5 comes from my personal feeling of a lack of plot development/no building tension to any kind of climax. Which is not a critique of the quality of any of the stories, just something that kept me from enjoying them fully. The very lack of the "typical" story structure made me wonder if it's just a disconnect across cultures, if the writing is not enough to evoke in me what it can for others because I'm not familiar with the intricacies of the cultures that are featured in these stories. Which is no fault of the stories or their authors and can only be changed by educating myself. But it also made me wonder if Indigenous story telling is a little different in structure than your "typical" story structure with 3 acts, rising tension, etc. Oral story telling is strongly interwoven with many Indigenous cultures, and morals come through these stories. In a course I took about Indigenous history, it was explained that instead of telling a child what is expected vs not, many cultures will tell a story instead and let the child figure out what to make of it, let the child experiment and find out on their own what is right or wrong. Stories with morals are not as focused on plot because they center around symbols instead, and I did feel these stories were loaded with symbols. Names, deities, cultures, climate, apocalypse, aliens, society, etc etc. I was reading these stories for pleasure and something new to experience, but I'm sure a closer eye would show just how loaded with symbol and teaching these stories are (on top of what you gather from the title and Whitehead's forward). In short, I think it's just a different style of storytelling than I'm used to, and it was cool to read something that made me question the very structure of stories, which I thought had been one of very few truly universal things.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Pat

    Nice thing about collections of short stories is that if you don't enjoy one, you're sure to enjoy the next. Some very sweet romances here, made less cloying (Im not much of a romance reader) by the acid that a good apocalypse provides. Most of the apocalypses (what is the plural of "apocalypse"?) involve climate change, which really, really works here, given the history of the Americas. (The cover on the ebook I read apparently is the one on the paperback edition. I like the blend of weird, futu Nice thing about collections of short stories is that if you don't enjoy one, you're sure to enjoy the next. Some very sweet romances here, made less cloying (Im not much of a romance reader) by the acid that a good apocalypse provides. Most of the apocalypses (what is the plural of "apocalypse"?) involve climate change, which really, really works here, given the history of the Americas. (The cover on the ebook I read apparently is the one on the paperback edition. I like the blend of weird, futuristic figures and the stereotypical "chief" with the 19th-century, Bierstadt-ic landscape.) There are lot of Anishinaabe writers included, which makes sense, given that the book is published by a Canadian publisher. I would have appreciated definitions of a number of words, because I'm not sure I got the correct understanding of words like "Anishinaabeg" and "Anishinaabek." One thing I really like about anthologies is finding writers new to me. Some of stories I enjoyed the most: "Abacus," by Nathan Adler, with a budding romance that transcends just about every boundary imaginable (don't want to spoil it for anybody); "How to Survive the Apocalypse for Native Girls," by Kai Minosh Pyle, which tells its story in a list of useful information and reminds us to stay wary of those in power; and "Story for a Bottle," by Darcie Little Badger, which knocks seasteading on its ass and plays with the idea of bottles (a story in a bottle written by an individual trapped in a bigger bottle). Some of the other stories got a little cartoonish, but all were interesting. I'm glad I found this.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alison

    There are some outstanding stories in this anthology. I particularly like How to Survive the Apocalypse for Native Girls by Kai Minosh Pyle, and Adam Garnet Jones' History of the New World, both of which built very strong central character-driven stories. Darcie Little Badger's Story for a Bottle was tautly drawn and highly satisfying. As an anthology, I'm not entirely sure it works. Turns out there are only so many apocalypses I can keep straight in a single book, and I wondered if a broader foc There are some outstanding stories in this anthology. I particularly like How to Survive the Apocalypse for Native Girls by Kai Minosh Pyle, and Adam Garnet Jones' History of the New World, both of which built very strong central character-driven stories. Darcie Little Badger's Story for a Bottle was tautly drawn and highly satisfying. As an anthology, I'm not entirely sure it works. Turns out there are only so many apocalypses I can keep straight in a single book, and I wondered if a broader focus, and hence a more varied reading experience, might have allowed each author to breathe a bit more.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Arryn

    This collection was curated so well. I enjoyed all of the stories and I loved the ways each author explored love and connection through out each story. Speculative fiction has quickly become one of my favourite genres and one I hope to pick up more in the future. I will definitley be picking up more works by the authors featured in this collection.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Emma Ito

    i recently read love after the end: an anthology of two-spirit & indigiqueer speculative fiction edited by joshua whitehead & i absolutely LOVED it 🔥. i definitely recommend this one, especially if you are into sci-fi/dystopic. this anthology is written by a number of 2SQ Indigenous writers from across turtle island (including darcie little badger, who wrote my favorite 2020 read, elatsoe!). each story was imaginative & provocative & gave me a lot to think about, especially on settler colonialism i recently read love after the end: an anthology of two-spirit & indigiqueer speculative fiction edited by joshua whitehead & i absolutely LOVED it 🔥. i definitely recommend this one, especially if you are into sci-fi/dystopic. this anthology is written by a number of 2SQ Indigenous writers from across turtle island (including darcie little badger, who wrote my favorite 2020 read, elatsoe!). each story was imaginative & provocative & gave me a lot to think about, especially on settler colonialism. from the back - “readers will discover bioengineered AI rats, transplanted trees in space, the rise of a 2SQ resistance camp, a primer on how to survive Indigiqueerly, virtual reality applications, mother ships at sea [one of my favorite stories in this!], and the very bending of space-time continuums queered through NDN time.”

  20. 4 out of 5

    Erica Skye

    An absolute gem of a book. A collection of short stories from a two spirit and indigiqueer perspective all pretty much following how each set of characters would do after the apocalypse. All the stories were extremely hopeful and sort of served as a redo where indigenous people were left alone and able to start over and live without interference from colonizers and how the world was much better off for it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    Hard tw if you can't do apocalyptic stories right now. Even though this was short, it took me a long time to finish because of the content Hard tw if you can't do apocalyptic stories right now. Even though this was short, it took me a long time to finish because of the content

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    4.5 stars "Our circle must be round." A beautifully written, haunting collection of short stories featuring Two-Spirit and Indigiqueer characters. This collection of stories had aspects of speculative fiction, science fiction, and ecofiction themes. My favorite stories were "Story for a Bottle" and "History of the New World." For fans of Ted Chiang. 4.5 stars "Our circle must be round." A beautifully written, haunting collection of short stories featuring Two-Spirit and Indigiqueer characters. This collection of stories had aspects of speculative fiction, science fiction, and ecofiction themes. My favorite stories were "Story for a Bottle" and "History of the New World." For fans of Ted Chiang.

  23. 4 out of 5

    James Resendes

    “What does it mean to search for romance at a pipeline protest — can we have intimacy during doomsday?” Yes, these stories work to decolonize a genre ripe with settler ideals, centering caretakers instead of explorers, reaching toward the utopia of indigiqueer futurisms. But more than that, they focus on the LOVE and JOY of these communities, and that's what makes them so refreshing. Are they perfect? Nah, but did it matter? Nahhhh. "Tomorrow will be kinder." “What does it mean to search for romance at a pipeline protest — can we have intimacy during doomsday?” Yes, these stories work to decolonize a genre ripe with settler ideals, centering caretakers instead of explorers, reaching toward the utopia of indigiqueer futurisms. But more than that, they focus on the LOVE and JOY of these communities, and that's what makes them so refreshing. Are they perfect? Nah, but did it matter? Nahhhh. "Tomorrow will be kinder."

  24. 5 out of 5

    Maura

    I backed this anthology through a Kickstarter campaign several months ago, and it's been very exciting to see this all come together and arrive at my doorstep! These sci-fi short stories are all by Indigenous authors and feature main characters who are queer and/or Two Spirit. If you aren't familiar with Indigenous culture or the term Two Spirit, please know that you will be expected to do your own research before, during, and after reading. These authors are not going to do the heavy lifting fo I backed this anthology through a Kickstarter campaign several months ago, and it's been very exciting to see this all come together and arrive at my doorstep! These sci-fi short stories are all by Indigenous authors and feature main characters who are queer and/or Two Spirit. If you aren't familiar with Indigenous culture or the term Two Spirit, please know that you will be expected to do your own research before, during, and after reading. These authors are not going to do the heavy lifting for you, so come prepared to listen and use context clues and Google to learn more about certain terms or experiences you may be unfamiliar with. As with any short story collection, especially one where every tale was written by a different author, I enjoyed some of the stories more than others. The most compelling facet of the collection for me was the wide range of utopias and dystopias and the varying levels of impact technology has on these worlds. Indigenous languages were beautifully interwoven into the stories as well. And of course, many of the characters were queer so it was great to see that representation! I think this was a great reading choice for the month of love and I'm glad my reward was delivered in time for February.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    an excellent anthology. of course, as with any collection, some of these stories I enjoyed more than others, but overall I had a great time entering these worlds and I look forward to reading more from many of the authors!!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ada

    ***WHO SUCKED ME IN*** Kazen of Always Doing on YouTube in their Most Anticipated Reads || October 2020 || Always Doing video published on 27 sept. 2020 Stories by indigenious people without the focus being on pain? Sign me up. I hope it will be stories in which love is the main part and not the massive generational trauma because of colonialism. Which has it's place but somehow I never want that in front and center in my romances. Escapisme ftw 😬. ***WHO SUCKED ME IN*** Kazen of Always Doing on YouTube in their Most Anticipated Reads || October 2020 || Always Doing video published on 27 sept. 2020 Stories by indigenious people without the focus being on pain? Sign me up. I hope it will be stories in which love is the main part and not the massive generational trauma because of colonialism. Which has it's place but somehow I never want that in front and center in my romances. Escapisme ftw 😬.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kara

    i liked this collection! connected with some stories more than others but that’s fairly typical in a multi author collection imo. would seek out more work from any of them individually.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Aiden

    Really enjoyed reading this collection! The stories are brilliant and fresh.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Antoine Dumas

    There's some really great stories in here. I particularly enjoyed "Nameless" by Nazbah Tom and "Abacus" by Nathan Adler. There's some really great stories in here. I particularly enjoyed "Nameless" by Nazbah Tom and "Abacus" by Nathan Adler.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Micaela

    standouts: “nameless”, “story for a bottle”, honorable mention “how to survive the apocalypse for native girls”

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