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The president of Southern Seminary reveals how secularism has infiltrated every aspect of society and how Christians, equipped with the gospel of Jesus Christ, can meet it head on with hope, confidence, and steadfast conviction. A storm is coming. Western civilization and the Christian church stand at a moment of great danger. The storm is a battle of ideas that will determ The president of Southern Seminary reveals how secularism has infiltrated every aspect of society and how Christians, equipped with the gospel of Jesus Christ, can meet it head on with hope, confidence, and steadfast conviction. A storm is coming. Western civilization and the Christian church stand at a moment of great danger. The storm is a battle of ideas that will determine the future of Western civilization and the soul of the Christian church. The forces we must fight are ideologies, policies, and worldviews that are deeply established among intellectual elites, the political class, and our schools. More menacingly, these ideas have also invaded the Christian church. From threats to religious liberty and redefinitions of marriage and family to attacks on the sacredness and dignity of human life, the perils faced by the West and the church are unprecedented. How should Christians respond to this challenge? The Gathering Storm provides the answer, addressing each dimension of culture and showing Christians how to give an answer for the hope that is within them and how to contend for the faith that was once and for all delivered to the saints.


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The president of Southern Seminary reveals how secularism has infiltrated every aspect of society and how Christians, equipped with the gospel of Jesus Christ, can meet it head on with hope, confidence, and steadfast conviction. A storm is coming. Western civilization and the Christian church stand at a moment of great danger. The storm is a battle of ideas that will determ The president of Southern Seminary reveals how secularism has infiltrated every aspect of society and how Christians, equipped with the gospel of Jesus Christ, can meet it head on with hope, confidence, and steadfast conviction. A storm is coming. Western civilization and the Christian church stand at a moment of great danger. The storm is a battle of ideas that will determine the future of Western civilization and the soul of the Christian church. The forces we must fight are ideologies, policies, and worldviews that are deeply established among intellectual elites, the political class, and our schools. More menacingly, these ideas have also invaded the Christian church. From threats to religious liberty and redefinitions of marriage and family to attacks on the sacredness and dignity of human life, the perils faced by the West and the church are unprecedented. How should Christians respond to this challenge? The Gathering Storm provides the answer, addressing each dimension of culture and showing Christians how to give an answer for the hope that is within them and how to contend for the faith that was once and for all delivered to the saints.

30 review for The Gathering Storm: Secularism, Culture, and the Church

  1. 4 out of 5

    David Steele

    The postmodern clouds loom large over our heads. What Francis Schaeffer anticipated in the sixties and seventies is now upon us - in full force. What was once suspected has now arrived. The full force of secularism has invaded our culture and is wreaking havoc in the church. Dr. R. Albert Mohler addresses the theme of secularism, culture, and the church in his latest book, The Gathering Storm. Each chapter sounds a warning cry to followers of Jesus Christ as the author demonstrates how secular hu The postmodern clouds loom large over our heads. What Francis Schaeffer anticipated in the sixties and seventies is now upon us - in full force. What was once suspected has now arrived. The full force of secularism has invaded our culture and is wreaking havoc in the church. Dr. R. Albert Mohler addresses the theme of secularism, culture, and the church in his latest book, The Gathering Storm. Each chapter sounds a warning cry to followers of Jesus Christ as the author demonstrates how secular humanism has managed to essentially “dechristianize the culture.” As Francis Schaeffer once wisely noted, “The tragedy of our situation today is that men and women are being fundamentally affected by the new way of looking at truth, and yet they have never even analyzed the drift which has taken place.” Over and over, Mohler demonstrates the radical nature of this seismic shift. The central theme of the book is that the storm is real and unavoidable. In the eye of the storm lie several key issues - the sanctity of life, marriage and family, and matters that pertain to gender and sexuality. Ignoring the storm will not alter the forecast. Evangelicals, then, must refuse to plant their heads in the ground like the proverbial ostrich. While the storm is alarming, Dr. Mohler is quick to leave his readers with hope: “The one true God is Lord over history, and he has now called Christians in this generation into the storm.” Anything less would be cowardly and unfaithful to God and his gospel. I commend The Gathering Storm to followers of Christ and also challenge them to pay careful attention to Al Mohler keen insight in this area.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Samuel

    Anyone familiar with Al Mohler’s work with The Briefing podcast will recognize much of the material and the perspective in this book. Mohler has given a lot of time to understanding current National and global events from a Christian worldview, and what he has seen in the last year or so has him (and many faithful Christians) very concerned about the coming trends. The secularizing culture has infiltrated the church and is seeking to reshape our view of the world. If we do not conform to this ne Anyone familiar with Al Mohler’s work with The Briefing podcast will recognize much of the material and the perspective in this book. Mohler has given a lot of time to understanding current National and global events from a Christian worldview, and what he has seen in the last year or so has him (and many faithful Christians) very concerned about the coming trends. The secularizing culture has infiltrated the church and is seeking to reshape our view of the world. If we do not conform to this new worldview, we will likely begin to experience true persecution soon. We need to understand the times that we are living in, make the best use of our time for the sake of the gospel during these evil days, and be willing to suffer for Christ whenever it should come.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Josh Ehrich

    Mohler excellently summarizes the state of affairs in the US. It is a sobering look that certainly is contrary to writers like David French who sees some sort of fantasy good news in the courts and elsewhere. What’s clear is that French and his like are deceived about the state of America and the Church. While Mohler describes the storm well, my only criticism is the lack of advice on what Christians should do in the present storm. It is implied but not expressly stated.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Christian Barrett

    If you ever listen to Mohler’s podcast “The Briefing”, then you have heard a large portion of the contents of this book. Even though it is repetitive in some areas this book was still incredibly helpful as Mohler presents the rising secular issues and then tackles them from a Christian worldview. As someone working in ministry I must admit this book was very sobering. I would encourage any Christian wanting to see lost people of the next generation come to know Jesus to read this book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    John Uit de Flesch

    Helpful and clear description of the coming conflicts in America due to moral decay and societal transformation. 90% of the book was focused on the horrible situation. Scant attention given to our response, solutions, mindsets, etc. If you keep up with the news, there will be little new information. Mohler is right however about the coming storm.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Poteet

    If you have listened to or read The Briefing, this book will be familiar territory as Mohler takes a look at the growing secularist mindset in our culture. Some of the chapters are definitely worth diving into. I find Mohler’s insights and analysis helpful personally, especially on thinking through some of the more challenging topics.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Havebooks Willread

    I really just can't recommend this one enough. If you are paying any attention at all to what is going on in the world at large, I think you should read this. My husband is now reading this and I've asked my adult children to read it. Mohler does a good job of identifying all the ways that a secular humanistic worldview has infiltrated ideas, policies, and actions. Ironically, the book was just published in 2020, but it came out right before COVID hit and the BLM movement exploded. It's almost p I really just can't recommend this one enough. If you are paying any attention at all to what is going on in the world at large, I think you should read this. My husband is now reading this and I've asked my adult children to read it. Mohler does a good job of identifying all the ways that a secular humanistic worldview has infiltrated ideas, policies, and actions. Ironically, the book was just published in 2020, but it came out right before COVID hit and the BLM movement exploded. It's almost prophetic! Not prophetic, really, but he saw hints then of what has now been revealed. The truth is, the book is a little depressing. The culture around us is bad and it's going to get worse. There IS a revolution going on. But ignorance is not bliss and I think it benefits us to have some idea ourselves what is going on and especially to educate and shape our children's worldview so they aren't taken in by destructive ideologies. I thought he did a good job giving hope in the final chapter. He reminded us what to put our faith in, where our hope is found, and how to walk (in love). His conclusion of the whole matter was borrowed from Jeremiah: "God spoke to the people of God as they were under severe oppression and told them not to lose heart, and to get busy. 'Build houses and live in them; plant gardens and eat their produce' (Jeremiah 29:5). What do we do in the face of a secular age? We build houses and live in them. We get married and have babies and grow families and plant churches and make a difference in the world" (197). "Christians reveal their faith in God's plan not only by telling the truth but by living out that truth. (James 2:18) Christians show their faith in God's design by living faithfully within that design. Our marriages, therefore, must last. Our children should know the Scriptures and the storyline of the Bible. Our families ought to be integrally tied to the local church and experience regular fellowship with the body of Christ. Our oppositions to abortion ought to be met with Christian families adopting and fostering children who are in need" (193).

  8. 4 out of 5

    David Tarkington

    Dr. Albert Mohler has become one of the best-known Christian leaders in the United States over recent years. As president of The Southern Baptist Seminary (SBTS) he has a particular platform in evangelicalism that offers him opportunities to speak and respond to the many issues impacting the world today from a viewpoint described by Mohler and others as a "biblical worldview." I, for one, have appreciated his input on numerous cultural issues, especially over the past decade and a half, as seism Dr. Albert Mohler has become one of the best-known Christian leaders in the United States over recent years. As president of The Southern Baptist Seminary (SBTS) he has a particular platform in evangelicalism that offers him opportunities to speak and respond to the many issues impacting the world today from a viewpoint described by Mohler and others as a "biblical worldview." I, for one, have appreciated his input on numerous cultural issues, especially over the past decade and a half, as seismic shifts in cultural norms and the now-termed "moral revolution" has sought to change the landscape of our understanding of right and wrong. Churchillian Title One of Dr. Mohler's favorite figures of history (known to anyone who regularly listens to his podcasts or has visited his personal library) is Sir Winston Churchill. The British Prime Minister, known for his solid and tenacious leadership of the United Kingdom during World War II, wrote the first of his six-volume series on the Second World War covering the growing threat of Nazi Germany. Churchill used the title The Gathering Storm for this volume. Mohler credits Churchill's book title as the reason he chose his book's title. As the threat of Nazism was growing in Europe, many in the UK and elsewhere minimized Hitler's potential impact and most saw Germany's revival as something that would remain within the German borders, not impacting the neighboring nations, much less the world. Churchill, on the other hand, was a voice crying out for others to take note of the growing threat. When it became clear that Hitler and his powerful Third Reich was bent on European (and eventual global) domination, Churchill seemed prophetic as one who had warned of the storm. In the same way, Dr. Mohler speaks in this new work of the growing and present threat of secularism to the culture and to the church. This is not a cry heretofore unmade. Dr. Mohler, as well as others, have been speaking of these threats for decades. Not unlike many in the UK who heard but ignored Churchill's warnings, sadly it seems that many Christians have either willingly or unintentionally been ignoring the warnings of secularism to such a degree that now the storm is not simply something that may impact us, it is clear that landfall has occurred. For those, like me, who live in Florida, hurricane preparedness is a way of life. Floridians have different seasons than other regions in the nation. We have spring, summer, football, and hurricane seasons. When hurricane season begins, we begin to watch our local meteorologists more intently as they share of new storms forming off the west coast of Africa. We know those storms often build up, begin spinning with more intensity, and at times, move from tropical depression to tropical storm to hurricane with eventual impact somewhere in the Caribbean, the Gulf of Mexico, or the southeastern coast of the US. The "cone of concern" is developed and we watch daily wondering if we will be impacted personally. Watching the daily hurricane updates is like watching a turtle run a race. It's slow and plodding and uncertain...until it isn't. Hurricane Warnings Living in a state where hurricanes are part of our annual schedules, there are often times where warnings are given, but ignored by many. It is akin to the ignoring the flight attendants in commercial flights as they give instructions regarding how to wear the seatbelt, put on oxygen masks, and emergency exit rules. Since most who have flown numerous times have never experienced an in-flight emergency, these repeated warnings go unheard. Yet, when something mid-flight does occur and the oxygen masks fall from the console, it is clear that many would be doing their best to remember what was said pre-flight as they slide into panic. In our culture wars and shifting sands of morality and rightness, the storm is no longer on the way. It is here. For those who have listened to Dr. Mohler's daily podcast "The Briefing" and at times felt overwhelmed with the data and daily updates of issues that run counter to a biblical worldview, his new book is a welcome resource. Many of the illustrations and delineated accounts in the book have been covered at some point by Dr. Mohler in one of his briefings, but to have the book available giving a systematic unveiling of the history of secularism and the subtle (and overt) impacts of this philosophy in our lives is telling and helpful. In some cases, the shifts have seemed immediate (e.g. the 2015 Obergefell vs. Hodges Supreme Court case legalizing same-sex marriage) but in truth are simply the latest visible impacts of the storm gusts upon culture. Responding to Landfall When hurricanes make landfall, the impact varies depending on wind speed, the structural strength of the buildings nearby, the depth and health of the roots of trees, and the preparedness of residents. Once the storm has passed, disaster relief teams arrive (many wearing yellow hats representing Southern Baptists serving and helping in Christ's name,) damage assessment occurs, and next steps for recovery begin. Unlike a natural hurricane, the storm we now face seems to be only increasing in intensity with an ever-widening cone of concern with no end in sight. Yet, as Christians we are affirmed that as we stand firmly on the gospel of Christ, though a narrow foot-hold certainly, we will not only withstand the storm, but thrive in its midst and in the aftermath. So, be encouraged. In Dr. Mohler's book, he focuses on nine specific issues impacted by the rising secularism. Sadly, this is not only a secular, godless worldview present outside the church, but also at times visible within. The chapter titles categorize these areas so the reader can more clearly see that which has occurred and is occurring. Chapters speaking of "The Gathering Storm in..." - Western Civilization - The Church - Human Life - Marriage - Family - Gender and Sexuality - Generational Divides - Engines of Culture - Religious Liberty After reading The Gathering Storm, I cannot help but see indicators of the growing secularization and worldview shifts daily as new headlines appear on my newsfeed. In fact, yesterday, the US Supreme Court ruled in what I deem a disastrous ruling, that "that 'sex' does, in fact, include sexual orientation and gender identity, despite the fact that legislators repeatedly voted against including those categories in the legislation." (ERLC - "After the Bostock Supreme Court Case") Where would this lie in Dr. Mohler's analysis? It is clearly part of the storm related to gender and sexuality, but also impactful in the area of religious liberty, not to mention family and generational divides. This is just one headline from today. One can simply peruse other current and recent stories to see how the moral revolution and the rise of secularism continues to impact all avenues of our culture on a daily basis. What Now? Dr. Mohler's concluding chapter hearkens once more to Churchill's warnings prior to World War II. While Churchill, along with the other Allied leaders, entered into the storm against Nazism, fascism, and imperial despotism with a united, military campaign that proved to be essential for victory, Dr. Mohler is not calling for a militaristic movement. He is, however, clearly reminding the church that what we face today is truly a battle. The church has been in this spiritual battle since the very beginning, but the storm of secularism is our most recent and current beachhead. Dr. Mohler gives reasoned, practical, and timelessly biblical encouragement and insight into how Christians and the church must live in such times. The concluding chapter is titled "Into the Storm" and that certainly is our calling. I recommend "The Gathering Storm" highly and encourage readers to subscribe to "The Briefing" for continued daily updates of current trends and shifts in culture from a biblical worldview.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Holly

    A timely read. I appreciated the author's commentary on the trends our nation and the comments on how Christian's can combat each assault. Those more well read in modern day happenings may not feel surprised but most of the information, but the majority of Christians will most likely find eye-opening information and guidance. I appreciated Mohler's words; he struck a good tone between awareness of modern day issues without leaving me feel depressed and unable to change anything myself, as other, A timely read. I appreciated the author's commentary on the trends our nation and the comments on how Christian's can combat each assault. Those more well read in modern day happenings may not feel surprised but most of the information, but the majority of Christians will most likely find eye-opening information and guidance. I appreciated Mohler's words; he struck a good tone between awareness of modern day issues without leaving me feel depressed and unable to change anything myself, as other, similar books have done.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Decker

    Mohler is far too intelligent and insightful as well as his ability to synthesize material too sharp to miss the connection of secularism and Critical theory with Critical Race theory. That a chapter was left out about racism and CRT must be deliberate. Considering his status in the SBC and the infamous "resolution 9," it is not too difficult to consider why. This explains my 3 star review to what would have otherwise been a 5 star book that introduced the cultural religion of secularism that ha Mohler is far too intelligent and insightful as well as his ability to synthesize material too sharp to miss the connection of secularism and Critical theory with Critical Race theory. That a chapter was left out about racism and CRT must be deliberate. Considering his status in the SBC and the infamous "resolution 9," it is not too difficult to consider why. This explains my 3 star review to what would have otherwise been a 5 star book that introduced the cultural religion of secularism that has arisen.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Roberts

    Great book! To be expected from Al Mohler. A very timely book, however, by the time it came out our world had changed with the racial issues taking the forefront. I wonder if Mohler will consider a second edition with a chapter on race and critical race theory? I would buy that! Recommended!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Crampton

    Important book written by a most insightful cultural observer. Highly recommended!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    A good summary of the cultural challenges the church is facing today, although much of the material was familiar to me as I am a regular listener to Dr. Mohler’s podcast, The Briefing.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Bill Pence

    The author, a seminary president and the host of the popular podcast The Briefing, borrows Winston Churchill’s title as he sees a gathering storm that already presents itself as a tremendous challenge to the faithfulness of the Christian church. He writes that it is a gathering storm of the secular age. He tells us that the most familiar word for the process we are witnessing is secularization. The challenge faced by Christians in the United States today is to see the storm and to understand it, The author, a seminary president and the host of the popular podcast The Briefing, borrows Winston Churchill’s title as he sees a gathering storm that already presents itself as a tremendous challenge to the faithfulness of the Christian church. He writes that it is a gathering storm of the secular age. He tells us that the most familiar word for the process we are witnessing is secularization. The challenge faced by Christians in the United States today is to see the storm and to understand it, and then to demonstrate the courage to face the storm. For regular listeners of The Briefing, many of the topics (abortion, family, sexual revolution, religious liberty, etc.) in this important book will be familiar. This is a book I’ve been reading and discussing with a few friends. Here are my main takeaways from each chapter: Chapter One: The Gathering Storm Over Western Civilization • Secular, in terms of contemporary sociological and intellectual conversation, refers to the absence of any binding theistic authority or belief. • One of the clearer developments in the past two decades has been the inevitable collision between religious liberty—America’s most cherished “first freedom”—and the newly invented sexual liberties. It has become clear that the entire LGBTQ movement represents a clear challenge to anyone who would hold to the historic, biblical position on sexual morality and marriage. • Historic Christianity is now increasingly either rejected outright or relegated to having no significance in the culture. Many people in the most privileged sectors of our modern societies do not even know a believing Christian. They are no longer even haunted by the remains of a Christian frame of mind. They are truly secular. • We must, with every fiber of our God-given strength, with full dependence upon the power of the Holy Spirit, with every ounce of conviction we can muster through prayer, with unwavering courage, protest this secular moment. • The attempt of secularism to usurp the rule of the Son of God amounts to the height of human folly. Nothing will prevail over our God. Nothing can withstand the power of the gospel. Chapter Two: The Gathering Storm in the Church • The secular age exerts a subtle but constant influence on churches and Christians. If not careful, churches will look less and less like churches and more and more like the secular world around them. • Discipleship to Christ makes objective demands on conduct, virtue, and morality. The God revealed in holy Scripture issues commands to his people, and God calls his children to live in obedience to his commands and statutes. • When churches and denominations surrender to the forces of secularism, they do so because they departed from the “rock,” namely, the lordship of Jesus Christ. • The obedient church of Jesus Christ cannot just preach a biblical morality; it must live out that morality. Otherwise, our words will ring hollow. Chapter Three: The Gathering Storm Over Human Life • The Christian worldview affirms the sanctity of human life at every moment, from fertilization to natural death. Thus, every abortion amounts to the murder of an unborn child. • American Christians must not only work and argue for the preservation of unborn life, but we must also pray for it. • The only real answer to the culture of death is the gospel of life. Chapter Four: The Gathering Storm Over Marriage • Marriage is about our happiness, our holiness, and our wholeness—but it is supremely about the glory of God. When marriage is entered rightly, when marriage vows are kept with purity, when all the goods of marriage are enjoyed in their proper place, God is glorified. • Marriage is not greatly respected in our postmodern culture. For many, the covenant of marriage has been discarded in favor of a contract of cohabitation. • Our culture is so sexually confused that the goods of sex are severed from the vows and obligations of marriage. • A society that disbelieves in God will eventually disbelieve in marriage. • A stable and functional culture requires the establishment of stable marriages and the nurturing of families. Without a healthy marriage and family life as foundation, no lasting and healthy community can long survive. Chapter Five: The Gathering Storm Over the Family • The secular storm and the sexual revolution aim to normalize its entire transgender ideology. • Secularism sets out to redefine humanity. • The secular age will not tolerate worldviews that challenge its comprehensive vision for humanity. • Faithfulness to Christian teaching now places parents outside the mainstream and could potentially lead to a termination of parental rights. • Christians need to understand what is at stake. The end of parental rights is the end of the family, and eventually, the end of human civilization as we know it. Chapter Six: The Gathering Storm Over Gender and Sexuality • The single greatest impetus of the sexual revolution was the advent of birth control, which began to transform the notion of the “possible” and gave way to an onslaught of consequences no one saw coming. • The LGBTQ revolution demands not only equality but also the suppression of divergent worldviews, namely, the Christian worldview. Any moral code that denies the new sexual rights must be silenced, • Sadly, many churches have capitulated to the demands of the sexual revolution. It will take extraordinary conviction to resist their revolution. We are about to find out which churches, denominations, and Christian institutions are capable of this resistance. • We cannot see Revoice as anything other than a house built upon the sand. Revoice is not the voice of faithful Christianity. • The sexual revolution—now undermining the very structure of humanity as male and female—represents a direct challenge to what Christians believe and teach and preach. • Biblical Christianity must speak the truth in love and seek to be good neighbors to all, but we cannot abandon the faith just because we are told that we are now on the wrong side of history. Chapter Seven: The Gathering Generational Storm • The coming generations do not see themselves as related in any formal or binding sense with churches, formal beliefs, or religious institutions. These young adults are considerably less religious than their parents, less committed to formal doctrines, and less involved, not only in church life, but even in such activities as volunteering in charity work and social organizations. • The problems facing the coming generations are massive with enormous cultural, social, political, and theological ramifications. • Delaying marriage, the deconstruction of the family, and the advent of social media have all had both a liberalizing and secularizing effect on America’s generations. Chapter Eight: The Gathering Storm and the Engines of Culture • Our responsibility is to think clearly, carefully, and critically about how our culture is being influenced, and what this means for Christians seeking to live faithfully in a secular age. • The cultural products we watch and read and listen to are sending moral messages, constantly. Hollywood controls the narrative, and if you can manipulate the narrative, you govern the mentality, worldview, and character of a culture. • Hollywood utilizes its creative authority to craft compelling narratives in step with the moral revolution—especially the LGBTQ agenda, but increasingly on abortion as well. • Corporate America’s desire to build its brand has moved many companies to engage in virtue signaling—a show of support through advertisement or company policies that tilts its hat toward the LGBTQ movement. By sending this signal, companies reveal to the larger culture their place on the “right side of history,” and their desire to live as part of the future rather than a now discredited past. • The monopolistic power of the social media giants is unprecedented in American history. Add to this the fact that Silicon Valley is rather astonishingly one-sided in its politics, and we can see the huge challenge now facing anyone who holds to a contrary worldview. Chapter Nine: The Gathering Storm Over Religious Liberty • If they maintain the House, regain the Senate, and secure the presidency, Democrats will have all they need to unleash a full-scale assault against religious liberty by making the Equality Act law. • We cannot understand the transcendent value of religious liberty without these three essential words: God, truth, and liberty, and in that order. Every one of these words is indispensable. • These are days that will require courage, conviction, and clarity of vision. • Religious liberty is being redefined as mere freedom of worship, but it will not long survive if it is reduced to a private sphere with no public voice. • The very freedom to preach the gospel of Jesus Christ is at stake, and thus so is the liberty of every American. • If we lose religious liberty, all other liberties will be lost, one by one. Conclusion: Into the Storm • For Americans, the intensity of this storm picks up with the backdrop of a presidential election. Christians must realize that the more enduring contest is not between rival candidates but between rival worldviews. • Only the Christian worldview is sufficient to answer the demands of secularization, nor can any other worldview provide the framework for true human flourishing. Silence in this age is not an option—indeed, silence and retreat are tantamount to failure. • If we take our stand upon the revelation of God, no revolution—not even a revolution in sex and gender—can confuse us. If we take our stand in any other authority, every revolution will engulf us. • The gathering storm is real—and we can see it, and we dare to see it for what it is. But Jesus Christ is Lord, and he promised that the gates of hell shall not prevail over his church. And that is enough. Appendix: The Storm Over the Courts • For several decades now, the courts—and the Supreme Court in particular—have taken unto themselves powers that should be in the hand of Congress or the White House. In most cases, the courts have taken up issues that Congress was either unwilling or unable to resolve. In other cases, the judiciary has usurped power for itself. • The competing visions for the Supreme Court center on divergent hermeneutics—different ways of reading a text. For decades, more liberal justices and law professors argued for the idea of a “living Constitution” that would evolve with the maturing nation. Conservatives, on the other hand, argued that any text, including the Constitution, should be interpreted in light of the author’s original meaning, looking to the actual text at stake. • If the American people wanted to legalize abortion and same-sex marriage, Congress could have legalized them through the legislative process. • Whoever appoints judges to the federal bench and justices to the Supreme Court controls, in large part, the future of the nation. • Christians understand that there is more at stake in the storm over the courts—including the future of religious liberty. At no time in our nation’s history have the courts been such a focus of attention—and rightfully so.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Jones

    Timely and needed.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Donald

    It’s his podcast but in book form. Excellent nonetheless.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Caleb Blevins

    Very disappointed. It seems Mohler has shifted his idea of what is most important in all of life from the Gospel to the Culture War. In addition to this, it is just transcripts from what he said on the briefing over the past 4 years. Perhaps Mohler has always put the Culture War about the Gospel and I am just now noticing it. I wouldn’t waste my time on this book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Chua

    Alarming, polarizing, and categorical, Albert Mohler makes a case for the times, an argument that must be heard, discerned, and considered, if one claims faith in the hope of the Christian faith, or of any revealed monotheistic faith, for that matter. Alarming- the state of affairs Mohler lays out is deeply serious, grave and of universal proportions: secularism's redefinition of all human institutions centered on a Judeo-Christian worldview, which is pretty much everything, from marriages to fa Alarming, polarizing, and categorical, Albert Mohler makes a case for the times, an argument that must be heard, discerned, and considered, if one claims faith in the hope of the Christian faith, or of any revealed monotheistic faith, for that matter. Alarming- the state of affairs Mohler lays out is deeply serious, grave and of universal proportions: secularism's redefinition of all human institutions centered on a Judeo-Christian worldview, which is pretty much everything, from marriages to families to schools to culture and to the courts. Mohler scans the different theaters of war in which secularization has attacked these cherished institutions, tracing out the contours of the battle across a broad spectrum of historical, theological, philosophical, social and political discourse in American life. What is at stake (Mohler balances real urgency with hyperbole) is America's soul as a free nation, as secularism's attacks on the Constitution's foundations on religious liberty is real, unrelenting, and of mammoth, apocalyptic proportions. Convincingly, Mohler provides ample evidence. Polarizing- sitting on the fence, for the believer, is not an option. It's either you are on the side of life, or you're on the side of death. Mohler's argument, expanding on interesting research by sociologists, consistently returns to the crux of the matter; humans are created in the image of God, and divine revelation is the definitive existential reference for human flourishing. The breakdown and re-constitution of human institutions is precisely the work of the "revolution" that liberal, wayward humanism has led us too. I like that Mohler does reach out an ecumenical hand in page 181; Jews, Christians, and Muslims, who seek to remain faithful to their traditions of scriptural fidelity are the defeated losers of the culture war that are seeing common, Abrahamic notions of gender, family, marriage and sexuality completely redefined by the "revolution." I do regret that his efforts could have been more inclusive and ecumenically robust without taking the occasional jibes at other Christian denominations' beliefs (I note the difference here between beliefs versus actual practices of those beliefs), or perhaps I am just overly sensitive as a Catholic with experience of being theologically attacked as a Catholic. Yet, to the end of sensitizing the faithful to the psychic-religious-spiritual landscape of the world, Mohler's work is truly a weapon in the hand of the reader, who is better educated on the threats that secularization has wrought, and will continue to do so. Categorical- who the enemy is, what the enemy has done, and what it intends to do and continue dong, Mohler is crystal clear. Perhaps in the area of how to counter the enemy's attacks is Mohler less systematic and substantive, offering only generic theological anecdotes in the vein of "love thy neighbor." This is a rather missed opportunity to evolve the book from an awareness-raising work, to a framework for a Christian ecumenical response to the sexual revolution. That being said, Mohler does offer many instances of beautiful theological prose that rings with the urgency and inspiration that a call-to-arms by a charismatic leader brings. An overall hugely compelling, simple, yet sublimely eloquent work, Mohler's work is an essential read. His off-the-cuff, provocative humor is the cream on the pie, making A Gathering Storm an enjoyable page-turner, as well as a prayer and meditation. It brings the reader deeper into introspection, renewal, and purpose. Overall grade: A. MSC.

  19. 5 out of 5

    James Schroeder

    The Gathering Storm gives allusion to Sir Winston Churchill's calls to bring attention to the gathering storm of Germany during WWII. Likewise, R. Albert Mohler Jr, in his most recent book, calls the church to wake up to the rising danger of secularism and culture. The wartime language alerts the reader to the fight on the main cultural fronts of abortion, marriage, family, gender, and sexuality. Molher warns of a growing passive secularism, as well as a militant active secularism. The culture th The Gathering Storm gives allusion to Sir Winston Churchill's calls to bring attention to the gathering storm of Germany during WWII. Likewise, R. Albert Mohler Jr, in his most recent book, calls the church to wake up to the rising danger of secularism and culture. The wartime language alerts the reader to the fight on the main cultural fronts of abortion, marriage, family, gender, and sexuality. Molher warns of a growing passive secularism, as well as a militant active secularism. The culture that we live in has a constant pressure towards the church and the pressure of the worldly expectation and beliefs drag everything and everyone along with it. Mohler rightly warns that if churches continue in their passivity towards secularism, churches will look less and less like churches and more and more like the secular world around them. In addition to the passive indoctrination of secularism, the world is actively arguing for the end of religious freedoms for churches, religious organizations and even individuals. They must either surrender to the moral, secular revolution or face being forcibly shut down; there is no middle ground. The current culture argues that churches, religious organizations and individuals must fully submit to a secular worldview or incur its full wrath. In this, they target both theological truth claims and all expressions of them in the public sphere. Mohler boldly maintains that the church must uphold and defend an inerrant view of the Bible and its teachings. Any giving way to secularism leads to the undoing of all the Bible teaches. Where the Word of God is not rightly preached, there is no church. "Capitulation on first things sows capitulation for all things. When a church jettisons the fundamental doctrines of the faith, it will allow for any cultural anomaly to enter through its doors; all in the name of relevance" Page 33. Mohler isn't so much against culture, its that he is so much in favor of the authority and inerrancy of Scripture as God's true revelation. Likewise, churches must not be know for what they are against. Rather, churches must be known for what we are for and boldly articulate the truth of Scripture. Mohler does not just point out the growing danger, he provides actionable, biblical responses Christians must undertake and articulates the hope that is within them. Where the culture conflicts with Scripture, we should trust in the wisdom of the creator rather than the fallible, fleeting opinions of sinful humans. The warning against secularism is one that all generations must deal with, though it comes by differing means. I believe that the church will weather this storm just as Christ proclaimed to Peter, "on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it" (Matthew 16:18 ESV). Every church member and leader should read this book. The church must actively fighting to preserve it's orthodoxy against the growing secularism advanced by culture. It must hold fast to the convictions of Scripture and be ready to defend them in love and with truth.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Thaddeus

    A good book overview of some of the implications of our culture's rapid secularization on various areas of life such as church, abortion, euthanasia, marriage, LBGTQ issues, family and the political arena. Dr. Mohler is perhaps one of the most qualified evangelical voices to speak to these issues and he speaks with clarity and conviction. Although this book is primarily focused on the situation in the USA, it is relevant to our times as the cultural sway of these secular ideologies extends to ev A good book overview of some of the implications of our culture's rapid secularization on various areas of life such as church, abortion, euthanasia, marriage, LBGTQ issues, family and the political arena. Dr. Mohler is perhaps one of the most qualified evangelical voices to speak to these issues and he speaks with clarity and conviction. Although this book is primarily focused on the situation in the USA, it is relevant to our times as the cultural sway of these secular ideologies extends to every westernized civilization. There is a gathering Storm, and we are in the midst of it. The next few years may become seen as pivotal for our portion of history as the consequences of ideas which have been brewing and taking footholds in our society are worked out to their logical conclusions. As Dr. Mohler writes, "Passive secularization works in subtle ways, apply ing pressure and influence rather than making overt demands. Passive secularization happens just because we are breathing the culture and constantly bombarded with cultural messages. Hollywood, the news media, and the culture-shaping forces of the society constantly tell us that right-minded and culturally acceptable people believe this and not that. The expectations of the culture shift and drag everything (and almost everyone) along." (page 22) We cannot help but be affected by and wrestle with the issues contained in this book. The only question is if we will do so knowledgeably and faithfully or not. This is a useful book for any Christian interested in how to identify and fight back to effects of secularization. It is an important work also for those unawares, as many Christians can find themselves blissfully ignorant of the Storm. As we move more and more to a crisis point, it is inevitable that Christian convictions will be tested and costly. We must have the wisdom and courage to endure faithfully. Dr. Mohler is a passionate and clear thinker well worth considering. I'd highly recommend this book. It is well argued, with many illustrations and examples that help drive the point home. The only reason for 4 out of 5 stars for me was the primary focus solely on the US - which is fine for Dr. Mohler to do as he is an American - but I wish there was some more commentary on the situation internationally as well. But alas, a book has to also have its limits. Also, some of the points of this book may become dated with time as they are made around current issues, but that is the case with any book like this. In any case, I think many will benefit from this work.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jim Spicer

    Mohler's book highlights in great detail the cultural shift we have experienced in the United States in recent history. It can be summed up in one word: secularization. Our culture has been turned upside down within a relatively short period of time. In his introduction the author cites the work of Canadian philosopher Charles Taylor, "A Secular Age." Taylor speaks of "unbelief as a lack of conscious commitment to a self-existent, self-revealing God." He notes that secularization is not about Mohler's book highlights in great detail the cultural shift we have experienced in the United States in recent history. It can be summed up in one word: secularization. Our culture has been turned upside down within a relatively short period of time. In his introduction the author cites the work of Canadian philosopher Charles Taylor, "A Secular Age." Taylor speaks of "unbelief as a lack of conscious commitment to a self-existent, self-revealing God." He notes that secularization is not about rejecting all religion, In fact many in America today are religious or spiritual, but when this religion or spirituality is carefully examined, it "rejects belief in a personal God, one who holds and exerts authority." He adds, "The issue is binding authority." So while many in the U.S. are still church going (though those numbers are diminishing) personal autonomy often overrules any divine authority. In other words, many still have some religious experience but because of the secularization of our culture, reject the personal authority of God. In 1986 my own Master's thesis was finished, tackling the formidable topic of "The Influence of the Philosophy of Secular Humanism on the Worldview of Contemporary Christians." Observations that I made at that point in time have now come full circle. In his book Mohler, chapter by chapter, discusses in detail how this secularization of culture has made significant inroads in the areas of ... church, human life, marriage, family, gender and sexuality and religious liberty. He is deliberate and thorough in his approach. His findings are sobering. To Christ followers, he leaves this admonishment, especially as we are in the final days of an election season, ... "Christians must realize that the more enduring contest is not between rival candidates but between rival worldviews. A clash of worldviews reveals all the fault lines of a society, from education and economics, to arts and entertainment. Eventually, everything is at stake. Over time, every culture conforms in general terms to one worldview, not to more than one. One morality, one fundamental picture of the world, one vision of humanity prevails." His challenge in light of this is for Christians to "maintain hope and joy and full faith when the culture appears to be hardening against us." I would encourage this book for anyone who takes his faith seriously.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    This is really solid. He offers a fantastic look at what is happening to our culture, gives a solid idea of how Christians can combat the problem, and gives a great summary of what it is Christians should believe. This isn't necessarily new information, but it bears repeating as much as possible. It is a bit outdated with everything that just happened in 2020, and at this point a Christian would have to willfully ignore the world not to already see the problems he is writing about. I think he spe This is really solid. He offers a fantastic look at what is happening to our culture, gives a solid idea of how Christians can combat the problem, and gives a great summary of what it is Christians should believe. This isn't necessarily new information, but it bears repeating as much as possible. It is a bit outdated with everything that just happened in 2020, and at this point a Christian would have to willfully ignore the world not to already see the problems he is writing about. I think he spends too long focusing on the federal government, when individual states mirror the problem in a much more focused way. From a rural area, I've completely lost my representation and my state in no way follows our beliefs out here. He also clearly had an axe to grind with the homosexuals. Don't misunderstand me; I agree with him. The homosexual movement has absolutely devastated the moral integrity of our culture, but the book should have just focused there instead of trying to encapsulate everything. He spent over thirty pages on that chapter alone, the next longest is in the mid twenties, and he brings up LGBT in about every other chapter. Again, I agree with him, but just focus your entire book there. The book, however, tends to be incredibly frustrating to read. At times it feels like I need a thesaurus next to me just to help plod through his huge sentences. I had some examples, but I don't want to spend the time typing them out. Most of his sentences go on for four or five lines, they include multiple appositives, lists of ideas, and double negative. I found myself rereading multiple sentences and paragraphs just to make sure I understood what he was saying. Who is this book intended for? What is your primary audience? This is too technical for a lay person, and too conversational for a textbook. It's like we straddled the divide. I can't see many people picking this up. I also recommend Live Not By Lies, The Devil and Karl Marx, and Apostates by Kevin Swanson.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Claudia

    In this book R. Albert Mohler Jr. clearly lays out the current situation in the United States of America, and to some degree in Canada and Europe, as well as how we got here. He does this from a Christian world view. He traces the trajectory and takes it into our possible future, explaining the dangers that lie ahead. Mohler addresses the topics of human life, marriage, family, gender, sexuality, and religious liberty. He addresses each from the basis of Scripture and historical facts, and draws In this book R. Albert Mohler Jr. clearly lays out the current situation in the United States of America, and to some degree in Canada and Europe, as well as how we got here. He does this from a Christian world view. He traces the trajectory and takes it into our possible future, explaining the dangers that lie ahead. Mohler addresses the topics of human life, marriage, family, gender, sexuality, and religious liberty. He addresses each from the basis of Scripture and historical facts, and draws logical conclusions. While many of these might leave the Christian reader with concerns, Mohler reminds us that concerns need not turn to worry; that we must remember in whom we have faith, and in whom our hope lies. We live in a fallen world, but greater is He who is in us than He who is in the world. Our hope is not in the next election cycle or in the next Supreme Court appointment. Our hope is our confidence in Christ, not in this world, but the world to come. This said, he also reminds us that of faith, hope and love, the greatest of these is love, not a sentimental love, but a substantial love that we must show to our Christian brother and sister as well as our neighbors both near and far. Above all, we must love God with all of our heart, soul, and mind because it is through this we can love others well. Mohler ends his final chapter by reminding us that the gathering storm is real, and we must see it for what it is, but that Jesus Christ is Lord, and He promised that the gates of hell shall not prevail over His church. I am very glad to have received a copy of The Gathering Storm in exchange for my honest opinion. I was under no obligation to provide a positive review and received no monetary compensation. I very highly recommend it, and especially to parents and grandparents as we must think of the legacy we are leaving four future generations.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Steven Kopp

    I agree with about 85% of what Molher says in these pages - My primary point of disagreement is over his assessment of Revoice. My primary issue with this book, however, is one of balance and tone. While he does say that our solution is primarily theological, not political, the content of the whole book is not just political, but partisan. The enemies are always the left, the liberals, and specifically democrats. If the enemies are the democrats than by implication, the answer must be the republ I agree with about 85% of what Molher says in these pages - My primary point of disagreement is over his assessment of Revoice. My primary issue with this book, however, is one of balance and tone. While he does say that our solution is primarily theological, not political, the content of the whole book is not just political, but partisan. The enemies are always the left, the liberals, and specifically democrats. If the enemies are the democrats than by implication, the answer must be the republicans. The presidential election is seen as the primary battlefield in which we must fight the broader worldview war. It is no surprise, then, that Al Mohler is now putting his weight and influence behind Donald Trump in 2020, a change from 2016. I would find this book for more credible if Mohler had given voice to examples of secularism on the right such as the abandonment as moral character as a criteria for public office, positions on immigration which undermine human dignity, the tendency of the current administration to blatantly lie for political expediency. Instead, while this book deals with real threats to we really do need to confront, it reads a lot more like red meat thrown to ravenous religious partisans.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Steven

    Dr. Mohler's well-informed, broad-reaching, urgent interpretation of the cultural war raging around us is a must-read for all Christians, even if they are too busy to be culturally informed. He delves into alarming developments in politics, education, gender and sexuality, religious freedom, freedom of speech, and so many areas of culture that have become ideological war zones. The humanistic secularists wage war that threatens to overwhelm the long-standing human norms so many have long assumed Dr. Mohler's well-informed, broad-reaching, urgent interpretation of the cultural war raging around us is a must-read for all Christians, even if they are too busy to be culturally informed. He delves into alarming developments in politics, education, gender and sexuality, religious freedom, freedom of speech, and so many areas of culture that have become ideological war zones. The humanistic secularists wage war that threatens to overwhelm the long-standing human norms so many have long assumed and taken for granted. However, rather than give up, It is time for the church to have courage and have faith in God, in truth, and in liberty. Christians must speak into the culture in faith, hope, and love rather than despair. Dr Mohler's style is readable for the average person, and he is well informed of historical political-cultural trends as well as the current situation across the Americal cultural landscape. More than a mere intelectual, he is a culturally-informed theologian, and his Biblical worldview and focus on the gospel and the glory of God shines through. I highly recommend this book for any concerned with America's current trajectory.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Brent McDaris

    Good book for those that haven’t listened to Dr. Mohler’s podcast, but if you do listen to The Briefing, you will encounter many of the same topics and arguments. With that being said, he presents many topics that will be crucial to think through prior to the coming election. I wish there would have been further discussion on a christian’s political involvement - a philosophical/biblical argument for why Christians should look out for their own interests when it comes to politics. From ancient E Good book for those that haven’t listened to Dr. Mohler’s podcast, but if you do listen to The Briefing, you will encounter many of the same topics and arguments. With that being said, he presents many topics that will be crucial to think through prior to the coming election. I wish there would have been further discussion on a christian’s political involvement - a philosophical/biblical argument for why Christians should look out for their own interests when it comes to politics. From ancient Egypt until now in places like China and North Korea, Jews and Christians have a long history of being persecuted. Dr. Mohler often times refers to the freedoms guaranteed by the bill of rights as the basis for why we should have religious liberty. But what if religious liberty was not included in the constitution? Would our arguments for religious liberty go away? He may have hinted at some of this in the book, I just wish there would have been more discussion about it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Bec Braly

    If you ask Mohler, the ultimate thing to blame for the secularization of the culture is the development of the birth control pill. The birth control pill, in Mohler’s view, led to the rapid growth of the sexual revolution, especially the LGBTQ+ rights movement. Mohler then moves on to blame the LGBTQ+ community along with everyone on the political left for the downfall of society. My qualms with Mohler’s views in this book are extensive, but I want to keep this review short. Most of Mohler’s ref If you ask Mohler, the ultimate thing to blame for the secularization of the culture is the development of the birth control pill. The birth control pill, in Mohler’s view, led to the rapid growth of the sexual revolution, especially the LGBTQ+ rights movement. Mohler then moves on to blame the LGBTQ+ community along with everyone on the political left for the downfall of society. My qualms with Mohler’s views in this book are extensive, but I want to keep this review short. Most of Mohler’s references to scripture (which were few) were taken out of context and used to prove his own political agenda. Most of the book was spent looking down on those with different views from him and criticizing their words. If Mohler wants to make moves toward desecularization of our culture, writing this book was not the way to do it. Evangelism and discipleship will be the only ways to draw people to a knowledge of the truth of the Gospel and of God’s love.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

    Dr. Mohler states that “the first task of faithfulness lies in understanding reality” (xii), much like Winston Churchill did with the rising Nazi threat. In the following nine chapters, Mohler illustrates the gathering storm of secularity in a number of arenas including human life, the church, marriage, family, gender and sexuality, religious liberty and more. He concludes by stating that retreat is tantamount to failure. “We are in a battle of ideas, and we will be in this battle until Jesus co Dr. Mohler states that “the first task of faithfulness lies in understanding reality” (xii), much like Winston Churchill did with the rising Nazi threat. In the following nine chapters, Mohler illustrates the gathering storm of secularity in a number of arenas including human life, the church, marriage, family, gender and sexuality, religious liberty and more. He concludes by stating that retreat is tantamount to failure. “We are in a battle of ideas, and we will be in this battle until Jesus comes...The one true God is Lord over history, and he has now called Christians in this generation into the storm” (189). In an election year, the issues at stake will inevitably rise to the surface. Christians are called to demonstrate faith in God’s design, God’s Word, and in the Gospel’s power.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mark D.

    Mohler uses the statement by Churchill about the gathering storm before the second world war, to lay the groundwork for his thoughts in this book. In this book, Mohler discusses many social and moral crisis facing the United States today. The issues he discusses are all issues of which we are aware. He speaks of them indepth. He warns of the consequences of a lack of thought on these matters. He ends the book with a discussion on the importance of the Supreme Court. One main issue discussed is t Mohler uses the statement by Churchill about the gathering storm before the second world war, to lay the groundwork for his thoughts in this book. In this book, Mohler discusses many social and moral crisis facing the United States today. The issues he discusses are all issues of which we are aware. He speaks of them indepth. He warns of the consequences of a lack of thought on these matters. He ends the book with a discussion on the importance of the Supreme Court. One main issue discussed is the way the Constitution is interpreted. Is it interpreted according to the meaning intended by the authors? Or, do we interpret the Constitution by what we think they meant. This is an excellent book. If you have not considered the great moral dilemma facing us, you need to read this book.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Landon Coleman

    In a real sense, The Gathering Storm was outdated the moment it was published. The book was released before the COVID-19 pandemic took the world by "storm." At many points in the book, I found myself wondering how Mohler would have written differently had the book been published a year later. Certainly the pandemic (and riots and lockdowns) would have played into the fabric of Mohler's arguments, not to mention the selection of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris as the Democrat nominee for President an In a real sense, The Gathering Storm was outdated the moment it was published. The book was released before the COVID-19 pandemic took the world by "storm." At many points in the book, I found myself wondering how Mohler would have written differently had the book been published a year later. Certainly the pandemic (and riots and lockdowns) would have played into the fabric of Mohler's arguments, not to mention the selection of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris as the Democrat nominee for President and Vice President. Nevertheless, the book provides an clear picture of the fracture in the United States. Left and right are moving in opposite directions, and a storm is gathering for conservative Christians. The book contains gospel encouragement for believers, but on the whole the book focuses on the storm clouds ahead.

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