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Love Letters From A War: The Letters Of Corporal John Leslie Johnson And His Family, June 1940 May 1941

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8 review for Love Letters From A War: The Letters Of Corporal John Leslie Johnson And His Family, June 1940 May 1941

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lynda

    War tears families apart. This book provides microscopic detail of that, showing a slice of Australia from June 1940-May 1941, when a 38 year old father of 8 children volunteered to serve his country. John Johnson of Walwa in country Victoria was determined to give his family a better life. The 1920s and 1930s were a time when it was impossible to prosper. John wanted to serve his country with utmost dedication, but justifiably wanted the recognition and future prospects that would reward his loy War tears families apart. This book provides microscopic detail of that, showing a slice of Australia from June 1940-May 1941, when a 38 year old father of 8 children volunteered to serve his country. John Johnson of Walwa in country Victoria was determined to give his family a better life. The 1920s and 1930s were a time when it was impossible to prosper. John wanted to serve his country with utmost dedication, but justifiably wanted the recognition and future prospects that would reward his loyalty, determination and sacrifice. Initially, John spent some months training in Albury, so the flow of letters and occasional visits to his family, were possible. His pregnant wife Josie was devastated by his absence, but lived in the hope their love would prevail over all else. The older children were incredibly proud of their father in uniform; they all wrote letters, even on behalf of the younger ones – touching and delightful letters. It is clear that John was an affectionate and much loved father and husband, son, nephew, cousin and friend. The children are listed at the front of the book, with their ages in May 1941: the eldest, 14 years old, and the youngest born when her father was in service. Len, the 4th youngest, went on to have a distinguished career himself in the Armed Services, and has written an impeccable account of the life, times and letters of his family and their society in the early years of World War II. The insights are authentic, and Len Johnson’s epilogue should be read by all Australians. Lest we forget.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nadine

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mary

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jen Caine

  5. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

  6. 5 out of 5

    Charm Watch

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tom

  8. 5 out of 5

    Trudy Boan

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