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I Am These Truths: A Memoir of Identity, Justice, and Living Between Worlds

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The Emmy Award winner, co-host of The View, and ABC News senior legal correspondent chronicles her journey from growing up in a South Bronx housing project to becoming an assistant U.S. attorney and journalist in this powerful memoir that offers an intimate and unique look at identity, intolerance, and injustice. As a child in the South Bronx who spent her earliest years in The Emmy Award winner, co-host of The View, and ABC News senior legal correspondent chronicles her journey from growing up in a South Bronx housing project to becoming an assistant U.S. attorney and journalist in this powerful memoir that offers an intimate and unique look at identity, intolerance, and injustice. As a child in the South Bronx who spent her earliest years in tenements and public housing, Sunny Hostin understands poverty intimately. As a mother of a black son, she deplores the scourge of police violence erasing the lives of too many black boys and men. As a biracial woman, she has a unique vantage point on identity, and the shades between black and white. I Am These Truths blends her compelling chronicle of her personal journey with her reflections on the high-stakes cases and stories she has worked on as a journalist and prosecutor. As the child of teenaged parents, Sunny escaped the violence of her childhood through hard work, some luck, and a college scholarship that led her to law school, where she became an assistant U.S. attorney in Washington D.C. Transitioning to journalism, she was the first national reporter to cover Trayvon Martin’s death—which her producers erroneously believed was “just a local story.” Today, at the top echelons of news and entertainment, Sunny fights for social justice and giving voice to the “other”—those forgotten and marginalized Americans. Inspiring and informative, I Am These Truths offers encouragement to those on the verge of giving up their dreams and implores us to rethink our biases—to not underestimate someone because of their gender, dismiss another because of their ethnicity, or prejudge someone because of their economic circumstances. Her life is proof of what each and every one of us can achieve, given the support and opportunity.


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The Emmy Award winner, co-host of The View, and ABC News senior legal correspondent chronicles her journey from growing up in a South Bronx housing project to becoming an assistant U.S. attorney and journalist in this powerful memoir that offers an intimate and unique look at identity, intolerance, and injustice. As a child in the South Bronx who spent her earliest years in The Emmy Award winner, co-host of The View, and ABC News senior legal correspondent chronicles her journey from growing up in a South Bronx housing project to becoming an assistant U.S. attorney and journalist in this powerful memoir that offers an intimate and unique look at identity, intolerance, and injustice. As a child in the South Bronx who spent her earliest years in tenements and public housing, Sunny Hostin understands poverty intimately. As a mother of a black son, she deplores the scourge of police violence erasing the lives of too many black boys and men. As a biracial woman, she has a unique vantage point on identity, and the shades between black and white. I Am These Truths blends her compelling chronicle of her personal journey with her reflections on the high-stakes cases and stories she has worked on as a journalist and prosecutor. As the child of teenaged parents, Sunny escaped the violence of her childhood through hard work, some luck, and a college scholarship that led her to law school, where she became an assistant U.S. attorney in Washington D.C. Transitioning to journalism, she was the first national reporter to cover Trayvon Martin’s death—which her producers erroneously believed was “just a local story.” Today, at the top echelons of news and entertainment, Sunny fights for social justice and giving voice to the “other”—those forgotten and marginalized Americans. Inspiring and informative, I Am These Truths offers encouragement to those on the verge of giving up their dreams and implores us to rethink our biases—to not underestimate someone because of their gender, dismiss another because of their ethnicity, or prejudge someone because of their economic circumstances. Her life is proof of what each and every one of us can achieve, given the support and opportunity.

30 review for I Am These Truths: A Memoir of Identity, Justice, and Living Between Worlds

  1. 4 out of 5

    Living My Best Book Life

    I Am These Truths is one of my favorite reads of 2020. It's an impactful and empowering memoir that details how Sunny Hostin became the person that she is today. I have been a fan of hers for some time always appreciating her genuine nature and tenacity to fight for justice and equality. Her memoir will give fans and readers an insight into her past and present in a way that is truly inspiring. As I started reading the first few pages, I was captivated. I am a fan of Sunny's but I admit that I di I Am These Truths is one of my favorite reads of 2020. It's an impactful and empowering memoir that details how Sunny Hostin became the person that she is today. I have been a fan of hers for some time always appreciating her genuine nature and tenacity to fight for justice and equality. Her memoir will give fans and readers an insight into her past and present in a way that is truly inspiring. As I started reading the first few pages, I was captivated. I am a fan of Sunny's but I admit that I didn't know much about her background. I learned so much about her that I didn't know before which made me feel so many emotions. I felt sad for the young girl that had to witness hard times, I felt proud when her parents believed in the importance of her education and dedication to provide for her, I felt happy when she talked about her marriage and children, and so much more. As a Latinx woman, I appreciate all the work that she has done and continues to do and applaud her even more for never giving up on her dreams. According to some people, a bi-racial woman like Sunny shouldn't be successful. But Sunny proved all her doubters wrong. She brings up the topic of race in this book to celebrate her Puerto Rican and African American roots. When she talked about all the racial prejudice she faced, I felt disheartened because I understand how it feels to be disregarded because of the color of our skin. The sad truth is that because of that prejudice so many give up because they feel like that is the only option. Instead of giving up Sunny reminded herself of the people who believed in her like her teacher, her parents, and friends. And the wonderful thing about her never give up attitude is that she paved the way for so many. Like I mentioned previously, Sunny is bi-racial being both Puerto Rican and African American. Culture is such a huge part of her life and to be proud of her background was sometimes frowned upon. Many people pressured her to pick one or the other. Why couldn't she be both? In some cases, when it came to reporting or jobs she either wasn't too black enough or Latina enough. I love that she embraced her culture. Even when some friends questioned her or asked her if she was really Latina, she handled it with class. Readers will get to see how Sunny became a prosecutor, reporter, TV personality, and journalist, but one of the most beautiful parts of the story was when she talked about her family. At the beginning of the book, we see her relationship with her family and how important it is to her. Even when she left the Bronx, her family could never be too far away. There is a part of the book where she talks about starting a family with her husband. She details the struggles with conceiving. The love she has for children is exponential and to see the lengths she went through to have her two children brought tears to my eyes. Paloma and Gabriel are so lucky to call this strong and fierce woman, mom. I give I Am These Truths 5 stars. This was an absolute page-turner and must-read. I appreciate Sunny's honesty and openness because it wasn't always sunshine and rainbows. By Sunny telling her truth, she's able to inspire so many people of color and remind us that our dreams are possible. We can achieve anything if we fight for our truth and happiness.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Savannah

    Disclaimer: I received an uncorrected proof of I Am These Truths from HarperOne. I watch The View semi-regularly and Sunny has always been my favorite host. I find that she is consistently clear-headed and makes really great arguments. I knew a little about her from anecdotes she tells during segments on the show but was not familiar with her past work prior to reading this book. I came away impressed by her motivation, talent, and commitment while pursuing different career paths. More than halfwa Disclaimer: I received an uncorrected proof of I Am These Truths from HarperOne. I watch The View semi-regularly and Sunny has always been my favorite host. I find that she is consistently clear-headed and makes really great arguments. I knew a little about her from anecdotes she tells during segments on the show but was not familiar with her past work prior to reading this book. I came away impressed by her motivation, talent, and commitment while pursuing different career paths. More than halfway through the memoir, Sunny emphasizes this idea that one of the most important days of someone's life is when they find out what their purpose is. She later comes to the realization that advocating for social justice and being a truth teller were her callings. Her passion for social issues really shines throughout the book. I thought two chapters that concern racial, ethnic, and class identities, "I Am What I Am" and "Trayvon", were standouts. In comparison, I did not find Sunny's accounts of her academic experience and legal career as interesting, although I do not know much about the law world. My other critique is that the organization of the chapters was not entirely chronological, and I think reorganizing some parts may benefit the story more. I didn't feel like I was able to keep clear track of Sunny's career path, for example. But overall I really enjoyed this read! I Am These Truths evoked a lot of strong emotions in me and only increased my admiration for Asuncion. The language used throughout is well-crafted (it's almost as if Mrs. Hostin used to write carefully-worded legal documents, lol) and I felt like she gave me excellent insight into unfamiliar worlds. I was able to breeze through the book because it kept me interested. I will recommend it to my friends upon its eventual publication in the fall!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    ..Over and over again, we have seen the weaponization of race against black people in our country. Driving while black, barbecuing while black, shopping while black, bird waching while black: Living while black may lead to confrontation, police intervention, death. Whhere the innocent are assumed guilty, because of the color of their skin. hope to see a reckoning,. Real introspection combined with real action. Because of what is going on from the street, to the classroom, to housing, to financia ..Over and over again, we have seen the weaponization of race against black people in our country. Driving while black, barbecuing while black, shopping while black, bird waching while black: Living while black may lead to confrontation, police intervention, death. Whhere the innocent are assumed guilty, because of the color of their skin. hope to see a reckoning,. Real introspection combined with real action. Because of what is going on from the street, to the classroom, to housing, to financial credit, to hospitals to the newsoom- it has to stop. Now. I enjoyed what I read for the most part, it was basically about Hostin upbringing and the inequalites that she faced as a mixed race. I don't know much about her other than seeing a few clips from the View and CNN, but I always admired her voice to tackle issues on race and discrimination. I loved how she overcame her obstacles and paid tribute to the people that paved her way. The pictures that accompanied the book was a nice touch, you can tell that she really loves her family and she will do anything to protect them. Amazing novel with themes of race, justice and lberation in america.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dominique

    Real, Raw, Real, Unique, Real, Truth. This book was more than what I expected it to be. I've watched Sunny for years on The View and her way of explaining things and the knowledge she has, has always been inspiring. I'm glad I listened and purchased the physical book. Very enlightening. Must Read. A Great Read. Real, Raw, Real, Unique, Real, Truth. This book was more than what I expected it to be. I've watched Sunny for years on The View and her way of explaining things and the knowledge she has, has always been inspiring. I'm glad I listened and purchased the physical book. Very enlightening. Must Read. A Great Read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tenner A

    I really wanted to like this book, actually, I really wanted to like Sunny. But, alas, she's quite the whiny narcissist. By the the time I had finished the book, I realized I missed a chance to keep count on how many times she'd referred to herself as "beautiful", and, "exceptionally bright"/straight A student...Oh, and how so-and-so just couldn't BELIEVE she was part Latina until they heard her speak Spanish...And, always suspicious that she was turned down/passed over for jobs simply bc of her I really wanted to like this book, actually, I really wanted to like Sunny. But, alas, she's quite the whiny narcissist. By the the time I had finished the book, I realized I missed a chance to keep count on how many times she'd referred to herself as "beautiful", and, "exceptionally bright"/straight A student...Oh, and how so-and-so just couldn't BELIEVE she was part Latina until they heard her speak Spanish...And, always suspicious that she was turned down/passed over for jobs simply bc of her ethnic background. Nope, it's solely due to her off putting attitude and personality. And, the WHINING!!! Waiting for The VIEW to show you The EXIT..Your ongoing complaints about your friggin dressing room, you should've been embarrased writing about it, I was actually embarrassed for YOU!!! So, maybe the veterans didn't want you near them, oh yea, they're intimidated by your beauty and exceptional brilliance!!! Augh!!!! Learn to be humble, get off that high horse and people WILL respect you!!! Just my 2 cents....

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kingtchalla83

    Sonny Hostin crossed my radar due to her coverage of Trayvon Martin and George Zimmerman on CNN. Hostin was the only journalist at the time challenging the prevailing narrative about Trayon, which set the blueprint for character assassination of the dead to justify extrajudicial killings of unarmed Black people. Hostin argued with a passion and zeal I found lacking from other journalists that adopted a prosaic approach absent of nuance. Each time I watched her argue a point, she took the words o Sonny Hostin crossed my radar due to her coverage of Trayvon Martin and George Zimmerman on CNN. Hostin was the only journalist at the time challenging the prevailing narrative about Trayon, which set the blueprint for character assassination of the dead to justify extrajudicial killings of unarmed Black people. Hostin argued with a passion and zeal I found lacking from other journalists that adopted a prosaic approach absent of nuance. Each time I watched her argue a point, she took the words out of my word. Hostin spoke for the voiceless and written off urban communities across the nation. I became a fan. 🐓 Sunny Hostin I Am These Truths: A Memoir of Identity, Justice, and Living Between Worlds examines Hostin’s place in the world as she comes of age. She details living in the Bronx and being poor. The importance of education in her home resulted in Hostin being skipped from the 2nd grade to the 5th. She entered high school at 12 and graduated at 16. Wow. She expounds upon being African American and Puerto Rican and the erasure of her dual identities. Hostin speaks Spanish, cooks arroz con gradules or pernil or pollo guisado, and her Grandmother was a Bruja. On the other hand, Hostin cooks collard greens, turkey necks, and loves soul music. She wanted to be a journalist, but her watershed moment occurred when she served as a juror on The Butcher of Tompkins Square Park case. It set Hostin on the path to become a lawyer. Eventually, she transitioned to broadcast news and described her rocky rise to prominence. The most challenging chapter to read was Motherhood. Whew. 🐓 Sunny’s memoir was highly entertaining and informative. It provided a unique perspective about prosecutors and how crucial it is to be in the room where it happens to affect the system from the inside out. 🐓 Favorite: "I think there are three defining days in your life. Besides day one, when you are born, and the day when you discover your purpose, I believe there is a day in between. And that is the moment when you find out who you will not be, who you will not become. Your day two." 🐓🐓🐓🐓🐓 5 chickens

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sandie Bell

    Loved this. Well written. From the heart and both heartwarming and heart-wrenching at times. I remember Sunny from Court TV and love watching The View. Thank you for sharing your most personal stories with us.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    I'm so glad I read Hostin's Memoir. Excellent read. I'm so glad I read Hostin's Memoir. Excellent read.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    I won a free copy of this book during BookCon thanks to HarperOne in exchange for an honest review. All opinions expressed are solely my own. In this memoir we follow Hostin’s life from growing up in the South Bronx in poverty to her journey to law school and into her career as a legal journalist. She was one of the first to report on Trayvon Martin’s death. We follow the case, how it impacted her, and how she came to use her platform to speak out for equality and justice. She touched on the adve I won a free copy of this book during BookCon thanks to HarperOne in exchange for an honest review. All opinions expressed are solely my own. In this memoir we follow Hostin’s life from growing up in the South Bronx in poverty to her journey to law school and into her career as a legal journalist. She was one of the first to report on Trayvon Martin’s death. We follow the case, how it impacted her, and how she came to use her platform to speak out for equality and justice. She touched on the adversity she’s had to overcome–both personally and professionally. This book was really interesting. Honestly, I hadn’t heard much about Hostin so it was fascinating to read about all of the things that she’s done and accomplished. It was a little eye-opening—where have I been the last 2 decades!? I’m ashamed to admit I don’t remember hearing of her. Reading about her life’s journey was inspiring. I really appreciate that she took her life experiences and used them to help connect with people during her career. I love that she is using her position of influence to stand up for equality and justice for minorities. Not only does she share her professional life, she shared her personal life as well. We learned how hard her parents worked so that she could have a better future, a work ethic she inherited. Even when she was a lawyer or on TV, she constantly worked to make sure she got things perfect. We learned about her family’s traditions and beliefs. We were privy to her struggles with fertility. She shared the indignities she often suffered from others for various things, including her race and her talent. Overall I recommend this book. I think this memoir is one that is timely and Hostin’s story is important.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    I am now a fan of Asunción! Her story was so relatable and honest. I don’t watch television or know her shows. Apparently she’s a lawyer, tv personality, and journalist. She talks a lot about being Afro Latina, colorism, and her fight for social justice for people of color. I loved this book so much I think I am in love with her! I think is so important to hear her story during National Hispanic Heritage Month but especially at a time when Black women are so under valued in this country. And not I am now a fan of Asunción! Her story was so relatable and honest. I don’t watch television or know her shows. Apparently she’s a lawyer, tv personality, and journalist. She talks a lot about being Afro Latina, colorism, and her fight for social justice for people of color. I loved this book so much I think I am in love with her! I think is so important to hear her story during National Hispanic Heritage Month but especially at a time when Black women are so under valued in this country. And not to mention she is a phenomenal woman who has accomplished a lot!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia Chambliss

    Very Relatable Even though the theme throughout the her story began with lack of acceptance because she is biracial, I found other relatable issues dealing with finding the confidence to believe she was not only good enough but exceeded expectations and able to find success on her own terms.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kary

    Wow I’m always fascinated by people who attend high school and college at young ages. It was interesting reading about not being black enough in the black community or Latina enough in the Latin community. It’s nice to get an inside look into the personality of someone I see on tv everyday and how important it is to her to be prepared for every interview she does.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Renee

    Sunny has led a very interesting life and has a very knowledgeable grasp on the law and the improvements that need to be made in the U.S.A. As far as racial equality. Very enjoyable & entertaining read.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

    I a long time fan of the view, and I enjoyed listening to Sunny Hostin tell her life story.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Madlyn

    Sunny I was enlightened to learn how difficult at times it was for you to figure out how to fit in around a circle of family, friends, jobs and relationships by being biracial. Your story in living a life of two worlds mixed with Latino and black American.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kari

    I admit I rolled my eyes a few times at the name dropping and her not so casual attempts at a casual mention of her BMW, Mercedes, large home, big salary, etc. But, mostly I found this an interesting and honest portrayal of what it is like for her as the daughter of a Puerto Rican mother and African American father. She openly address what it is like to be caught between what others perceive as two different worlds and the need for others try to put her into one box or the other.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    I enjoy watching "The View" most days. I like all the hosts, but Sonny interests me the most. One day she would talk about being a Latina. On another, she claimed to be Afro American, and then she said her grandfather was Jewish. I found all of that interesting. How could she possibly have so much in her background? Then after the terrible hurricane in Puerto Rico, she talked about going there to help and to check on her relatives. Every time she gave a little bit about her background, I felt my I enjoy watching "The View" most days. I like all the hosts, but Sonny interests me the most. One day she would talk about being a Latina. On another, she claimed to be Afro American, and then she said her grandfather was Jewish. I found all of that interesting. How could she possibly have so much in her background? Then after the terrible hurricane in Puerto Rico, she talked about going there to help and to check on her relatives. Every time she gave a little bit about her background, I felt myself more and more interested. So, when this book came out, I wanted to read it, and I have enjoyed it. From her childhood in an interracial family to her hosting job at "The view," Sunny's life has been full of adventures and challenges. She has gone from the South Bronx to Westchester County, New York. All challenges have brought her confidence to live her life trying to reach her many goals both personal and professional. I enjoyed the book, found it easy to read, and would recommend it to anyone interested in Sunny's journey.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Debra

    Sunny has had a very interesting life and still is going strong!!! She is a beautiful young educated very intelligent woman. I love her on the View, she is honest and forthright with her comments, oh and always well prepared. Very good read!!!!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Betty Seaman

    What a powerful, riveting story! Now I know why I love this gal on The View! All the diversity and racism she encountered while growing up and how she chose to deal with it. Very insightful and inspiring. A must read especially in these times.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Slusher

    Absolutely fabulous! Authentic and pure

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany

    I really enjoyed this in depth look at Sunny Hostin's life. I always enjoyed her on The View but never knew the story that makes her, her. She discusses her challenges and triumphs growing up as biracial, a Latina and an African American women and how she is still having to prove or defend her identity to this day. It was reassuring to also read about her mistakes in the professional world and celebrate her successes that most of us see today. I really enjoyed this in depth look at Sunny Hostin's life. I always enjoyed her on The View but never knew the story that makes her, her. She discusses her challenges and triumphs growing up as biracial, a Latina and an African American women and how she is still having to prove or defend her identity to this day. It was reassuring to also read about her mistakes in the professional world and celebrate her successes that most of us see today.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Erika Soveranes

    Amazing! A truly emotional rollercoaster about intersectionality issues facing a biracial woman in what is perceived as a progressive American society. Asunción is relatable, strong willed, vulnerable, intelligent, and a woman of deeply rooted values. Her journey reminds me of the Hamilton line “if you stand for nothing, what’ll you fall for?” because after trying to fit into a mold of what she thought people wanted, she truly found herself when she found her own voice. She found what she was wi Amazing! A truly emotional rollercoaster about intersectionality issues facing a biracial woman in what is perceived as a progressive American society. Asunción is relatable, strong willed, vulnerable, intelligent, and a woman of deeply rooted values. Her journey reminds me of the Hamilton line “if you stand for nothing, what’ll you fall for?” because after trying to fit into a mold of what she thought people wanted, she truly found herself when she found her own voice. She found what she was willing to fall for. Truly one of my newest favorite reads!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Marquitta Harlan

    Sunny invites us into her world. She discloses the difficulty that she had getting to where she is today. She includes us into the ins and out of the tv industry. This book is an honest account of her truth and reality.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Eileen E Walborn

    We are all these truths I bought this book because I started watching The View recently and was impressed by Sunny's composure and clarity whenever she spoke and the truth of her words was sobering. I grew up in Birmingham during the late fifties early sixties. I was raised Catholic and walked to Our Lady of Sorrows Catholic school with my youngest sister. I was 12 when the 16th Ave Street Baptist Church was bombed. I couldn't understand why anyone would bomb a church. My dad said it was because t We are all these truths I bought this book because I started watching The View recently and was impressed by Sunny's composure and clarity whenever she spoke and the truth of her words was sobering. I grew up in Birmingham during the late fifties early sixties. I was raised Catholic and walked to Our Lady of Sorrows Catholic school with my youngest sister. I was 12 when the 16th Ave Street Baptist Church was bombed. I couldn't understand why anyone would bomb a church. My dad said it was because they were the N word. My mom confirmed for me that it WAS wrong and my catechism was correct, we are ALL the children of God, red, yellow, blue, brown, green, black, orange or purple. That's how I raised my kids and I am so proud of them both for how they have handled the prejudices they have faced. Sunny's fear for her children is heartbreaking and ANGRY-making: No woman should have that fear in this country and too many do. One can only hope that the new batch of young people will go on to change the law and attitudes so that we ALL may be free. Sunny is my new hero!! Long may she fight!!!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Darlene

    The View has always been as good as a cup of coffee to wake up to in the morning. I've watched since the inception with Barbara Walters and the rest. So I had to grab this Audible book. I have seen Sunny Hostin grow on this show. I've seen her change a stance or two as she learned from the ladies or just time and news on her own. Not in a way that is wishy-washy but with knowledge and grace to see another side. To me that makes her one of the strongest women on the show. She doesn't shout at the The View has always been as good as a cup of coffee to wake up to in the morning. I've watched since the inception with Barbara Walters and the rest. So I had to grab this Audible book. I have seen Sunny Hostin grow on this show. I've seen her change a stance or two as she learned from the ladies or just time and news on her own. Not in a way that is wishy-washy but with knowledge and grace to see another side. To me that makes her one of the strongest women on the show. She doesn't shout at the others, she isn't rude to her elders. She is a shining example of what we all should be as we interact with others who might not have similar points of view. In this book, Sunny shows us her life and how she became who she is now. I loved the whole book. I hope you get the chance to read or listen to it. Sunny narrates the Audible version and I find that makes it like she's right in the room telling her story.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Eff Emm

    I'm not sure what I expected, exactly. I appreciated hearing Sunny's story and am proud of her and the students she's made. It seemed...shallow. I suspect that is probably more related to her matter-of-fact delivery than anything else. I appreciated her openness about her experiences trying to make a television name for herself and the divide between who she is and who other people think she is. It was not boring, and I will probably actually think of many of her stories from time to time, but the I'm not sure what I expected, exactly. I appreciated hearing Sunny's story and am proud of her and the students she's made. It seemed...shallow. I suspect that is probably more related to her matter-of-fact delivery than anything else. I appreciated her openness about her experiences trying to make a television name for herself and the divide between who she is and who other people think she is. It was not boring, and I will probably actually think of many of her stories from time to time, but the writing want very memorable. I already knew that I liked her, that she was an Afro-Latina and that she's worked hard to get where she is. I didn't read anything that made me like her less, though I'm not exactly sure I read anything that made me know her more.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Francesca Calarco

    I make no secret of the fact that I low-key love The View and all of its infamous pandemonium; I also like the concept of people with different viewpoints dissecting the headlines at one table. Considering how polarizing politics can be, I really enjoy this setup; even if I do not always agree with the direction or outcomes of conversations, I can generally appreciate that they at least happen. And in this mix, we have my absolute favorite co-host, Sunny Hostin, a former-prosecutor turned ABC leg I make no secret of the fact that I low-key love The View and all of its infamous pandemonium; I also like the concept of people with different viewpoints dissecting the headlines at one table. Considering how polarizing politics can be, I really enjoy this setup; even if I do not always agree with the direction or outcomes of conversations, I can generally appreciate that they at least happen. And in this mix, we have my absolute favorite co-host, Sunny Hostin, a former-prosecutor turned ABC legal correspondent. She is typically the one voice of reason who will always fact-check the others and keep the conversations intellectually honest; she is essentially the legitimizing presence of the crew now that Barbara Walters is retired. She also has pet chickens, which considering everything else is just brilliant. When she came out with her book, I Am These Truths: A Memoir of Identity, Justice, and Living Between Worlds, I couldn't not pick up a copy. Her life growing up in different parts of Manhattan and the Bronx were incredibly relatable, especially as my own friends and family are from some of these areas. More so, her experiences growing up as a bi-racial Puerto Rican African American are incredibly relatable for anyone with hyphenated heritage. People never quite know how to categorize her, and society’s tendency to box people in as one thing is a very real nuisance. There was one account that I found the most relatable. This was when Sunny went out for some innocent day-drinking (aka: “lunch”) with the journalist Don Lemon, The View’s executive producer Candi, and her fellow co-host Ana Navarro. Candi, a black woman, admits that she struggled to accept Sunny as a fellow black woman, and Ana, a Latina, also admits that she struggled to see Sunny as a fellow Latina. And Sunny is just sitting there trying to take it all in, but mostly just drink in peace, and it’s as hilarious as it is depressing. Only the gay and black Don Lemmon seems to be able to understand her discomfort of existing between two worlds. Now this struck a cord, because similar incident has happened to me (and I suspect most biracial folks). Once, when I was at an English-speaking pub in Japan, my perceived racial identity actually caused a similar awkward argument. Me and a group of friends were talking about social politics, and the topic of my ethnicity somehow came up. I am a Peruvian-Italian-American and racially identify as a Latina (or a mestiza) because I simply was not treated like a “white” person, or even knew that was an identity option for me until I got to college. I would never deny my white or light skinned privilege, but I was especially determined to have my identity respected because I had just flown to Peru a couple months prior for my abuelo’s funeral (which is not a fun trip from Japan; those 48 hours of travel were the most brutal of my entire life). Now unlike Sunny, my one friend of color kept insisting I was Latina, and my white friends kept insisting I was white. A part of me wanted to be flattered that at least they were each somewhat trying to include me in their own perceived racial in-groups, but mostly I just remember being so annoyed no one would actually listen to me. It was so ridiculous; I left to get a drink at the bar, came back to our table ten minutes later, and they were still arguing about "what" I was. So, when Sunny vents about her frustration about this type of absurdity, and never really feeling like she belongs, I cannot help but shout, “Amen!” In her own words: “Still, when I encounter such sentiments from blacks and Latinos alike, even from friends, I feel odd. I believe people with mixed ancestry are the embodiment of the American dream, reflecting the tapestry that has enriched this country. My mingled bloodlines should make boundaries and borders disappear. But too often my very existence makes people uncomfortable… What do you do when your authentic self is dissected and debated by others who want to deny the dualities that have always made up this country?” Sunny also does not shy away from how her lighter skin has allotted her privileges that she would not have had otherwise. Colorism is an interesting exploration, especially from her perspective. She is ever aware of social boundaries and power structures, so even though I would not characterize her as a “leftist” as the media likes to think, Sunny’s legal analyses are always rooted in this fundamental life outlook, and as a result, on The View panel she offers some truly nuanced, occasionally progressive, views. One of my favorite segments she covered on The View was on the college admission bribery scandal that hit in 2019. Wealthy parents had paid thousands to have their children admitted to prestigious universities, and people were understandably pissed off. Sunny famously asked, “How mediocre do you have to be to game a system that is already disproportionately in your favor?” That really annoyed the conservative panelists with famous fathers, but rang so true to so many from working class backgrounds. Overall, my only complaint about this book would be that each of her accounts do feel a bit overly curated at times, but I still feel a genuine openness shines through. There is a lot that was interesting about her time working in the media, and plenty of “tea” for anyone interested in that sort of material. Overall, this was a fun read, and I definitely recommend it if you are a fan.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sandra

    Excellent look into Sunny Hostin’s life I have always appreciated Sunny Hostin’s contribution to the View. I was always curious as how she got there. This autobiography is illuminating and filled with interesting explanations of her life choices. It’s written very well, And I highly recommend it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Liz Sergent

    Sunny, one of the hosts on the View talks about her growing up the Bronx, becoming a lawyer and covering the Travon Martin case. She mentions how Barbara Walters said "when people come on this show, they are a guest in your house and your must treat them that way. I wonder what in the world happened to that philosophy? This book was ok, check it out from your library like I did. Sunny, one of the hosts on the View talks about her growing up the Bronx, becoming a lawyer and covering the Travon Martin case. She mentions how Barbara Walters said "when people come on this show, they are a guest in your house and your must treat them that way. I wonder what in the world happened to that philosophy? This book was ok, check it out from your library like I did.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mary Buss

    Very honest and moving memoir. Ms Hostin is a co-host on the morning talk show The View. Her story is about growing up in New York and the triumphs and trials she had , both personally and professionally, to get where she is today.

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