web site hit counter Tarinaniskijä - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Tarinaniskijä

Availability: Ready to download

Joe Crowne is a poor boy from Brooklyn with a burning ambition to write… to be a storyteller. Thanks to natural street smarts and ruthless ambition, Joe tears himself free from a world of gangsters, drug dealers, prostitutes, and pimps. In his sights is the unmatched glamour of Hollywood… the dolce vita of Europe… and all the glitter and self-indulgence that comes with succ Joe Crowne is a poor boy from Brooklyn with a burning ambition to write… to be a storyteller. Thanks to natural street smarts and ruthless ambition, Joe tears himself free from a world of gangsters, drug dealers, prostitutes, and pimps. In his sights is the unmatched glamour of Hollywood… the dolce vita of Europe… and all the glitter and self-indulgence that comes with success. Yet as much as Joe wants fame, excess, and easy sex, he hungers for real love. The Storyteller is a ticket to the hidden fantasy world of beautiful people, to luxury and desire... it is the story of a brilliant young man whose every American dream came true.


Compare

Joe Crowne is a poor boy from Brooklyn with a burning ambition to write… to be a storyteller. Thanks to natural street smarts and ruthless ambition, Joe tears himself free from a world of gangsters, drug dealers, prostitutes, and pimps. In his sights is the unmatched glamour of Hollywood… the dolce vita of Europe… and all the glitter and self-indulgence that comes with succ Joe Crowne is a poor boy from Brooklyn with a burning ambition to write… to be a storyteller. Thanks to natural street smarts and ruthless ambition, Joe tears himself free from a world of gangsters, drug dealers, prostitutes, and pimps. In his sights is the unmatched glamour of Hollywood… the dolce vita of Europe… and all the glitter and self-indulgence that comes with success. Yet as much as Joe wants fame, excess, and easy sex, he hungers for real love. The Storyteller is a ticket to the hidden fantasy world of beautiful people, to luxury and desire... it is the story of a brilliant young man whose every American dream came true.

30 review for Tarinaniskijä

  1. 5 out of 5

    zulma Rodriguez

    Impressive . Great plot and an unbelievable ending. Very entertaining. Can't be anything but a five stars. It's a Harold Robbins book; one of the greatest writers. Recommend it to anyone that loves a hard to put down book. Loved the plot, the characters and the unbelievable ending. Impressive . Great plot and an unbelievable ending. Very entertaining. Can't be anything but a five stars. It's a Harold Robbins book; one of the greatest writers. Recommend it to anyone that loves a hard to put down book. Loved the plot, the characters and the unbelievable ending.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Miss

    Really not his best. And I'm actually a fan (even though I put brown paper bag covers on them when I ride the train.) Really not his best. And I'm actually a fan (even though I put brown paper bag covers on them when I ride the train.)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Balle Millner (Blogger, Freelance Writer, Aspiring Autho

    The Storyteller isn't one of Robbins best books, but it is entertaining nonetheless. The Carpetbaggers is still his best book in my opinion. The Storyteller isn't one of Robbins best books, but it is entertaining nonetheless. The Carpetbaggers is still his best book in my opinion.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jasonmwooten

    First novel I was suggested to read by someone other then a teacher. I still want to be the main character!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Racy. That's the word. A lot of earthy language, a lot of titillation, a lot of characters, too - but most of them you look at askance. The story is a story by the storyteller, of his origins, his making, his success. You can’t help wonder who the old man who book-ends the piece might be. Joe, our protagonist, comes from a Jewish family of meat traders in downtown New York, and is destined to be a writer - a writer of the same literary standards as he who wrote this book and sold millions, with H Racy. That's the word. A lot of earthy language, a lot of titillation, a lot of characters, too - but most of them you look at askance. The story is a story by the storyteller, of his origins, his making, his success. You can’t help wonder who the old man who book-ends the piece might be. Joe, our protagonist, comes from a Jewish family of meat traders in downtown New York, and is destined to be a writer - a writer of the same literary standards as he who wrote this book and sold millions, with Hollywood options. He lives with his brother and 'sister' Motty, a second cousin brought up by the family. Theirs is a straightforward story of extended families taking in relatives as their own, a picture not uncommon in the times, those largely being the '40s. Normal. And then the War comes, and things start happening fast. Robbins writes with a facility and pace that slides you along with ease in his small world of realistic characters whose potty mouths betray their own subculture morality: green is the means, get it how you can; sex the adjunct need, get it how you can; topped up by the leisurely use of drugs, largely for resale. There's nothing too offensive about these characters - there are good and bad and mostly those who just get by how they can - but there's no one to really root for, except perhaps Motty, who soon absorbs the prevailing mores of those around her. I enjoyed the first part of the book, following Joe as he leaves home and makes his way in New York: it has a familiarty not uncommon with my youth, albeit mine was enacted in slightly less corrupting surroundings: bum jobs, a sense of remove, ambition as pet project, keep going, keep moving. But once we switch to the years immediately after the War (which doesn't impinge on this domestic turf), once we move to L.A., then morals become looser as Joe and Motty learn the ropes, the business, the conventions, and the dialogue becomes cluttered with the lingua franca of Hollywood film studios and their brand of shark. But it is the dialogue which makes the book as readable as it is, it's through dialogue that Robbins largely develops his characters, and all that fills between is merely setting. We all know not to expect anything too literary from a Robbins novel, but we also know that for a brief burst of action, we get a slice of a life that feels somehow genuine from a tranche of the population we would never otherwise have come across since most of us have never quite lived that kind of life, but perhaps a local variation of it, if not so littered with casual sex and drugs. Of course, the moral of the endgame is always visible on the horizon as Joe leaps from New York to Italy to the south of France and finds his easy-going equanimity with his new lifestyle troubling his deeper needs, which is to become an established writer of fiction, if not of subjects more profound than his scriptwriting bread and butter, and of finding someone to help him with the fruition of his calling. Yet for all my highbrow admonitions and occasional raised eyebrows, The Storyteller is also a brief burst of dazzling light that you can turn to without having to give anything at all, something to make those interminably endless waits in NHS waiting-rooms 10 minutes of popcorn, or something to fall asleep to without having to worry about where you got up to. In one ear, out the other. And sometimes that's all you need. I enjoyed the first third of the book, as novel and gripping as any King piece that dips into that vast warren which is New York (like parts of his Dark Tower series does); but then the facile wheels and deals of L.A., Rome and the south of France took over, and I wanted it to end. It took me over 3 months to read it, but I could pick it up after weeks without needing any recap, it lay like a thin film on a superficial layer of short-term memory, with a feel to it, a flavour, just exactly reminiscent of The Betsy [1971] and The Carpetbaggers [1961] I'd read in my late teens. Maybe I'll revisit those two most famous of this paradigm of pulp fiction?

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    Just wanted to give the famous Harold Robbins another chance in case he messed up The Betsy. What if he was indeed a good writer and I just chose a poor book? Boy I was so so wrong. He just doesnt know how to write. His stories dont have a plot. And this one is ironically named ' The Storyteller' when there's absolutely no story! I find his writing unintelligent and confusing except for the dirty explicit sex scenes where he becomes clear and precise. It seems like he wants to enjoy writing those Just wanted to give the famous Harold Robbins another chance in case he messed up The Betsy. What if he was indeed a good writer and I just chose a poor book? Boy I was so so wrong. He just doesnt know how to write. His stories dont have a plot. And this one is ironically named ' The Storyteller' when there's absolutely no story! I find his writing unintelligent and confusing except for the dirty explicit sex scenes where he becomes clear and precise. It seems like he wants to enjoy writing those scenes. But inorder to do that he needs a story which he hates writing, but somehow manages to fill the pages with shit until his interesting segments come up. Here he dedicates himself wholeheartedly, coming up with the most repulsive unrealistic ideas for sex. His portrayal of female characters as submissive and 100% willing to cooperate with his disgusting ideas of sex is downright misleading and misogynistic. I dont think he ever 'loved' a woman or tried to understand one. I cant emotionally connect with the thoughts and actions of any of his characters. They dont feel human. :( So I stand by my opinion: if you have read one Harold Robbins, you have read them all.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Muhammad

    Too much sex, too much BJs, too much jerking off. A cheap sex story writer finds his way to Hollywood as a scriptwriter for the sensuous B movies right after WWII. There he experiences all sorts of sex, gets new cunts everyday. 'Let's fuck' is the most obvious and probably the only way to celebrate any occasion. And dope too. Sex and dope; that's nearly all about Hollywood. I am not sure whether Harold Robbins tried to portray the screwed up lives of Hollywood or just tried to increase his sales Too much sex, too much BJs, too much jerking off. A cheap sex story writer finds his way to Hollywood as a scriptwriter for the sensuous B movies right after WWII. There he experiences all sorts of sex, gets new cunts everyday. 'Let's fuck' is the most obvious and probably the only way to celebrate any occasion. And dope too. Sex and dope; that's nearly all about Hollywood. I am not sure whether Harold Robbins tried to portray the screwed up lives of Hollywood or just tried to increase his sales ( considering the fact that he alone sold 750 million books) but either way it's a very cheap piece of writing. There are 38 chapters in total excluding the prologue and epilogue and there is not a single chapter where none of the characters is not jerking off/ giving someone a 'quickie'/ spreading the labia with two fingers or in the least getting a hard on. I finally raised my hands up my head and surrendered when the protagonist peed inside the cunt of a black girl. It's probably my 'oriental' view but I'm truly, utterly disgusted. God, why did I even read the book?

  8. 5 out of 5

    Zohaib Furqan

    A great book, really inspiring. Love the way, how the author takes the reader from dark valleys to extravagant parties. I really admire, the starting and the ending and all the events that connect the start and the end. It really gives us the lesson on how we need to maneuver through as a young adult. all in all "A PLEASURE TO READ" A great book, really inspiring. Love the way, how the author takes the reader from dark valleys to extravagant parties. I really admire, the starting and the ending and all the events that connect the start and the end. It really gives us the lesson on how we need to maneuver through as a young adult. all in all "A PLEASURE TO READ"

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kwame M

    Very well-written story This was a very neat, very well-written story with all the usual Robbins elements. Even though it probably wasn't as compelling as his other works, it was a fairly good read and its ideas plausible. Solid work! Very well-written story This was a very neat, very well-written story with all the usual Robbins elements. Even though it probably wasn't as compelling as his other works, it was a fairly good read and its ideas plausible. Solid work!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Phani

    One of the worst. I really liked some of his novels, but this is very bad.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Vala MO

    Fue el primer libro de segunda mano que compré.

  12. 4 out of 5

    pilar

    Una novela ligera, muy entretenida. Con un toque de erotismo dentro del mundo del cine y con un final que puede sorprender.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dwight Brooks

    Was amazing!

  14. 5 out of 5

    HighFidelity

    Nista posebno. Ali fina knjiga.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    The Storyteller is one of Robbins' later works and is a novel length journey through a young man's life that takes him from Brooklyn to Hollywood and to the French Riviera. It is told in a bawdy manner with all kinds of sexual affairs from meeting prostitutes to Hollywood casting couches, endless affairs, producer's wives, orgies with European nobility, and more. It starts with a few coming of age episodes that has a young man escape the draft by putting in work for the Mafia, managing a hotel fu The Storyteller is one of Robbins' later works and is a novel length journey through a young man's life that takes him from Brooklyn to Hollywood and to the French Riviera. It is told in a bawdy manner with all kinds of sexual affairs from meeting prostitutes to Hollywood casting couches, endless affairs, producer's wives, orgies with European nobility, and more. It starts with a few coming of age episodes that has a young man escape the draft by putting in work for the Mafia, managing a hotel full of call girls. His young innocence doesn't last too long, particularly after he becomes a screenwriter and finds joe sleazy a t is behind the silver screen. The story is about the emptiness of lives spent chasing each new dollar, each new thrill, each opportunity. And, despite all the risqué scenes and debauchery, threatened are points where the story feels a bit flat and pointless.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jimmy

    There's good Harold Robbins junk like Never Love A Stranger and good-but-filthy Harold Robbins junk like Goodbye, Janette, but The Storyteller is just bad Harold Robbins junk. I wonder if this is when he started losing his junky magic. The main character, Joe Crown, is just unbelievable. He shows none of the talent or perceptions or sensitivities or anything that makes it believable that he's supposed to sit down at a typewriter and create work that makes literary agents and movie studios gush. There's good Harold Robbins junk like Never Love A Stranger and good-but-filthy Harold Robbins junk like Goodbye, Janette, but The Storyteller is just bad Harold Robbins junk. I wonder if this is when he started losing his junky magic. The main character, Joe Crown, is just unbelievable. He shows none of the talent or perceptions or sensitivities or anything that makes it believable that he's supposed to sit down at a typewriter and create work that makes literary agents and movie studios gush. He's just a sneaky guy who worked hard to avoid the draft (WWII) and befriends a drug-dealing, pimp who batters his girls, and no one is redeeemed or ever changes or grows as a character.

  17. 5 out of 5

    YasJoon

    A fun book to read; honestly nothing was difficult to understand en it flew into your background noise and could take you away from everydays’ for few minuets. It was my book to read in public transport; somehow now and then I would laugh cause tbh it is a fun read with good amount of erotica and humor.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Harish P

    Damn quick read. Has all the rawness that Harold Robbins is known. one line summary: Joe Crown, coming out of nowhere, fucks his way to glory in Hollywood and then becomes a celebrated novelist.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bob Box

    Read in 1986. A story of a brilliant young man whose every dream came true.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jv

    Keri naman sya. Di naman sayang sa oras.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Greg Cain

    Classic Robbins. I revisited this book when I found it on my bookshelf recently. My Mom and Dad had several of his books around the house when I was growing up, along with books by Leon Uris from about the same time frame. If you liked The Betsy or The Carpetbaggers, and you haven't read The Storyteller yet, break it out and read it. It's got all the smut his other books do, but it also has a decent story line that pulls you along through a bygone era, and makes you want to pick it up at lunch, Classic Robbins. I revisited this book when I found it on my bookshelf recently. My Mom and Dad had several of his books around the house when I was growing up, along with books by Leon Uris from about the same time frame. If you liked The Betsy or The Carpetbaggers, and you haven't read The Storyteller yet, break it out and read it. It's got all the smut his other books do, but it also has a decent story line that pulls you along through a bygone era, and makes you want to pick it up at lunch, before and after dinner, and right away when you get up in the morning.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kristína Tóth

    I have not read anything else by him and after this one I do not even want to. It is not because of the cheap sex scenes but because of the cheap description. Fortunately it is a thin book so I did not waste too much of my time reading it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Adarsh

    For most part, this book reads like a cheap erotic entertainer. The ending is quite good though, and sort of redeems the book. a very quick read, but too much eroticism and too little story. Not the Harold Robbins I know. I wonder how much of this is from his real life.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Pamela

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mark Leeman

  26. 5 out of 5

    S

  27. 4 out of 5

    Treasa Joy Karotte

  28. 4 out of 5

    Palko Palko

  29. 5 out of 5

    Miroslava Brutovská

  30. 4 out of 5

    Steve

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.