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Don’t Turn Out the Lights: A Tribute to Alvin Schwartz's Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark

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Featuring stories from R.L. Stine and Madeleine Roux, this middle grade horror anthology, curated by New York Times bestselling author and master of macabre Jonathan Maberry, is a chilling tribute to Alvin Schwartz’s Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark. Flesh-hungry ogres? Brains full of spiders? Haunted houses you can’t escape? This collection of 35 terrifying stories from t Featuring stories from R.L. Stine and Madeleine Roux, this middle grade horror anthology, curated by New York Times bestselling author and master of macabre Jonathan Maberry, is a chilling tribute to Alvin Schwartz’s Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark. Flesh-hungry ogres? Brains full of spiders? Haunted houses you can’t escape? This collection of 35 terrifying stories from the Horror Writers Association has it all, including ghastly illustrations from Iris Compiet that will absolutely chill readers to the bone. So turn off your lamps, click on your flashlights, and prepare—if you dare—to be utterly spooked! The complete list of writers: Linda D. Addison, Courtney Alameda, Jonathan Auxier, Gary A. Braunbeck, Z Brewer, Aric Cushing, John Dixon, Tananarive Due, Jamie Ford, Kami Garcia, Christopher Golden, Tonya Hurley, Catherine Jordan, Sherrilyn Kenyon, Alethea Kontis, N.R. Lambert, Laurent Linn, Amy Lukavics, Barry Lyga, D.J. MacHale, Josh Malerman, James A. Moore, Michael Northrop, Micol Ostow, Joanna Parypinksi, Brendan Reichs, Madeleine Roux, R.L. Stine, Margaret Stohl, Gaby Triana, Luis Alberto Urrea, Rosario Urrea, Kim Ventrella, Sheri White, T.J. Wooldridge, Brenna Yovanoff


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Featuring stories from R.L. Stine and Madeleine Roux, this middle grade horror anthology, curated by New York Times bestselling author and master of macabre Jonathan Maberry, is a chilling tribute to Alvin Schwartz’s Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark. Flesh-hungry ogres? Brains full of spiders? Haunted houses you can’t escape? This collection of 35 terrifying stories from t Featuring stories from R.L. Stine and Madeleine Roux, this middle grade horror anthology, curated by New York Times bestselling author and master of macabre Jonathan Maberry, is a chilling tribute to Alvin Schwartz’s Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark. Flesh-hungry ogres? Brains full of spiders? Haunted houses you can’t escape? This collection of 35 terrifying stories from the Horror Writers Association has it all, including ghastly illustrations from Iris Compiet that will absolutely chill readers to the bone. So turn off your lamps, click on your flashlights, and prepare—if you dare—to be utterly spooked! The complete list of writers: Linda D. Addison, Courtney Alameda, Jonathan Auxier, Gary A. Braunbeck, Z Brewer, Aric Cushing, John Dixon, Tananarive Due, Jamie Ford, Kami Garcia, Christopher Golden, Tonya Hurley, Catherine Jordan, Sherrilyn Kenyon, Alethea Kontis, N.R. Lambert, Laurent Linn, Amy Lukavics, Barry Lyga, D.J. MacHale, Josh Malerman, James A. Moore, Michael Northrop, Micol Ostow, Joanna Parypinksi, Brendan Reichs, Madeleine Roux, R.L. Stine, Margaret Stohl, Gaby Triana, Luis Alberto Urrea, Rosario Urrea, Kim Ventrella, Sheri White, T.J. Wooldridge, Brenna Yovanoff

30 review for Don’t Turn Out the Lights: A Tribute to Alvin Schwartz's Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark

  1. 4 out of 5

    megs_bookrack

    Don't Turn Out the Lights is a Middle Grade Horror anthology curated by bestselling author, Jonathan Maberry, as a tribute to Alvin Schwartz's, Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark. The collection is comprised of 35-spine tingling tales penned by an impressive list of fiction authors! I know what some of you may be thinking, Middle Grade though? I can assure you, quite of few of these stories legit creeped me out. They're quick, fun and each one left me wanting to continue reading. There really is som Don't Turn Out the Lights is a Middle Grade Horror anthology curated by bestselling author, Jonathan Maberry, as a tribute to Alvin Schwartz's, Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark. The collection is comprised of 35-spine tingling tales penned by an impressive list of fiction authors! I know what some of you may be thinking, Middle Grade though? I can assure you, quite of few of these stories legit creeped me out. They're quick, fun and each one left me wanting to continue reading. There really is something for everyone in this collection. No matter what your fears are, you will find a story that works for you. Some things you may not even realize you are afraid of until you read this book, like toys, for example. I mean, I have always been afraid of certain toys, but I digress. There were a lot of stories in here that I really loved. The standouts for me include: The Carved Bear by Brendan Reichs, The Golden Peacock by Alethea Kontis, Tag, You're It by NR Lambert, The Cries of the Cat by Josh Malerman, The Umbrella Man by Gary A. Braunbeck, Brain Spiders by Luis Alberto Urrea and Rosario Urrea, and Light as a Feather, Stiff as a Board by Margaret Stohl. I did listen to the audiobook and highly recommend that medium. There are two narrators and they both did a fantastic job bringing every story to life. Overall, this is a very solid collection with plenty of chills and thrills for readers of all ages. If you like to give yourself the heebie-jeebies, you should definitely pick this one up!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sadie Hartmann

    Originally hosted on my blog: https://sadiehartmann.blogspot.com/20... What a fantastic idea for an anthology! A tribute to one of the most iconic spooky short story collections for all ages. DON'T TURN OFF THE LIGHTS edited by Jonathan Maberry is presented by The Horror Writers Association and published by Harper Collins. To say I grew up reading SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARK is a bit of an understatement. My mom is a major Horror Hound and our home library was filled with adult, young adult, Originally hosted on my blog: https://sadiehartmann.blogspot.com/20... What a fantastic idea for an anthology! A tribute to one of the most iconic spooky short story collections for all ages. DON'T TURN OFF THE LIGHTS edited by Jonathan Maberry is presented by The Horror Writers Association and published by Harper Collins. To say I grew up reading SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARK is a bit of an understatement. My mom is a major Horror Hound and our home library was filled with adult, young adult, and middle-grade horror. I'm 5 and 8 years older than my two sisters so I read out loud to them pretty regularly and SCARY STORIES (all 3 of them) were in heavy rotation. When I heard about this tribute anthology, I had to have it. Modern horror authors trying on the tone and style of SCARY STORIES that I cherished so much? A no-brainer. The question in my mind was: Would this anthology be successful at capturing the essence of something that has endured for generations of young horror readers (that later grew up into adult horror readers that also review horror professionally)? My enthusiastic opinion is YES!! Yes, a thousand times. The dedication reads, "This book is dedicated to Alvin Schwartz, for scaring the snot out of generations of young readers. And for making being scared a whole bunch of fun!" When I thought about this dedication I wondered what it was that actually scared me. Was it the storytelling? Were those very short stories really that creepy to have such a lasting impact on me? The stories are great, for certain, but I honestly believe that the illustrations that accompany each tale are responsible for the nightmare fuel. There was one drawing in particular that my sisters made me promise not to show them (of course I always did). DON'T TURN OUT THE LIGHTS has illustrations for every story too. Of course, I have to confess, they're nowhere near as scary but this doesn't hinder the reading experience one bit, as far as I'm concerned. Pictures are pictures and having them in horror is a special treat. There are a few exceptions, I don't want to post them here because it's more fun to discover the scary ones for yourself, but I will mention the stories they go with: THE TALL ONES by Madeleine Roux THE BOTTLE TREE by Kami Garcia IN STITCHES by Michael Northrop (this one might be a contender to be on equal footing with that classic image my sisters were scared of) THE GREEN GRABBER by D. J. MacHale TAG YOU'RE IT by N. R. Lambert JINGLE JANGLE by Kim Ventrella These are all exceptional stories too! And to be quite honest, I didn't think there was a dud in the bunch which almost never happens to me. My favorite aspect is this book is true to the source material; a big variety of tone and style. Some of the stories push boundaries for young readers with some potential "big scares". Other stories play with dark humor and lighter themes. It's my opinion that stories with animals will be a huge hit with younger audiences, DON'T YOU SEE THE CAT by Gaby Triana and THE CRIES OF THE CAT by Josh Malerman stand out as favorites. THE GARAGE by Tananarive Due is an awesome gateway story into zombie fiction. THE GHOST IN SAM'S CLOSET by R. L. Stine reminds me of the more endearing ghost stories kids love. It starts out, "Ghosts have feelings too." I like that some of the stories will lead grown-ups to have conversations with children after reading these stories together, for example, MUD by Linda Addison will certainly have curious children asking about, "What happened to grandma?" I love that. I love this book. I will totally Skype with my nieces and nephews and read some of these to them for a Halloween treat so that even if "Halloween is canceled" due to the plague of 2020, at least we can have spooky stories.

  3. 4 out of 5

    John

    A Nice Change from the Heavier Stuff Stories – 4.5/5 Narration – 5/5 “Don’t Turn Off the Lights” edited by Jonathan Mayberry is “A Tribute to Alvin Schwartz's Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark” as told by a number of select authors of Horror. The stories are all pretty good, but you have to remember that these are intended for Middle Graders, so nothing really heavy. A few of the stories and one poem gave even me a creepy feeling, though. It’s nice to see that these authors can write a story that de A Nice Change from the Heavier Stuff Stories – 4.5/5 Narration – 5/5 “Don’t Turn Off the Lights” edited by Jonathan Mayberry is “A Tribute to Alvin Schwartz's Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark” as told by a number of select authors of Horror. The stories are all pretty good, but you have to remember that these are intended for Middle Graders, so nothing really heavy. A few of the stories and one poem gave even me a creepy feeling, though. It’s nice to see that these authors can write a story that depends on plot and atmosphere, and not entirely on the gag factor. Recommendation – it’s a fun read and if you can see still through the eyes of a child, then you might like this.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    A delightfully creepy tribute to Alvin Schwartz’s Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark. If you’re anything like me, you were simultaneously fascinated by and terrified of Schwartz’s Scary Stories books. They were fantastic for scaring yourself silly, and many of them still send shivers down my spine when I think of them now as an adult (The girl with the green ribbon! That one where the head falls down the chimney!) Don’t Turn Out the Lights is a satisfying homage to Schwartz’s work. Like all collec A delightfully creepy tribute to Alvin Schwartz’s Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark. If you’re anything like me, you were simultaneously fascinated by and terrified of Schwartz’s Scary Stories books. They were fantastic for scaring yourself silly, and many of them still send shivers down my spine when I think of them now as an adult (The girl with the green ribbon! That one where the head falls down the chimney!) Don’t Turn Out the Lights is a satisfying homage to Schwartz’s work. Like all collections by multiple authors, the quality of the stories is a bit of a mixed bag, but mostly it’s a good crop of terrifying tales that accurately capture the spirit of the original collections. There are a few that are too long to be an accurate fit, and I didn’t love the stories that incorporated too much modern technology or social media (which felt too disconnected from the very analog originals), but most of the authors got the feel of this so, so right. My three favorites: The Carved Bear The House on the Hill Light as a Feather, Stiff as a Board *I received an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.*

  5. 4 out of 5

    Liana Grace

    Short story collections are tricky to rate. I chose only 3 stars because some stories fell flat, however, other stories I loved. This is definitely a fun, nostalgic read if you grew up with the original Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Armand

    This tribute to Schwartz's seminal Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark Trilogy diverges quite a bit from the original. The tone and style of the narration is different, dispensing with the whimsy and creepy charm of its source to present tales aimed at a slightly older audience. They're longer too, and there are very few of the ditties and storytelling prompts which made the former unique. Some are also unabashedly contemporary, dealing with current technologies like SMS and emails. One spirit eve This tribute to Schwartz's seminal Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark Trilogy diverges quite a bit from the original. The tone and style of the narration is different, dispensing with the whimsy and creepy charm of its source to present tales aimed at a slightly older audience. They're longer too, and there are very few of the ditties and storytelling prompts which made the former unique. Some are also unabashedly contemporary, dealing with current technologies like SMS and emails. One spirit even terrorized its targets via social media. The art actually hews closer to the base, and technically I believe it can hold its own against Gammell. However, it doesn't always depict the actual monsters in their full eerie glory, which was a huge part of the appeal and efficacy of Scary Stories. The thing is, taken on its own terms it's still competently amusing. While the original trumps it in terms of the compact unity behind its concept and in the nostalgia it evokes in the hordes of kids who enjoyed it over time, I think adults who haven't been exposed to it would most likely appreciate this one more. With a total of thirty-five stories, it has all the terrorific firepower you might require to sate your appetite for juvenile horror. The most memorable stories here are: The Golden Peacock - why you shouldn't stick a revered family heirloom in a child's room. Jingle Jangle - for a short tale, it has all the gory goodness of the best local folk legends. The Neighbor - sinister ghost story with a twist. The Painted Skin - a helpful young man invites a preternaturally beautiful beggar into his house. The Skelly-Horse, The Umbrella Man, and In Stitches - stays truest to the spirit of the Schwartz trilogy, which is not totally surprising since two of the authors penned children's books before. Light as a Feather, Stiff as a Board - a popular pyjama party game doubles as a revenge mechanism. 7/10; 3 stars.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Irene

    "He reaches for me and I'm sure he plans to pull out my intestines and wear them like a scarf, but instead he pats my head." When my son was in middle school I bought him the set of Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark. After he read them I did too. Don't Turn Out The Lights is exactly the kind of story collection that I would have bought for him when he was younger and that he would still keep on his book case now that he is grown. Whether you have kids or are a kid at heart these stories are a spo "He reaches for me and I'm sure he plans to pull out my intestines and wear them like a scarf, but instead he pats my head." When my son was in middle school I bought him the set of Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark. After he read them I did too. Don't Turn Out The Lights is exactly the kind of story collection that I would have bought for him when he was younger and that he would still keep on his book case now that he is grown. Whether you have kids or are a kid at heart these stories are a spooky journey into otherworldly realms, sometimes with a moral to the story, such as being careful what you wish for in Jingle Jangle. One of my absolute favorites was "The Neighbor" when a lonely boy finds a playmate but all is not as it seems. Some reveal some hidden dangers in social media or text messages from strangers such as in The House On The Hill or the even more terrifying "Tag You're It" where a boy has a creepy social media stalker from which there is no escape. I also loved that each story has a spine tingling illustration. This was such a fun read and for me it was like a trip down memory lane and something brand new all rolled in to one. 4 out of 5 stars I received an advance copy for review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    Awesome collection of short stories!! I am very nostalgic for the Scary Stories To Tell In The Dark books. Those books are my first memories of reading horror as a kid (back in second grade I think) and I’ve been a horror lover ever since then so when I saw this was a tribute to those books I was all for it. I’m glad I got to read this, I even read some of the stories to my daughters and they loved them as well. Now they want to read the Scary Stories To Tell In The Dark books and I’ve decided s Awesome collection of short stories!! I am very nostalgic for the Scary Stories To Tell In The Dark books. Those books are my first memories of reading horror as a kid (back in second grade I think) and I’ve been a horror lover ever since then so when I saw this was a tribute to those books I was all for it. I’m glad I got to read this, I even read some of the stories to my daughters and they loved them as well. Now they want to read the Scary Stories To Tell In The Dark books and I’ve decided since Halloween is coming soon that we are going to read that series together next 👻 if you enjoyed those books then I’d definitely recommend this to you.

  9. 4 out of 5

    TJL

    Glorious. Perfection. Amazing. It invokes the original Scary Stories in a way that's both highly original and pays good homage to their forebears. Genuinely creepy, and none of the stories felt repetitive at all. Highly recommend. Glorious. Perfection. Amazing. It invokes the original Scary Stories in a way that's both highly original and pays good homage to their forebears. Genuinely creepy, and none of the stories felt repetitive at all. Highly recommend.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jamesboggie

    I was excited to read Don’t Turn off the Lights. It is a tribute to Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark and its sequels, and I love those books. I even like the stories as much as the gnarly pictures. When I saw a tribute anthology by the Horror Writers Association with authors like R.L. Stine and Tananarive Due, I knew I had to read it for Halloween. I have mixed feelings. The first few stories disappointed me. I wonder if some of the stories were written independent of this project, without Scary I was excited to read Don’t Turn off the Lights. It is a tribute to Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark and its sequels, and I love those books. I even like the stories as much as the gnarly pictures. When I saw a tribute anthology by the Horror Writers Association with authors like R.L. Stine and Tananarive Due, I knew I had to read it for Halloween. I have mixed feelings. The first few stories disappointed me. I wonder if some of the stories were written independent of this project, without Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark in mind. The original books drew from existing folklore and included stories specifically written to be told aloud. Many of the stories in this volume felt artificial in the way that most published fiction does and did not work well when spoken aloud. They feel like standard horror stories or even dark fairy tales. Those stories do not in my opinion fit the theme well. Another thing that makes this anthology feel different, more artificial, more predictable: the illustrations. The art is not bad. It is among the best attempts to recreate Stephen Gammell’s style I have ever seen. The framing is all wrong, though. In Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark, the pictures were all over the place in size and location. Sometimes they took up the entire page after the story. Sometimes they came before. Sometimes they took half a page in the middle. The reader never knew when a picture would appear. It made the whole book feel more unpredictable, more spooky. I found myself skipping illustrated pages in Don’t Turn off the Lights as if they were blank pages in between stories, and that is sad. That said, I liked more of the stories than I realized. Once I got through the first few, I found most to be pretty good. Some of these stories will stick with me for a long time. Not bad for some fun Halloween reading. 3.5/5, round up to 4 "The Funeral Portrait" by Laurent Lint I was not expecting such a standard dark fairy tale. It is fine as a fairy tale, but does not remind me of Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark. 3/5 "The Carved Bear" by Brendan Reichs This story fits the theme well. It is a creepy cautionary tale aimed at children. It reminds me of "The Drum" and "Harold", but also "Prey" by Richard Matheson. 3.5/5 "Don't You See That Cat" by Gaby Triana I do not understand this story. Many of the Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark pulled from folk tales or common fears. You could tell where it came from, or it had a logic. Not here. Is fear of ghost cats really common? Why did the ghost cat start haunting Kendra? This story just feels incomplete, like it needs one more pass by an editor. 2/5 "The Golden Peacock" by Alethea Kontis This story is almost right! It is a pretty classic ghost story about a girl and her "imaginary friend". It's not clear why a painting that had been in the family for generations would cause problems only for this girl, or why the ghost was unhappy. It feels like this should be a cautionary tale, but there is no coherent or meaningful lesson. 3/5 "The Knock-Knock Man" by Brenna Yovanoff This is exactly what I wanted from this anthology. This story taps into some common primordial fears and delivers a moral. I could actually see this as an urban legend, passed from child to child. 4/5 "Strange Music" by Joanna Parapinski This is a good little ghost story. It has a nice hook in the instrument and a satisfying ending. It subverted my expectation of a cautionary tale in a nice way. 4/5 "Copy and Paste Kill" by Barry Lyga This is a silly little story. It relies on surprise rather than atmosphere or logical plotting. Many short horror stories do. I just did not find it surprising. It also did not get me in the right state of mind. It might work on younger horror fans with less experience with the genre. 2/5 "The House on the Hill" by Micol Ostow This story is familiar in the best way. I can see influences from horror stories and tropes from spooky folklore. It feels more like the updated urban legend I expected from this anthology. 4/5 "Jingle Jangle" by Kim Ventrella This story is exactly what I hoped to find in this anthology. It feels like genuine folklore. It has familiar elements that fit perfectly. It is a cautionary tale with a message about being careful what you wish for and a monstrous punishment. It has great pacing and atmosphere. If you changed it from 1st person to 3rd person it would fit right into Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark. 5/5 "The Weeping Woman" by Courtney Alameda This is a retelling of La Llorona tales. It fits the theme of Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark, but does not have quite the same level of creepiness. 4/5 "The Neighbor" by Amy Lukavics I enjoyed this creepy tale. It did spook me, and it surprised me. I expected one twist and got another equally logical twist. The last few paragraphs with the little girl were unnecessary. 4/5 "Tag, You’re It” by N.R. Lambert The Instagram is coming from INSIDE THE HOUSE! Lol. I have seen a fair number of attempts to use the Internet, social media, smart phones, and apps as the starting point for horror. So far, no hits. Really scary stuff does happen on the Internet, but it never involves magical unblockable social media accounts. Please, authors, follow the rules of the tech you're using. 2/5 "The Painted Skin" by Jamie Ford I was pleasantly surprised to find a story that seems so influenced by Far Eastern folklore. This tale could have come right out of a Lafcadio Hearn book. I hope there are more stories from different folklore traditions. 4/5 "Lost to the World" by John Dixon I could actually read this story around a campfire. It has a sense of growing tension, great pacing, and a chilling end. I could not ask for more. 5/5 "The Bargain" by Aric Cushing This is a story set on Dia de los Muertos, although it seems more aesthetical than substantive. It is a decent creepy story. It sets up a cautionary tale, then subverts expectations. 3.5/5 "Lint Trap" by Jonathan Auxier Poor parenting is the TRUE horror. Seriously, watch your crotch goblins. Especially if you are moving into a clearly haunted house. It was interesting to read from the perspective of a 5 year old. It has good progression and a satisfying ending. 4/5 "The Cries of the Cat" by Josh Malerman Oh boy, This story is uncomfortable. Mental illness and elder abuse require more care in modern horror stories. 2/5 "The Open Window" by Christopher Golden We have all heard a version of the imposter parent story. My favorite is a common two sentence version. That really is all it needs. 3/5 "The Skelly-Horse" by T.J. Wooldridge Another story that would be good for telling in the dark. I like the second person storytelling. It sounds like one of those folktales your grandparents might tell as a warning. 4/5 "The Umbrella Man" by Gary A. Braunbeck I was excited to see a story written to be read aloud. It has an alternate ending and stage notes like some of the Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark. The story is a good spooky tale as well. Unfortunately, I tried to read it aloud and I feel the pace and rhythm were not conducive to oral storytelling. 3.5/5 "The Green Grabber" by D.J. MacHale This is a longer story, and it takes the time to do a few interesting things. It is a story centered on another story, a folktale told around a fire. It also opens with a previous victim of the monster that is later referenced as part of the legend. The result is a multilayered story that homages Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark in a unique way. 4/5 "Brain Spiders" by Luis Alberto Urrea and Rosario Urrea Effectively, this story is the classic "The Red Spot" on steroids. It is a longer and more complex story with a bigger scare. I am not sure it will hit everyone as hard as the original. I liked it, but I think the authors should have avoided specifying where Katya originated. Details are always hazy in urban legends so they could have happened anywhere. 3.5/5 "Hachishakusama" by Catherine Jordan This is a straight-up boogeyman story. It is based on an actual Japanese boogeyman. Not bad, Not surprising, and it could have been more suspenseful. 3.5/5 "Light as a Feather, Stiff as a Board" by Margaret Stohl Kiki got what she deserved. Anyone who bullies someone at their own birthday party and then demands they play a killer party game was not long for this world. 5/5 "In Stitches" by Michael Northrup This is another story centered around a story. It has some good creepy elements. The little girl walking alone, the stranger, the scare at the end. It is a little meta in the way that it incorporates a character telling a story in the style of Scary Stories. 3.5/5 "The Bottle Tree" by Kami Garcia I really like this story. It had me gripped from the beginning. It is a ghost story with a witch twist. I did not expect the ending, and it was a pleasant surprise. 5/5 "The Ghost in Sam's Closet" by R. L. Stine I love ghost stories told from the ghost's perspective. This first person narrative captures the feeling of sillier stories from Scary Stories. It is also short enough to remember and retell. I bet it sticks in my head when the others fade. 5/5 "Rap Tap" by Sherrilyn Kenyon This is another silly story. This time, it is a poem. I am glad to see the diversity of Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark represented in this tribute. 3/5 “The Garage” by Tananarive Due This story is not written like folklore or an oral tale in any way. It is good enough that I did not care. It is a zombie story that hits close to home during quarantine. 5/5 “Don’t Go into the Pumpkin Patch at Night” by Sheri White This story feels perfect for Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark. It is short. It has great pacing. It is exactly the kind of spooky warning that would get passed around in the dark. I am not sure it is as memorable as some. 4.5/5 “Pretty Girls Make Graves” by Tonya Hurley A bullied child’s sleepover gone terribly wrong. This is a fantastic story. Again, this is the kind of story that gets passed around, the kind that makes you wonder if there was any truth before it was exaggerated in the telling. I expect this one to stick with me. 5/5 “Whistle Past the Graveyard” by Z Brewer I have heard the superstition about whistling as you walk or bike past a graveyard. I also have never heard what supposedly happens when you fail to whistle. I think this story represents one of the approaches to this tribute anthology: taking stories that would work in Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark but writing them as traditional published fiction. It works here. 4/5 “Long Shadows” by James A Moore An interesting take on the shadow people phenomenon. The references to domestic violence made me tense, and I expected a different kind of horror. The result is good, but I wish the two fears were more directly connected. 4/5 “Mud” by Linda A. Addison Talk about going overboard. This is going WAY too far to teach your stinky kid to bathe. “Mud” feels like a dark fairy tale to me, like a tribute to the Grimm Brothers. 4/5 “The Tall Ones” by Madeleine Roux The anthology ends strong. I greatly enjoyed this story. It manages to establish a unique and authentic world gripped by its own superstitions and folklore. It is about a town visited by unknown, potentially supernatural, beings. No one has seen the Tall Ones, but they all know the signs. The townsfolk leave offerings in the hopes of being spared. The young Estrella is not satisfied with the stories. This story will definitely stick with me. 5/5

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mehsi

    A spooky anthology with stories from various pretty well-known authors. I really had fun reading it and flew through the pages. I have to say that I think it is hilarious how I am not a fan of Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark I just love all these tribute books that are popping up. The tribute books do know how to tell a story, don’t just build it up and then suddenly the story is over, and they just weren’t scary. I know I read the book when I was an adult, but hello I grew up with Goosebumps, A spooky anthology with stories from various pretty well-known authors. I really had fun reading it and flew through the pages. I have to say that I think it is hilarious how I am not a fan of Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark I just love all these tribute books that are popping up. The tribute books do know how to tell a story, don’t just build it up and then suddenly the story is over, and they just weren’t scary. I know I read the book when I was an adult, but hello I grew up with Goosebumps, with Fear Street, with other horror stuff that scared the crap out of me, SStTitD just wasn’t anywhere in the league of those and I know as a kid I would have been really disappointed with it as well. Back to this book, this one features 35 stories that feature haunted houses, social media and dolls, witches, murder, and much much more. Some of the stories are quite short others are much longer. I definitely loved reading them and with the excerption of a couple stories most felt like complete stories that often scared the wits out of me! Haha, definitely not the book to read at night but that is when I read it. One of my favourite stories would definitely be the Pretty Girls Make Graves, OH BOY. I loved how most of the stories had a scary ending, something to leave you screaming or something that scared the wits out of you. Oh, and the Green Grabber? That one could have used an extra subtitle (something like x time later at x place), as I thought the story was over after x happened but instead it continued. That had me looking on the internet if something was wrong with my ecopy. But all I could find is that it was correct. I loved the various authors that participated in this book and was happy to see several names that I recognised. I do wonder why several stories were about naughty kids and them getting killed/murdered/in trouble/losing their legs for something naughty. I mean every kid does something naughty in their lives. That is how kids are. Even adults can be naughty. Why is it such a bad thing? I mean, given that most of the naughty things meant staying out late or calling someone a jerk it seemed too much, too excessive. There were at least two stories that really had me wondering why they were added (I may have one or two more but these two really stood out in my eyes). One is the Sam’s closet story and the other is the story about someone rapping on the tent. Both weren’t that scary but were decent to read, but than had the most anticlimatic and horrible ending ever. They are in the midst of all the spookiness, ghosts, whistling in a graveyard, and it just doesn’t feel right to have them in here. I would have rather had two other stories that were scary. The illustrations varied from OK to WOW to NOPE NOPE NOPE flips Kindle closed. Haha. I really want to check out more of the illustrations by this illustrator. All in all, if you want some spooky and scary stories? Be sure to check out this book! Review first posted at https://twirlingbookprincess.com/

  12. 5 out of 5

    Peacegal

    The SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARK series, with its folklore-influenced stories, jump scares, and chilling illustrations, was a formative part of my reading life in childhood. I had no idea how many others have such strong memories of this series until recently, when I watched a documentary of the history and influence of the books. And now we have this, a book that attempts to capture the spirit of the short story collections. While DON'T TURN OUT THE LIGHTS may be a tribute, it actually rem The SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARK series, with its folklore-influenced stories, jump scares, and chilling illustrations, was a formative part of my reading life in childhood. I had no idea how many others have such strong memories of this series until recently, when I watched a documentary of the history and influence of the books. And now we have this, a book that attempts to capture the spirit of the short story collections. While DON'T TURN OUT THE LIGHTS may be a tribute, it actually reminded me of the dozens upon dozens of other "scary story" anthologies I read as a kid. Each story is by a different author, and some are genuinely shuddery and spooky, while others are barely a cut above the submissions we receive at the library for our junior writers' contest. I do like that kids are still enjoying the pastime of reading scary story collections, just as I did 30 years ago.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kylie Summers

    This is a very creepy collection of scary stories for young readers. It is a tribute to Alvin Schwartz’s very spooky anthology series “Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark.” There are stories by some of my favorite horror writers from childhood, such as R.L. Stine and more contemporary ones such as Amy Lukavics. The stories are all quite eerie and unnerving, much like the stories in Scary Stories to tell in the Dark, which creeped me out as a kid. From haunted houses and ghostly hauntings, to creep This is a very creepy collection of scary stories for young readers. It is a tribute to Alvin Schwartz’s very spooky anthology series “Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark.” There are stories by some of my favorite horror writers from childhood, such as R.L. Stine and more contemporary ones such as Amy Lukavics. The stories are all quite eerie and unnerving, much like the stories in Scary Stories to tell in the Dark, which creeped me out as a kid. From haunted houses and ghostly hauntings, to creepy monsters and terrifying folk tale legends, it’s got a bit of everything. My personal favorites were, The Neighbor by Amy Lukavics, The Open Window by Christopher Golden and Pretty Girls Make Graves by Tonya Hurley. In the story, The Neighbor, Dennis makes a creepy new friend, who lives across the street. It has a nice twist at the end that I didn’t see coming. The Open Window was quite an uncanny little story, which reminded me of an episode of the Twilight Zone. One night, Tyler hears someone calling him from outside his window and things get really weird after that. In Pretty Girls Make Graves, Mona is a very unpopular girl who is bullied by the Cheerleaders in her school. One day, her mother suggests that she should call the cheerleaders over for a slumber party and Mona reluctantly agrees. Things go very wrong. The twist at the end is horrifying and clever. I would recommend this book for all middle grade readers (and adults too!) who love spooky stories. They won’t be disappointed. Thank you to the publisher & NetGalley for providing me with an advance reader’s copy for an honest review.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rachael Fryman

    Six word summary: Tons of perfectly spooky short stories! Loved: I loved the variety of the stories. While I would have loved even more variety in cultural lore, I enjoyed what was included! I think there will be several stories in this collection for every reader, especially for young fans of Scary Stories to Tell in the dark! Also, the illustrations are top notch and very reminiscent of the books that inspired this collection! Favorite Stories: The Funeral Portrait by Laurent Linn Knock Knock M Six word summary: Tons of perfectly spooky short stories! Loved: I loved the variety of the stories. While I would have loved even more variety in cultural lore, I enjoyed what was included! I think there will be several stories in this collection for every reader, especially for young fans of Scary Stories to Tell in the dark! Also, the illustrations are top notch and very reminiscent of the books that inspired this collection! Favorite Stories: The Funeral Portrait by Laurent Linn Knock Knock Man by Brenna Yovanoff The Neighbor by Amy Lukavics Tag, You're It by N.R. Lambert The Open Window by Christopher Golden The Green Grabber by D.J. MacHale Brain Spiders by Luis Alberto Urrea and Rosario Urrea The Bottle Tree by Kami Garcia Rap Tap by Sherrilyn Kenyon Recommend for: Middle grade students looking for spooky books who have read all the Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark books already! Reminds me of: Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark -- obviously! :) Verdict: Read it! Especially now during spooky season! *Disclaimer* - I received an early copy of this title for review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

  15. 4 out of 5

    orangerful

    Getting in the mood for the spooky season, I picked up this colletion of short scary stories for middle grade readers. I was a BIG fan of the 'Scary Stories To Tell in the Dark' trilogy as a kid. This collection is just as creepy and terrifying as those stories were. Ghosts in the woods, monsters in the closet, and other creepy creatures lurk on every page. I'm not going to lie - I went to bed after reading a few stories and found myself genuinely spooked as I sat in the dark! If you or your kid Getting in the mood for the spooky season, I picked up this colletion of short scary stories for middle grade readers. I was a BIG fan of the 'Scary Stories To Tell in the Dark' trilogy as a kid. This collection is just as creepy and terrifying as those stories were. Ghosts in the woods, monsters in the closet, and other creepy creatures lurk on every page. I'm not going to lie - I went to bed after reading a few stories and found myself genuinely spooked as I sat in the dark! If you or your kid is a fan of the horror genre, this is a great set of stories for the Halloween season. Just know that after you finish reading these stories, you might be saying "Don't turn out the lights!" to your family!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jocelyn

    3.5 rounded up. This is a great anthology and really honors the spirit of Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark. Some stories are stronger than others, but they're all fun! I would give this to any pre-teen in my life who liked to get a bit spooky. 3.5 rounded up. This is a great anthology and really honors the spirit of Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark. Some stories are stronger than others, but they're all fun! I would give this to any pre-teen in my life who liked to get a bit spooky.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bryce

    As someone who grew up with the Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark trilogy, I feel like this anthology is for those of us who are a certain age and who still like getting spooked. There are no duds in this collection however, some tales are truly more disturbing than others. My favorites of Don’t Turn Out the Lights are “The Carved Bear” by Brendan Reichs, “Tag, You’re It” by N.R. Lambert, “Lint Trap” by Jonathan Auxier, “The Green Grabber” by D.J. MacHale and “Pretty Girls Make Graves” by Tonya As someone who grew up with the Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark trilogy, I feel like this anthology is for those of us who are a certain age and who still like getting spooked. There are no duds in this collection however, some tales are truly more disturbing than others. My favorites of Don’t Turn Out the Lights are “The Carved Bear” by Brendan Reichs, “Tag, You’re It” by N.R. Lambert, “Lint Trap” by Jonathan Auxier, “The Green Grabber” by D.J. MacHale and “Pretty Girls Make Graves” by Tonya Hurley. For those of you who liked those spooky stories from your childhood, this is the perfect collection for you.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Amburgey

    2.5 Stars I can’t tell you how much it kills me, absolutely kills me, to rate this book as just “ok.” Everything about it should have been 5 stars – A great author as editor? Check. Tribute to Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark? Check. A fantastic stable of writers? Check. And yet… This anthology really missed the mark for me. My issues mostly lay with the unevenness of the collection. The book is marketed as YA horror and some of the stories are, but some are written to a very young middle-grade m 2.5 Stars I can’t tell you how much it kills me, absolutely kills me, to rate this book as just “ok.” Everything about it should have been 5 stars – A great author as editor? Check. Tribute to Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark? Check. A fantastic stable of writers? Check. And yet… This anthology really missed the mark for me. My issues mostly lay with the unevenness of the collection. The book is marketed as YA horror and some of the stories are, but some are written to a very young middle-grade market. Like its predecessor, the stories in Lights can be read to yourself or aloud to others, but so many are missing that – Boo! ending. You know the one I’m talk about – the one that makes you look behind you, over your shoulder to see what’s waiting in the darkness. Many of these tales just… end. They leave you feeling incomplete and wondering what the heck happened. I feel one of the greatest faults lies with adult horror authors not knowing how to write to a YA audience. It is my opinion that they feel they need to write down to teens and they don’t give them the credit they deserve as readers. One of the most glaring examples of this was in The Cries of the Cat by Josh Malerman. I adore Malerman and the premise he had was a creepy one, but it felt so watered down that it lost its way. Having said all that, there are some standout stories in this collection: The Neighbor by Amy Lukavics – Dennis makes a new, unwanted friend with the little boy he sees across the street. Tag, You’re It by N.R. Lambert – Nick keeps getting tagged in photos by someone who seems to be physically getting closer and closer. Lint Trap by Jonathan Auxier – Jasper’s family moves into a new house and he starts talking to the children who live in the dryer in the basement. Brain Spiders by Luis Alberto Urrea & Rosario Urrea – What happens when the kids in class start bullying the new girl from another country? Mud by Linda D. Addison – Maurice fights his mother about taking baths and she sends him off to his grandmother’s house for an unforgettable sleepover. The Tall Ones by Madeleine Roux – Estrella tries to convince the new boy in town that the town’s customs and traditions must be honored or else something may happen to him and his family. I think there are enough stories in here that make checking out this collection worthwhile. It would be a good pick for a library check-out for sure. Thanks to NetGalley and HarperCollins for making this digital ARC available for me to review. Don’t Turn Out the Lights releases on September 1st 2020. Full review can be read here: https://tatteredandbroken.com/2020/08...

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Definitely not just for kids. These stories were very much in the vein of Alvin Schwartz and repeatedly gave me the creepy crawlies.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Elle

    Thank you to NetGalley for allowing me to read an Advanced Reader Copy of this collection in exchange for my honest review. Don't Turn Out the Lights is a beautifully done tribute to Alvin Schwartz’s Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark. It is edited by one of the masters of horror, Jonathan Mabery. There are a total of 35 original short stories written by an absolutely amazing assortment of authors, including some of my personal favorites such as DJ McHale, Josh Malerman, Kami Garcia, Madeline Rou Thank you to NetGalley for allowing me to read an Advanced Reader Copy of this collection in exchange for my honest review. Don't Turn Out the Lights is a beautifully done tribute to Alvin Schwartz’s Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark. It is edited by one of the masters of horror, Jonathan Mabery. There are a total of 35 original short stories written by an absolutely amazing assortment of authors, including some of my personal favorites such as DJ McHale, Josh Malerman, Kami Garcia, Madeline Roux, and RL Stine. Some of the stories are very short and some are a bit longer, but each story is manageable for a child to read in one sitting. These stories include ghost stories, urban legends, campfire tales, and creatures. Most of the stories are in the 3-4 star range. Only one story fell completely flat and was a 1 star story and there were a few 5 star stories. Altogether this was a highly enjoyable collection that I read in one evening. I really enjoyed that there were some very creepy illustrations throughout this book. I think that children will like being able to see some of the things being read about while they are reading. I definitely recommend this to older children who enjoy spooky stories, but also to adults who enjoyed reading Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark. This collection will make you remember how you felt as a child when you first discovered a good spooky tale.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Magdalena

    The following is copied and pasted from my blog. The subtitle and a somewhat lengthy editor’s foreword at the beginning of this book introduces it as a tribute to Alvin Schwartz’s Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark series, and as such, it’s sure to attract a lot of eager readers. Although the book as a whole is much longer than the immensely popular Scary Stories books, and most of the individual short stories are longer than Schwartz’s stories, too, it’s still similar enough in genre and appeal f The following is copied and pasted from my blog. The subtitle and a somewhat lengthy editor’s foreword at the beginning of this book introduces it as a tribute to Alvin Schwartz’s Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark series, and as such, it’s sure to attract a lot of eager readers. Although the book as a whole is much longer than the immensely popular Scary Stories books, and most of the individual short stories are longer than Schwartz’s stories, too, it’s still similar enough in genre and appeal factors that I would absolutely recommend it to children who’ve already read (and thoroughly enjoyed) all of the Scary Stories books, especially if they’re ready for something slightly more advanced. The foreword also implied that this book is not just for kids, but since the protagonists are mostly preteens and the reading level is at an upper-elementary-school level, I expect that this book will be most popular with fourth and fifth graders. As you would expect from a multi-author short story collection like this, the thirty-five stories vary widely in style and tone. They even vary a little in terms of target audience and sub-genre. For example, there are several stories like The Skelly-Horse by T.J. Wooldridge that describe a scary, ghostly creature without including much of a plot, but other stories like The Green Grabber by D.J. MacHale, The Neighbor by Amy Lukavics, and Lint Trap by Jonathan Auxier are much longer with detailed plotlines and, in some cases, twist endings. There are stories about cursed objects and stories about haunted houses, but then there are a few with sci-fi vibes like The Open Window by Christopher Golden and The Tall Ones by Madeleine Roux. Umbrella Man by Gary A. Braunbeck and In Stitches by Michael Northrop almost sound more like urban legends than literary short stories. And Light as a Feather, Stiff as a Board by Margaret Stohl is based on the common slumber party game, but told in a narrative story fashion with its own characters. My personal favorite was probably Pretty Girls Make Graves by Tonya Hurley. The main character Mona is an unpopular middle school girl who talks the cheerleaders into coming over for a sleepover by promising that they’ll do makeovers. Her mom is a professional makeup artist. She’s been forbidden to ever use her mother’s work makeup, but, lured by the promise of popularity, she sneaks it out of her mother’s room and uses it on all of her guests. But it turns out that she didn’t know as much as she thought she did about her mother’s job and what that makeup was for. A close second was Tag, You’re It by N.R. Lambert, in which a boy is repeatedly tagged in online photos with a creepy doll-like creature. At first, he thinks the pictures are bizarre recreations of his own photos, but then he realizes that he’s in the background in all of them. The doll is stalking him and posting pictures of him. This continues happening even when he thinks he’s alone. I can’t honestly say that I loved each and every one of the stories, but that’s beside the point. I can appreciate that this book contains enough variety that any reader who likes spooky stories will find at least a couple that match their personal favorite flavor of horror. While this book certainly won’t be topping my Best of the Year list, it’s well worth reading and absolutely deserves a space on the shelf in a library’s middle-grade fiction collection.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Faith Hurst-Bilinski

    Oh, this takes me back. Reading the introduction by the editor I was brought to my own introduction to Scary Stories from the 90s when I started teaching and my kids loved them. I thought I should know what my fourth graders though was scary and I was surprised by how truly creepy some of these stories actually were. I don't know how I missed them before that. I think I just missed the demographic age wise. Back to Jonathan Maberry and the introduction he wrote. Getting people to write more stor Oh, this takes me back. Reading the introduction by the editor I was brought to my own introduction to Scary Stories from the 90s when I started teaching and my kids loved them. I thought I should know what my fourth graders though was scary and I was surprised by how truly creepy some of these stories actually were. I don't know how I missed them before that. I think I just missed the demographic age wise. Back to Jonathan Maberry and the introduction he wrote. Getting people to write more stories in this short, creepy style was brilliant! I read a few every night just before going to sleep. My favorites The Carved Bear. Scary toys are always a hit. Truly evil toys? Even better. Copy, Paste, and Kill. Not what you were expecting. The House on the Hill An updated haunted house story. Jingle Jangle. An old tale that doesn't end at the end. The Neighbor. Sad and a twist I actually didn't see coming. I just realized I could go on and on as I stare at the table of contents. Just read it. Pick your own favorites.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

    **I received and voluntarily read an e-ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.** When I saw this book as an option for a read and review, I jumped at the opportunity. With Halloween coming up shortly, what better time to read scary stories? Just like when I was a kid, the first thing I did was flip the pages and look at the illustrations, trying to see if I could guess the contents of the stories to come. The black and white illustrations capture **I received and voluntarily read an e-ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.** When I saw this book as an option for a read and review, I jumped at the opportunity. With Halloween coming up shortly, what better time to read scary stories? Just like when I was a kid, the first thing I did was flip the pages and look at the illustrations, trying to see if I could guess the contents of the stories to come. The black and white illustrations capture the imagination, just like the originals did in the Schwartz collections. After flipping through the pictures, I grabbed my popcorn and drink, turned down the air conditioner, crawled all the way under a blanket, flipped off the lights, and began to read. Although it's much easier to read in the dark with an iPad, something is lost when you're not holding a book and flashlight. Some of the stories were excellent, some less than excellent. but It's always the case when you have a book made of works from several different authors. Overall, the collection hits the target on paying tribute to one of my most well loved books from childhood. 5/5 stars, and a fitting tribute to something that brought back some great memories.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    Gonna be honest when I picked this up I didn't realize it was middlegrade, but when I learned that I quickly switched my expectations for the stories in this collection. Here are my favorites: - The Carved Bear - Don't You See the Cat? - The Neighbor - Tag, You're It - The Painted Skin - Light As a Feather, Stiff as a Board - The Bottle Tree Overall I enjoyed this collection. I could tell where the stories took inspiration from (our holy books, Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark), and that was a great ca Gonna be honest when I picked this up I didn't realize it was middlegrade, but when I learned that I quickly switched my expectations for the stories in this collection. Here are my favorites: - The Carved Bear - Don't You See the Cat? - The Neighbor - Tag, You're It - The Painted Skin - Light As a Feather, Stiff as a Board - The Bottle Tree Overall I enjoyed this collection. I could tell where the stories took inspiration from (our holy books, Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark), and that was a great callback to those stories we love so much. However, at some points it felt like the authors were really concerned with being on the up-and-up with the kids and it really took me out of the story. I think that I would give this to my child should I have one.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sean McBride

    If you are looking to regain some of that 80s/90s magic of children's horror stories...look no further. This is a collection of a number of stories that hit the nostalgic cord perfectly. None of these stories are outright scary, but they do have a bit of that creepy insight that we all got while sitting down with Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark. Many of the stories have the glorious camp of Goosebumps, and each author gives a bit of their own personal flair. I know this review comes after Hall If you are looking to regain some of that 80s/90s magic of children's horror stories...look no further. This is a collection of a number of stories that hit the nostalgic cord perfectly. None of these stories are outright scary, but they do have a bit of that creepy insight that we all got while sitting down with Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark. Many of the stories have the glorious camp of Goosebumps, and each author gives a bit of their own personal flair. I know this review comes after Halloween, but if you love this style of horror, this is the perfect time to dig into it!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Gates

    A love letter to the originals from an array of horror authors, the collection lacked the format of the originals. The omission of end notes is telling these tales didn’t come from folklore or myth as the originals did. Some stories were worthy of inclusion for genuine scares, but others were odd or out of place. I’m glad to have read this, but it’s the weakest of the series.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Raina

    I loved Scary Stories as a kid and was SO excifedfor this anthology. While I love the shorter short stories, the more traditional length ones felt like they went on for too long. The opening story "The Funeral Portrait" was incredibly creepy as was "The Cries of the Cat". Although nothing will live up to the original, I oove reading new stories inspired by them. I loved Scary Stories as a kid and was SO excifedfor this anthology. While I love the shorter short stories, the more traditional length ones felt like they went on for too long. The opening story "The Funeral Portrait" was incredibly creepy as was "The Cries of the Cat". Although nothing will live up to the original, I oove reading new stories inspired by them.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Moo

    If you liked the "Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark" series and R.L. Stine you would love this. I grew up reading "Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark" and this book is so nostalgic for me. It has some great horror authors especially ones from my childhood. It has everything in it and I really enjoyed it. Thank you Netgalley and author/publisher for the ARC. If you liked the "Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark" series and R.L. Stine you would love this. I grew up reading "Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark" and this book is so nostalgic for me. It has some great horror authors especially ones from my childhood. It has everything in it and I really enjoyed it. Thank you Netgalley and author/publisher for the ARC.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jenn of The Bookish Society

    This spooky compilation is going to be a hit with kids who love a good jump scare. It's going on my list of recommended seasonally scary stories! This spooky compilation is going to be a hit with kids who love a good jump scare. It's going on my list of recommended seasonally scary stories!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Cmeiss330

    Creepy and fun. My favorites were: "The Garage" by Tananarive Due, "Hachishakusama" by Catherine Jordan, "The Open Window" by Christopher Golden, "Brain Spiders" by Luis Alberto Urrea and Rosario Urrea, and "Light as a Feather, Stiff as a Board" by Margaret Stohl. Nice mix of creepy and downright scary. Creepy and fun. My favorites were: "The Garage" by Tananarive Due, "Hachishakusama" by Catherine Jordan, "The Open Window" by Christopher Golden, "Brain Spiders" by Luis Alberto Urrea and Rosario Urrea, and "Light as a Feather, Stiff as a Board" by Margaret Stohl. Nice mix of creepy and downright scary.

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