web site hit counter Wheels of Courage: How Paralyzed Veterans from World War II Invented Wheelchair Sports, Fought for Disability Rights, and Inspired a Nation - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Wheels of Courage: How Paralyzed Veterans from World War II Invented Wheelchair Sports, Fought for Disability Rights, and Inspired a Nation

Availability: Ready to download

Out of the carnage of World War II comes an unforgettable tale about defying the odds and finding hope in the most harrowing of circumstances. Wheels of Courage tells the stirring story of the soldiers, sailors, and marines who were paralyzed on the battlefield during World War II-at the Battle of the Bulge, on the island of Okinawa, inside Japanese POW camps-only to retur Out of the carnage of World War II comes an unforgettable tale about defying the odds and finding hope in the most harrowing of circumstances. Wheels of Courage tells the stirring story of the soldiers, sailors, and marines who were paralyzed on the battlefield during World War II-at the Battle of the Bulge, on the island of Okinawa, inside Japanese POW camps-only to return to a world unused to dealing with their traumatic injuries. Doctors considered paraplegics to be "dead-enders" and "no-hopers," with the life expectancy of about a year. Societal stigma was so ingrained that playing sports was considered out-of-bounds for so-called "crippled bodies." But servicemen like Johnny Winterholler, a standout athlete from Wyoming before he was captured on Corregidor, and Stan Den Adel, shot in the back just days before the peace treaty ending the war was signed, refused to waste away in their hospital beds. Thanks to medical advances and the dedication of innovative physicians and rehabilitation coaches, they asserted their right to a life without limitations. The paralyzed veterans formed the first wheelchair basketball teams, and soon the Rolling Devils, the Flying Wheels, and the Gizz Kids were barnstorming the nation and filling arenas with cheering, incredulous fans. The wounded-warriors-turned-playmakers were joined by their British counterparts, led by the indomitable Dr. Ludwig Guttmann. Together, they triggered the birth of the Paralympic Games and opened the gymnasium doors to those with other disabilities, including survivors of the polio epidemic in the 1950s. Much as Jackie Robinson's breakthrough into the major leagues served as an opening salvo in the civil rights movement, these athletes helped jump-start a global movement about human adaptability. Their unlikely heroics on the court showed the world that it is ability, not disability, that matters most. Off the court, their push for equal rights led to dramatic changes in how civilized societies treat individuals with disabilities: from kneeling buses and curb cutouts to the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Their saga is yet another lasting legacy of the Greatest Generation, one that has been long overlooked. Drawing on the veterans' own words, stories, and memories about this pioneering era, David Davis has crafted a narrative of survival, resilience, and triumph for sports fans and athletes, history buffs and military veterans, and people with and without disabilities.


Compare

Out of the carnage of World War II comes an unforgettable tale about defying the odds and finding hope in the most harrowing of circumstances. Wheels of Courage tells the stirring story of the soldiers, sailors, and marines who were paralyzed on the battlefield during World War II-at the Battle of the Bulge, on the island of Okinawa, inside Japanese POW camps-only to retur Out of the carnage of World War II comes an unforgettable tale about defying the odds and finding hope in the most harrowing of circumstances. Wheels of Courage tells the stirring story of the soldiers, sailors, and marines who were paralyzed on the battlefield during World War II-at the Battle of the Bulge, on the island of Okinawa, inside Japanese POW camps-only to return to a world unused to dealing with their traumatic injuries. Doctors considered paraplegics to be "dead-enders" and "no-hopers," with the life expectancy of about a year. Societal stigma was so ingrained that playing sports was considered out-of-bounds for so-called "crippled bodies." But servicemen like Johnny Winterholler, a standout athlete from Wyoming before he was captured on Corregidor, and Stan Den Adel, shot in the back just days before the peace treaty ending the war was signed, refused to waste away in their hospital beds. Thanks to medical advances and the dedication of innovative physicians and rehabilitation coaches, they asserted their right to a life without limitations. The paralyzed veterans formed the first wheelchair basketball teams, and soon the Rolling Devils, the Flying Wheels, and the Gizz Kids were barnstorming the nation and filling arenas with cheering, incredulous fans. The wounded-warriors-turned-playmakers were joined by their British counterparts, led by the indomitable Dr. Ludwig Guttmann. Together, they triggered the birth of the Paralympic Games and opened the gymnasium doors to those with other disabilities, including survivors of the polio epidemic in the 1950s. Much as Jackie Robinson's breakthrough into the major leagues served as an opening salvo in the civil rights movement, these athletes helped jump-start a global movement about human adaptability. Their unlikely heroics on the court showed the world that it is ability, not disability, that matters most. Off the court, their push for equal rights led to dramatic changes in how civilized societies treat individuals with disabilities: from kneeling buses and curb cutouts to the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Their saga is yet another lasting legacy of the Greatest Generation, one that has been long overlooked. Drawing on the veterans' own words, stories, and memories about this pioneering era, David Davis has crafted a narrative of survival, resilience, and triumph for sports fans and athletes, history buffs and military veterans, and people with and without disabilities.

45 review for Wheels of Courage: How Paralyzed Veterans from World War II Invented Wheelchair Sports, Fought for Disability Rights, and Inspired a Nation

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kerri

    This was a fascinating look at the development of wheelchair sports thanks to the work of World War II veterans, doctors, therapists, and allies. Before WW2, a spinal cord injury meant a very short, bedridden life. But when doctors started treating the injuries as something to rehabilitate, they found that using sports like wheelchair basketball worked wonders both for the vets' physical and mental health. The book walks us through the medical advancements in spinal cord injury rehab; the develo This was a fascinating look at the development of wheelchair sports thanks to the work of World War II veterans, doctors, therapists, and allies. Before WW2, a spinal cord injury meant a very short, bedridden life. But when doctors started treating the injuries as something to rehabilitate, they found that using sports like wheelchair basketball worked wonders both for the vets' physical and mental health. The book walks us through the medical advancements in spinal cord injury rehab; the development of wheelchair sports that eventually led to things wheelchair divisions in marathons and the Paralympics; and how the playing tours of these athletes helped advance the disability rights movement. As a sports fan and the mother of a wheelchair-using kiddo, I found the whole thing immensely interesting and will probably be recommending it to everyone I know who has an interest in disability rights, veterans, medicine, rehabilitation, sports, and human beings. Also, the story about Marlon Brando in the bar was fantastic.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    What a well researched and entertaining read! David Davis’ exploration of wheelchair sports, disabled veterans, and the disability movement was uplifting and interesting. Spanning decades, Wheels of Courage was full of so many surprises - I couldn’t believe how crazy integrated wheelchair basketball was to Hollywood, politics, international relations, and more. I learned so much from this book, which showcases the triumph and resilience of the human spirit. A big thank you to Center Street for t What a well researched and entertaining read! David Davis’ exploration of wheelchair sports, disabled veterans, and the disability movement was uplifting and interesting. Spanning decades, Wheels of Courage was full of so many surprises - I couldn’t believe how crazy integrated wheelchair basketball was to Hollywood, politics, international relations, and more. I learned so much from this book, which showcases the triumph and resilience of the human spirit. A big thank you to Center Street for the finished copy!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Phi Beta Kappa Authors

    David Davis ΦBK, Hamilton College, 1984 Author From the publisher: Wheels of Courage tells the stirring story of the soldiers, sailors, and marines who were paralyzed on the battlefield during World War II-at the Battle of the Bulge, on the island of Okinawa, inside Japanese POW camps-only to return to a world unused to dealing with their traumatic injuries. Doctors considered paraplegics to be "dead-enders" and "no-hopers," with the life expectancy of about a year. Societal stigma was so ingrained David Davis ΦBK, Hamilton College, 1984 Author From the publisher: Wheels of Courage tells the stirring story of the soldiers, sailors, and marines who were paralyzed on the battlefield during World War II-at the Battle of the Bulge, on the island of Okinawa, inside Japanese POW camps-only to return to a world unused to dealing with their traumatic injuries. Doctors considered paraplegics to be "dead-enders" and "no-hopers," with the life expectancy of about a year. Societal stigma was so ingrained that playing sports was considered out-of-bounds for so-called "crippled bodies." But servicemen like Johnny Winterholler, a standout athlete from Wyoming before he was captured on Corregidor, and Stan Den Adel, shot in the back just days before the peace treaty ending the war was signed, refused to waste away in their hospital beds. Thanks to medical advances and the dedication of innovative physicians and rehabilitation coaches, they asserted their right to a life without limitations. The paralyzed veterans formed the first wheelchair basketball teams, and soon the Rolling Devils, the Flying Wheels, and the Gizz Kids were barnstorming the nation and filling arenas with cheering, incredulous fans. The wounded-warriors-turned-playmakers were joined by their British counterparts, led by the indomitable Dr. Ludwig Guttmann. Together, they triggered the birth of the Paralympic Games and opened the gymnasium doors to those with other disabilities, including survivors of the polio epidemic in the 1950s. Much as Jackie Robinson's breakthrough into the major leagues served as an opening salvo in the civil rights movement, these athletes helped jump-start a global movement about human adaptability. Their unlikely heroics on the court showed the world that it is ability, not disability, that matters most. Off the court, their push for equal rights led to dramatic changes in how civilized societies treat individuals with disabilities: from kneeling buses and curb cutouts to the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Their saga is yet another lasting legacy of the Greatest Generation, one that has been long overlooked. Drawing on the veterans' own words, stories, and memories about this pioneering era, David Davis has crafted a narrative of survival, resilience, and triumph for sports fans and athletes, history buffs and military veterans, and people with and without disabilities.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    Beginning with the humanity of each man in the sports, progressing through graphic descriptions of the inhumanity forced upon them by war, to the cultural ignorance and effective ostracism by their fellow Americans, this book goes on to describe their heroic efforts AFTER the war. The paramedical community did the best they could for the time, but it was each man's own determination that brought him through to refuse to be defeated. Together they organized team sports and the early incarnation o Beginning with the humanity of each man in the sports, progressing through graphic descriptions of the inhumanity forced upon them by war, to the cultural ignorance and effective ostracism by their fellow Americans, this book goes on to describe their heroic efforts AFTER the war. The paramedical community did the best they could for the time, but it was each man's own determination that brought him through to refuse to be defeated. Together they organized team sports and the early incarnation of the Paralympic Games which includes amputees, accident sufferers, and those whose lives have been changed by diseases like polio, from countries around the world. This is a complex narrative of survival, resilience, and triumph for athletes, history buffs, military veterans, and people with and without disabilities, backed up by factual memories of the early pioneers of the movement. This is definitely a story of real bravery too long forgotten! Read it if you dare. I requested and received a free ebook copy from Center Street, a division of Hachette Book Group via NetGalley. Thank you!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Robert Yokoyama

    This book started out as an article in Los Angeles magazine. I appreciate the research David Davis did to expand that article into a book I loved learning about the history of the battles of World War II. I knew that soldiers fought and died in Europe but not in the Philippines. I learned about the long history of wheelchair basketball in this book. The sport started in California hospital wards in the years following the war and grew into an international sport. I am impressed that these wheelc This book started out as an article in Los Angeles magazine. I appreciate the research David Davis did to expand that article into a book I loved learning about the history of the battles of World War II. I knew that soldiers fought and died in Europe but not in the Philippines. I learned about the long history of wheelchair basketball in this book. The sport started in California hospital wards in the years following the war and grew into an international sport. I am impressed that these wheelchair athletes were able to defeat able bodied athletes.. I don't have the strength or coordination to play wheelchair basketball because all four of my limbs are affected by a disability, but I am inspired to stay physically fit just like a wheelchair basketball player by walking. I loved reading how each athlete participated in playing basketball regardless of the severity of their disability. They were grouped with athletes who were similar in disability. This is an excellent example of inclusion which is a big movement in the disability community.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mark Gorman

    Great history of people who made huge steps As a person who benefited from all their work. It is great to read the details of of the folks who changed the disabled community.

  7. 4 out of 5

    A. Davis

    Great book. Reads like a (good) novel but filled with new insights into the lives and triumphs of the so called disabled.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jaime

  9. 4 out of 5

    frances stevens

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jill Jaracz

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mackenzie Gillund

  14. 5 out of 5

    Don Wallace

  15. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Cheresnick

  16. 5 out of 5

    Carol

  17. 5 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kim Friant

  19. 4 out of 5

    Karen

  20. 5 out of 5

    Shantel

  21. 4 out of 5

    Melissa ahmed

  22. 5 out of 5

    Doris Moore

  23. 4 out of 5

    Micielle

  24. 5 out of 5

    Brandie

  25. 5 out of 5

    Douglass Abramson

  26. 4 out of 5

    Brenda Maki

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kye Cantey

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jillian McKee Loera

  29. 5 out of 5

    Fleet Sparrow

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Bullock

  31. 5 out of 5

    Shelley

  32. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Hubenthal

  33. 5 out of 5

    Lydia Wallace

  34. 5 out of 5

    Shelley

  35. 4 out of 5

    Joyce

  36. 5 out of 5

    Abeer Toma

  37. 4 out of 5

    Deborah Gerhart

  38. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie Cutler

  39. 5 out of 5

    Scott L. Frost

  40. 5 out of 5

    amy

  41. 4 out of 5

    Bettye Short

  42. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Radke

  43. 5 out of 5

    Jillian Walker

  44. 5 out of 5

    Valerie Berns

  45. 5 out of 5

    Jerrilynn Atherton

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.