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Shocked by the Bible: The Most Astonishing Facts You've Never Been Told

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Shocked by the Bible  sets the record straight with well-researched, controversial, myth-breaking assertions about what the Bible really does—and doesn’t—say. And guess on which day the Bible says Jesus died. Believe it or not, the Good Book doesn't mention Friday, and even more surprisingly, while the Bible says Jesus rose from the grave, it does not say it occurred Sun Shocked by the Bible  sets the record straight with well-researched, controversial, myth-breaking assertions about what the Bible really does—and doesn’t—say. And guess on which day the Bible says Jesus died. Believe it or not, the Good Book doesn't mention Friday, and even more surprisingly, while the Bible says Jesus rose from the grave, it does not say it occurred Sunday morning. Remember, Jesus' followers found an empty tomb then. But don't feel bad if you've always assumed otherwise. Like countless millions of people, you've just been misinformed, misled or even (dare we say) lied to about what the Bible actually says. In a stunning investigation, news veteran Joe Kovacs goes on a mission to help both Christians and non-Christians alike find out what the Bible really contains, and what it doesn't. "Shocked by the Bible: The Most Astonishing Facts You've Never Been Told" is an educational juggernaut that relies solely on the Holy Bible to reveal hundreds of Scriptural facts that many people of all persuasions simply don't know. The book instantly skyrocketed to the No. 1 position in three Bible-related categories on Amazon.com. "I'm among the biggest fans of the Bible of all time," says Kovacs. "My goal is to educate people about the solid truth of Scripture and to stop the spread of erroneous information. I want people to crack open their Bibles and see with their own eyes what's actually printed on the pages, and what's not. It's shocking!" According to Scripture, you won't find "Three Wise Men" mentioned anywhere in the story of Jesus' birth. For that matter, none are said to have shown up at the manger in Bethlehem. The truth straight from your own Bible is that an unspecified number of wise men first met Jesus as a "young child" in a "house," not a babe in a manger, and it might have been more than a year after He was born. Go ahead, look it up for yourself. Also, according to Scripture, you won't find a single mention of Easter eggs, but you will find God warning His people not to have anything to do with a pagan fertility goddess, whose name is synonymous with "Easter." "Yes, I'm a Bible-believing Christian," says Kovacs. "But I'm not here to convert anyone. People are free to believe whatever they wish and can come to their own conclusions. I just want to show them the biblical record is often very different from what many assume. Not only will Christians love this book, but I think Jews, Muslims and even agnostics and atheists will get a kick out of it as well."


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Shocked by the Bible  sets the record straight with well-researched, controversial, myth-breaking assertions about what the Bible really does—and doesn’t—say. And guess on which day the Bible says Jesus died. Believe it or not, the Good Book doesn't mention Friday, and even more surprisingly, while the Bible says Jesus rose from the grave, it does not say it occurred Sun Shocked by the Bible  sets the record straight with well-researched, controversial, myth-breaking assertions about what the Bible really does—and doesn’t—say. And guess on which day the Bible says Jesus died. Believe it or not, the Good Book doesn't mention Friday, and even more surprisingly, while the Bible says Jesus rose from the grave, it does not say it occurred Sunday morning. Remember, Jesus' followers found an empty tomb then. But don't feel bad if you've always assumed otherwise. Like countless millions of people, you've just been misinformed, misled or even (dare we say) lied to about what the Bible actually says. In a stunning investigation, news veteran Joe Kovacs goes on a mission to help both Christians and non-Christians alike find out what the Bible really contains, and what it doesn't. "Shocked by the Bible: The Most Astonishing Facts You've Never Been Told" is an educational juggernaut that relies solely on the Holy Bible to reveal hundreds of Scriptural facts that many people of all persuasions simply don't know. The book instantly skyrocketed to the No. 1 position in three Bible-related categories on Amazon.com. "I'm among the biggest fans of the Bible of all time," says Kovacs. "My goal is to educate people about the solid truth of Scripture and to stop the spread of erroneous information. I want people to crack open their Bibles and see with their own eyes what's actually printed on the pages, and what's not. It's shocking!" According to Scripture, you won't find "Three Wise Men" mentioned anywhere in the story of Jesus' birth. For that matter, none are said to have shown up at the manger in Bethlehem. The truth straight from your own Bible is that an unspecified number of wise men first met Jesus as a "young child" in a "house," not a babe in a manger, and it might have been more than a year after He was born. Go ahead, look it up for yourself. Also, according to Scripture, you won't find a single mention of Easter eggs, but you will find God warning His people not to have anything to do with a pagan fertility goddess, whose name is synonymous with "Easter." "Yes, I'm a Bible-believing Christian," says Kovacs. "But I'm not here to convert anyone. People are free to believe whatever they wish and can come to their own conclusions. I just want to show them the biblical record is often very different from what many assume. Not only will Christians love this book, but I think Jews, Muslims and even agnostics and atheists will get a kick out of it as well."

30 review for Shocked by the Bible: The Most Astonishing Facts You've Never Been Told

  1. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    One would be amazed at the things that are in the bible, if only he would take the time to read it well. Joe Kovacs obviously read his bible well and presents the facts in a way that are accessible to someone who may not be very literate in the bible. The book will make you angry because you don't want to change your beliefs; make you angry because you've been lied to all your life by a church; or make you re-examine what you believe and possibly change what you believe. One would be amazed at the things that are in the bible, if only he would take the time to read it well. Joe Kovacs obviously read his bible well and presents the facts in a way that are accessible to someone who may not be very literate in the bible. The book will make you angry because you don't want to change your beliefs; make you angry because you've been lied to all your life by a church; or make you re-examine what you believe and possibly change what you believe.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Beverly

    Those who have attended church most of their lives on a regular basis may not be very shocked by Kovacs' revelations, but those unfamiliar with the Bible may learn new things. Those who have attended church most of their lives on a regular basis may not be very shocked by Kovacs' revelations, but those unfamiliar with the Bible may learn new things.

  3. 4 out of 5

    J

    There aren't much books that claim they are shockers that can truly shock the well-educated reader. So in this particular case I wasn't looking for as much as a type of shocking read as to what this author would sell to me as shocking. Unfortunately there was no shock value or at least in my opinion. Instead Joe Kovacs agitated me first off with his introduction. He made it sound like it was the pastors and/or preachers who were responsible for mostly misleading their flocks even if they themse There aren't much books that claim they are shockers that can truly shock the well-educated reader. So in this particular case I wasn't looking for as much as a type of shocking read as to what this author would sell to me as shocking. Unfortunately there was no shock value or at least in my opinion. Instead Joe Kovacs agitated me first off with his introduction. He made it sound like it was the pastors and/or preachers who were responsible for mostly misleading their flocks even if they themselves may not have known any better. What vexes me about this the most is that it isn't anyone's responsibility to educate another and that if we did what we are suppose to then we would be studying on our own. Thus the fault of misinformation should be set rightly on the individual's shoulders instead of those in authority. Another thing is that reading this particular book had me wondering about the author's intent. It isn't my place to judge him as a Christian nor as a person but there were clearly at least three places where his writing bordered on misleading. These spots were: -In the telling of Abraham hosting the three heavenly beings he made a run-on where they sat down while bargaining for Sodom and Gomorrah. The bargaining if one must say that happened after the meal and well on the way out. -The title of one section mentioned homosexual angels. Even in his paragraph about it the angels themselves weren't making passes or doing the deed with anyone thus the name should have been changed to something a lot clearer. And -Joe mentioned that everyone in the city of Jericho that was living was destroyed when the Israelites made the walls to tumble. He needs to re-read that story and remember that although he was mostly right there was one woman and her family who survived the destruction thus not everyone was killed. In other cases his points were rather duh-worthy such as there being no Easter bunny and eggs or Santa Claus. Anyone who reads and studies their Bible or goes to church will already know much of the information that has been offered. The writing itself was bland and totally repetitive. The author made sure to repeat his point at least three or four times to knock the information in his reader's head. At the same time he would use Bible variations to "clarify" his point but unfortunately there were a few variations that basically just repeated the word-for-word verse from the previous variation. In the end it was just an awful book and there are better other books to educate curious Christians and non-Christians alike who want to know more about the Bible.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ronald Edwards

    Not terribly written. Most of the topics discussed are obvious and not shocking to anyone that attends church much or they are nonsense. Obvious: we don’t know how many wise men there were and 12/25 probably wasn’t the day Jesus was born. Nonsense: we are still under Old Testament food laws.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    This is a quick read, and VERY interesting. Learned alot!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Brian Meadows

    The author, Joe Kovacs, wrote this book to attempt to challenge misconceptions about what is in the Bible and what is not in the Bible. He is not a pastor or a Biblical scholar, but a journalist who is well versed on the Bible and is a Bible believer. His background is journalism and it shows. To try to meet the target audience, he tries to use trendy vernacular and illustrations. It was almost too much so for my taste as he sometimes came off as trying to be “cute” and writing like a reporter w The author, Joe Kovacs, wrote this book to attempt to challenge misconceptions about what is in the Bible and what is not in the Bible. He is not a pastor or a Biblical scholar, but a journalist who is well versed on the Bible and is a Bible believer. His background is journalism and it shows. To try to meet the target audience, he tries to use trendy vernacular and illustrations. It was almost too much so for my taste as he sometimes came off as trying to be “cute” and writing like a reporter with a scoop and trying to sensationalize it. In fact, for me, the title was way overblown. I was not shocked by much that he was “exposing” as I had encountered almost all of it at one time or another in different churches and Bible study groups over the years. If the reader has done very little studying of the Bible, attends a traditional formal ritualistic church, and believes without question what he is told that seems good to him, he may actually be shocked. Overall, I found myself mostly agreeing with what he had to say with a few exceptions. The only nugget I remember as something I really did not know was that the designation of God specifically as the Father does not exist in the Old Testament. He went on to show that the Old Testament appearances of God were actually pre-incarnate Jesus. That rings true to me as the Bible says that it is impossible to see the Father. Add to that that Jesus claimed to be God (I am) and said “I and the Father are one.” It is all part of the theology of the Holy Trinity and helps to visualize how God is three in one. He stopped short of elaborating on the Holy Spirit, which was a shortcoming. My biggest issue was with Chapter 5. He, without using the term, tried to make the case that once we die, our soul “sleeps” (is not conscious) until the return of Christ when we are resurrected. He did not use the term, but that is advocating “soul sleep”. He trotted out scriptures that do seem to support that view. He acknowledged the controversy, but was pretty lame in dismissing scriptures that are embraced by most of the Christian world that to be absent with the body is to be present with the Lord, including Jesus’ statement to the thief on the cross who asked Him to remember him when He came into His kingdom, “today you will be with me in Paradise”. There were other scriptures that could have been brought in, but were not as the author wanted to prove his point. I believe that the Lord leaves many things a mystery and this is one of them – what will occur for us from the time we die until Jesus Christ returns to set up His kingdom. The book was different from most as it seemed fragmented. It was a collection of chapters that were pretty much separate and could be read as an article by themselves. There was not much to link them and result in a flow progressing to a main point or theme or group of points. The common theme, I suppose, was to quit believing that every “good” thing around us is from the Bible and study the Bible yourself. That is a good theme. I would only recommend reading this book if you are a believer or a serious enquirer and, then, only if you are going to follow it up with good Bible study for the long term. Do not let this be a source for just knowing shocking facts about the Bible to impress others. Let it be a spark to discover for yourself the truths in the Bible and develop a deeper relationship with Jesus.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    At first, the book presents some interesting (if fairly obvious for anyone with more than a passing knowledge of the Bible) facts. It quickly becomes clear that Kovacs is a practicing and believing Christian. That's fine - gives him good reason to read the Bible. Even if he does conveniently forget difficult passages that scholars still wrestle with today (Zipporah cutting her son's foreskin, for example is far from straight forward as he presents it). Then it becomes very clear it is a believer At first, the book presents some interesting (if fairly obvious for anyone with more than a passing knowledge of the Bible) facts. It quickly becomes clear that Kovacs is a practicing and believing Christian. That's fine - gives him good reason to read the Bible. Even if he does conveniently forget difficult passages that scholars still wrestle with today (Zipporah cutting her son's foreskin, for example is far from straight forward as he presents it). Then it becomes very clear it is a believer in the Bible as the literal word of God, untouched by fallible human hands. There is no understanding of how culture changes over time, why things might have been written (down) at one time but change, who put together the Bible as we know it now, and how translation works (he does make some references to "original" texts, but I'm skeptical about his sources, and he seems only to do so when convenient). I'm much less interested now. The Bible may be divinely inspired (that is where faith comes in and is not what I read for), but it has human influence all over it (from the original writing down, to lost original sources, to translations (and shitty ones at that!), to the Nicene Convention where humans sat down and said what was and wasn't part of the Bible), and any scholarly reading of the Bible must acknowledge this. By the last third, it moves even away from being a clear "Bible is the literal word of God" into trying to preach how we should act, and assuming we are - or should be - Christians. The chapter on God creating us in His image - pure preaching (and leaves out some very interesting theories that are tied to that whole plural thing he brings up!). Not so subtly preaching against homosexuality (despite some pretty strong biblical phrases that sound like King David had a male lover, and was a rapist and murderer too). Really strong "God has killed before, you should do what he says (Kovacs's interpretation thereof at least), or he'll kill you too!" vibes. Definitely not what I signed up for. I skimmed the last 1/3 of the book, mostly because I hate not finishing a book, not because I thought I'd learn anything else of interest. But hey, I learned that the Bible mentions hemorrhoids, so that's cool.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Conway Salmon

    Can GOD do as recorded in HIS WORD? Sadly most professing Christians in the west at least are quite selective in what they choose to believe in GOD's revealed word perhaps they believe in a lesser god? Can GOD do as recorded in HIS WORD? Sadly most professing Christians in the west at least are quite selective in what they choose to believe in GOD's revealed word perhaps they believe in a lesser god?

  9. 4 out of 5

    Nathalie

    Thought provoking @t times

  10. 5 out of 5

    Deena Brannon

    Easy to read. Sometimes funny. There really are things that I KNEW that were WRONG.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Doug

    For anyone looking for revelation of secrets or perhaps a new perspective on the text of the Bible, keep looking. Kovacs doesn't bring anything to the table that a person with basic reading comprehension can't discover for himself. Seriously, he makes it sound like some kind of brilliant discovery that there is no mention of Easter or December 25th in the Bible. Really? Anyone who is willing to look at the Bible as a documentation of history and some moralistic teachings understands that there ar For anyone looking for revelation of secrets or perhaps a new perspective on the text of the Bible, keep looking. Kovacs doesn't bring anything to the table that a person with basic reading comprehension can't discover for himself. Seriously, he makes it sound like some kind of brilliant discovery that there is no mention of Easter or December 25th in the Bible. Really? Anyone who is willing to look at the Bible as a documentation of history and some moralistic teachings understands that there are tons of things that do not appear anywhere in the text of the Bible, and have been added to Christianity later on to make it an easier pill to swallow. In addition to clumsy attempts at humor, he seems to vascilate between literal interpretations of passages and deeply interpretive examinations of others. This alone sets this book up to fail. Are you literally deconstructing the book, or are you offering another translation? In the end I don't think Kovacs even knows that himself. Deeply religious people, who have never examined the Bible itself, or who have blindly accepted some evangelical interpretations of the Bible might be surprised by some of the information contained herein, but I don't see anyone being shocked. People without powerful religious views may think this book is fodder for their arguments against religion, and they would be surprised at how poor an instrument this book is. In the end it doesn't really illuminate much, or seem top be helpful to many people who have at least a couple of brain celss to rub together. Defenititely a book to skip.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Monica Aho

    This book promises to "shock" - but really.... if anyone has actually READ the Bible, there's nothing at all shocking about what's in here. What did shock me was the lack of any historical perspective or supporting documentation for the author's conclusions about such things as "Jesus didn't REALLY die on a Friday and rise on a Sunday" (has he read ANY early Christian authors? If they were within one generation of Christ, and knew the people who were THERE, and THEY say he died on a Friday and r This book promises to "shock" - but really.... if anyone has actually READ the Bible, there's nothing at all shocking about what's in here. What did shock me was the lack of any historical perspective or supporting documentation for the author's conclusions about such things as "Jesus didn't REALLY die on a Friday and rise on a Sunday" (has he read ANY early Christian authors? If they were within one generation of Christ, and knew the people who were THERE, and THEY say he died on a Friday and rose on a Sunday, then... I believe them, even if there work isn't part of the canon of the Bible) or "we don't really go to heaven when we die". I feel like this is a case of of "sola scriptura" gone awry.... how anyone can interpret the Bible any way they wish when they view it in a vacuum, without taking into account 2000 years of history, and corroborating sources. Plus some of those conclusions lack any authority - he is making theological statements without BEING any sort of theologian at all . Other chapters are just interesting little tidbits. Overall, I was rather disappointed in this book.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Mercer

    While this text is quite informative for those that haven't read the bible cover to cover... it is pretty lacking on anything 'shocking', 'astounding', or 'facts you've never been told'. Would make a great gift though for young-adults to spark an interest in the bible, or anyone for that matter. Would also be a great gift for people that make a lot of assumptions and assume things in movies and Christmas songs MUST be in the bible... might open their eyes. However, for anyone with at least an ele While this text is quite informative for those that haven't read the bible cover to cover... it is pretty lacking on anything 'shocking', 'astounding', or 'facts you've never been told'. Would make a great gift though for young-adults to spark an interest in the bible, or anyone for that matter. Would also be a great gift for people that make a lot of assumptions and assume things in movies and Christmas songs MUST be in the bible... might open their eyes. However, for anyone with at least an elementary understanding of the contents of the books in the Bible, won't bring much new to the table. Joe Kovacs did a great job writing the text however, and even if you consider yourself an armchair expert (or an actual expert) on the Bible, it will still prove to be an entertaining read.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ana

    A few really surprising and/or eye-opening chapters, but mostly things any regular Bible reader would know. Specifically recommended to people who don't tend to get into the word very often for themselves. In that case, this book would be an informative companion to read alongside the Bible, and may even spark a greater curiosity for scripture. If you're already in the Bible reading habit, you may still get something out of this book. I'd suggest at least flipping through it to the chapters that i A few really surprising and/or eye-opening chapters, but mostly things any regular Bible reader would know. Specifically recommended to people who don't tend to get into the word very often for themselves. In that case, this book would be an informative companion to read alongside the Bible, and may even spark a greater curiosity for scripture. If you're already in the Bible reading habit, you may still get something out of this book. I'd suggest at least flipping through it to the chapters that intrigue you.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Brett

    I don't think this book is meant to be the definitive bible study reference tome. It's more of a teaser for various misunderstood elements in scripture. But what it lacks in detail and supporting evidence, it makes up for in the breadth of material. I would recommend it as a way to get someone interested in bible, if only to learn about some of the common misconceptions that are pervasive among christians. I don't think this book is meant to be the definitive bible study reference tome. It's more of a teaser for various misunderstood elements in scripture. But what it lacks in detail and supporting evidence, it makes up for in the breadth of material. I would recommend it as a way to get someone interested in bible, if only to learn about some of the common misconceptions that are pervasive among christians.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brent Wolters

    This book answered a lot of questions that have been bothering me concerning what I've read in the Bible and what I've heard in churches. Eye opening book that shows most Christians are in deep trouble with the God of the Bible if they don't get their act together and really read from the source of their beliefs, instead of relying on traditions and ministers who don't tell (or don't know) the whole truth. This book answered a lot of questions that have been bothering me concerning what I've read in the Bible and what I've heard in churches. Eye opening book that shows most Christians are in deep trouble with the God of the Bible if they don't get their act together and really read from the source of their beliefs, instead of relying on traditions and ministers who don't tell (or don't know) the whole truth.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jadah

    THIS BOOK WAS SIMPLY AMAZING AND I ENJOYED READING AND LEARNING AS I ENDULGED FROM CHAPTER TO CHAPTER! I LOVED EVERY MINUTE OF IT! THIS BOOK WAS SO INFORMATIVE AND IT ANSWERED ALOT OF UNANSWERED QUESTIONS IN MY HEAD THAT I ALWAYS OFTEN WONDERED BUT NEVER HAD TIME TO RESEARCH THE INFORMATION! THIS IS WORTH EVERY MINUTE OF YOUR TIME AND I SUGGEST YOU TAKE HEED TO MY WORDS AND CHECK IT OUT

  18. 5 out of 5

    Don Paske

    Three stars is actually a gift. There wasn't much shocking that I learned. I do wonder, in this day and age, why would Mr. Kovacs quote from the King James bible. Not the New King James bible, the original! I suggest folks actually read the bible rather than this simplistic book. Three stars is actually a gift. There wasn't much shocking that I learned. I do wonder, in this day and age, why would Mr. Kovacs quote from the King James bible. Not the New King James bible, the original! I suggest folks actually read the bible rather than this simplistic book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    ReeKee

    Joe Kovacs is very knowledgeable when it comes to the Bible. He didn't add or explain away anything from the Bible that most would want to do away with as it isn't politically correct. God is the same yesterday, today and tomorrow. No apology needed! Joe Kovacs is very knowledgeable when it comes to the Bible. He didn't add or explain away anything from the Bible that most would want to do away with as it isn't politically correct. God is the same yesterday, today and tomorrow. No apology needed!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ronnie Sanders

    Is this intended to discuss biblical topics? Ignore it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Reedy

    I really enjoyed reading this book. It was very informative and humorous at times. It wasn't to deep or mind numing. I would recommend this book to anyone with an interest in the Bible. I really enjoyed reading this book. It was very informative and humorous at times. It wasn't to deep or mind numing. I would recommend this book to anyone with an interest in the Bible.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kriste

    This book was informative and I learned things I hadn't known before. The author takes a lot of things extremely literal in the Bible, but overall I did learn a lot from this book :) This book was informative and I learned things I hadn't known before. The author takes a lot of things extremely literal in the Bible, but overall I did learn a lot from this book :)

  23. 4 out of 5

    Janice

    Read the Bible instead.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nanette

    Ok, I thought about a few new things. I also thought, buddy, use the original Greek and Hebrew, not Darby's paraphrase. Duh! Ok, I thought about a few new things. I also thought, buddy, use the original Greek and Hebrew, not Darby's paraphrase. Duh!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Flaherty

  26. 5 out of 5

    Missye

  27. 5 out of 5

    Frank Darrah

  28. 4 out of 5

    Allan Elder

  29. 4 out of 5

    Gerald Caldwell

  30. 5 out of 5

    Marsha Altman

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