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Blue Ocean Strategy: How to Create Uncontested Market Space and Make the Competition Irrelevant

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The global phenomenon, embraced by business worldwide and now published in more than 40 languages. This international bestseller challenges everything you thought you knew about the requirements for strategic success. Since the dawn of the industrial age, companies have engaged in head-to-head competition in search of sustained, profitable growth. They have fought for compet The global phenomenon, embraced by business worldwide and now published in more than 40 languages. This international bestseller challenges everything you thought you knew about the requirements for strategic success. Since the dawn of the industrial age, companies have engaged in head-to-head competition in search of sustained, profitable growth. They have fought for competitive advantage, battled over market share, and struggled for differentiation. Yet, as this influential and immensely popular book shows, these hallmarks of competitive strategy are not the way to create profitable growth in the future. In the international bestseller Blue Ocean Strategy, W. Chan Kim and Renee Mauborgne argue that cutthroat competition results in nothing but a bloody red ocean of rivals fighting over a shrinking profit pool. Based on a study of 150 strategic moves (spanning more than 100 years across 30 industries), the authors argue that lasting success comes not from battling competitors, but from creating "blue oceans"—untapped new market spaces ripe for growth. Such strategic moves, which the authors call “value innovation,” create powerful leaps in value that often render rivals obsolete for more than a decade. Blue Ocean Strategy presents a systematic approach to making the competition irrelevant and outlines principles and tools any company can use to create and capture their own blue oceans. A landmark work that upends traditional thinking about strategy, this bestselling business book charts a bold new path to winning the future.


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The global phenomenon, embraced by business worldwide and now published in more than 40 languages. This international bestseller challenges everything you thought you knew about the requirements for strategic success. Since the dawn of the industrial age, companies have engaged in head-to-head competition in search of sustained, profitable growth. They have fought for compet The global phenomenon, embraced by business worldwide and now published in more than 40 languages. This international bestseller challenges everything you thought you knew about the requirements for strategic success. Since the dawn of the industrial age, companies have engaged in head-to-head competition in search of sustained, profitable growth. They have fought for competitive advantage, battled over market share, and struggled for differentiation. Yet, as this influential and immensely popular book shows, these hallmarks of competitive strategy are not the way to create profitable growth in the future. In the international bestseller Blue Ocean Strategy, W. Chan Kim and Renee Mauborgne argue that cutthroat competition results in nothing but a bloody red ocean of rivals fighting over a shrinking profit pool. Based on a study of 150 strategic moves (spanning more than 100 years across 30 industries), the authors argue that lasting success comes not from battling competitors, but from creating "blue oceans"—untapped new market spaces ripe for growth. Such strategic moves, which the authors call “value innovation,” create powerful leaps in value that often render rivals obsolete for more than a decade. Blue Ocean Strategy presents a systematic approach to making the competition irrelevant and outlines principles and tools any company can use to create and capture their own blue oceans. A landmark work that upends traditional thinking about strategy, this bestselling business book charts a bold new path to winning the future.

30 review for Blue Ocean Strategy: How to Create Uncontested Market Space and Make the Competition Irrelevant

  1. 4 out of 5

    Hal

    The signal-to-noise ratio of business books generally tends towards zero. They fall into one of three categories: baked-over platitudes designed to reinforce the self-esteem of the reader (see First Break all the Rules), laughably faulty reasoning (see Good to Great), and interesting ideas that are overextended and driven into the ground (see The Tipping Point). Fortunately for Blue Ocean Strategy, it tends towards the latter. There are a few good ideas in the book, but they are shrouded in unnec The signal-to-noise ratio of business books generally tends towards zero. They fall into one of three categories: baked-over platitudes designed to reinforce the self-esteem of the reader (see First Break all the Rules), laughably faulty reasoning (see Good to Great), and interesting ideas that are overextended and driven into the ground (see The Tipping Point). Fortunately for Blue Ocean Strategy, it tends towards the latter. There are a few good ideas in the book, but they are shrouded in unnecessary jargon and applied precariously to far too many companies. It uses the holy grail of business books: create a structured, numbered framework for analysis (see The 7 Habits of Highly Successful People or The 21 Indispensable Qualities of a Leader or at least 1000 others) and then cherry-pick examples that can fit into the framework (see Built to Last). All this aside, the fact that is directionally correct in advice and contains some thought-provoking ideas earns it a couple of stars. Unfortunately, I may never be able to sell my business book idea: It's All Due to Luck and Nepotism.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    Blue Ocean Strategy: How to Create Uncontested Market Space and Make the Competition Irrelevant W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne Harvard Business School Press This is an especially thought-provoking book that, as have so many others, evolved from an article published in the Harvard Business Review. According to Kim and Mauborgne, "Blue Ocean Strategy challenges companies to break out of the red ocean of bloody competition by creating uncontested market space that makes the competition irrelevant...T Blue Ocean Strategy: How to Create Uncontested Market Space and Make the Competition Irrelevant W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne Harvard Business School Press This is an especially thought-provoking book that, as have so many others, evolved from an article published in the Harvard Business Review. According to Kim and Mauborgne, "Blue Ocean Strategy challenges companies to break out of the red ocean of bloody competition by creating uncontested market space that makes the competition irrelevant...This book not only challenges companies but also shows them how to achieve this. We first introduce a set of analytical tools and frameworks that show you how to systematically act on this challenge, and, second, we elaborate the principles that define and separate blue ocean strategy from competition-based strategic thought." The material provided by Kim and Mauborgne is essentially worthless, however, unless and until decision-makers in a given organization accept their challenge, are guided and informed by the six principles, and effectively use the tools within appropriate frameworks. The responsibility is theirs, not Kim and Mauborgne's. To assist their efforts, Kim and Mauborgne focus on several exemplary companies that have dominated (if not rendered irrelevant) their competition by penetrating previously neglected market space. They include the Body Shop, Callaway Golf, Cirque du Soleil, Dell, NetJets, the SONY Walkman, Southwest Airlines, Starbucks, the Swatch watch, and Yellow Tail wine. All of these Blue Ocean strategies created new or much greater value for customers. Their emphasis is on the quality of experience, not on the benefits of a new technology. According to Kim and Mauborgne, their research indicates that "the strategic move, and not the company or the industry, is the right unit of analysis for explaining the creation of blue oceans and sustained high performance. A strategic move is the set of managerial actions and decisions involved in making a major market-creating business offering." The cornerstone of a Blue Ocean strategy is value innovation that occurs "only when companies align innovation with utility, price, and cost positions. If they fail to anchor innovation with value in this way, technology innovators and market pioneers often lay the eggs that other companies hatch." For Kim and Mauborgne, value innovation is about strategy that embraces the entire system of a company's activities. It requires companies to orient the whole system toward achieving a "leap" in value for both buyers and themselves. Kim and Mauborgne explain HOW to create uncontested market space wherein competition is essentially irrelevant.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    Kind of a stupid book. The overall premise is, don’t compete directly with your competitors, create new markets. Of course, it falls into the classic trap that all business books seem to fall into, which is looking only at cases that support the theory and ignoring all that don’t. The theory itself is pretty obvious when you look at it - basically it argues that making a profit in any commodities market boils down to reducing costs, and that when your competitors cannot directly compete against Kind of a stupid book. The overall premise is, don’t compete directly with your competitors, create new markets. Of course, it falls into the classic trap that all business books seem to fall into, which is looking only at cases that support the theory and ignoring all that don’t. The theory itself is pretty obvious when you look at it - basically it argues that making a profit in any commodities market boils down to reducing costs, and that when your competitors cannot directly compete against you, you will make much more money. This is essentially the classic economic picture of perfect competition vs monopoly, and is quite obvious. Furthermore, many of the examples he uses have only a tenuous connection to his theory. For example, he tries tying the turnaround of the NYPD to his theory. It was an interesting story, but I’m still scratching my head how targeting hotspots and shifting resources is an example of Blue Ocean theory.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Doug Lautzenheiser

    The authors provide case studies on how some companies left their "bloody-red" oceans of competition for completely open blue oceans where they were unique. Some are well-known business stories, such as Southwest Airlines becoming a low-cost provider. However, the book provides details into Southwest's underlying business strategies that may not be well known. Other case studies gave new insight into various companies and their product strategics. One interesting story, for example, was [yellow The authors provide case studies on how some companies left their "bloody-red" oceans of competition for completely open blue oceans where they were unique. Some are well-known business stories, such as Southwest Airlines becoming a low-cost provider. However, the book provides details into Southwest's underlying business strategies that may not be well known. Other case studies gave new insight into various companies and their product strategics. One interesting story, for example, was [yellow tail], the Australian wine company that stepped outside of the traditional wine marketing with a simpler offering targeting casual drinkers. The book covers the "strategic canvas" for analyzing competitors and planning a new market space. It then outlines six different principals for creating your own "blue ocean" strategy: 1) Reconstruct market boundaries 2) Focus on the big picture, not on the numbers 3) Reach beyond existing demand 4) Get the strategic sequence right 5) Overcome key organizational hurdles to make blue ocean strategy happen in action 6) Build execution into strategy from the start to build organizational trust and commitment

  5. 5 out of 5

    MissUnderstoodGenius

    This well-written book seems like common sense however it is an eye-opener for less sophisticated colleagues who doesn't know much about competitive advantage. It arguments how contested markets ("red oceans") should look for uncontested markets ("blue oceans"). Everything in this book is common sense. Nintendo is another high-profile example. Satoru Iwata, Nintendo's CEO, has referred to the Blue Ocean Strategy in interviews. I do think the Blue Ocean Strategy is nothing without execution though This well-written book seems like common sense however it is an eye-opener for less sophisticated colleagues who doesn't know much about competitive advantage. It arguments how contested markets ("red oceans") should look for uncontested markets ("blue oceans"). Everything in this book is common sense. Nintendo is another high-profile example. Satoru Iwata, Nintendo's CEO, has referred to the Blue Ocean Strategy in interviews. I do think the Blue Ocean Strategy is nothing without execution though. I think a large number (maybe more than 50%) of companies do not have a strategy. So it is not just execution that is missing. In fact, execution is easier once you have a strategy. This book, like many other business books, fails because it only talks about success stories. It does not talk about the majority of examples of Blue Ocean failed or currently marginal businesses: - SPARSH, an innovative computer interface (google Pranav Mistry) - Electric cars, which were invented in 1899! I wouldn't highly recommend it but its an interesting read for someone new to this concept. For others, I would suggest or should look at "The Innovator's Dilemma" by Clayton M. Christensen for a better treatment of the ideas and the root causes for why they work.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ia Tjitrawasita

    Keywords: blue ocean - red ocean - value innovation How to win the competition? You can challenge your opponents on a head-to-head competition. Suppose that your target is to book 200 contracts each month. In order to fulfil the target you can compete on pricing. It means that you should give bigger discount than your opponents. But head-to-head competition has its own limitation. There is another way to compete. A smarter way. Chan Kim and Mauborgne propose another solution: don't compete with Keywords: blue ocean - red ocean - value innovation How to win the competition? You can challenge your opponents on a head-to-head competition. Suppose that your target is to book 200 contracts each month. In order to fulfil the target you can compete on pricing. It means that you should give bigger discount than your opponents. But head-to-head competition has its own limitation. There is another way to compete. A smarter way. Chan Kim and Mauborgne propose another solution: don't compete with your competition, why don't you make them irrelevant! The book idea is to give your customers better services without any head-to head competition. It gives you a framework helps you to re-design your products/services. It helps you find your niches. The book is quite easy to read and has an excellent and brilliant idea. It's a must for anyone responsible in decision making.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Blue Ocean Strategy is a business book that covers how to beat the competition by not trying to beat the competition. A red ocean symbolizes blood in the water, where companies are competing by traditional means (like price). The book advocates creating a category and explores a variety of topics to aid in creating a "blue ocean" such as value innovation, emphasis on the big picture, diminishing risk, and evaluating alternatives to your industry (and much more). The first half of the book seemed Blue Ocean Strategy is a business book that covers how to beat the competition by not trying to beat the competition. A red ocean symbolizes blood in the water, where companies are competing by traditional means (like price). The book advocates creating a category and explores a variety of topics to aid in creating a "blue ocean" such as value innovation, emphasis on the big picture, diminishing risk, and evaluating alternatives to your industry (and much more). The first half of the book seemed to be more about the strategic approach to category creation, where the second half of the book had more of a focus on people and management. I personally found the first half to be much more useful. I think there's better material out there for the management side of things. Overall, Blue Ocean Strategy was definitely worth the investment of time. I'd highly recommend it for entrepreneurs.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Marks54

    This is a business school sort of trade book that has been getting a lots of hype. I had to read it for some other purposes so I worked through the book rather than through the numerous HBR articles. The premise of this book is that firms should not bother with messy competition, which will limit their profits and keep them warring with other competitors. Instead, firms should redefine their businesses into new offerings that are appealing to customers but are in such conditions or situations th This is a business school sort of trade book that has been getting a lots of hype. I had to read it for some other purposes so I worked through the book rather than through the numerous HBR articles. The premise of this book is that firms should not bother with messy competition, which will limit their profits and keep them warring with other competitors. Instead, firms should redefine their businesses into new offerings that are appealing to customers but are in such conditions or situations that other firms cannot easily imitate them. This is "blue ocean" strategy - in which you are the only fish in a big pond. The alternative, of course, is "red ocean" strategy - red because there are other fishes in the pond, whose competition will bloody the waters. Get the analogy?? Examples are provided of firms that have done this and suggestions are made about how to copy them. The writing style is crisp. OK, but the problem is that there is nothing new here. Coming up with a distinctive position that is very attractive to customers and that will justify high prices and good profits is a very old idea. Who wouldn't want to do that? The problem is that finding such opportunities happens most times through a combination of some skill and more luck. The firms that do this, and the examples in the book, have not escaped competition and their advantage does not last for long on average. Telling someone to go out and follow such a strategy is a little bit like the old joke about the cure to poverty being simple - step 1, get yourself a million dollars; Step 2 . . . (I think Steve Martin originally did this.) The examples are not really helpful. Given a successful firm, it will not prove hard to find a reason why it succeeded. That is not helpful for someone else moving forward. Overall, this is a popular treatment of corporate strategy that oversimplifies a lot. Careful readers can find better meals on which to chew.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sotiris Makrygiannis

    all my previous comments/critique was encapsulated on 2 appendixes at the end of the book so it confirmed my assumptions rather nicely. I believe he made for him self a blue ocean consultancy business and this book was the start of it? Beyond the Machiaveli political tips , everything else was around a catchy phrase and that what his main message seems to be. Rest are old theories in new color.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mario Tomic

    This book is an essential read for any entrepreneur looking to compete in a saturated marketplace and build a successful business. Too many startups fail because founders try to compete directly with well-established companies that dominate the market. The Blue Ocean Strategy is a book about finding your niche within a niche so you can stay competitive and grow.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Van Edwards

    I had to read this book for a strategy class. Business strategy is all about how you intend to differentiate yourself from the competition and how you plan to get there. The premise of Blue Ocean Strategy is, as stated on page 4, "Red oceans represent all the industries in existence today. This is the known market space. Blue oceans denote all the industries not in existence today. This is the unknown market space." So the point of this strategy is to remove your business from the bloody sea of I had to read this book for a strategy class. Business strategy is all about how you intend to differentiate yourself from the competition and how you plan to get there. The premise of Blue Ocean Strategy is, as stated on page 4, "Red oceans represent all the industries in existence today. This is the known market space. Blue oceans denote all the industries not in existence today. This is the unknown market space." So the point of this strategy is to remove your business from the bloody sea of eat-each-other-alive competition and find or create a new field all to yourself. But none of the examples cited in the book have created any "new industries". Southwest Airlines is still an airline. [yellow tail] is still a wine. Cirque de Soleil is still a circus. They do find ways to tap into new or specialized markets. So to me, these companies have more or less sailed to the edge of the red oceans, but they haven't completely left it. What's bothersome to me is that the authors don't have an example of how they or someone else have taken a company through the steps to find that coveted blue ocean. What we have are existing companies who have differentiated themselves from their competition or tapped into a new customer base. So it seems as if the tenets of blue ocean strategy have been reverse-engineered to fit a handful of companies. This seems to be a research project that yielded some similarities between successful companies. I'm not saying that their strategy is wrong, but perhaps I'd be more convinced of it if there were a company who successfully followed their method.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    A boring book with several great insights. The take-aways: - Competition can be tough. Well-defined business spaces (a.k.a. red ocean, filled with blood) are vicious. - Instead of competing in red oceans, consider creating a new space (a.k.a. blue oceans, no blood) - There are several ways to create a blue ocean. The main idea is to re-evaluate core assumptions about (1) who your customers are/could be, and (2) what your customers value. - For example, "the circus" was traditionally for kids. It had A boring book with several great insights. The take-aways: - Competition can be tough. Well-defined business spaces (a.k.a. red ocean, filled with blood) are vicious. - Instead of competing in red oceans, consider creating a new space (a.k.a. blue oceans, no blood) - There are several ways to create a blue ocean. The main idea is to re-evaluate core assumptions about (1) who your customers are/could be, and (2) what your customers value. - For example, "the circus" was traditionally for kids. It had animals. And clowns. And over-priced popcorn. However, Cirque du Soleil re-thought these assumptions. Did "the circus" *need* to be for kids? What about adults? Did it need to have animals? And 3-ring acts? What if it was more performative/thematic instead? - By changing their value proposition or by targeting a specific customer segment, businesses in competitive spaces can carve out profitable niches. - That said, be mindful of what prevents competitors from copying your strategy! Ideally, you can do find something valuable and then protect it, otherwise your blue ocean will turn purple... then red.

  13. 4 out of 5

    CaptainWolfsborg

    It took me 7 years to finish this book. This book is one of those books that I can't find a reasonable explanation why I bought it in the first place. Maybe, seven years ago, I was searching for some interesting ideas how to run a company, maybe, my attention was drawn by the label "International Bestseller, millions of copies sold", maybe, lack of better alternatives at that moment at the airport shop, etc. I have Another stupid behavior of mine is that I force myself to finish even a totally i It took me 7 years to finish this book. This book is one of those books that I can't find a reasonable explanation why I bought it in the first place. Maybe, seven years ago, I was searching for some interesting ideas how to run a company, maybe, my attention was drawn by the label "International Bestseller, millions of copies sold", maybe, lack of better alternatives at that moment at the airport shop, etc. I have Another stupid behavior of mine is that I force myself to finish even a totally irrelevant book in order to defend those 32 USD spent. So I lose both money and time and multiplying to wrongs doesn't give one right.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Trevor

    I remember as a child asking my dad why I should pick up skiing over snowboarding. He responded that while snowboarding was certainly fun, because of its popularity it was also commonplace. Reasonably talented teenage snowboarders were a dime a dozen on any ski hill. Good young skiers, however, were few and far between. Reflecting on the choice between becoming one of the unwashed masses of snowboarders or one of the few, the happy few skiers, I chose the latter. Over the years being a reasonabl I remember as a child asking my dad why I should pick up skiing over snowboarding. He responded that while snowboarding was certainly fun, because of its popularity it was also commonplace. Reasonably talented teenage snowboarders were a dime a dozen on any ski hill. Good young skiers, however, were few and far between. Reflecting on the choice between becoming one of the unwashed masses of snowboarders or one of the few, the happy few skiers, I chose the latter. Over the years being a reasonably good skier has served me well, differentiating myself from many of my peers and has created numerous business relationships and opportunities. Kim and his co-authors take this basic concept and apply it to business. They suggest that positioning one's company away from popular and hotly contested "red ocean" and moving to less frequented "blue ocean" can pay huge dividends. Blue Ocean Strategy differentiates itself from many business strategy books in that it doesn't simply dwell on this semi-novel strategic formulation, instead it includes numerous tools and suggestions for actively moving a company from red to blue ocean. Although some of the suggestions strike me as too esoteric to prove useful in a real business, the majority are simple, straight-forward, and can be utilized as useful thought experiments if nothing else. All in all I found the book engaging a worthwhile read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    محمد الملا

    I read the book after reading the article published in HBR, the book is really valuable and will enrich the reader will a lot of perspectives, tools and frameworks ... i liked mainly the "Strategy canvas" form first sight .. what a great and powerful tool This is clearly a must read book for every one interested in the filed of management or strategy, But i will emphasis and insist on these points: - Before reading this book, Please, read other book related to strategy (I will advice: Michael E. I read the book after reading the article published in HBR, the book is really valuable and will enrich the reader will a lot of perspectives, tools and frameworks ... i liked mainly the "Strategy canvas" form first sight .. what a great and powerful tool This is clearly a must read book for every one interested in the filed of management or strategy, But i will emphasis and insist on these points: - Before reading this book, Please, read other book related to strategy (I will advice: Michael E. Porter books, or at least his article: what is strategy?) - I figured that some ideas that told in the book already told before, but the author but it in the very very right context - The theory needs to be challenged and examined by an independent party - I expect that i will find a drawn chart for the process of creation the blue ocean strategy, the absence of this chart is making the book hard to follow and challenged Note: I added a lot of quotes from the book into goodreads and social media platforms

  16. 4 out of 5

    Deane Barker

    This book is meant to describe a new approach/strategy to marketing. The "blue ocean" strategy means that you find some aspect of your market that no one is doing, and try to dominate that, rather than fighting it out with other vendors in your space -- which is a "red ocean" strategy. It's a good book that's just long enough. Long enough to describe the strategy and explain the pitfalls, but not padded too far. The problem is that acting on the strategy in this book will be a very long play. This This book is meant to describe a new approach/strategy to marketing. The "blue ocean" strategy means that you find some aspect of your market that no one is doing, and try to dominate that, rather than fighting it out with other vendors in your space -- which is a "red ocean" strategy. It's a good book that's just long enough. Long enough to describe the strategy and explain the pitfalls, but not padded too far. The problem is that acting on the strategy in this book will be a very long play. This is not a tactical book that gives you some tips you can use today. To do anything with this, you'd need a lot of time to completely pivot your business, I think.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    This is a very good book. I am reading it for the first time because the new one has come out and I wanted a baseline. The premise is simple most competitors compete in price, variety, quality etc but the profits are slim and market is stagnant. This is called the red (bloody) ocean. To win big, you need to develop the Blue Ocean Strategy, bu looking into unexplored market. For example, Cirque du Soleil had transformed circus performance into sort of a theatre thing, attracting audience who woul This is a very good book. I am reading it for the first time because the new one has come out and I wanted a baseline. The premise is simple most competitors compete in price, variety, quality etc but the profits are slim and market is stagnant. This is called the red (bloody) ocean. To win big, you need to develop the Blue Ocean Strategy, bu looking into unexplored market. For example, Cirque du Soleil had transformed circus performance into sort of a theatre thing, attracting audience who would not mind paying the high price for a nice performance. It also managed to cut costs by doing away with the animals. This is all very well and good, but sometimes success is only obvious after the fact. Even Steve Jobs did not get everything right and had a few products that flopped. It is of course easy to see after the facts, but the only way to develop these blue oceans is to try and try and try again. The unforeseen effect of this book has been the explicit point made in this book: Do not focus on your existing customers because they are relatively happy anyway, and competition is stiff; focus on getting new customers instead as they are the Blues. This has caused some companies, including my local cable TV company giving their customers the feeling that they don't treasure their existing customers and are just nice to the new ones. That is the saddest side effect of this international best seller.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jelantik

    It was a booming marketing strategy that suddenly every body talked about. Even my 'ex' boss! With curiousity I bought this book to find out what is this so famous new marketing strategy?!?!? when I finally read the book, actually there is nothing new in it. It is actually the same strategy that I've learned in university. Mainly it talks about DIFFERENTIATION AND BEING DIFFERENT, that's it. Thanks God I didn't buy the original english version that cost a fortune!! It was a booming marketing strategy that suddenly every body talked about. Even my 'ex' boss! With curiousity I bought this book to find out what is this so famous new marketing strategy?!?!? when I finally read the book, actually there is nothing new in it. It is actually the same strategy that I've learned in university. Mainly it talks about DIFFERENTIATION AND BEING DIFFERENT, that's it. Thanks God I didn't buy the original english version that cost a fortune!!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra

    A few too many examples in my opinion - it became repetitive. assess trends across time: "decisive to your business...irreversible...have clear trajectory" 1) focus 2) divergence 3) Compelling tag line Without buyer utility there's no blue ocean. Compelling reason for a mass of people to buy. Setting strategic price - compelling ability to pay for offering Product at cost. Cost don't drive price. Address adoption hurdles. volume intensive - more costs in knowledge marketplace on r&d not on production. The A few too many examples in my opinion - it became repetitive. assess trends across time: "decisive to your business...irreversible...have clear trajectory" 1) focus 2) divergence 3) Compelling tag line Without buyer utility there's no blue ocean. Compelling reason for a mass of people to buy. Setting strategic price - compelling ability to pay for offering Product at cost. Cost don't drive price. Address adoption hurdles. volume intensive - more costs in knowledge marketplace on r&d not on production. The people at the front line care as much about process/strategy as people at the top. Follow due process at rollout or risk alienating your employees. Reconstruction (demand - redfine problem itself) vs recombination (supply)

  20. 5 out of 5

    Brooke

    Insightful observations on how to create market differentiation without feature comparisons against competitors. Since this was written 15 years ago, several of the case studies were rather dated (Borders, Barnes & Noble, iTunes), yet I was also fascinated to observe the businesses that have continued to succeed in their blue oceans (Cirque du Soleil, Southwest Airlines, Starbucks).

  21. 5 out of 5

    Fredrik Storflor

    Another great model. That doesn't take into account halo effect and bias in the data. Great for having a tool and framework for business model, but not an generalised model. Read Phil Rosenzweig book to get perspectives on the common mistakes from its data Another great model. That doesn't take into account halo effect and bias in the data. Great for having a tool and framework for business model, but not an generalised model. Read Phil Rosenzweig book to get perspectives on the common mistakes from its data

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ebrahem Anwar

    This book change my perspective on How to build lasting and competitive businesses

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ammar Naaimi

    It was super interesting!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Paco

    Modeling disruptive innovation is easier read than done. Blue Ocean Strategy comes with the promise of an absolute shift in how you will think about business and just delivers some new interesting frameworks to add to your toolkit. The idea that competitors are fighting in a red sea of blood while there is always a blue ocean of opportunity is very a powerful visual idea that most readers could feel as absolutely disruptive and inspiring. However is nothing new, it all comes back to the idea of th Modeling disruptive innovation is easier read than done. Blue Ocean Strategy comes with the promise of an absolute shift in how you will think about business and just delivers some new interesting frameworks to add to your toolkit. The idea that competitors are fighting in a red sea of blood while there is always a blue ocean of opportunity is very a powerful visual idea that most readers could feel as absolutely disruptive and inspiring. However is nothing new, it all comes back to the idea of thinking outside of the box, finding a solution that has never been thought of before. But the book comes with the promise of a structural way to deliver and think about how to make this disruption happen. It fails. And the reason it fails is that disruption is by definition unstructured. The book has some clever business frameworks, useful and innovative, but don't expect anything more sophisticated than the classical Porter 4 forces. Blue Ocean Strategy its just a good read if you enjoy business strategy that will enrich your business knowledge.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kislay Verma

    Full review at Solomon Says: Let's go through the pros and cons of this book. The idea that there are no eternally excellent companies, and that the strategic move, instead of the company should be the unit of analysis is compelling. The authors argue that all companies make mistakes, so we should look to their strategic moves for excellence or the lack thereof instead of the companies themselves. Now for the con, which is pretty much the existence of this book. Anybody even remotely familiar with Full review at Solomon Says: Let's go through the pros and cons of this book. The idea that there are no eternally excellent companies, and that the strategic move, instead of the company should be the unit of analysis is compelling. The authors argue that all companies make mistakes, so we should look to their strategic moves for excellence or the lack thereof instead of the companies themselves. Now for the con, which is pretty much the existence of this book. Anybody even remotely familiar with business will realize what a gigantic truism Blue Ocean Strategy is. “Create awesome things that everyone and their grandmother wants.”. This is literally all the book says. Sure. Why Not!!! Just let me put on my magic hat! Innovation of the type that Kim and Mauborgne are suggesting is very, very hard. The Blue Ocean Strategy fails to acknowledge this difficulty. It takes the greatest challenge of corporate strategy and peddles an oversimplified solution through anecdotes and fancy terms. Blue Ocean Strategy is not a theory. There is neither hypothesis nor attempted proof here. The whole thing goes backwards from effects to causes. What little “theory” is given is self-validating. We already know what the traits of a successful product/service are. It adds value to peoples lives and makes money for the company. The authors have made these two the hallmark of their “value innovation”, and since every successful new business meets these criteria, the authors pretend that the theroy is valid. The book is also guilty of what Nassim Taleb calls “survivorship bias”. It analyzes only successful cases of blue ocean creation. If there is any industry segment which is trying to create blue oceans, it is startups. How many startups did all that this book suggests and yet failed? Blue Ocean Strategy is a great tag line, but is actually a descriptive work masquerading as prescriptive theory. Read it only if you must.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    For as long as I can remember, my environment has been teaching me that if I want to stand out and be recognized as an individual I have to set myself apart and be different in a positive way. Along my journey, I picked up the idea that I need to be competitive or else I will succumb forever into a state of oblivion or worse into a debilitating state not worthy of anyone's attention. Of course, most if not all businesses have the same orientation. Many organizations are driven to be competitive e For as long as I can remember, my environment has been teaching me that if I want to stand out and be recognized as an individual I have to set myself apart and be different in a positive way. Along my journey, I picked up the idea that I need to be competitive or else I will succumb forever into a state of oblivion or worse into a debilitating state not worthy of anyone's attention. Of course, most if not all businesses have the same orientation. Many organizations are driven to be competitive especially in capitalistic economies. If you are strong you'll win but if you're weak you'll die. For as long as our society measures the success of companies as compared to others performance, competition shall remain relevant. However, sometimes you get tired of the ordinary discourses of competition. This book offers another way of looking at strategy. For me, blue ocean strategy is another way for companies to outperform (compete with) others in a whole new level. Instead of being reactive to what other companies are doing, a company adopting blue ocean strategy focuses on creating value innovation. The book has multitude of examples and good ideas on how companies can adopt this mindset. In a very simple way this means wowing you existing customers plus others who don't care with your product. I have read the expanded edition of this book and the edition itself is an example of the renewal idea espoused in the last chapters. This book brings fresh perspectives for those who are engaged in a militaristic view of competition. Will I recommend this book? Yes because I am tired of the normal Company A vs. Company B type of games within the bloody red pool of competition. I think I am ready to swim to a fresh blue ocean.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jina

    I only skimmed this book. Thought the charts were stupid. Reasonably interesting premise that would have been the right length for 100 pages or less, not a full book. The thesis is that in selecting your product-market fit, you can try to compete with everyone else (the crowded "red ocean") or you can try to be the only one in your market (the "blue ocean"). For example, if you're running a circus, you could try to compete with Ringling Bros. and plenty of lesser-known competitors, who were in a I only skimmed this book. Thought the charts were stupid. Reasonably interesting premise that would have been the right length for 100 pages or less, not a full book. The thesis is that in selecting your product-market fit, you can try to compete with everyone else (the crowded "red ocean") or you can try to be the only one in your market (the "blue ocean"). For example, if you're running a circus, you could try to compete with Ringling Bros. and plenty of lesser-known competitors, who were in a race to the bottom. (The book was written when Ringling Bros. was still in business, but their closure in 2017 just emphasizes the authors' point.) Or you can make a new market. Cirque du Soleil went after the adult market rather than appealing to families with small kids. Their product is obviously different, more theatrical; and instead of the same act all the time, they offer different performances, so there's a reason to keep going back. The price is also similar to live theater. Another example is Curves: instead of trying to compete with other gyms, they offered something very specific, a convenient gym for busy women, with an easy-to-follow circuit routine and no mirrors. Authors Kim and Mauborgne are also fans of Novo Nordisk (marketed to patients instead of doctors by making insulin injections easier), Bloomberg Business (offered shopping to time-strapped traders, who then forced IT managers to buy the terminals), and the "broken windows" policing model of the New York police department (also described by Malcolm Gladwell). Overall an enjoyable read, and I don't disagree with their premise, I just think it should have been a lot shorter.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Alexandre

    Practical advice from one of the bosses at the INSEAD Strategy Institute. Sometimes it gets a little self-helpy in the sense that creates its own vocabulary and repeats them ad nauseaum until we can't take it anymore. The references, of course, are dated. But I like its insights. Some reviewers accuse it of nitpicking evidences, but business is already a tricky area for scientific exactness: there is just too many variables, and this book doesn't (nor tries to) cover all of them. This is a book a Practical advice from one of the bosses at the INSEAD Strategy Institute. Sometimes it gets a little self-helpy in the sense that creates its own vocabulary and repeats them ad nauseaum until we can't take it anymore. The references, of course, are dated. But I like its insights. Some reviewers accuse it of nitpicking evidences, but business is already a tricky area for scientific exactness: there is just too many variables, and this book doesn't (nor tries to) cover all of them. This is a book about strategy, not a failure-proof-execution-guide. Good place to start when it comes to innovation, since it introduces a "curve of value", that can measure in what companies should innovate and truly generate value for the clients, avoiding small niches and creating a relative monopoly (or "blue ocean") for itself.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Thanh Tu

    What a good book for those who are interested in strategy. Very clear examples with many case studies on how some companies get a big profit by leaving the traditional red oceans of competitions for blue oceans where they are unique. it's a little bit unfortunately for me that I've recently read this book while it was actually published more than 12 years ago. In the past 12 years, the strategy of companies has changed a lot, come along with changes in the market, mostly because of the technolog What a good book for those who are interested in strategy. Very clear examples with many case studies on how some companies get a big profit by leaving the traditional red oceans of competitions for blue oceans where they are unique. it's a little bit unfortunately for me that I've recently read this book while it was actually published more than 12 years ago. In the past 12 years, the strategy of companies has changed a lot, come along with changes in the market, mostly because of the technology revolutions. So some ideas in this book become common sense nowadays. Even though I don't find some big "new" things in this book, but many pieces of advice, as well as approaches to blue oceans how to create our own market, are still very useful.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Maurice Rubino

    How to Run your Business and Become the Competition This is a very technical book to read cover to cover, which explains the 3 star rating.However the message is clear. If you run your business attempting to price your product or device below the competition or by adding "bells and whistles" to an existing product, you will continually be looking over your shoulder to fend off your competitors. The book includes several excellent examples of companies that used the existing product or service but How to Run your Business and Become the Competition This is a very technical book to read cover to cover, which explains the 3 star rating.However the message is clear. If you run your business attempting to price your product or device below the competition or by adding "bells and whistles" to an existing product, you will continually be looking over your shoulder to fend off your competitors. The book includes several excellent examples of companies that used the existing product or service but found a way to market these to previously untapped markets creating a space in the marketplace and become the leader in that space.

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