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In Jane Haddam's One of Our Own, Gregor Demarkian, former FBI agent and police consultant, returns for his final case—a surprising murder and an attempted murder, which threaten the safety of his Philadelphia neighborhood. A mysterious black van is spotted by several people at various times in the area around Cavanaugh Street, Philadelphia's Armenian-American enclave. Presu In Jane Haddam's One of Our Own, Gregor Demarkian, former FBI agent and police consultant, returns for his final case—a surprising murder and an attempted murder, which threaten the safety of his Philadelphia neighborhood. A mysterious black van is spotted by several people at various times in the area around Cavanaugh Street, Philadelphia's Armenian-American enclave. Presumed by some to be related to the increasing ICE raids around the area, the mystery deepens one night when a body falls out of the back of the van when speeding through the neighborhood.


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In Jane Haddam's One of Our Own, Gregor Demarkian, former FBI agent and police consultant, returns for his final case—a surprising murder and an attempted murder, which threaten the safety of his Philadelphia neighborhood. A mysterious black van is spotted by several people at various times in the area around Cavanaugh Street, Philadelphia's Armenian-American enclave. Presu In Jane Haddam's One of Our Own, Gregor Demarkian, former FBI agent and police consultant, returns for his final case—a surprising murder and an attempted murder, which threaten the safety of his Philadelphia neighborhood. A mysterious black van is spotted by several people at various times in the area around Cavanaugh Street, Philadelphia's Armenian-American enclave. Presumed by some to be related to the increasing ICE raids around the area, the mystery deepens one night when a body falls out of the back of the van when speeding through the neighborhood.

30 review for One of Our Own

  1. 4 out of 5

    megs_bookrack

    When I received my ARC copy of One of Our Own, by Jane Haddam, I was elated, but it was also bittersweet. This is the 30th, and final book, of her beloved, Gregor Demarkian series. The author, Orania Papazoglou, writing under the pen name of Jane Haddam, unfortunately passed away in July of 2019. Prior to this novel, I have read nine other books in this series; the first eight, and then I read Bleeding Hearts, number eleven in the series, because it sounded so interesting. I really enjoyed them all When I received my ARC copy of One of Our Own, by Jane Haddam, I was elated, but it was also bittersweet. This is the 30th, and final book, of her beloved, Gregor Demarkian series. The author, Orania Papazoglou, writing under the pen name of Jane Haddam, unfortunately passed away in July of 2019. Prior to this novel, I have read nine other books in this series; the first eight, and then I read Bleeding Hearts, number eleven in the series, because it sounded so interesting. I really enjoyed them all. A lot of the earlier books in the series were holiday-themed, which I always love in my Cozies. The main protagonist of this series is, Gregor Demarkian, an Armenian-American, ex-FBI Agent, who consults with local police departments on bizarre and compelling cases. Gregor lives on Cavanaugh Street in Philadelphia, which is essentially an Armenian-American enclave. Over the course of the series you get to know the various characters in his community and it's really a lot of fun! With this novel, from the start, it felt a little different. I commented early on that it felt choppy. The author did not have the chance to finish this one herself, it was actually completed by her sons; seriously, what an honor. I wonder, however, if perhaps she didn't have the chance to go through final edits on this if that was the case. The Prologue in particular, for me, felt like she wrote a framework of how she wanted it to go and planned to go in and smooth it out at a later time, but never had the chance? Obviously, I have no way of knowing what the exact process of getting this novel ready for print was, but it did feel different than her earlier work. Additionally, there was some content in here that made me uncomfortable. There's a big focus on immigrants and immigrant populations throughout the novel. Basically, you have a neighborhood that is shifting. For example, one building that might have once been filled with German immigrants is now filled with Spanish immigrants. So, you have characters that are feeling affected by those shifts. As a reader, you get a lot of their thinking, or even ranting, about these new communities. For me, I felt like while that is a valid topic to examine if your setting is a vibrant city like, Philadelphia, and that I understand you will have community members who will feel very passionately about the topic, I still felt like the content could have been handled with a bit more care. There was a lot of stereotypes being thrown about and not until the very end did I feel like they were challenged at all. The narrative did come full circle on that topic; I am happy with how it ended up, but there were a few characters getting there that were downright vile. I just wish at least Gregor would have put up a challenge to what they were saying. The mystery itself was interesting, although it did wrap up rather quickly. I love Gregor, and his now wife, novelist, Bennis Hannaford. Overall, this is a good novel, but I would definitely recommend starting with the earlier books in the series. In fact, the first book in the series is Christmas themed, so perfect timing! I am really going to miss Gregor, Bennis, Tibor and the rest of Cavanaugh Street, but luckily, I still have twenty more books in the series I can pick up! Thank you so much to the publisher, St. Martin's Press, for providing me with a copy of this to read and review. I appreciate the opportunity. My deepest condolences to her sons. Their Afterword brought me to tears. Orania sounds like an amazing woman, she certainly left a legacy with her work and will be missed.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Rosemary Reeve

    Thirtieth and final Gregor Demarkian mystery, published posthumously by the author’s sons, who provide a moving tribute to their mother at the end. Elegiac, humane, timely, unsparing yet hopeful – a fitting end to the series. A garbage bag falls out of the back of a mysterious black van skidding on icy Philadelphia streets. In the bag is the barely breathing Marta Warkowski, a reclusive older woman at odds with her changing neighborhood, sleazy landlord, and bullying building superintendent. In Ma Thirtieth and final Gregor Demarkian mystery, published posthumously by the author’s sons, who provide a moving tribute to their mother at the end. Elegiac, humane, timely, unsparing yet hopeful – a fitting end to the series. A garbage bag falls out of the back of a mysterious black van skidding on icy Philadelphia streets. In the bag is the barely breathing Marta Warkowski, a reclusive older woman at odds with her changing neighborhood, sleazy landlord, and bullying building superintendent. In Marta’s immaculate apartment, police find the super’s body. To the annoyance of the Philly police, higher-ups ask former FBI agent Gregor Demarkian to consult on the investigation. The book focuses on bringing the series’ continuing storylines and characters to appropriate resolution and offering a benediction of social commentary, which played an increasingly important part of the series. The mystery itself is a bit thin, with some muddled motives. Many thanks to NetGalley for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Linda Strong

    Gregor Demarkian, former FBI agent and consultant, is ready to retire. He and his wife Bennis have agreed to foster a child, Javier, with a mysterious past and limited language skills. He's called once again to join an investigation. Marta Warkowski, a reclusive older woman, is found bound up in a garbage bag after it falls out of the van. In a coma, Warkowski is unable to tell police how she ended up as she did. When they go to search her apartment, the police find the dead body of her building' Gregor Demarkian, former FBI agent and consultant, is ready to retire. He and his wife Bennis have agreed to foster a child, Javier, with a mysterious past and limited language skills. He's called once again to join an investigation. Marta Warkowski, a reclusive older woman, is found bound up in a garbage bag after it falls out of the van. In a coma, Warkowski is unable to tell police how she ended up as she did. When they go to search her apartment, the police find the dead body of her building's super, a man with whom she has a history of conflict. Who killed the super? Why was she in the back of a van ... tied up in a garbage bag? Lots of action in this one .. lots of characters to follow ... and suspect. Added to the murder mystery is a parallel story of a local developer, Cary Alder. FBI have eyes o him ... but he isn't working alone. How does tie into the murder of a super ,,, and the attempted murder of the woman .. or is she the one who murdered the super? Twists and turns are compelling. Characters are all deftly drawn. The ending, although not totally unexpected, was satisfactory. Although 30th in the series, this reads easily as a stand alone. Many thanks to the author / St Martin's Press / Netgalley for the digital copy of this crime fiction/mystery. Read and reviewed voluntarily, opinions expressed here are unbiased and entirely my own.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ellen

    One of Our Own (Gregor Demarkian, #30) by Jane Haddam. This was the author's final Demarkian mystery and my 21 in this series. I intend to do some catch-up on the few I've missed. J.H. has added so much to my enjoyment as a reader through her realistic portrayal of an Armenian man who retired from the F.B.I. but is called again and again to use his expertise in solving cases as a consultant. Gregor's evolving relationship with Bennis his wife adds to the depth of the man and his story. Each neigh One of Our Own (Gregor Demarkian, #30) by Jane Haddam. This was the author's final Demarkian mystery and my 21 in this series. I intend to do some catch-up on the few I've missed. J.H. has added so much to my enjoyment as a reader through her realistic portrayal of an Armenian man who retired from the F.B.I. but is called again and again to use his expertise in solving cases as a consultant. Gregor's evolving relationship with Bennis his wife adds to the depth of the man and his story. Each neighbor in the Armenian community has their own story that unfolds and blends into each chapter. The enchantment of the way of life offered by this author continues to bring me back for more. Cary Alder is a local developer with too much power in this Philadelphia neighborhood. How did he gain so much power and what does he intend to do with it? There is one tenant living in a building of his who is not in the least swayed by this man. Unfortunately, Marta Warkowski may have stood up to him once too often. A black van flies along Cavanaugh Street when suddenly the back doors open and a huge bag falls onto the road. A few witnesses run towards that bag and find inside is Marta...but is she dead? My sincere thanks to the author's sons, Matthew & Gregory, for bringing this book through to publication after her passing. May Jane Haddam rest in Heavenly peace.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bookreporter.com Mystery & Thriller

    ONE OF OUR OWN marks the bittersweet end of the long-running Gregor Demarkian series due to the passing of Jane Haddam, the pseudonym for prolific author Orania Papazoglou. While she penned a number of romance novels under her own name and other aliases, Papazoglou achieved her greatest success with the Demarkian books. She wrote ONE OF OUR OWN in the final year of her life, knowing it would be her last. Matthew and Gregory DeAndrea, Papazoglou’s sons, note in their touching Afterword that the bo ONE OF OUR OWN marks the bittersweet end of the long-running Gregor Demarkian series due to the passing of Jane Haddam, the pseudonym for prolific author Orania Papazoglou. While she penned a number of romance novels under her own name and other aliases, Papazoglou achieved her greatest success with the Demarkian books. She wrote ONE OF OUR OWN in the final year of her life, knowing it would be her last. Matthew and Gregory DeAndrea, Papazoglou’s sons, note in their touching Afterword that the book is their mother’s gift to her fans. For longtime readers of the series, ONE OF OUR OWN resolves some issues that were left hanging fire in FIGHTING CHANCE, while giving newcomers enough backstory to pick up on what has gone before. The first few pages introduce a character named Marta Warkowski, whose presence throughout the book is more off-stage than on, yet she serves as a catalyst for everything that happens. Warkowski, a long-term tenant in an apartment complex, may be a bit of a character but is on the side of the angels in her disputes with her building's supervisor and owner. When we meet her, she is jousting with some very real windmills; the next time we encounter her, she is in a comatose state. At the request of local law enforcement, Demarkian is drawn into the investigation but becomes more deeply involved when a corpse is found in her apartment. His own inquiries are dovetailing with those of his former agency, the FBI, who have an eye on Cary Alder, an enigmatic Philadelphia real estate magnate who owns the apartment in which Warkowski resides. It seems that Alder has business interests on several fronts that stray far beyond high-rises. Demarkian’s involvement in these proceedings is reluctant at best, given that he and his wife, Bennis, have just begun fostering Javier through their church. Little is known about the seven-year-old boy, except that he apparently is able to communicate only in Spanish. This new addition to the family (as well as another) provides Demarkian with a bit of a respite from the intellectual rigors of the case with which he is involved. That is, until a surprising source reveals Javier’s origin, even as it appears that the mysteries of the attack on Warkowski and the presence of the body in her apartment are on the verge of being solved. Possibly. ONE OF OUR OWN ends satisfactorily but not neatly, making it more realistic. In its complexity, it is one of Haddam’s best books. It slices into and out of contemporary issues without necessarily resolving any of them, yet provides interesting points of discussion without succumbing totally to political correctness. It is also a fitting conclusion for Haddam’s loyal readers, while providing a convenient place for those seeking out a new series to jump on before seeking out her backlist. Oh, and one more thing about that Afterword. While Haddam did not write it, one cannot help but heed well the final sentence. No peeking, but be sure not to skip it. Reviewed by Joe Hartlaub

  6. 5 out of 5

    AC

    I did not know that this was part of a series - much less one with 29 books prior to this. This is, though, the final Gregor Demarkian book, as the author died of cancer while writing it. The book was finished by her sons. While this can be read as a standalone, it did not work well in that regard for the reasons below. This may be due to the sons completing it, but the editor should shoulder part of this as well. This is a slow, slow ride of a book. It opens with a nine part prologue, so all the I did not know that this was part of a series - much less one with 29 books prior to this. This is, though, the final Gregor Demarkian book, as the author died of cancer while writing it. The book was finished by her sons. While this can be read as a standalone, it did not work well in that regard for the reasons below. This may be due to the sons completing it, but the editor should shoulder part of this as well. This is a slow, slow ride of a book. It opens with a nine part prologue, so all the major players can be introduced, instead of pushing them into the narrative, to be introduced more organically. I found this annoying. A 14 year old boy takes a bus to a prison to visit someone named "Russ" who I presumed was his father. There's no indication as to why Russ is locked up. In fact, we don't find out the actual reason until almost the 75% mark. I also found this annoying, as other characters would mention him and that he's gone nutty into conspiracy theories, almost making it sound like he was locked up because he was mentally unbalanced. But what did he do, exactly? There's an old Armenian woman named Marta, who lives in a rent-controlled apartment, and who has arguments with the building's super, Hernandez, because he wants her to move out of her three room apartment into a single room so a larger Hispanic/Latino family can move in. This doesn't go over well with Marta, who is a racist, hating the Latinos, most of whom she's convinced are there illegally. There's a bunch of nuns, doing their best to help the community, which is admirable, but there's also a point where one of the nuns infodumps the history of American nuns via dialogue. They've seen seeing a black van from time to time, and worry it's ICE, come to pick off the adults and children they have in the church/school. There's Tommy, the 14 year old, who seems to be smarter and more level headed than almost anyone else in this book. There's Meera, from Mumbai, who hates Americans and America, and wants to move back, continuing to add to the cash stockpile she has going right now. There's Clare, from Lithuania, who likewise hates America, but who also hates Indians like Meera. There's a Latino whose name I forget who doesn't like black people. Everyone seems to be a giant, raging racist here. Marta, who famously does not go out at night, suddenly does, stomping her way to the Adler Properties office. The building in which she lives is owned by Cary Adler. He owns a number of buildings, it seems. He also has various loans that he has to pay on. While Tommy and the priest are walking, a black van is racing down the street. It loses control, slamming sideways into a light pole. The back doors pop open, and what looks like a large trash bag falls out. It's a body - more specifically, an older woman, still alive, but in bad shape. I knew who it was immediately. Then we get a whole bunch of stuff about illegal immigrants and a racist cop. Gregor and his wife Bennis are fostering a 7 year old Latino boy, so there's discussion of paperwork, etc. It turns out that Adler is under investigation by the feds for coyote operations - that is, bringing people illegally over the border and getting them to Philly so they can work in his various buildings, if possible. Clare and Meera are both money people, and they move money around to make things seem a bit rosier than they really are at Adler Properties. But the feds are having a tough time, because although they can see that movement of money, they can't quite pin it down. ICE shows up at the church to arrest some 70 year old janitor who had a DUI and served his time. Gregor wanders around as a consultant for the police, who don't say it, but don't want him there. He doesn't add much as a consultant. It takes a long time to get to the point where things start folding in on Adler. I won't spoil what's happening with the coyote operation except to say it isn't quite as bad or as usual for what we consider coyotes to be. Eventually, the case is wrapped up, with multiple pieces coming together at the same time. The writing is fine, some of the characters were nicely fleshed out, but this book couldn't seem to decide just what it wanted to be. Discussion of the currently broken immigration system and abuses by ICE? Social commentary on people living in cramped quarters, barely eking out a living? White collar crime and embezzlement and/or money laundering? An investigation into an assault and then later, a murder? Race relations and how most everyone is racist to their core? Who knows? It's very, very slow. If you can't get through multiple POVs and narrative that seems to add nothing whatsoever to the store, this is not for you. If you're a reader of the series, you'll likely find it satisfying enough a finale. Two stars out of five. Sorry, folks, this was just not for me. Thanks to Minotaur and NetGalley for the review copy.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Pam McClure

    Wonderful last book As usual I loved the book. I love Jane Haddam’s writing and her characters and the atmosphere. I wonder if it was hard for her to write the ending, which I won’t talk about so not to spoil. I recommend the whole series to all mystery lovers, and I’d read them in order if possible as the relationships develop over time. I shall miss Jane Haddam a lot.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Louise

    I was so happy to know Jane Haddam had written another Demarkian novel...then I was so sad to learn she had died from breast cancer. The book wrapped things up nicely....her usual sardonic self came through and loved it. Very up to date topics and a thoroughly enjoyable read

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sue Kelso

    I read this book knowing it would be the last Gregor Demarkian book. I'll miss this series so much. Bennis and Gregor decide to foster a child who had come into the US as an unaccompanied minor. Being a Jane Haddams book, of course it draws on current events. All of her books do so. A black van has been driving by the Catholic school and church that arranged the foster. The nuns are nervous that it could be ice. During an ice storm, one of the black vans hits a light pole and a body wrapped in a I read this book knowing it would be the last Gregor Demarkian book. I'll miss this series so much. Bennis and Gregor decide to foster a child who had come into the US as an unaccompanied minor. Being a Jane Haddams book, of course it draws on current events. All of her books do so. A black van has been driving by the Catholic school and church that arranged the foster. The nuns are nervous that it could be ice. During an ice storm, one of the black vans hits a light pole and a body wrapped in a garbage bag falls out the back. It takes awhile to identify the person, who survived but is in a coma. Gregor is asked to assist the Philadelphia police on the case. The body is a cantankerous older woman who is constantly suing her landlord. What does she have to do with the van and ultimately the child, Javier, that is the foster child. All through the book there is a side plot about Russ, the man who shot Gregor, and his family. Russ believes there will be a civil war and his paranoia concerns his family and Father Tibor. There are a lot of characters in this book who we have grown to know and love over the previous 29 books. If this review confuses you on who they are, you should go back to the beginning and read the whole series. The book ends with a surprise twist and a happy hopeful ending. It made me smile. Then I read the afterwards written by Jane's sons and I cried. Excellent job Orania and it was a pleasure knowing you.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Gray

    I'm sad that this is the last of the Demarkian books and will caution readers that it's likely best for long time fans of the series. Haddam died last year and her sons worked with what she left to wrap things up in a way that will satisfy those familiar with the characters. This might be a tad frustrating for those who have not followed the saga and adventures of Bennis and Gregor. The long running saga of Russ, who shot Gregor comes to conclusion. The wonderful Armenian American neighborhood f I'm sad that this is the last of the Demarkian books and will caution readers that it's likely best for long time fans of the series. Haddam died last year and her sons worked with what she left to wrap things up in a way that will satisfy those familiar with the characters. This might be a tad frustrating for those who have not followed the saga and adventures of Bennis and Gregor. The long running saga of Russ, who shot Gregor comes to conclusion. The wonderful Armenian American neighborhood figures large as well. It also has a fresh thread- Bennis and Gregor foster a teenage boy. Haddam also explores the issue of illegal immigration and how immigrants are treated. Thanks to Edelweiss for the ARC. I thoroughly enjoyed this, in part because of the plot and writing, and in part because it's a satisfying conclusion to a beloved series.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    It's hard to say goodbye. The mystery community lost a wonderful voice when Orania Papazoglou passed away before finishing this, the 30th book in her great series. Her sons picked up the torch and brought One of Our Own to publication. Thanks, guys. On one hand it is hard knowing this ends the series but long running story lines were tied up and I finished the book feeling satisfied. First, this may not work for most readers as a stand alone. As the 30th book, if you have not read the previous b It's hard to say goodbye. The mystery community lost a wonderful voice when Orania Papazoglou passed away before finishing this, the 30th book in her great series. Her sons picked up the torch and brought One of Our Own to publication. Thanks, guys. On one hand it is hard knowing this ends the series but long running story lines were tied up and I finished the book feeling satisfied. First, this may not work for most readers as a stand alone. As the 30th book, if you have not read the previous books this may leave you a bit confused. Having said that, it's still a great read. It's full of tension, various points of view, current issues and lots of strong emotions. There is a lot packed into this book. Immigration is front and center - some are people who have been in America for decades and some who are new to our country. We meet Javier, a seven year old boy who is taken in as a foster child by Bennis and Gregor, a child who came as an unaccompanied minor and was lucky to find shelter with a group of nuns. The elderly woman who has lived her whole life in the same apartment is angry and afraid due to the changes in her neighborhood. She especially is at odds with the apartment super. Other characters in the book are running their own illegal games and the Feds are very interested. Soon Gregor, former FBI, is asked to join the investigation. I won't say more to prevent spoilers. Fans of the series will be glad to spend time with the regular characters we have come to know and, if you enjoyed One of Our Own as much as I did, you will read the end and say thank you, Orania, for many, many hours of reading pleasure. My thanks to the publisher, Minotaur Books and NetGalley for giving me an advance copy in exchange for my honest review.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Gregor Demarkian and his wife, writer Bennis Hannaford have agreed to foster a young boy found in a refugee center, which brings them to St. Catherine's Church and School, and the nuns who run the school, just when a long-time parishioner is found almost dead in the street, after being attacked. Marta has lived in the same apartment for her entire life, but has become a stranger in her own neighborhood as the population has changed from Polish to Spanish. Apartments and immigration--those are th Gregor Demarkian and his wife, writer Bennis Hannaford have agreed to foster a young boy found in a refugee center, which brings them to St. Catherine's Church and School, and the nuns who run the school, just when a long-time parishioner is found almost dead in the street, after being attacked. Marta has lived in the same apartment for her entire life, but has become a stranger in her own neighborhood as the population has changed from Polish to Spanish. Apartments and immigration--those are the twin strands running through this somber but ultimately hopeful book, as a local real estate mogul and the two women who are involved in his machinations meet their appropriate fates and Javier settles into the Demarkian household. Sadly, this is the last of the Demarkian tales, published posthumously.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Diane Hernandez

    One of Our Own follows police consultant, Gregor. A trash bag falls out of an unmarked van in Philadelphia’s predominately Armenian neighborhood. Inside is a woman in a coma. When the police arrive at her home, they find her dead super locked inside. Who were the woman’s kidnappers and why did they do it? Did the kidnappers or the woman kill the super? Most of the things I didn’t like about this book were my own fault. I didn’t do any research about the book before requesting it. It is the thirti One of Our Own follows police consultant, Gregor. A trash bag falls out of an unmarked van in Philadelphia’s predominately Armenian neighborhood. Inside is a woman in a coma. When the police arrive at her home, they find her dead super locked inside. Who were the woman’s kidnappers and why did they do it? Did the kidnappers or the woman kill the super? Most of the things I didn’t like about this book were my own fault. I didn’t do any research about the book before requesting it. It is the thirtieth and final book in the series. I haven’t read any of the previous books. I spent most of this novel confused by all the characters’ backstories, which I’m sure were fully fleshed out in previous books in the series. There is about 1,000 pages of history that I missed. However, the writing style, mystery and the focus on immigrant policies was good. 4 stars to One of Our Own! It is sure to be an excellent conclusion to fans of the series. Thanks to St. Martin’s Press and NetGalley for a copy in exchange for my honest review.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Catie LeMar

    Ironically, One of Our Own is the last book in this series but my first introduction to it. I thoroughly enjoyed the mystery in this book, about a woman who is flung out of a black van, barely alive, while in her apartment lies a man who has been murdered. There are so many pieces to this puzzle that all come together to form a fairly satisfying picture. It was a bit difficult to keep all the different characters straight. I don't feel I missed anything by not having read any of the other books Ironically, One of Our Own is the last book in this series but my first introduction to it. I thoroughly enjoyed the mystery in this book, about a woman who is flung out of a black van, barely alive, while in her apartment lies a man who has been murdered. There are so many pieces to this puzzle that all come together to form a fairly satisfying picture. It was a bit difficult to keep all the different characters straight. I don't feel I missed anything by not having read any of the other books in the series yet, but it may have helped in that aspect. I did enjoy the characters and their varied lives, and look forward to reading more. I recommend this book to anyone who likes a good mystery and needs a little escape from the real world. Thank you to #NetGalley and the publisher for the ARC. All opinions are my own.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kayleigh 2babesandabookshelf

    A few things to note: -This is the final book (#30) in the Gregor Demarkian series and this is a fact that I did not know before picking this one up. Because of this, I feel like my star rating is lower for the simple fact that I literally missed 30 other stories featuring this character and was absolutely confused while reading it -I listened to this on audiobook and it was pretty slow, even at 1.5 speed. I wish I had been able to speed it up a bit because it really dragged for me -This was a slow A few things to note: -This is the final book (#30) in the Gregor Demarkian series and this is a fact that I did not know before picking this one up. Because of this, I feel like my star rating is lower for the simple fact that I literally missed 30 other stories featuring this character and was absolutely confused while reading it -I listened to this on audiobook and it was pretty slow, even at 1.5 speed. I wish I had been able to speed it up a bit because it really dragged for me -This was a slow burn mystery/thriller and I usually prefer lots of action early on to pique my interest -The characters are super racist in this book which was off-putting for me. It felt very unnecessary to the storyline

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    I know people are going to say 5 stars?? But my reviews are always personal feelings and knowing that there will never be another chance to spend time with Gregor Demarkian and Bennis and Father Tibor has to color the way this book read. This has always been one of my favorite series, even when the author started to spend more time on political/social commentary than characters and plot. The previous book in the series was a real downer and this one had its moments but when I finished I felt lik I know people are going to say 5 stars?? But my reviews are always personal feelings and knowing that there will never be another chance to spend time with Gregor Demarkian and Bennis and Father Tibor has to color the way this book read. This has always been one of my favorite series, even when the author started to spend more time on political/social commentary than characters and plot. The previous book in the series was a real downer and this one had its moments but when I finished I felt like I could let the characters go and they will be okay. Thanks Jane Haddam ; you will be missed.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Pat Yosca

    I did not realize that Jane Haddam had passed away and that this was published posthumously by her sons. I always enjoyed her Gregor Demarkian mysteries so it was bittersweet to read this final book. It was as always so well written that it kept you on the edge of your seat predicting who did what and when. The postscript from from her sons was a great tribute to her as a mother and a writer.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jan

    I have no idea why I haven't kept up with Demarkian for the last six years, but I was excited to see one on offer from NetGalley. But. I was sad to see that the author was assaulted by a virulent form of Breast Cancer and that this is the last one that she wrote. At least we have all the others to go back to and can see the list on https://www.bookseriesinorder.com/ Now then. Demarkian is retired FBI with a degree in accounting and is currently on board as a consultant to the Philadelphia PD on a I have no idea why I haven't kept up with Demarkian for the last six years, but I was excited to see one on offer from NetGalley. But. I was sad to see that the author was assaulted by a virulent form of Breast Cancer and that this is the last one that she wrote. At least we have all the others to go back to and can see the list on https://www.bookseriesinorder.com/ Now then. Demarkian is retired FBI with a degree in accounting and is currently on board as a consultant to the Philadelphia PD on an apparent attempted murder. He had happened to be close by the parish church on a private errand involving the fostering of a 7 year old traumatized boy who spoke no English (but understood much) and, apparently, a rescue dachshund. What was immediately known is that a large leaf bag containing a battered older woman who lived nearby fell out of a sinister big black van which had recently been cruising the ethnically changed neighborhood. No ID and in a coma, but once identified and residence located, a dead body with no face was found in her flat. Now comes a very complex investigation involving ethnic neighborhoods, legal and clandestine immigrants and the attitudes and prejudices that they have as well as the ones they face (including Demarkian himself). An excellent tale as a mystery and as a reminder to all of us whose parent, grands, and greats came here from wherever to face the unknown. I requested and received a free ebook copy from St. Martin's Press/Minotaur Books via NetGalley. Thank you!

  19. 4 out of 5

    sssnoo reads

    Reading this book broke my heart. I've read and enjoyed all 30 Gregor Demarkian mysteries. Jane Haddam's quirky style and quirky characters made me smile and think about the complexity of personalities. But this is her last book. The author passed away in late 2019 from breast cancer and her sons helped bring this final volume to her fans. Thank you Jane and family for bringing the body of work into my life. I started reading Haddam's books back in the '90s. I never thought about the reality tha Reading this book broke my heart. I've read and enjoyed all 30 Gregor Demarkian mysteries. Jane Haddam's quirky style and quirky characters made me smile and think about the complexity of personalities. But this is her last book. The author passed away in late 2019 from breast cancer and her sons helped bring this final volume to her fans. Thank you Jane and family for bringing the body of work into my life. I started reading Haddam's books back in the '90s. I never thought about the reality that I might outlive my favorite serial writers. Sigh. This joins the Dr. Siri series by Colin Cotteril The Coroner's Lunch (He is still alive and writing other things) in favorite mystery series recently closed out. I need to find some new authors!

  20. 4 out of 5

    S. Smith

    For many reasons law enforcement consultant and former FBI agent Gregor Demarkian is contemplating retirement, but he is persuaded to assist the Philadelphia police with looking into a strange series of events. Can there be links among increased ICE activity near a local Catholic parish, a comatose older woman wrapped in a trash bag, a murdered apartment house superintendent, and a local developer under investigation for shady dealings? With Demarkian on the case, murky details soon become clear For many reasons law enforcement consultant and former FBI agent Gregor Demarkian is contemplating retirement, but he is persuaded to assist the Philadelphia police with looking into a strange series of events. Can there be links among increased ICE activity near a local Catholic parish, a comatose older woman wrapped in a trash bag, a murdered apartment house superintendent, and a local developer under investigation for shady dealings? With Demarkian on the case, murky details soon become clearer and Gregor can concentrate on some significant personal decisions. This is the final novel in a long-running mystery series, and though it will be most fully enjoyed by readers familiar with the many recurring characters populating Gregor's quirky Armenian-American neighborhood, it can be read easily as a standalone. The book also includes a moving memorial tribute to the late author, written by her sons. Thanks to the publisher for supplying an advance reading copy via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    I had mixed feelings opening this book. Jane Haddam died in 2019, after completing this one last book, and I was reluctant to start it. I love this series and am sorry to see it end. Jane Haddam was a combination of a traditional detective fiction writer and a contemporary social issue writer. In her best books, the social issues didn’t overwhelm the story – in her worst books, they did. This book is a loving wrap up to her long, revered and beloved series, and if you are a fan of Gregor Demarki I had mixed feelings opening this book. Jane Haddam died in 2019, after completing this one last book, and I was reluctant to start it. I love this series and am sorry to see it end. Jane Haddam was a combination of a traditional detective fiction writer and a contemporary social issue writer. In her best books, the social issues didn’t overwhelm the story – in her worst books, they did. This book is a loving wrap up to her long, revered and beloved series, and if you are a fan of Gregor Demarkian I recommend it. Like a good wrap up to a great TV series (Breaking Bad comes to mind), a satisfying wrap up is really the greatest gift a writer can give to readers. Agatha Christie, who knew she had impending dementia, wrapped up her beloved characters in a very final way, but Haddam sets her Demarkian off on a new life path. It’s enough for this reader to hope he’ll enjoy it. This book opens on an icy winter day in Philadelphia as main series characters Gregor Demarkian (a former FBI agent, and now a police consultant), and his wife Bennis (a well known fantasy writer), head to their neighborhood Catholic church and attached school to pick up a foster child. While they’ve never discussed children, this one, Javier, seems to have fallen into their laps. Bennis begins an intense round of cooking as Javier settles in, with the help of their young neighbor, Tommy, whose stepfather went away to prison in the last book. Gregor, meanwhile, is asked to consult on a case involving a woman who had fallen out of the back of a van, wrapped in a garbage bag, right in front of series stalwart Father Tibor and young Tommy as they walk home one night. The woman, Marta, turns out to have been a life long resident of a building that has slowly changed from the Eastern European Catholic emigrees of her youth to a mostly Hispanic emigree population. The super is always bugging her about moving from her large 3 bedroom to a smaller apartment so a bigger family can have hers. She refuses to budge, has a restraining order against the super, and persistently takes her landlord to court. Her landlord is a Donald Trump like figure who owns lots of buildings throughout the city and apparently has lots of shady financing keeping him afloat. While this is a gentler outing from the usually fiery Haddam, she’s still concerned with ICE agents and differing attitudes toward immigrants. The subject matter is incredibly timely. As always, a Haddam novel is full of complexity – of character, of plot, and of ideas. After such a long and glorious run, however, there’s also comfort here in these familiar characters and the familiar Armenian neighborhood where Gregor and Bennis have made their home. The series ends on a New Year and on a new direction for Gregor and his family. I had a tear in my eye but I also felt an immense gratitude for this long, wonderful, eccentric, and beautiful series of books

  22. 5 out of 5

    Shirley Wetzel

    Marta Warkowski no longer feels safe in the Philadelphia neighborhood where she grew up. Most of the other Polish families have moved on, replaced by refugees from Central America. They look at her with suspicion; teenage boys taunt her in a language she can’t understand. She no longer feels like she belongs here, but she has nowhere else to go. When her super once again hassles her to give up her larger apartment to one of the larger families in need, she’s had enough. She is afraid to go out a Marta Warkowski no longer feels safe in the Philadelphia neighborhood where she grew up. Most of the other Polish families have moved on, replaced by refugees from Central America. They look at her with suspicion; teenage boys taunt her in a language she can’t understand. She no longer feels like she belongs here, but she has nowhere else to go. When her super once again hassles her to give up her larger apartment to one of the larger families in need, she’s had enough. She is afraid to go out at night, but she can’t wait to take her complaints to the building’s owner, Cary Alder. Alder is an unpopular, unscrupulous property developer. The low rent properties he owns are his bread and butter, but he caters to the one percent. It’s well known that he uses coyotes to smuggle in illegals to work for him. It’s also rumored that his bookkeeping is somewhat creative. Marta is a major pain in his side, always complaining, frequently taking his business to court. The police have been investigating him for years, but so far he’s covered his tracks. St. Catherine’s School staff provide education, spiritual guidance, and other assistance to their students and the community. They also find foster homes for unaccompanied refugee children. They are accustomed to the frequent ICE raids and visits from social services, but the unmarked black vans cruising the neighborship recently are something new. It is from one of those vans that a bundle wrapped in garbage bags is ejected. Two witnesses discover the bags contain the body of an elderly woman, barely clinging to life. At the hospital she is identified as Marta Warkowski, a long-time parish member at St. Catherine’s. Gregor Demarkian is a retired FBI agent living in the neighborhood. He still consults with the Philadelphia police, but his long-suffering wife Bennis has been looking forward to the end of that involvement for some time. Now that they’re fostering Javier, a young refugee boy with emotional issues, Gregor agrees this might be the right time. When Gregor is asked to consult on the investigation of the attack on Marta Warkowski, the murder of a man found dead in her apartment, and the possible connection to Cary Alder, he decides he can take on one last case. This is indeed the final case for Gregor Demarkian, and the final novel for Ms. Haddam/Orania Papazoglu. The story lines for the main characters are tied up neatly, and the reader knows they will be fine in the future. Fans of the series will be pleased and satisfied with its ending. In a touching epilogue, her sons Matthew and Gregory DeAndrea pay homage to her and her long and successful career. I received this ebook from Netgalley.com

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tamara Morning

    Title: One of Our Own Author: Jane Haddam Genre: Mystery Rating: 4 out of 5 So…I’ve actually never read any of the previous 29 books in this series. I know. Despite that, I didn’t have any problems stepping into this story. The mixture of cultures in this story was fascinating, and I would definitely read the other books in this series. I had no idea what was really going on here, but to me the novel was about the characters anyway, not so much the mystery aspect—and what was really going on was pret Title: One of Our Own Author: Jane Haddam Genre: Mystery Rating: 4 out of 5 So…I’ve actually never read any of the previous 29 books in this series. I know. Despite that, I didn’t have any problems stepping into this story. The mixture of cultures in this story was fascinating, and I would definitely read the other books in this series. I had no idea what was really going on here, but to me the novel was about the characters anyway, not so much the mystery aspect—and what was really going on was pretty cool. Vivid characters, solid writing, I’d say this series is worth checking out. (Galley courtesy of St. Martin’s Press in exchange for an honest review.) More reviews at Tomorrow is Another Day

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ilona

    Final case of Gregor Demarkian, former FBI agent and now consultant. I have read a few of the books in this series, and eventually will get to them all. This book gives you a glimpse in the world of the illegal/undocumented, those who have entered legally, and 2nd plus generations. Their hopes, drives, cultural difference, all pulled together in a tale involving murder, conspiracy, fraud, human trafficking. I enjoyed how the different characters were introduced and how they eventually crossed pat Final case of Gregor Demarkian, former FBI agent and now consultant. I have read a few of the books in this series, and eventually will get to them all. This book gives you a glimpse in the world of the illegal/undocumented, those who have entered legally, and 2nd plus generations. Their hopes, drives, cultural difference, all pulled together in a tale involving murder, conspiracy, fraud, human trafficking. I enjoyed how the different characters were introduced and how they eventually crossed paths, and how Gregor puts it all together. You can easily read this book on its own, but you will want to go back and read the rest. I was saddened when I realized that the author has passed away. Thank you to St. Martin’s Press for letting me have an early read.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Karin Carlson

    In Jane Haddam's One of Our Own, Gregor Demarkian, former FBI agent and police consultant, returns for his final case—a surprising murder and an attempted murder, which threaten the safety of his Philadelphia neighborhood. Sadly this author passed away and there will be no more in this wonderful series. This is the 30th and I feel that this series goes out on a good note. If you haven't read any of this series, you have a lot of catching up to do. Thank you NetGalley for the advanced readers copy In Jane Haddam's One of Our Own, Gregor Demarkian, former FBI agent and police consultant, returns for his final case—a surprising murder and an attempted murder, which threaten the safety of his Philadelphia neighborhood. Sadly this author passed away and there will be no more in this wonderful series. This is the 30th and I feel that this series goes out on a good note. If you haven't read any of this series, you have a lot of catching up to do. Thank you NetGalley for the advanced readers copy for review.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Christine Moore

    This was a great murder mystery book. Gregor Demarkian former FBI agent is called in to consult with the police with a murder case. This is the 30th book in the series and I wished I had read the others. I followed along with the story but I didn't understand some of the references to other books. I really enjoyed this book and its characters. I received an advanced readers copy and all opinions are my own. This was a great murder mystery book. Gregor Demarkian former FBI agent is called in to consult with the police with a murder case. This is the 30th book in the series and I wished I had read the others. I followed along with the story but I didn't understand some of the references to other books. I really enjoyed this book and its characters. I received an advanced readers copy and all opinions are my own.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ilyssa Wesche

    I especially loved Gregor and Bennis in this one. The mystery was a little convoluted but I didn't mind. I had NO IDEA Jane Haddam died last year so I was extra sad at the end. I have so much enjoyed the Gregor Demarkian novels from the beginning, when they revolved less around the characters and more around a holiday, and am sad they will be no more. I especially loved Gregor and Bennis in this one. The mystery was a little convoluted but I didn't mind. I had NO IDEA Jane Haddam died last year so I was extra sad at the end. I have so much enjoyed the Gregor Demarkian novels from the beginning, when they revolved less around the characters and more around a holiday, and am sad they will be no more.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    When life for the entire universe and planet turns on its end and like everyone else you "have nothing to do" while your place of work is closed and you are in #COVID19 #socialisolation, superspeed readers like me can read 250+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. (I AM BORED!!) ANd it is too hot to go outside, so why not sit in from of the blasting a/c and read and review books?? I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGal When life for the entire universe and planet turns on its end and like everyone else you "have nothing to do" while your place of work is closed and you are in #COVID19 #socialisolation, superspeed readers like me can read 250+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. (I AM BORED!!) ANd it is too hot to go outside, so why not sit in from of the blasting a/c and read and review books?? I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. In Jane Haddam's One of Our Own, Gregor Demarkian, former FBI agent and police consultant, returns for his final case—a surprising murder and an attempted murder, which threaten the safety of his Philadelphia neighbourhood. A mysterious black van is spotted by several people at various times in the area around Cavanaugh Street, Philadelphia's Armenian-American enclave. Presumed by some to be related to the increasing ICE raids around the area, the mystery deepens one night when a body falls out of the back of the van when speeding through the neighbourhood. Marta Warkowski, a reclusive older woman, is found bound up in a garbage bag after it falls out of the van. In a coma, Warkowski is unable to tell police how she ended up as she did. When they go to search her apartment, the police find the dead body of her building's super, a man with whom she has a history of conflict. How did she end up in garbage bag in the back of a mysterious van? How did he end up dead in her locked apartment? What does all of this have to do with the real estate holdings of infamous local developer, Cary Alder? Gregor Demarkian, a former FBI agent and consultant, is ready to retire. He and his wife Bennis have agreed to foster a child, Javier, with a mysterious past and limited language skills. But he has been pulled in once again, for a final case, to uncover the truth about the murder—and attempted murder—on Cavanaugh Street. I don't know Philly (other than getting seriously lost once there driving through) but I have some good friends who live there and I will recommend this book and its series to them after reading this. The book is well crafted and I loved that I did not know who the guilty party was right off the bat. (There was a certain very highly paid mystery Irish-American writer who I generally guessed who the killer was the moment that they are introduced! However, as she recently passed perhaps I can pass on this advice: it is the same with your daughter's books. ... lol) This is the THIRTIETH (yes, 30th!) book in the series but it can be read as a stand-alone novel - I liked it enough to look for Miss Haddam's other works at my local public library when it opens up again. - I miss reading books in hard copy. An enjoyable book, through and through, and decidedly worth checking out.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Meredith Rankin

    This is a final book in the series. I haven’t read any of the other titles. That’s unfortunate: I’m sure I missed a great deal of nuance in the story. There’s quite a bit of reference to earlier novels and some of that confused me. Even so, Haddam gave enough contextual clues that I was able to work out some of the characters’ past interactions. While a big part of the actual mystery didn’t interest me, the characters did. That kept me reading. Characters like Bennis, Gregor’s wife, and the pries This is a final book in the series. I haven’t read any of the other titles. That’s unfortunate: I’m sure I missed a great deal of nuance in the story. There’s quite a bit of reference to earlier novels and some of that confused me. Even so, Haddam gave enough contextual clues that I was able to work out some of the characters’ past interactions. While a big part of the actual mystery didn’t interest me, the characters did. That kept me reading. Characters like Bennis, Gregor’s wife, and the priest, Gregor’s old friend, intrigued me. Tommy, a young teen, struggles in his relationship with his surrogate father, now jailed for murder. Sister Margaret Mary fears ICE raids (as most of the residents in the Hispanic neighborhood do) and I could understand and feel the fear an unmarked van sparked throughout the area. Pickles the overdressed dog made a terrific addition to the cast. Some characters I rooted for; others I rooted for their downfall. But they were always believable. Even the unsympathetic ones, such as Marta (who refuses to give up the apartment that’s been in her family for generations) or Meera (always infuriated by Americans), sparked an emotional response. Even when I didn’t have a clue what was happening, I was apprehensive about what lay ahead for these people. As the book went on, the conflict became clearer. It never felt very intense. While I never understood why the police would consult with Demarkian–he seems in their way–I did like how he investigated. While nothing in the book stood out as exceptional, One of Our Own is still a good mystery. The book ends on a hopeful note. It’s a bittersweet but fitting farewell, I think, to a beloved series, and I feel confident that the characters will live on in readers’ imaginations. When Haddam wrote this book, she was dying of cancer. In a sense, this is her goodbye to her supportive fans. They are probably the best judges of the quality of One of Our Own, not me. The book is probably best for fans of the Gregor Demarkian series. Even so, I enjoyed it. Note: I received a complimentary copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. All opinions are my own. This review will appear on my blog on 9 November 2020.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Woodstock Pickett

    A double farewell, to the author and to her main character who was featured in 30 books, beginning back in 1990. Haddam created an appealing Armenian American community in a small corner of Philadelphia, with a retired FBI agent who had moved back to the environs of his youth, after a long career in Washington, DC. In each book, Gregor Demarkian was called upon to consult with local law enforcement to help them analyze a crime with strange or confusing characteristics. In One of Our Own , Gregor h A double farewell, to the author and to her main character who was featured in 30 books, beginning back in 1990. Haddam created an appealing Armenian American community in a small corner of Philadelphia, with a retired FBI agent who had moved back to the environs of his youth, after a long career in Washington, DC. In each book, Gregor Demarkian was called upon to consult with local law enforcement to help them analyze a crime with strange or confusing characteristics. In One of Our Own , Gregor has been thinking about full retirement. He and his wife have agreed to foster a young Latino boy, an undocumented immigrant. But before he makes his decision, Gregor is called upon once again - to assist the police as they investigate the strange discovery of a woman, still alive, but wrapped in large black plastic bags and dumped on the street. In her apartment, they find the bloody body of the man who manages the building she lives in. In her usual style, Haddam draws on current headlines, current political controversies, and current personalities in the news for her story. Gregor does decide to retire, I'll leave it to other readers to learn the details of solving the crimes. Haddam died in the summer of 2019 as the book was being readied for publication. There is a poignant afterword written by her sons. For those who are unfamiliar with the series, each title is worth searching for. It's not completely necessary to read the books in order, but it does help. Many of Gregor's neighbors in Philadelphia are important parts of the story, and some developments make not always make much sense if the books are read out of order. I found many paperback copies in used book exchanges, and also relied on inter library loan to find others. I always felt my effort to get the book involved was worth it.

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