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John Rawlings Investigates (Part One)

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Having just finished his indentures, John Rawlings is celebrating in Vaux Hall Pleasure Gardens when he trips over the body of a young girl. Summoned to the magistrate’s office as prime suspect, Rawlings not only clears his own name but impresses Fielding so much with his power of recollection that he is asked to investigate the crime. Thus begins the illustrious career Having just finished his indentures, John Rawlings is celebrating in Vaux Hall Pleasure Gardens when he trips over the body of a young girl. Summoned to the magistrate’s office as prime suspect, Rawlings not only clears his own name but impresses Fielding so much with his power of recollection that he is asked to investigate the crime. Thus begins the illustrious career of John Rawlings, the ingenious detective stalking London's grimy streets, in this four-part box set that opens Deryn Lake's acclaimed series. The Rawlings novels are richly atmospheric and compelling Georgian mysteries woven around the real characters of John Fielding, the phenomenal sightless magistrate known as the ‘Blind Beak’, whose Runners formed London’s early police force; and John Rawlings, the Apothecary reputed to have invented soda water. Praise for Deryn Lake’s John Rawlings Mysteries: ‘A wealth of marvellous characters parade across the pages, their dialogue is lively and John Rawlings is proving to be a real charmer’ - Eastbourne Herald ‘An effervescent tale...the author organises her large cast and colourful background with skill and gusto through a racily readable drama’ - Felicia Lamb in the Mail on Sunday’s Night & Day Magazine


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Having just finished his indentures, John Rawlings is celebrating in Vaux Hall Pleasure Gardens when he trips over the body of a young girl. Summoned to the magistrate’s office as prime suspect, Rawlings not only clears his own name but impresses Fielding so much with his power of recollection that he is asked to investigate the crime. Thus begins the illustrious career Having just finished his indentures, John Rawlings is celebrating in Vaux Hall Pleasure Gardens when he trips over the body of a young girl. Summoned to the magistrate’s office as prime suspect, Rawlings not only clears his own name but impresses Fielding so much with his power of recollection that he is asked to investigate the crime. Thus begins the illustrious career of John Rawlings, the ingenious detective stalking London's grimy streets, in this four-part box set that opens Deryn Lake's acclaimed series. The Rawlings novels are richly atmospheric and compelling Georgian mysteries woven around the real characters of John Fielding, the phenomenal sightless magistrate known as the ‘Blind Beak’, whose Runners formed London’s early police force; and John Rawlings, the Apothecary reputed to have invented soda water. Praise for Deryn Lake’s John Rawlings Mysteries: ‘A wealth of marvellous characters parade across the pages, their dialogue is lively and John Rawlings is proving to be a real charmer’ - Eastbourne Herald ‘An effervescent tale...the author organises her large cast and colourful background with skill and gusto through a racily readable drama’ - Felicia Lamb in the Mail on Sunday’s Night & Day Magazine

30 review for John Rawlings Investigates (Part One)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bonnye Reed

    PART 1 Available on Kindle Unlimited OWN PART'S 2 AND 3 PART 1 Available on Kindle Unlimited OWN PART'S 2 AND 3

  2. 5 out of 5

    Hettie Lynch

    A series of ripping yarns, spoiled by dreadful grammar and ridiculous purple prose in the descriptions of people and places. The faults are easily avoidable, and it is clear that the author has done considerable historical research but schoarship in one field does not excuse terrible writing. What were her editors smoking? Do they not know that in English, a preposition (to, from, by, with, etc), demands that any pronoun following it be the accusative form - me, him, her, them, whom, NOT the nomi A series of ripping yarns, spoiled by dreadful grammar and ridiculous purple prose in the descriptions of people and places. The faults are easily avoidable, and it is clear that the author has done considerable historical research but schoarship in one field does not excuse terrible writing. What were her editors smoking? Do they not know that in English, a preposition (to, from, by, with, etc), demands that any pronoun following it be the accusative form - me, him, her, them, whom, NOT the nominative I, he, she, they, who. In present, vulgar usage, it is distressingly common for that error to be made where two or more people are being discussed, but as a child of seven I taught this very simple rule :- take the named person/s out of the sentence, and use the pronoun you would naturally use. The examples used we're these - Dad took me to the footy with him. Therefore, Dad took Tom and me to the footy with him. I went to the footy with Dad. Tom and I went to the footy with Dad. What Dad said to me was... What Dad said to Tom and me was.. You see? The other frequent and equally annoying error was the mistreated participle. Yer wot?? In a sentence that starts with a word like coming, going, looking etc, the first noun must be menacing-lookingaction. Coming round the corner, the cliff looked menacing. Er, no. The cliff could not come around the corner, could it? Coming round the corner, we saw menacing looking cliff. We all know that the second sentence gives the same meaning as the first, but the first is the product of ignorance. As to the Purple Prose, I can do no better than refer the interested to a splendid little book by Stella Gibbons called "Cold Comfort Farm" a very funny little novel set in the England of the late 1920s. I shall say no more about it, but it is available on kindle. Back to John Rawlings and his investigations. They are ripping yarns, or I would not have bothered reading them. The first 4, at least. Don't know if I can be bothered with the second lot. They are rather Mills and Boon meets 18th century London and crime fighting. Mind candy, spoiled by a lot of fluff and poor packaging.

  3. 5 out of 5

    margo wheeler

    This series brings historical fiction a whole new level All good mystery novels set in historical periods bring the past to life. But the John Rawlings series, by using two exceptional historical figures as the main characters,makes for even more grounded stories. The use of actual London settings of the time, with the nearly forgotten streetnames, Thames stairs and pleasure gardens, all is the reader together in the moment with the characters. Well -written dialogue and action, seamless plots an This series brings historical fiction a whole new level All good mystery novels set in historical periods bring the past to life. But the John Rawlings series, by using two exceptional historical figures as the main characters,makes for even more grounded stories. The use of actual London settings of the time, with the nearly forgotten streetnames, Thames stairs and pleasure gardens, all is the reader together in the moment with the characters. Well -written dialogue and action, seamless plots and just the right sprinkling of love and murder makes for a.marvelous time spent in 18th c. London.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ken Grant

    Took me a while to get into this book, but once I did it came together quite nicely. Very period and requires focus to keep up with the manner that people live, act, and speak. I really enjoyed the development of the main character as he grows into his role in being at the center of solving a murder mystery. Given the time period and way of life there is a foundation for many more good mysteries to come.

  5. 5 out of 5

    sarah lewis

    Excellent, a proper good old fashioned, thoroughly good read. I enjoyed the box set 1 immensely. The detail was enough to gat a flavour of the times, without being overly "wordy". Pace was measured at a good romp, not once did my attention waiver. I read the entire box set in 3 days, I was sorry when I finished the set. Unfortunately I will have to wait, to read any further into the adventures and just hope I can find further "special offers" on these sets. Bravo!!! Excellent, a proper good old fashioned, thoroughly good read. I enjoyed the box set 1 immensely. The detail was enough to gat a flavour of the times, without being overly "wordy". Pace was measured at a good romp, not once did my attention waiver. I read the entire box set in 3 days, I was sorry when I finished the set. Unfortunately I will have to wait, to read any further into the adventures and just hope I can find further "special offers" on these sets. Bravo!!!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mpppg

    Fascinating and Engrossing A near perfect set of historical mysteries by an author who has clearly thoroughly researched the period and created vivid characters to populate it. I’m delighted that there are many books to come in this series and intend to read them all.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Draffin

    Excellent The idea of an apothecary as a detective is a novel one. I enjoyed that John always carried a supply of elixirs and infusions, etc. and used his knowledge of herbs to get information from others by offering to ease their suffering.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sandra Boyce

    Great period mystery A compelling series of mysteries. The author keeps his characters fresh throughout and adds layers of information making the reader wanting more. Looking forward to the second series.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jackie Skidmore

    Excellent. Brilliant stories which held my attention throughout. I can't wait to read the next set. It's just a pity the historical notes were missing from the first three stories as I would've enjoyed reading them and getting more background. Excellent. Brilliant stories which held my attention throughout. I can't wait to read the next set. It's just a pity the historical notes were missing from the first three stories as I would've enjoyed reading them and getting more background.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Pat

    Good mystery,

  11. 4 out of 5

    Haydn Pope

    A really interesting series I have enjoyed reading the John Rawlings book s. Some odd mysteries to get to the bottom, with the help of Bow Street of course. Good books

  12. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Interesting series, well written. Plot moves at a good pace. Interesting characters and plots.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Steven Potts

    Fun Historical Fiction This is a series of light historical novels based in the early eighteenth century England. It is very apparent a lot of good research went into this collection.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Betty Torma

    A pleasure to read The mysteries are well developed and not revealed until the end. The language is really enjoyable, especially that the author uses the language of the time period, and I very much recommend this set of stories.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Walz

    A Charming series! I have this set a 5 because I found it delightful! It grabbed my interest from the first. With each case I liked the characters even more. The stories were intriguing and I was never quite sure who the villains were. I very much appreciated how the writer had the main characters explain the mystery at the conclusion of each case. I highly recommend this series!!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Catherine Brooks-Fava

  17. 4 out of 5

    vincent g sieracki

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ian Robertson

  19. 4 out of 5

    Phil Johnson

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nuranar

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ratnavali Burra

  22. 4 out of 5

    John H Rice III

  23. 5 out of 5

    Karen harper

  24. 5 out of 5

    Paul Peretz

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ronald S

  26. 5 out of 5

    Missie Krueger

  27. 4 out of 5

    Marcia J. Boswell

  28. 4 out of 5

    Avril Hemingway

  29. 5 out of 5

    Terry

  30. 4 out of 5

    Karen Svenson

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