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A fascinating expose proving that Nazi Germany won the race for the atom bomb in late 1944. Were the Nazis secretly researching the occult, alternative physics and new energy sources� This scientific-historical journey tracks down the proof and answers these fascinating questions: * What were the Nazis developing in Czechoslovakia� * Why did the US Army test the atom bomb A fascinating expose proving that Nazi Germany won the race for the atom bomb in late 1944. Were the Nazis secretly researching the occult, alternative physics and new energy sources� This scientific-historical journey tracks down the proof and answers these fascinating questions: * What were the Nazis developing in Czechoslovakia� * Why did the US Army test the atom bomb on Hiroshima� * Why did the Luftwaffe fly a non-stop round-trip mission within twenty miles of New York City in 1944�


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A fascinating expose proving that Nazi Germany won the race for the atom bomb in late 1944. Were the Nazis secretly researching the occult, alternative physics and new energy sources� This scientific-historical journey tracks down the proof and answers these fascinating questions: * What were the Nazis developing in Czechoslovakia� * Why did the US Army test the atom bomb A fascinating expose proving that Nazi Germany won the race for the atom bomb in late 1944. Were the Nazis secretly researching the occult, alternative physics and new energy sources� This scientific-historical journey tracks down the proof and answers these fascinating questions: * What were the Nazis developing in Czechoslovakia� * Why did the US Army test the atom bomb on Hiroshima� * Why did the Luftwaffe fly a non-stop round-trip mission within twenty miles of New York City in 1944�

30 review for Reich of the Black Sun: Nazi Secret Weapons and the Cold War Allied Legend

  1. 4 out of 5

    Justin

    You know how you are in the express lane in the supermarket and you see a picture of (an obviously faked) "Batboy Living in a Cave" on the front cover? And even though you don't believe in it at all, you are compelled by strange supernatural forces beyond your control to read the article anyway - because, dear sweet heaven - what if there really IS a Batboy in that cave?! Or... You are watching "Soylent Green" on late night T.V. and you think to yourself, "What if Soylent Green really IS people?! You know how you are in the express lane in the supermarket and you see a picture of (an obviously faked) "Batboy Living in a Cave" on the front cover? And even though you don't believe in it at all, you are compelled by strange supernatural forces beyond your control to read the article anyway - because, dear sweet heaven - what if there really IS a Batboy in that cave?! Or... You are watching "Soylent Green" on late night T.V. and you think to yourself, "What if Soylent Green really IS people?!" (Spoiler Alert: Soylent Green is not actually People. It is a 1973 Sci-Fi movie starring Charlton Heston. If Soylent Green was real, it would, in fact, be composed entirely of People.) So, I can't help it. Some people's guilty pleasure is eating ding-dongs under the covers at midnight. (Or they did, before Hostess went Tango Uniform.) Me, I take sweet, decadent pleasure in reading about the Nazi association with the Occult - even though the rational side of my brain knows it is just a steaming pile of malarkey. The literary equivalent of a campfire ghost story. The same principle with Templars and Cryptozoology. In fact, if there was a book about Yeti Knights Templar riding Loch Ness Monsters to battle Nazi warlocks and their UFO robots, I would probably buy two copies. One collectible to keep pristine under shrink-wrap, and the other to peruse with chocolate covered fingers as I secretly consume a large portion of my ding-dong stash. Undercovers. With flashlight. But seriously (or more accurately, slightly more serious), the author puts forward a researched, albeit circumstantial, but non-the-less surprisingly compelling case for an advanced Nazi nuclear weapons program and aerial weapons platforms. Farrell is more or less the Von Daniken of Nazi lore. This book intrigued me so much that after reading it, I immediately purchased two others by the author, "The SS Brotherhood of the Bell," and "Nazi International." I have not read them yet, but will be doing so and reviewing them at a future date, barring the advent of the Zombie Apocalypse. Or the slightly less popular but equally dreaded Unicorn Apocalypse. While this book can be dry and technical at times, and is complete with supporting research and diagrams, it proffers some fascinating premises. If you have more than a passing interest in Occult Nazi conspiracy theories or UFOs, you should do yourself a favor and pick this one up. Also, you should buy some more ding-dongs before those are gone, too.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Tony Calder

    I was tempted to shelve this as fantasy or sci-fi, but the author does intend it as a non-fiction book, so I went with that :) It took a while to read, as I put it down a few times to read other things when it was annoying me too much. The first half of the book looks at the atomic weapons programme of the Nazis, and how advanced they may have been, as opposed to the position that Allied governments took at the end of the war. The second half looks at more esoteric weaponry that was being worked I was tempted to shelve this as fantasy or sci-fi, but the author does intend it as a non-fiction book, so I went with that :) It took a while to read, as I put it down a few times to read other things when it was annoying me too much. The first half of the book looks at the atomic weapons programme of the Nazis, and how advanced they may have been, as opposed to the position that Allied governments took at the end of the war. The second half looks at more esoteric weaponry that was being worked on in the Third Reich, such as death rays and flying saucers. Let me say at this point, that I enjoy tales of Nazi super-weaponry, and I enjoy role-playing and war-gaming scenarios that pit Nazi advanced weapons against the Allies, but I accept that these are entirely fictitious, whereas Farrell is writing this book attempting to show that it isn't. In fact, the second star of my rating is because this book is a treasure trove of ideas for a pulp-style role-playing campaign. As is reasonably common in this type of book, the author makes assumptions based on very thin evidence and then uses these assumptions as fact to build further arguments on. The author's previous work looked at the Giza pyramid and postulated that is may have been an interplanetary weapon system that was used to destroy the 5th planet and created the asteroid belt, so this book is comparatively mainstream. The remainder of this review contains spoilers. Farrell makes the following, mostly unsupported, claims: - the Nazis tested an atomic weapon in 1944 and may have had as many as 15 by the end of the war. They weren't used against the Allies in the West because the Germans had no delivery system (umm, V2 anyone?). They may have been used against the Soviets, but Stalin wouldn't admit that because it would have seen him ousted. - the bomb that the Americans dropped on Nagasaki was in fact a German bomb, captured on board U-234, which was supposed to be delivered to Japan. Although he also says that the Japanese may have tested their own atomic bomb in Korea early in 1945. - the Nazis had developed a disintegrator weapon (perhaps as early as 1943) but it was too large to be portable, occupying an entire building. - the Nazis had developed flying saucers, powered by Zero Point Energy, capable of speeds of around 1200 mph (nearly Mach 2). - senior Nazis escaped to an Antarctic base at the end of the war, and continued their research into esoteric weaponry there. - the Roswell incident in 1947 was, in fact, a German flying saucer, and this led to Admiral Byrd's heavily armed expedition to the South Pole as a cover for an American military probe, which was driven off. The Nazi Antarctic base continued for another 10 years before it was eventually destroyed by American nuclear weapons. Farrell cherry-picks a lot to support his arguments, and often ignores far more plausible explanations. And he has no real way of explaining how it is that (a) either some of the technology the Nazis discovered has still not been rediscovered more than 70 years later; or (b) the American military has successfully kept this all secret for 70 years. Neither of these strikes me as particularly likely.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Max Nemtsov

    Довольно забавная криптоистория Второй мировой и Третьего райха — да-да, там про летающие тарелки нацистов и прочее увлекательное. Автор — фигура, как выяснилось, вполне потешная, бывший христианский теолог, спец по патерналистике (так, кажется, называется наука об отцах церкви?), впоследствии ушедший так далеко и глубоко, что даже уфологи считают его маргиналом. Но мне (и любому, я думаю, прикладному пинчоноведу) она интересна, в первую очередь, потому, что может дать еще один ключ к «Радуге тяг Довольно забавная криптоистория Второй мировой и Третьего райха — да-да, там про летающие тарелки нацистов и прочее увлекательное. Автор — фигура, как выяснилось, вполне потешная, бывший христианский теолог, спец по патерналистике (так, кажется, называется наука об отцах церкви?), впоследствии ушедший так далеко и глубоко, что даже уфологи считают его маргиналом. Но мне (и любому, я думаю, прикладному пинчоноведу) она интересна, в первую очередь, потому, что может дать еще один ключ к «Радуге тяготения» — а именно, что в ней Пинчон конспективно зашифровал историю создания нацистских радикальных технологий, «чудовищной физики», как это называет достоп. Фаррелл. Сам Пинчон в книжке не упоминается, это было бы чересчур богато. Но начинается все с того, что нам рассказывают что такое «Любекский ангел» (т.е. Пинчон его не выдумал из головы, конечно, хотя в пинчоноведении я его расшифровки нигде не находил: по версии некоторых исследователей, это были испытания урановой бомбы в октябре 1944 года над островом Рюген, что от Любека, в общем, недалеко, если по прямой, а сам остров в романе, понятно, тоже фигурирует). Дальше — пунктир: Пенемюнде, аналог лагеря «Дора», даже ракета «Энциан», не говоря уже о прототипе Бликеро (и нет, это не Вернер фон Браун), операция «Скрепка» и другие операции как союзников, так и совков, по извлечению технологий, патентов и ученых из Германии, вплоть до Хиросимы и Нагасаки (в которых нацистские технологии, если не впрямую артефакты тоже участвовали)… И Пинчон, что характерно, даже в 60-х, в общем, мог об этом знать — читал же он Вальтера Дорнбергера, который тоже у Фаррелла фигурирует как участник «мозгового центра» СС. В общем, для меня в «Радуге» остается, пожалуй, одна большая загадка — призраки ветряных мельниц в глазу на Люнебургской пустоши. Но может, где-то еще нам и это Фаррелл объяснит. Да, из потешного. Автор с удлп эпиграфы называет эпиграммами.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Matthew W

    Mr. Joseph P. Farrell could not have written a more banal book on such an phenomenal subject. Kudos to him! Farrell is Adjunct Professor of Patristic Theology and Apologetics at California Graduate School of Theology, an unaccredited (AKA bullshit) Christian institution. It seems that Mr. Farrell has mastered the art of CON-artistry, just enough to make a career out of it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Heinz Reinhardt

    Certainly an intriguing premise, which touches on a vast array of interconnected topics, ranging from Nazi nuclear weapons research, to SS dabblings in occult and esoteric research to inspire their faith in non-linear physics, to the possibility of Nazi flying saucers, the Roswell crash,Project Paperclip, and the Majestic-12 documents. All of it fundamentally hyper fascinating. However, while I won't say that Farrell didn't do his research, as the book is highly sourced and cited, the problem is Certainly an intriguing premise, which touches on a vast array of interconnected topics, ranging from Nazi nuclear weapons research, to SS dabblings in occult and esoteric research to inspire their faith in non-linear physics, to the possibility of Nazi flying saucers, the Roswell crash,Project Paperclip, and the Majestic-12 documents. All of it fundamentally hyper fascinating. However, while I won't say that Farrell didn't do his research, as the book is highly sourced and cited, the problem is that those sources are revolve around a paucity of primary source material. Not to say that some of this isn't spot on. Certainly I believe much of it is, but that Farrell has built a massive edifice in his book series that has a thin foundation. It is utterly absorbing in it's ability to fascinate, but I do believe a measure of salt must be held while reading these books. Still, they can be recommend as amongst the very best of the alternative research community and their works.

  6. 5 out of 5

    vhatos

    Цікава книжка про таємниці нацистської Німеччини, наприклад, про роботу над створенням атомної бомби, дослідження окультних наук, подорожі до Антарктиди..

  7. 4 out of 5

    Cwn_annwn_13

    This book took me forever to get through, partially because I had to concentrate on reading books that needed to be returned to the library and partially due to Farrells dry writing style. A good portion of this book is Farrells claim that the Nazis had nukes. He shows a lot of interesting coincidences and circumstantial evidence but doesn't make a 100% convincing case either. There's also stuff on Nazi secret weapons programs, Nazi "UFOs", and even a little bit on the theories that are out ther This book took me forever to get through, partially because I had to concentrate on reading books that needed to be returned to the library and partially due to Farrells dry writing style. A good portion of this book is Farrells claim that the Nazis had nukes. He shows a lot of interesting coincidences and circumstantial evidence but doesn't make a 100% convincing case either. There's also stuff on Nazi secret weapons programs, Nazi "UFOs", and even a little bit on the theories that are out there on secret Nazi bases under Antarctica and the North Pole. Overall this is interesting subject matter which is put together in a very dry way but if your into alternative viewpoints on history/WW2/Nazis then this may interest you.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    A guilty pleasure. It did convince me that America most likely dropped a German atomic device weapon on Japan.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bood

    Well you know another nazi ufo book, fun stuff. Learn what all those noise songs are about.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kit Bradley

    I'll jump right to the biggest problem with The Reich of the Black Sun - it's unintentionally pro-Nazi. The thesis of the book is that Nazi scientists when they discarded as "Jewish science" relativity were able to make incredible scientific and technological advances - including anti-gravity and perpetual motion machines that could power long-ranged submarines - even though the Nazis lacked the wealth and freedom of the West (and, particularly, the unbombed United States that benefited from the I'll jump right to the biggest problem with The Reich of the Black Sun - it's unintentionally pro-Nazi. The thesis of the book is that Nazi scientists when they discarded as "Jewish science" relativity were able to make incredible scientific and technological advances - including anti-gravity and perpetual motion machines that could power long-ranged submarines - even though the Nazis lacked the wealth and freedom of the West (and, particularly, the unbombed United States that benefited from the immigration the largest portion of Jewish scientists fleeing the Nazis). That's not an obviously racist thing to think, but it as I read the book, it became increasingly anti-Semitic: the only thing holding back science from technologies like anti-gravity and free energy was the pernicious influence of "Jewish science." I don't think this is intentional on the author's part, just the ignorant blindness of most conspiratologists. Like most conspiracy theorists, Farrell is driven by his passions past the point of all reason. There is no evidence of sympathy for Nazi goals in the book, merely an ecstatic gushing about his line of reasoning that puts Nazi scientists on divergent lines of technological development that lead to amazing places. To do that, he created from whole cloth a silly hypothesis that Nazi scientists were freed by ignoring the contributions of Jewish scientists - that, somehow, the partial science of the Nazis could develop faster than a complete science used in other nations. That his thesis has racist implications is, I suspect, invisible to him, because he believes he's illuminating facts. (He's not. There are few to no facts to be found in this book.) Once past the racist interpretation of science, though, the book is a test in either a person's credulity or punishment to see how many stupid things can be strung together before madness takes root. Like most conspiracy theory books, it starts off with the most palatable parts - in Reich of the Black Sun, the idea that the Nazis had tested an atomic bomb before their surrender. It's not true - the Nazis didn't have the facilities or technologies to create an atomic bomb; their failure to make a working atomic reactor sealed that fate - but it's not inherently ridiculous. Much of the science that would go on to create atomic weapons was of German origin, after all. Late 19th and early 20th century physics is a catalog of German-speaking people. However, as unproven assertions pile up, as speculations in one chapter are transformed into certain facts in the next, leading to increasingly outrageous speculations that in turn become more facts for more speculation without either citation or physical proof. . . Well, before long, it wasn't that the Nazis tested an atom bomb. They used them against the Russians, and Stalin hid it. Also, Americans used Nazi bombs captured on a German submarine to bomb Japan. And the Nazis had antigravity because this Austrian forester saw a trout swimming in a stream and created a free-energy machine that was used in Nazi flying saucers. Plus, the Nazis have a secret base in Antarctica, in the Andes, and in the Canadian Arctic, but they also have taken over the US military-industrial complex. The book ends by saying that the UFO crash in Roswell - which the author doesn't even feel the urge to defend as ridiculous, by this point Farrell assumes you believe that what happened in Roswell was a flying saucer crash - and the Kecksburg UFO incident were, in truth, accidents with Nazi UFOs. When presenting the "evidence" - and if you don't know what Majic/Majestic-12 is, the whole last part of the book will likely be opaque to you - Farrell doesn't see the glaring inconsistencies and technical absurdities presented as proof that Majic/Majestic-12 is a hoax or prank, but those contradictions are "proof" that the UFOs were of Nazi design and not from outer space. I'd give it a miss, unless you're researching the bizarre beliefs of conspiracy theorists and are looking for a good laugh.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    I had to give this five stars because the scholarship is immaculate and the conclusions are so mind blowing that it makes me think of the world in a whole new way. That's a tall order. I thought when I started reading it that it would be relatively historical WWII and post-war material in a dated period setting. The fact of the matter is that this is having a significant impact on the world today and may help explain a few of the things about our crazy modern politics. I have to point out the nega I had to give this five stars because the scholarship is immaculate and the conclusions are so mind blowing that it makes me think of the world in a whole new way. That's a tall order. I thought when I started reading it that it would be relatively historical WWII and post-war material in a dated period setting. The fact of the matter is that this is having a significant impact on the world today and may help explain a few of the things about our crazy modern politics. I have to point out the negative portion of this book though. The typos are so bad in here that it almost seems like a conspiracy on the part of the publisher to discredit the work by alluding to faulty intellect on the authors part. I mean, who hires an illiterate typesetter? There are on average two typos per page which would total 700. I know that Mr. Farrell did not commit all these errors to the page. You have to have some faith in the literacy of an Oxford graduate. So who was the proof-reader? I don't intend to go into details about the contents of this book. I expect you to go and read it. It can be difficult to find the books of Joseph P. Farrell or Jim Marrs for that matter in book stores and libraries. This is likely due to the fact that the reality that they reveal will alter the fabric of society to the point that the charade forced upon us completely unravels. Please pull that thread.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    This book provides a fascinating exploration of Nazi war technology and what happened to it after the end of World War II. Some of the shocking revelations include the fact that the Nazis were more technologically advanced than the U.S. Furthermore, many of the Nazi scientists were brought to the U.S. and placed in the Paperclip program where their research continued. Prior to reading this book, I had only briefly encountered some of these ideas. Now that I have a better understanding, I want to This book provides a fascinating exploration of Nazi war technology and what happened to it after the end of World War II. Some of the shocking revelations include the fact that the Nazis were more technologically advanced than the U.S. Furthermore, many of the Nazi scientists were brought to the U.S. and placed in the Paperclip program where their research continued. Prior to reading this book, I had only briefly encountered some of these ideas. Now that I have a better understanding, I want to read more, especially about UFOlogy, since this subject was given the least amount of space in the book. The Hunt for Zero Point by Nick Cook seems like the next logical book to read. My main criticism -- and the reason why I gave it 4 stars instead of 5 -- is the book is filled with typos. The author is clearly quite intelligent and well-read. Nevertheless, this book needed an editor to clean up after the author.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Aitken

    he did a good job in calling attention to the fact that the Black Sun is a deeply occultic symbol and it is not by accident that Himmler happened to use it. When you start exploring those connections, others appear. Also posits that the Nazis could have used a minor atomic weapon in the invasion of Russia. The theory works, though I suppose it is hard to prove at any rate.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lori Turner

    Fascinating read! If true and the author makes a good case...it change the paradigm of the Allied postwar narrative. Great documentation and well thought out. Scary stuff.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nathaniel

    I probably should have read this first instead of Brotherhood of the Bell first, but it is an amazing look at secret German World War II projects and operations.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sami Koskinen

    This rating is purely for entertainement factor. Evidence are really thin...but book really gives something to think about wwII history.

  17. 4 out of 5

    John

    Another fine Mr Farrell has again put together a body of work worthy for any intelligent, rational being to read, ponder, question, wonder . and discuss

  18. 5 out of 5

    Erik

    a great book! a keen view into the post WWII lies with the allied forces...opertation paperclip is well alive today!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ed Mortensen

    Another good but not great look at the German scientific research spanning the years just before and after World War 2. I will say that the man needs an editor, there are many typos in the book.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Faulteh

    Dry essay writing style arguing a lot of coincidences and circumstantial evidence. Took me ages to get through

  21. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Tollemache

    I did have a thin hope that this book would make an interesting case that the Nazi nuclear program was much further along than was ever admitted. A book that pushed the boundary on what is currently known would be great. I woul have even tolerated a book that pushed into flimsy revisionism. Unfortunately it all careens off the rails into batshit crazy. The book is plausible on the material covering idea that Nazis and even Japan might have been further along on their atomic programs than we ev I did have a thin hope that this book would make an interesting case that the Nazi nuclear program was much further along than was ever admitted. A book that pushed the boundary on what is currently known would be great. I woul have even tolerated a book that pushed into flimsy revisionism. Unfortunately it all careens off the rails into batshit crazy. The book is plausible on the material covering idea that Nazis and even Japan might have been further along on their atomic programs than we ever realized or wanted to admit. He wants us to believe both Germany and Japan even tested their own nukes in the closing days of the war. Problem here is: Where is the BLAST SITE!?!? All of 5 eye witness accounts seems thin. Germany isn't the US where we could hide our test sites in New Mexico desert. He claims the Nazis did a test on Rugen island. I am not even going to go into the UFO, rayguns and hollow Earth stuff.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Darren

    Persuasively argued, but this author is in SERIOUS need of an editor. Too many typos to count. The book is great, the editing is poor. "Great research; poor editing" is basically a Farrell trademark. All the same, a must read for those interested in UFOlogy or war and post-war geopolitics/alternative history. Persuasively argued, but this author is in SERIOUS need of an editor. Too many typos to count. The book is great, the editing is poor. "Great research; poor editing" is basically a Farrell trademark. All the same, a must read for those interested in UFOlogy or war and post-war geopolitics/alternative history.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Don Carner

    Content is explosive! An incredibly fascinating read hampered only by its amateurish grammar. It appears the manuscript was published directly from the author's personal typewriter. Sad, considering the importance of the books content. Content is explosive! An incredibly fascinating read hampered only by its amateurish grammar. It appears the manuscript was published directly from the author's personal typewriter. Sad, considering the importance of the books content.

  24. 5 out of 5

    John W. IV

    When a person gets the big picture on the hidden history of our world, then Farrell's body of work can be fully appreciated. Its not easy but its worth it. Mainstream history is a grand lie. Farrell is on the front line of disclosure. When a person gets the big picture on the hidden history of our world, then Farrell's body of work can be fully appreciated. Its not easy but its worth it. Mainstream history is a grand lie. Farrell is on the front line of disclosure.

  25. 4 out of 5

    David

    The author doesn't impress. The author doesn't impress.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ietrio

    Hitler as Indiana Jones and the big bomb. Or was it The Big Bomb?

  27. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Black

    I think this is a good read with an interesting 'story' I think this is a good read with an interesting 'story'

  28. 5 out of 5

    john r baucom jr

    Seems like a poorly scripted bad dream. Where is any independent, factual, verifiable information to back up a lot of these wanderings. No other source seems to know about so many of these"facts". Seems like a poorly scripted bad dream. Where is any independent, factual, verifiable information to back up a lot of these wanderings. No other source seems to know about so many of these"facts".

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    If I knew more about physics I guess I could say one way or the other. One of the end hypotheses seems to be that Nazis are/were running secret projects out of Canada. Not really sure.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Carlos Banegas

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