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From the former editor-in-chief of Nylon comes a provocative and intimate collection of personal and cultural essays featuring eye-opening explorations of hot button topics for modern women, including internet feminism, impossible beauty standards in social media, shifting ideals about sexuality, and much more. Gabrielle Korn starts her professional life with all the right From the former editor-in-chief of Nylon comes a provocative and intimate collection of personal and cultural essays featuring eye-opening explorations of hot button topics for modern women, including internet feminism, impossible beauty standards in social media, shifting ideals about sexuality, and much more. Gabrielle Korn starts her professional life with all the right credentials. Prestigious college degree? Check. A loving, accepting family? Check. Instagram-worthy offices and a tight-knit group of friends? Check, check. Gabrielle’s life seems to reach the crescendo of perfect when she gets named the youngest editor-in-chief in the history of one of fashion’s most influential publication. Suddenly she’s invited to the world’s most epic parties, comped beautiful clothes and shoes from trendy designers, and asked to weigh in on everything from gay rights to lip gloss on one of the most influential digital platforms. But behind the scenes, things are far from perfect. In fact, just a few months before landing her dream job, Gabrielle’s health and wellbeing are on the line, and her promotion to editor-in-chief becomes the ultimate test of strength. In this collection of inspirational and searing essays, Gabrielle reveals exactly what it’s truly like in the fashion world, trying to find love as a young lesbian in New York City, battling with anorexia, and trying not to lose herself in a mirage of women’s empowerment and Instagram perfection. Through deeply personal essays, Gabrielle recounts her struggles to reconcile her long-held insecurities about her body while coming out in the era of The L Word, where swoon-worthy lesbians are portrayed as skinny, fashion-perfect, and power-hungry. She takes us with her everywhere from New York Fashion Week to the doctor’s office, revealing that the forces that try to keep women small are more pervasive than anyone wants to admit, especially in a world that’s been newly branded as woke. From #MeToo to commercialized body positivity, Korn’s biting, darkly funny analysis turns feminist commentary on its head. Both an in-your-face take on impossible beauty standards and entrenched media ideals and an inspiring call for personal authenticity, this powerful collection is ideal for fans of Roxane Gay and Rebecca Solnit.


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From the former editor-in-chief of Nylon comes a provocative and intimate collection of personal and cultural essays featuring eye-opening explorations of hot button topics for modern women, including internet feminism, impossible beauty standards in social media, shifting ideals about sexuality, and much more. Gabrielle Korn starts her professional life with all the right From the former editor-in-chief of Nylon comes a provocative and intimate collection of personal and cultural essays featuring eye-opening explorations of hot button topics for modern women, including internet feminism, impossible beauty standards in social media, shifting ideals about sexuality, and much more. Gabrielle Korn starts her professional life with all the right credentials. Prestigious college degree? Check. A loving, accepting family? Check. Instagram-worthy offices and a tight-knit group of friends? Check, check. Gabrielle’s life seems to reach the crescendo of perfect when she gets named the youngest editor-in-chief in the history of one of fashion’s most influential publication. Suddenly she’s invited to the world’s most epic parties, comped beautiful clothes and shoes from trendy designers, and asked to weigh in on everything from gay rights to lip gloss on one of the most influential digital platforms. But behind the scenes, things are far from perfect. In fact, just a few months before landing her dream job, Gabrielle’s health and wellbeing are on the line, and her promotion to editor-in-chief becomes the ultimate test of strength. In this collection of inspirational and searing essays, Gabrielle reveals exactly what it’s truly like in the fashion world, trying to find love as a young lesbian in New York City, battling with anorexia, and trying not to lose herself in a mirage of women’s empowerment and Instagram perfection. Through deeply personal essays, Gabrielle recounts her struggles to reconcile her long-held insecurities about her body while coming out in the era of The L Word, where swoon-worthy lesbians are portrayed as skinny, fashion-perfect, and power-hungry. She takes us with her everywhere from New York Fashion Week to the doctor’s office, revealing that the forces that try to keep women small are more pervasive than anyone wants to admit, especially in a world that’s been newly branded as woke. From #MeToo to commercialized body positivity, Korn’s biting, darkly funny analysis turns feminist commentary on its head. Both an in-your-face take on impossible beauty standards and entrenched media ideals and an inspiring call for personal authenticity, this powerful collection is ideal for fans of Roxane Gay and Rebecca Solnit.

30 review for Everybody (Else) Is Perfect: How I Survived Hypocrisy, Beauty, Clicks, and Likes

  1. 5 out of 5

    Katie B

    This book is a fascinating collection of essays written by the former editor-in-chief of Nylon, a lifestyle magazine known for its focus on pop culture and fashion. A highly respected gig as Gabrielle Korn was responsible for shaping the magazine's content. Invites to every industry related party, and free access to clothing from all the hottest designers are other pretty cool perks of the job. She was living the dream! Except we all know things are never as they seem. These essays are raw, hone This book is a fascinating collection of essays written by the former editor-in-chief of Nylon, a lifestyle magazine known for its focus on pop culture and fashion. A highly respected gig as Gabrielle Korn was responsible for shaping the magazine's content. Invites to every industry related party, and free access to clothing from all the hottest designers are other pretty cool perks of the job. She was living the dream! Except we all know things are never as they seem. These essays are raw, honest, and powerful and make for a thought-provoking read. There are so many subjects explored in her writing and each reader has the potential to take away something different. I personally was drawn more to her stories of working in the publishing industry rather than her personal life although they were all good reads. It kinda is mindboggling that so many publications attempt to promote body positivity but yet frequently miss the mark. And it's sad although not too surprising that most female industry professionals still strive for that size 2 body. A must read if you enjoy reading nonfiction that explores the topic of feminism and many other worthwhile subjects. Thank you to Atria Books for providing me with an advance copy! All thoughts expressed are my honest opinion.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sheena

    This memoir discusses many important aspects of what women and others in our society go through. Homophobia, sexism, racism, body dysmorphia, eating disorders, and mental health. I believe these topics are extremely important especially in this day and age. I did enjoy this but there was something I found lacking that kept me from connecting with the author. This was however a very quick read, I finished it in a few hours. Thank you Netgalley for this advanced copy!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Genevieve Trono

    This was one of the books that I initially picked up almost entirely because of the amazing title. I mean, who hasn't felt this way before?! It doesn't matter what stage of life you are in...it is quite easy to fall into the trap of feeling less than and thinking everyone else has a better understanding of how to do it all. Now imaging navigating this feeling while working in women's media..in the beauty department. Shared through essay format, Everbody (Else) is Perfect takes us through Gabriel This was one of the books that I initially picked up almost entirely because of the amazing title. I mean, who hasn't felt this way before?! It doesn't matter what stage of life you are in...it is quite easy to fall into the trap of feeling less than and thinking everyone else has a better understanding of how to do it all. Now imaging navigating this feeling while working in women's media..in the beauty department. Shared through essay format, Everbody (Else) is Perfect takes us through Gabrielle Korn's experience as a white, Jewish lesbian in her 20s, working in women's digital media. From imposter syndrome to body dysmorphia to the mixed messages society sends us daily, this was just such a timely and important read. Her perspective was refreshing, and the insider look at the beauty and fashion media empire was fascinating and illuminating. The underbelly of the media that touts self-love also shares a whole other level of hypocrisy and Korn showed up. While the focus on the beauty and fashion industry was a large part of these essays, Korn also shared candidly about many other important topics, including sexuality, feminism, mental health, racism, eating disorders/body dysmorphia, and misogyny. Like many essay collections, some of them were 5-star reads for me while others were not quite as impactful but overall this was a very solid read that had the perfect mix of being totally readable while also being a powerful call for change. Thank you to Atria Books for my advanced copy.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Marian

    At 64, I'm not sure I'm the target audience for this book, but as someone who has strived (and failed numerous times) for perfection through body image, relationships, and career goals, maybe I am. Gabrielle Korn's words resonated with me. As I read, I highlighted phrases and while there were a lot, the following sentence spoke to me the most: "I grieved for the years of my life I'd spent not speaking up for myself, years I'd never get the chance to do over." Sadly, I think a lot of women (and me At 64, I'm not sure I'm the target audience for this book, but as someone who has strived (and failed numerous times) for perfection through body image, relationships, and career goals, maybe I am. Gabrielle Korn's words resonated with me. As I read, I highlighted phrases and while there were a lot, the following sentence spoke to me the most: "I grieved for the years of my life I'd spent not speaking up for myself, years I'd never get the chance to do over." Sadly, I think a lot of women (and men) can relate to those words. When we don't speak up and move on, we lose. Ms. Korn's writing is provocative, raw, and brutally honest, and Everybody (Else) Is Perfect is testimony to the fact that she has learned to move on and that our best support network is the one within ourselves. *Thank you to NetGalley and Simon & Schuster for this ARC (Advance Reader's Copy) in exchange for my honest review.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Maude Carrier-Pion

    This is not the type of book that I normally read. However, it was a good one.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jill Elizabeth

    The essays in here were interesting, although I must confess that about halfway through they started to feel very repetitive to me. Her perspective on her professional challenges was interesting, as were the memoir/self-reflection aspects of the stories she told, but the repetitive nature did make even the interesting bits less interesting over time. Perhaps this is exacerbated by the fact that I did not know what Nylon was and had never heard of Gabrielle Korn. I'm not much for fashion or lifes The essays in here were interesting, although I must confess that about halfway through they started to feel very repetitive to me. Her perspective on her professional challenges was interesting, as were the memoir/self-reflection aspects of the stories she told, but the repetitive nature did make even the interesting bits less interesting over time. Perhaps this is exacerbated by the fact that I did not know what Nylon was and had never heard of Gabrielle Korn. I'm not much for fashion or lifestyle and trend magazines, online or otherwise, so I'm probably not the ideal audience for this and that may explain why I had a difficult time staying interested in the latter parts of the book. Still, her struggles as a young woman in a field that is very competitive and male-dominated at the highest levels, exacerbated by the emphasis on thinness and control, did make for interesting reading...

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mhughessc

    Gabrielle Korn, the former editor of Nylon magazine, has written this collection of essays about a variety of topics: self esteem, self discovery, making your way up the corporate ladder, etc. While I felt that the author had some good perspective, I didn't feel connected to her personally and I didn't feel that there was anything in this book that I hadn't read before. Thanks to NetGalley for the ARC. All opinions are my own. Gabrielle Korn, the former editor of Nylon magazine, has written this collection of essays about a variety of topics: self esteem, self discovery, making your way up the corporate ladder, etc. While I felt that the author had some good perspective, I didn't feel connected to her personally and I didn't feel that there was anything in this book that I hadn't read before. Thanks to NetGalley for the ARC. All opinions are my own.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Preslava

    This book felt like a magazine interview with a famous person. The only difference was that it wasn't a famous person but a random lady I couldn't care less about. Very disappointing. This book was provided to me for free from the publisher in exchange of an honest review. This book felt like a magazine interview with a famous person. The only difference was that it wasn't a famous person but a random lady I couldn't care less about. Very disappointing. This book was provided to me for free from the publisher in exchange of an honest review.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mara

    I’ve been vaguely aware of Nylon magazine for years, but hadn’t previously heard of Gabrielle Korn and her meteoric rise to Editor in Chief at only 28. The description for this memoir/essay collection was appealing and it did not disappoint. Korn writes in an incredibly readable and enticing manner that drew me in immediately. Korn is incredibly smart and ambitious, but was admittedly in the right time and place to become editor in chief of a major publication due to amassing key skills, catapul I’ve been vaguely aware of Nylon magazine for years, but hadn’t previously heard of Gabrielle Korn and her meteoric rise to Editor in Chief at only 28. The description for this memoir/essay collection was appealing and it did not disappoint. Korn writes in an incredibly readable and enticing manner that drew me in immediately. Korn is incredibly smart and ambitious, but was admittedly in the right time and place to become editor in chief of a major publication due to amassing key skills, catapulting her image/brand, and layoffs of other departments. Korn was also admittedly very privileged in terms of her education and not requiring much income to survive in New York due to having a free place to live, which gave her freedom to accept low-paying jobs in writing, which she was able to use as stepping stones in her career. Korn writes about her struggles with the massive hypocrisies ever-present in the fashion world and personal struggles with anorexia. She illuminates the ways in which feminism and body positivity becoming mainstream have been monetized, while the beauty industry continues to profit largely off of insecurity. This theme was a bit redundant and I wanted more variety or distance. I appreciated how Korn was so candid about her personal struggles and growth in her twenties. I really enjoyed this memoir, but maybe it’s just me, I have a hard time with memoirs written by those who are so young and not entirely separated from what they are writing about. Korn is still figuring things out, as we all are, and I really liked her push in broadening the scope of Nylon and emphasizing how we shouldn’t have to sacrifice ourselves and our health for successful careers. Thank you NetGalley and Atria Books for providing this ARC.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Samantha (my_read_feed)

    Everybody (Else) Is Perfect is a beautifully written memoir by a firecly intelligent + wonderfully honest feminist. Gabrielle Korn, the Former EIC of Nylon, discusses her career path, her push for diversity, anti-racism, queer representation and size inclusivity, and some of her own thoughts on what it means to be a feminist. ⠀⠀ Throughout the book Korn also discusses her own battle with anorexia. She also weaves her battle into the story, explaining how even the most feminist-forward and size-inc Everybody (Else) Is Perfect is a beautifully written memoir by a firecly intelligent + wonderfully honest feminist. Gabrielle Korn, the Former EIC of Nylon, discusses her career path, her push for diversity, anti-racism, queer representation and size inclusivity, and some of her own thoughts on what it means to be a feminist. ⠀⠀ Throughout the book Korn also discusses her own battle with anorexia. She also weaves her battle into the story, explaining how even the most feminist-forward and size-inclusive women oftentimes forget to view themselves in the same light—countless women championing size diversity in the media look at themselves in the mirror and berate their own love handles. ⠀⠀ I really don’t have anything bad to say about this book. It’s clear from her writing how much Korn cares about the issues she discusses, and she discusses them with such eloquence and passion. I highly recommend this book! **I was gifted this book in exchange for an honest review. All the thoughts and feelings expressed above are my own.**

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lex

    Gabrielle Korn delivers nothing but honesty and humility in her new memoir Everybody (Else) Is Perfect through various essays with interconnecting themes. Readers get an inside look at the world of beauty and fashion journalism through the eyes of the intelligent and accomplished author. Korn spent her 20s developing an identity within her sexuality, maneuvering through various romantic interests (some of which being extremely toxic), and regaining herself through a battle with an eating disorde Gabrielle Korn delivers nothing but honesty and humility in her new memoir Everybody (Else) Is Perfect through various essays with interconnecting themes. Readers get an inside look at the world of beauty and fashion journalism through the eyes of the intelligent and accomplished author. Korn spent her 20s developing an identity within her sexuality, maneuvering through various romantic interests (some of which being extremely toxic), and regaining herself through a battle with an eating disorder. Meanwhile, Korn rocketed through the ranks at an independent fashion, entertainment, and music magazine, Nylon, until she became the editor-in-chief at the spritely young age of 28. However, Korn delves into how her fancy new title came with new, nearly insurmountable, responsibilities. The best word to sum up the book (even though summarizing a book in one word is a terrible idea) is: important. Korn's ability to call out the beauty/fashion industry's hypocrisy for touting self-love and empowerment without improving the environment within their own offices is refreshing. People on the outside of the industry can be easily fooled into believing they're alone in their struggle to find a place of self acceptance when they're constantly bombarded with magazines and influencers telling them to drop all of your insecurities this second, and if you can't then you're just not trying hard enough. Additionally, Korn's honesty in how this industry dynamic affected her own experience with an eating disorder is exactly the kind of rhetoric the industry needs to produce more of to offset the insecurities they help create. Everybody (Else) Is Perfect won't be for everyone. Despite Korn's evident writing talent, any reader who has no interest in journalism, specifically beauty and fashion journalism, might find they have trouble keeping an interest in this book. Since the book is a collection of essays, there are some essays that stand out and others that feel like they were used to puff up the book. This proved the book difficult to rate. While there are several 5-star essays, the inclusion of a couple 2 or 3-star essays averages the book out to a solid 4-star read. At times, there was a little too much description of what people were wearing or what bag someone was holding. Of course, these are the kinds of details expected from a writer whose background is in beauty and fashion, so perhaps the reader should do their best to forgive Korn for these instances. The struggle with any book with a theme as strong as this one, is how it can start to seem repetitive after a while. Korn did her best in trying to bring certain points up in different ways, but it wasn't always possible to avoid. Due to the structure of the book, there are several essays in a row that are extremely similar and could cause many readers to give up before reaching the essays later in the book with novel themes. Readers who find themselves discouraged should try to skip around within the book and consider reading the essays out of order.

  12. 4 out of 5

    abigail | bookswithgail

    Everyone (Else) Is Perfect is a deeply insightful and beautifully honest memoir by the former (and youngest ever) editor in chief of Nylon magazine, Gabrielle Korn. During her experience working in women's media throughout her 20s, Gabrielle fought hard to dismantle the widely accepted beauty standards of the time that excluded anyone who wasn't thin and white. She worked tirelessly to evolve that standard into one that not only includes, but actually celebrates women of all races, body sizes, a Everyone (Else) Is Perfect is a deeply insightful and beautifully honest memoir by the former (and youngest ever) editor in chief of Nylon magazine, Gabrielle Korn. During her experience working in women's media throughout her 20s, Gabrielle fought hard to dismantle the widely accepted beauty standards of the time that excluded anyone who wasn't thin and white. She worked tirelessly to evolve that standard into one that not only includes, but actually celebrates women of all races, body sizes, and sexual orientations. Gabrielle took a deep dive into many topics I realized I had only thought about on a surface level. One that especially resonated with me was why as women are we champions of body positivity as it applies to everyone one else, but oftentimes don't afford our own bodies that same grace and acceptance? Gabrielle notes that even in this golden age of feminism when were supposed to promote a message of self-love, eating disorders continue to rise. This conversation leads to one of my favorite quotes in the book (a quote I will revisit every day as a reminder): "The misogyny that says women need to be skinny has infiltrated your brain until you believe it, until it feels like it's a belief you organically hold. It's oppression at its most sinister: so pervasive that it becomes a part of you... you are in effect working to uphold the values of a system built on keeping you down." I didn't know what to expect when I picked up this memoir, but it absolutely blew me away! I think it would make a great book club pick to inspire important and honest discussion among women, and I know so many women will benefit from reading this!

  13. 5 out of 5

    kelsey ⚡️

    Honest question: how many of you have looked in the mirror after looking at social media and found so many things about yourself that you wish you could change? How many times have you found yourself the victim of comparison? Gabrielle Korn seemingly has it all- good family, degree from a prestigious school, great friends, and a fancy new title as the youngest editor-in-chief for Nylon. But what if everything isn’t as perfect as it seems? Korn’s story of her own turbulent feelings towards social Honest question: how many of you have looked in the mirror after looking at social media and found so many things about yourself that you wish you could change? How many times have you found yourself the victim of comparison? Gabrielle Korn seemingly has it all- good family, degree from a prestigious school, great friends, and a fancy new title as the youngest editor-in-chief for Nylon. But what if everything isn’t as perfect as it seems? Korn’s story of her own turbulent feelings towards social media, her health, and internet feminism is a must read for anyone who uses social media. Korn’s refreshingly honest essay tackles some hot button social media issuers like: feminism, body positivity, #MeToo, and faking it (till it seems) like you’re making it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Wallace

    I read this book several times over. For me it brought to the surface many things that women deal with in their everyday lives that have perhaps been buried by society and accepted as norms. Gabrielle lays out truths ranging from racism to mental health to body imagery giving the reader a hard yet necessary pill to swallow. I think this book allows to reader to re-examine how we see ourselves and others and why it’s important we talk about it.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    I'm not sure if this type of memoir is even possible to write without a lot of humble bragging about the author's various successes, and it makes for a slightly cringe-y reading experience. I did want to like this based on the blurb, and she had some interesting perspectives, but overall I found it a bit surface level and repetitive and didn't think any of her takes were really THAT insightful or unique. Like.. the fact that the beauty industry is misogynistic and racist and fatphobic doesn't pa I'm not sure if this type of memoir is even possible to write without a lot of humble bragging about the author's various successes, and it makes for a slightly cringe-y reading experience. I did want to like this based on the blurb, and she had some interesting perspectives, but overall I found it a bit surface level and repetitive and didn't think any of her takes were really THAT insightful or unique. Like.. the fact that the beauty industry is misogynistic and racist and fatphobic doesn't particularly surprise me. I feel like I've read about all these issues, many times over. I'm happy that she tried to make changes but at the same time, I'm not sure if that industry is redeemable in its current form. Personally, I don't have a lot of interest in fashion, so it seems really hard to reconcile how fucked the industry is with.. "I like pretty clothes and makeup." Like there's this sense that she's trying to justify complicity by claiming that fashion is so important, and I'm kind of skeptical about that. But, I'm also very anti-consumerism, so I'm biased, too! Also, I do empathize with her struggles, but it's a bit harder when the struggles seem to be interspersed with self congratulations, almost to like.. soften them? Like "I accomplished this and this and this and this and it all seemed so perfect but secretly I had an eating disorder and a bad relationship and it was hard." I'm sure it WAS hard, like we all have struggles and I'm not discounting that, but I'm not sure if her struggles were enough to fill a whole book. Or at least, I think her examinations of her struggles never dove deep enough. I think other people who have more interest in the New York fashion world with a queer bent will appreciate this more than I did.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    I most highly recommend this book. Isn't the very best writing when an author can be honest with themselves and, therefore, write in a way that is so meaningful and moving to the reader? That describes this book. Korn provides a lens, not only into her public life, but into her values, struggles and growth. Excellent work, not to be missed. I most highly recommend this book. Isn't the very best writing when an author can be honest with themselves and, therefore, write in a way that is so meaningful and moving to the reader? That describes this book. Korn provides a lens, not only into her public life, but into her values, struggles and growth. Excellent work, not to be missed.

  17. 5 out of 5

    SarahReads

    Everybody (else) is perfect seemed like a compelling book. A memoir that looks at at so many womens and queer issues as well as eating disorders and navigating success at a young age. Although well written, the book quickly felt repetitious - at times it felt like she was beating a dead horse in writing about some of the book's themes. At 38 I am probably outside the target age group for this book, but I found Korn harder to relate too as the book continued. This book is probably better suited t Everybody (else) is perfect seemed like a compelling book. A memoir that looks at at so many womens and queer issues as well as eating disorders and navigating success at a young age. Although well written, the book quickly felt repetitious - at times it felt like she was beating a dead horse in writing about some of the book's themes. At 38 I am probably outside the target age group for this book, but I found Korn harder to relate too as the book continued. This book is probably better suited to the 18-30 age range, perhaps younger people will better connect with the author. 2.5 Stars rounded up to 3. Thank you to NetGalley for providing an advanced copy of this book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Phoebe

    I feel bad leaving a two-star review without context, so I'll say my main issue with this book was it's repetitiveness. It felt like reading the same two essays over and over again; it could have easily been one (1) internet Long Read. I don't want to hold that against Gabrielle Korn, I've followed her for years on Instagram and she seems like a cool, nice person with a cute wife and dog, so I guess instead I'll hold it against whoever edited the book. At one point Korn actually acknowledges she I feel bad leaving a two-star review without context, so I'll say my main issue with this book was it's repetitiveness. It felt like reading the same two essays over and over again; it could have easily been one (1) internet Long Read. I don't want to hold that against Gabrielle Korn, I've followed her for years on Instagram and she seems like a cool, nice person with a cute wife and dog, so I guess instead I'll hold it against whoever edited the book. At one point Korn actually acknowledges she wrote it mainly on the subway while commuting, which 1) I can believe and 2) felt like a weird admission of half-assing it?

  19. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    When life for the entire universe and planet turns on its end and like everyone else you "have nothing to do" while your place of work is closed and you are in #COVID19 #socialisolation, superspeed readers like me can read 250+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. (I have played a zillion games of scrabble, done a zillion crosswords and I AM BORED!!!) I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the a When life for the entire universe and planet turns on its end and like everyone else you "have nothing to do" while your place of work is closed and you are in #COVID19 #socialisolation, superspeed readers like me can read 250+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. (I have played a zillion games of scrabble, done a zillion crosswords and I AM BORED!!!) I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. From the former editor-in-chief of Nylon comes a provocative and intimate collection of personal and cultural essays featuring eye-opening explorations of hot button topics for modern women, including internet feminism, impossible beauty standards in social media, shifting ideals about sexuality, and much more. Gabrielle Korn starts her professional life with all the right credentials. Prestigious college degree? Check. A loving, accepting family? Check. Instagram-worthy offices and a tight-knit group of friends? Check, check. Gabrielle’s life seems to reach the crescendo of perfect when she gets named the youngest editor-in-chief in the history of one of fashion’s most influential publication. Suddenly she’s invited to the world’s most epic parties, comped beautiful clothes and shoes from trendy designers, and asked to weigh in on everything from gay rights to lip gloss on one of the most influential digital platforms. But behind the scenes, things are far from perfect. In fact, just a few months before landing her dream job, Gabrielle’s health and wellbeing are on the line, and her promotion to editor-in-chief becomes the ultimate test of strength. In this collection of inspirational and searing essays, Gabrielle reveals exactly what it’s truly like in the fashion world, trying to find love as a young lesbian in New York City, battling with anorexia, and trying not to lose herself in a mirage of women’s empowerment and Instagram perfection. Through deeply personal essays, Gabrielle recounts her struggles to reconcile her long-held insecurities about her body while coming out in the era of The L Word, where swoon-worthy lesbians are portrayed as skinny, fashion-perfect, and power-hungry. She takes us with her everywhere from New York Fashion Week to the doctor’s office, revealing that the forces that try to keep women small are more pervasive than anyone wants to admit, especially in a world that’s been newly branded as woke. From #MeToo to commercialized body positivity, Korn’s biting, darkly funny analysis turns feminist commentary on its head. Both an in-your-face take on impossible beauty standards and entrenched media ideals and an inspiring call for personal authenticity, this powerful collection is ideal for fans of Roxane Gay and Rebecca Solnit. I FREAKING LOVED THIS BOOK!!!!!! (I actually already ordered a copy for my niece and two of my sisters as "IOU-this-book Christmas gifts!) It is not a secret how I feel about social-media "influences (see my sign off on EVRY book review) and this book skewers them as they should be. Admittedly, Miss Korn has a very extensive Instagram account full of fashion and whatnot, but she somehow makes it work ... she WORKED to get where she is, she didn't go on some inane TV show where her job was listed as "social media influencer! This is NOT a "fluffy read" - I am not really sleeping these days so this was a welcome read as these social- media-posers are villains to women far and wide. I am NOT a card-carrying feminist but all I have to do is go on Instagram, etc. and feel like less of a woman as I am not thin enough, fit enough, pretty enough, smart enough, ANYTHING-enough for the world. Miss Korn is a saviour to women worldwide by having the balls to write this book. it NEEDED TO BE WRITTEN and she WROTE IT. The book is not a feminazi-RANT (i.e. what most misogynists call a woman having and expressing an opinion) it is an entertaining yet important read. Add it to your book club list to read and recommend it to your friends to read as well. Here we go: ***************** As always, I try to find a reason to not rate with stars as I love emojis (outside of their incessant use by "🙏-ed Social Influencer Millennials/#BachelorNation survivors/Tik-Tok and YouTube Millionaires/etc. " on Instagram and Twitter... Get a real job, people!) so let's give it 👩‍❤️‍💋‍👩👩‍❤️‍💋‍👩👩‍❤️‍💋‍👩👩‍❤️‍💋‍👩👩‍❤️‍💋‍👩 p.s CONGRATS to Miss Korn on her engagement - that is why I chose the above emoji!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Buron

    I went into this book not having heard of the author - the cover is what completely drew me in. While it took me a while to finish it (I found myself liking the second half much more than the first), the themes covered were very important and relevant. Thanks so much to NetGalley and Atria for the free copy in exchange for my review!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mara

    I’ve been vaguely aware of Nylon magazine for years, but hadn’t previously heard of Gabrielle Korn and her meteoric rise to Editor in Chief at only 28. The description for this memoir/essay collection was appealing and it did not disappoint. Korn writes in an incredibly readable and enticing manner that drew me in immediately. Korn is incredibly smart and ambitious, but was admittedly in the right time and place to become editor in chief of a major publication due to amassing key skills, catapul I’ve been vaguely aware of Nylon magazine for years, but hadn’t previously heard of Gabrielle Korn and her meteoric rise to Editor in Chief at only 28. The description for this memoir/essay collection was appealing and it did not disappoint. Korn writes in an incredibly readable and enticing manner that drew me in immediately. Korn is incredibly smart and ambitious, but was admittedly in the right time and place to become editor in chief of a major publication due to amassing key skills, catapulting her image/brand, and layoffs of other departments. Korn was also admittedly very privileged in terms of her education and not requiring much income to survive in New York due to having a free place to live, which gave her freedom to accept low-paying jobs in writing, which she was able to use as stepping stones in her career. Korn writes about her struggles with the massive hypocrisies ever-present in the fashion world and personal struggles with anorexia. She illuminates the ways in which feminism and body positivity becoming mainstream have been monetized, while the beauty industry continues to profit largely off of insecurity. This theme was a bit redundant and I wanted more variety or distance. I appreciated how Korn was so candid about her personal struggles and growth in her twenties. I really enjoyed this memoir, but maybe it’s just me, I have a hard time with memoirs written by those who are so young and not entirely separated from what they are writing about. Korn is still figuring things out, as we all are, and I really liked her push in broadening the scope of Nylon and emphasizing how we shouldn’t have to sacrifice ourselves and our health for successful careers. Thank you NetGalley and Atria Books for providing this ARC.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

    Thank you Netgalley for this ARC of Everybody (Else) Is Perfect by Gabrielle Korn. These are essays written by Gabrielle Korn, who was once EIC of Nylon. In these essays she discusses being a woman of privilege, but also tackling issues of race, body acceptance, sexuality, relationships, prejudices and misogyny. Korn shines a bright light on an industry that is supposed to be considered more "woke" and progressive, but still has a long way to go in tearing down damaging social constructs. It took Thank you Netgalley for this ARC of Everybody (Else) Is Perfect by Gabrielle Korn. These are essays written by Gabrielle Korn, who was once EIC of Nylon. In these essays she discusses being a woman of privilege, but also tackling issues of race, body acceptance, sexuality, relationships, prejudices and misogyny. Korn shines a bright light on an industry that is supposed to be considered more "woke" and progressive, but still has a long way to go in tearing down damaging social constructs. It took a few essays in to get hooked to this one, but after time I finally did and I learned a lot. It's easy to assume what I would do if confronted with certain situations, but Korn describes well just how hard it is to stand up for oneself, even when you are strong and exhausted from patriarchal abuse.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Emily Brochin

    Gabrielle Korn is a fun person to stalk on Instagram because of a) she is in a cute relationship b) she goes to cool parties. Cool to read about a trailblazer but I was reminded, even though I have no urge to, to NEVER work in fashion/beauty/editorial Takeaway: men who work at magazines suck and also fashion magazines suck

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Fredericks

    “Under the guidance of 29-year-old Gabrielle Korn, an out lesbian who lives in Brooklyn with her musician girlfriend, Nylon has become one of the most politically-aware, racially diverse, LGBTQ-inclusive, and feminist-forward digital magazines out there since Korn was appointed editor-in-chief in September 2017 (the same time the outlet’s print edition folded).” Women! We empower one another to live life to the fullest, love who we want to love, feel confident in our bodies and demand equality in “Under the guidance of 29-year-old Gabrielle Korn, an out lesbian who lives in Brooklyn with her musician girlfriend, Nylon has become one of the most politically-aware, racially diverse, LGBTQ-inclusive, and feminist-forward digital magazines out there since Korn was appointed editor-in-chief in September 2017 (the same time the outlet’s print edition folded).” Women! We empower one another to live life to the fullest, love who we want to love, feel confident in our bodies and demand equality in our everyday lives. But the bottom line is…are we ever 100% happy within our own skin? How can we get to a place of peace and acceptance of our most wonderful selves, especially when we are promoting this to those around us? Sometimes a deep dive into the roots of these issues is more telling than a one size fits all answer. Gabrielle Korn, a digital media expert, former editor at Refinery29 and former editor-in-chief of Nylon shares in her new memoir, personal essays relating to this very issue. Her story is an eye-opening, contemporary account of how damaging the fashion and beauty industries have been (and still can be) to women. Her writing is fresh and alive and pretty much blew me away. I hope you will read her book and find wisdom and courage in her words. Gabrielle Korn’s memoir was a deep-seated read. I was beguiled with how she shared her most private moments in her life in a way that felt like she was talking in confidence with a close friend. As a forty something year old straight woman who has never worked in the fashion industry, I could still relate to so much of what she revealed. I have lived through my fair share of fashion/body trends and unreachable beauty standards and of course…sexism at its finest. I can’t say that it was all bad (excluding sexism…that is always never welcomed here), but looking back now I wonder if some of it was even worth it. Some trends worked in my favor, while others had me scrambling or left feeling pretty low. Through the decades, I have witnessed media, fashion, diets and beauty products make strides towards diversity and inclusion of all shapes, sizes and even genders…at least from my perspective as a consumer. But is society moving in the right direction to meet the needs of our diverse and beautiful world? Hopefully. Do I still feel like I am reaching for the stars sometimes? Absolutely. But my one take away from Korn is that there are so many outside factors that influence our lives and we can’t change everything, especially all at once. What we can change though, is our reaction to the cultural influences around us and how we let it seep into our minds and relationships. We do not have to be a slave to our image. We can just be who we are and love ourselves, flaws and all. 2021 continues to be an uphill battle. But as the steepness slowly decreases, our strength is increasing. Our bodies are our vessels that carry us through life. I am focussing more on loving my vessel than hating it. How about you? Check out my full blog post below. https://dearmrhemingway.com/fashion-s...

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa

    Thank you to @atriabooks and Gabrielle Korn for my copy of Everybody (Else) is Perfect. This memoir is out now! Gabrielle Korn starts her professional life with all the right credentials. Prestigious college degree? Check. A loving, accepting family? Check. Instagram-worthy offices and a tight-knit group of friends? Check, check. Gabrielle’s life seems to reach the crescendo of perfect when she gets named the youngest editor-in-chief in the history of one of fashion’s most influential publication Thank you to @atriabooks and Gabrielle Korn for my copy of Everybody (Else) is Perfect. This memoir is out now! Gabrielle Korn starts her professional life with all the right credentials. Prestigious college degree? Check. A loving, accepting family? Check. Instagram-worthy offices and a tight-knit group of friends? Check, check. Gabrielle’s life seems to reach the crescendo of perfect when she gets named the youngest editor-in-chief in the history of one of fashion’s most influential publications. Suddenly she’s invited to the world’s most epic parties, comped beautiful clothes and shoes from trendy designers, and asked to weigh in on everything from gay rights to lip gloss on one of the most influential digital platforms. But behind the scenes, things are far from perfect. In fact, just a few months before landing her dream job, Gabrielle’s health and wellbeing are on the line, and her promotion to editor-in-chief becomes the ultimate test of strength. In this collection of inspirational and searing essays, Gabrielle reveals exactly what it’s truly like in the fashion world, trying to find love as a young lesbian in New York City, battling with anorexia, and trying not to lose herself in a mirage of women’s empowerment and Instagram perfection. (Goodreads) Korn is a beautiful storyteller. You can feel her passion come through in her writing, and it makes the book so easy to read. It feels like a conversation with a good friend over drinks. I appreciate the many times that Korn called out the beauty industry for its hypocrisy in its standards and ways of being. So often do they preach one thing in public, but practice another in their offices, and Korn draws attention to how that transpired in her life. Her journey to self-love was inspiring, and I hope it inspires other women and men with similar struggles.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Advance copy received from Atria books in exchange for my honest review. Let me start by saying that I'm not a fan of giving memoirs stars as I feel like I'm rating someone's life and their impression of it. With that in mind, Everybody (Else) is Perfect is a very well written and very timely look at the hypocrisy in the fashion industry, on social media, and even the hypocrisy many of us are guilty of as members of society. As someone with an average body, I related to so much of what Korn share Advance copy received from Atria books in exchange for my honest review. Let me start by saying that I'm not a fan of giving memoirs stars as I feel like I'm rating someone's life and their impression of it. With that in mind, Everybody (Else) is Perfect is a very well written and very timely look at the hypocrisy in the fashion industry, on social media, and even the hypocrisy many of us are guilty of as members of society. As someone with an average body, I related to so much of what Korn shared about her body image and struggles to be thin. Double standards were a huge part of this book. I found the scenes especially poignant where we complement others for the same things we can't stand about ourselves. I also found Korn's work ethic and desire to speak up for others to be inspiring. I'm not far off her age and no where near as accomplished or brave as she is. I think she recognizes her privilege and does not come off as condescending or as entitled as she was often perceived to be. At times this book did feel repetitive and there were glimpses where I felt Korn was not fully able to practice her self what she preaches to others (but, the same is true for myself so this is comment not me judging). Big picture, this is a relatable read but not necessarily a solution (nor should a memoir be one) to surviving the conflicting ideals and messages of society.

  27. 5 out of 5

    ♡Ellie

    As a Latina girl, with brown skin, brown hair and brown eyes.. born in Mexico, and raised in the United States.. I never (or hardly ever) saw a representation of myself in American media, like television, or magazines. It was tough to love myself, I grew up hating my beauty marks, or the way I felt black nail polish looked odd against my brown skin. Today, I cherish my caramel skin color, and wear black nail polish with pride. I LOVE myself. This book made me appreciate the hard work that some ama As a Latina girl, with brown skin, brown hair and brown eyes.. born in Mexico, and raised in the United States.. I never (or hardly ever) saw a representation of myself in American media, like television, or magazines. It was tough to love myself, I grew up hating my beauty marks, or the way I felt black nail polish looked odd against my brown skin. Today, I cherish my caramel skin color, and wear black nail polish with pride. I LOVE myself. This book made me appreciate the hard work that some amazing human beings go to great lengths to help represent women like me. All the good and the bad. We get to know Gabrielle, her triumphs, her struggles… HER. In this collection of essays, I was inspired more then a few times, and I couldn’t stop reading about her determination, and defiance at times to do good onto others. Her heartbreaking story, and how she came back from a condition that’s unfortunately too common in this world. I admire her, I celebrate her, and I’m so glad I read this book. The honesty within these pages, and the passion behind her writing, and topics that are talked about are a few of many good reasons to read this book. I strongly feel like it will be an incredible audiobook as well, if it’s narrated by the author I will definitely give it a listen.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Adri

    I’ve been following Gabrielle on Instagram for years now. When I saw that she was coming out with a book I was so happy! I immediately preordered the book and I finally got the chance to read it. Honestly, for a first book I think she did pretty good. I highly enjoyed learning more about the work she did and her perseverance to create change. I was truly blown away about how honest she was about her traumatic experience. I can imagine it was hard to write about, but she definitely made points wh I’ve been following Gabrielle on Instagram for years now. When I saw that she was coming out with a book I was so happy! I immediately preordered the book and I finally got the chance to read it. Honestly, for a first book I think she did pretty good. I highly enjoyed learning more about the work she did and her perseverance to create change. I was truly blown away about how honest she was about her traumatic experience. I can imagine it was hard to write about, but she definitely made points when she brought up those experiences. Also, how she did not sugar coat her sexuality or the nasty realities of dating. I was very impressed with her ownership of her toxic patterns in her dating life. To me, that shows growth. It demonstrates that she outgrew those traits and doesn’t try to hide those facts. As someone of color, I appreciate how she takes accountability of her “privilege” and how other people have a rough time because of they are not white. I was actually shocked, but appreciative. If I had any complaints about this book it would probably be just about the jumping back and forth of events. When she would circle back to things I was confused at first. However, I still think this is a great first book and I highly recommend it. I can’t wait to see what else she brings out!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    "As a new generation of women, how do we recognize ourselves and each other without the pressure to be perfect - however that's currently being defined?" This was the question Gabrielle Korn set out with in her new memoir "Everybody (Else) is Perfect," and I really loved how her ten essays weaved together her answer. As the former Editor in Chief at Nylon, Gabrielle has this insight into what it's like being the lowest in a digital newsroom, all the way to the top in just a matter of a few years. "As a new generation of women, how do we recognize ourselves and each other without the pressure to be perfect - however that's currently being defined?" This was the question Gabrielle Korn set out with in her new memoir "Everybody (Else) is Perfect," and I really loved how her ten essays weaved together her answer. As the former Editor in Chief at Nylon, Gabrielle has this insight into what it's like being the lowest in a digital newsroom, all the way to the top in just a matter of a few years. Along the way, she talks about hypocrisies in the fashion industry, feminism and coming out in college, navigating relationships in her 20s, and her struggles with food and body image. I didn't know who Gabrielle was before this memoir, but I don't think you needed to to enjoy it. It is clearly evident that she is a super smart women, but the entire memoir comes off in a very relatable/non-superior tone. Overall - really enjoyed this memoir! Thanks AtriaBooks + Netgalley for the chance to read early in exchange for an honest review.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Signed, Iza

    In this provocative and intimate collection of essays, #GabrielleKorn reveals exactly what it's truly like in the fashion world, trying to find love as a young lesbian, battling with anorexia, and trying not to lose herself in a mirage of women's empowerment and Instagram perfection. #EverybodyElseIsPerfect tackles hot topics such as: ▪️ Homophobia ▪️ Sexisms ▪️ Internet feminism ▪️ Impossible beauty standards in social media ▪️ Shifting ideas about sexuality ▪️Queer Representation ◾Career women ◾Fe In this provocative and intimate collection of essays, #GabrielleKorn reveals exactly what it's truly like in the fashion world, trying to find love as a young lesbian, battling with anorexia, and trying not to lose herself in a mirage of women's empowerment and Instagram perfection. #EverybodyElseIsPerfect tackles hot topics such as: ▪️ Homophobia ▪️ Sexisms ▪️ Internet feminism ▪️ Impossible beauty standards in social media ▪️ Shifting ideas about sexuality ▪️Queer Representation ◾Career women ◾Feminism ▪️Eating Disorders ◾The #MeToo Movement ◾Mental Health ◾Body Shaming "In my self-righteous 24 years old words, I proclaimed that there was a difference between natural beauty and radical beauty. That the former is a privilege for those who fit the standards and the latter is about reclaiming the concept of beauty for identities that are usually excluded from it. " Overall: I appreciated Korn's criticism of the fashion industry and its criteria for models and the lengths these models would go to just to be accepted. Plus social media body positivity influencers. Do they practice what they preach? Are they spilling the tea on these issues and how they've achieved theirs? This was a very quick read. So if you're looking for something to read while you're trying to unwind, why not give it a go? Many thanks to atriabooks for the eArc copy.

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