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An Oxford Murder

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After Miss Catherine Tregowyn, poet, and Dr. Harry Bascombe, her bête noire, discover a body in the Somerville College chapel, they are declared suspects in a murder inquiry. How can they prove their innocence? The pair decide they must launch their own investigation into the strangling of Oxford don, Agatha Chenowith. But working as a team will not be easy. Their relation After Miss Catherine Tregowyn, poet, and Dr. Harry Bascombe, her bête noire, discover a body in the Somerville College chapel, they are declared suspects in a murder inquiry. How can they prove their innocence? The pair decide they must launch their own investigation into the strangling of Oxford don, Agatha Chenowith. But working as a team will not be easy. Their relations are anything but cordial. It is not long before they uncover motives aplenty. Apparently, Dr. Chenowith was not at all what she seemed. As the surprises about the victim’s secret life multiply, they are awash in a sea of suspects. Into this scenario sails the former love of Catherine’s life as he returns from Kenya. Is she going to give Rafe another chance to break her heart? He convinces her to give him a six-month trial, and eager to show his worth, he joins in the investigation. Rafe offers to fly Catherine and Harry in his de Havilland six-seater to the Isle of Man where they must pursue a lead. Inevitably, Rafe and Harry square off in a battle for Catherine’s affections. Meanwhile, playing detectives proves to be a dangerous pursuit. Catherine and Harry shortly embroil themselves in a plot much larger than mere murder. No one wants to hear their theory, however. It contains truths too painful to contemplate. And it makes Catherine and Harry’s lives expendable. Fans of Lord Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane will love this tale! A stylish mystery set in Oxford in the 1930's with loveable characters and a cast of eccentric suspects.


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After Miss Catherine Tregowyn, poet, and Dr. Harry Bascombe, her bête noire, discover a body in the Somerville College chapel, they are declared suspects in a murder inquiry. How can they prove their innocence? The pair decide they must launch their own investigation into the strangling of Oxford don, Agatha Chenowith. But working as a team will not be easy. Their relation After Miss Catherine Tregowyn, poet, and Dr. Harry Bascombe, her bête noire, discover a body in the Somerville College chapel, they are declared suspects in a murder inquiry. How can they prove their innocence? The pair decide they must launch their own investigation into the strangling of Oxford don, Agatha Chenowith. But working as a team will not be easy. Their relations are anything but cordial. It is not long before they uncover motives aplenty. Apparently, Dr. Chenowith was not at all what she seemed. As the surprises about the victim’s secret life multiply, they are awash in a sea of suspects. Into this scenario sails the former love of Catherine’s life as he returns from Kenya. Is she going to give Rafe another chance to break her heart? He convinces her to give him a six-month trial, and eager to show his worth, he joins in the investigation. Rafe offers to fly Catherine and Harry in his de Havilland six-seater to the Isle of Man where they must pursue a lead. Inevitably, Rafe and Harry square off in a battle for Catherine’s affections. Meanwhile, playing detectives proves to be a dangerous pursuit. Catherine and Harry shortly embroil themselves in a plot much larger than mere murder. No one wants to hear their theory, however. It contains truths too painful to contemplate. And it makes Catherine and Harry’s lives expendable. Fans of Lord Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane will love this tale! A stylish mystery set in Oxford in the 1930's with loveable characters and a cast of eccentric suspects.

30 review for An Oxford Murder

  1. 5 out of 5

    Suzie Howe

    WRITER NEEDS TO CHECK OUT DECIMALIZATION Shoddy research the reader deserves more respect. Some numbskull has just paid for a museum guidebook with 50 pence. 50 pence did not exist until 1971 when it replaced 10 shillings and 10 shillings would have been around £30 pre WWII. Also full of unpleasant Americanisms - lockdown facility - swear down an oath - ME - police department - liquor And talking about liquor she might want to check out the history of lager drinking in England between the wars - es WRITER NEEDS TO CHECK OUT DECIMALIZATION Shoddy research the reader deserves more respect. Some numbskull has just paid for a museum guidebook with 50 pence. 50 pence did not exist until 1971 when it replaced 10 shillings and 10 shillings would have been around £30 pre WWII. Also full of unpleasant Americanisms - lockdown facility - swear down an oath - ME - police department - liquor And talking about liquor she might want to check out the history of lager drinking in England between the wars - especially when the story is supposed to be about Germany! I doubt whether well educated young ladies would be sitting at the bar in a public house swigging pints of lager.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Prof Thomas D Wilson

    A poorly researched novel I do wish Americans would stop trying to write "classic" English detective stories. They simply don't do enough research to provide authenticity. Here, the head of Somerville College is referred to as the "Dean" - which I think is not used of any Oxford college head, they are all Masters or, e.g., in Somerville's case, Principals. And the head of an Oxford college would never refer to "my faculty", since the term "faculty" is used for one of the levels of university gove A poorly researched novel I do wish Americans would stop trying to write "classic" English detective stories. They simply don't do enough research to provide authenticity. Here, the head of Somerville College is referred to as the "Dean" - which I think is not used of any Oxford college head, they are all Masters or, e.g., in Somerville's case, Principals. And the head of an Oxford college would never refer to "my faculty", since the term "faculty" is used for one of the levels of university government, e.g., the Faculty of Law, the Faculty of Pure Sciences, etc. The Principal would almost certainly have referred to "my colleagues", or, just possibly, "the academic staff". The Ploughman's Lunch per se, did not exist in England until an advertising campaign introduced the term in the 1950s - Cat could not have ordered one in the 1920s. Indeed at the time pubs served very little in the way of food other than bar snacks that didn't need cutlery. And, in any event, women generally did not go into pubs - any woman who did so would be assumed to be "available". Nor would Dot have said she was "going down to London" - no one, to this day, born in the south speaks of anything other than "going up to Town", whether they are coming up from the south or down from the north. And an Oxford don such as Dr. Harry, would never have used "gotten" - particularly one versed in English literature - Shakespeare used it, but it survived only in the US and occasionally in Scotland. I could go on, but, please - if you write American stick to setting your stories in America - the oddities of language mis-use really grate.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tony Hisgett

    The book started badly for me, because after a few pages Two Weeks Earlier appeared. I hate this and it may have tainted my view of the book right from the start. The author’s depiction of Oxford in the 30s didn’t quite work with many minor mistakes, but I think my main problem with the book was Catherine. I tried to like her, but there were lots of little things that irritated me. Early in the book the author made it clear that she disliked Dr Harry, but then had her constantly voluntarily The book started badly for me, because after a few pages Two Weeks Earlier appeared. I hate this and it may have tainted my view of the book right from the start. The author’s depiction of Oxford in the 30s didn’t quite work with many minor mistakes, but I think my main problem with the book was Catherine. I tried to like her, but there were lots of little things that irritated me. Early in the book the author made it clear that she disliked Dr Harry, but then had her constantly voluntarily mixing with him. At the same time she is yearning after an old boyfriend, Rafe and I had the horrible feeling this was going to be more of a romance than a mystery. An example of how irritated I was getting, was when Catherine was asked what she did when not being a poet, she says she teaches little boys because; “I happen to love little boys and want them to get a good start in life.” My first thought was not how noble, but has she got something against little girls getting a good start in life? In the end I just couldn’t finish the book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Connie

    Enjoyable read with likeable characters, good description and a twisty plot with a few surprises. It's an escape for these troubled times. It reads like a true Golden Age Mystery with Catherine Tregowyn starring as a Harriet Vane character and Dr. Harry Bascombe taking a sidekick role as a non-titled Lord Peter. No gore, thankfully. Believable romance. The Oxford setting in the early 1930's is well defined, as are the social norms and taboos and struggles for women seeking professional standing Enjoyable read with likeable characters, good description and a twisty plot with a few surprises. It's an escape for these troubled times. It reads like a true Golden Age Mystery with Catherine Tregowyn starring as a Harriet Vane character and Dr. Harry Bascombe taking a sidekick role as a non-titled Lord Peter. No gore, thankfully. Believable romance. The Oxford setting in the early 1930's is well defined, as are the social norms and taboos and struggles for women seeking professional standing at this point in history. I found a few places which an editor might have caught, where the language didn't flow smoothly, but still ordered the second book in the series.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Pat Roberts

    The star ratings are so hard because they’re too broad, or perhaps not broad enough. I’d give this book a 2.75. It’s an ok not deep at all beach read, or for something to spend one’s time on when flying. It’s supposedly a period piece, but the author doesn’t come close to Jacqueline Winspear’s Maggie Dobbs series.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sandra McKenna

    An enjoyable read. I do love a good murder mystery, and this one did not disappoint. Set mainly in Oxford and London in the 1930s. Catherine returns to Oxford to farewell a former tutor, only to discover a dead body. Not satisfied with the police investigation, she, a friend and an old collegue decide to become amateur sleuths. Plenty of twists and turns to keep me turning the pages.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    This book took too long to get started and could benefit from some additional editing, but overall a good cozy.

  8. 5 out of 5

    John Keeth

    One Of The Worst Books I Have Ever Read What can I Say? I started to quit it after a few chapters but later decided to give it another chance. I did finish it but only by skimming much of it. Horrible. Why waste her time adding in a former boyfriend when it was clear from the beginning who the main character was going to end up with. The book was dull and very boring. Don’t waste your time on it. I know I won’t be looking at this author’s other books.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Nina

    Cute little murder mystery set in 1930's Oxford, England. A couple of academics who found the body decide to investigate (in ways that might be considered obstruction of justice in 2020 America). Lots of wealthy British titled-types with personal servants. They throw money at hotels and food and travel without a thought. Every time they eat, we get a list of what was served. Not great literature, but it was entertaining. Cute little murder mystery set in 1930's Oxford, England. A couple of academics who found the body decide to investigate (in ways that might be considered obstruction of justice in 2020 America). Lots of wealthy British titled-types with personal servants. They throw money at hotels and food and travel without a thought. Every time they eat, we get a list of what was served. Not great literature, but it was entertaining.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Margaret Hollon

    I thought this was poorly written. Lots of details on inconsequential items. Not enough details on the plot. Poor character developments. The story jumped around as if the writer was in manic mode. Many historical inconsistencies.

  11. 5 out of 5

    J.R. Stefanie

    This effort was at best worth two stars, and I considered one. Writing any historical piece requires an examination of the history of the time. This book, set in 1936, contains numerous anachronisms which serve to jar the reader. Two points 1 - the 'heroine'; jabs 999 to call in an emergency situation. The 999 exchange number was introduced to London just prior to WWII and to Oxford AFTER the war. Not sure what a caller would have gotten with 999 in 1936. 2- OXFAM was created in q\1942, a full 6 This effort was at best worth two stars, and I considered one. Writing any historical piece requires an examination of the history of the time. This book, set in 1936, contains numerous anachronisms which serve to jar the reader. Two points 1 - the 'heroine'; jabs 999 to call in an emergency situation. The 999 exchange number was introduced to London just prior to WWII and to Oxford AFTER the war. Not sure what a caller would have gotten with 999 in 1936. 2- OXFAM was created in q\1942, a full 6 years AFTER the events taking place in the book. It would be instructive for ANY one attempting an historical fiction to get the historical FACTS right first. I understand the author is a champ at restoration novels; perhaps that is her proper writing domain. As to the writing - it switches between a faint attempt at the '30s (Strewth, Crikey) but the whole is swallowed up in a monotone which is perhaps best signified by the 'flat' police procedural. There is no color, character development, etc......... Oxford is drawn from a Google map - tons of locations and street names, but 'no on the ground' views of the environment. Oh, by the way, a nod to Danielle Steel - all the primary characters are rich, come from exquisite backgrounds, attend sherry parties, and drive 'motors' (although automobile was a term in use in the '30s - except amongst the Steel types! No spoilers here. The book is not worth the read as an historical mystery; the quasi-romance characteristics don't quite measure up to a 'romance'; the key characters ger involved in a 'mystery and murder' and 'sleuth; it out even though Scotland Yard is on the case - and the Yard is outwitted by these two escapees from the 1%. Sorry. Oh, and a final note, this has the overtone of a 'cost', but it isn't; the university in OPxfords is denoted in American terms (Dean rather than Master, for example). Americanisms abound and decimalization has arrived early in England. I have not read the author's romance series; I was interested in this book because it was 1 - an historical fiction; 2 - it was set in Oxford. I read it.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Kilpatrick

    I loved this book until I reached Chapter 27. I liked the style, the humor, the protagonist constantly taking baths. I don't live in England and I did not attend Oxford so all the complaints from Brits don't have a bearing on my liking or disliking the story. I understand why the author uses Americanisms since her biggest audience is in the U.S. Perhaps the protagonist might have been from the U.S., or even have been raised there until returning to the UK and going to Oxford. However, she did wh I loved this book until I reached Chapter 27. I liked the style, the humor, the protagonist constantly taking baths. I don't live in England and I did not attend Oxford so all the complaints from Brits don't have a bearing on my liking or disliking the story. I understand why the author uses Americanisms since her biggest audience is in the U.S. Perhaps the protagonist might have been from the U.S., or even have been raised there until returning to the UK and going to Oxford. However, she did what she did, and frankly, I overlooked many things because I was having such a good time. I found the protagonist charming, fun, her girlfriends with reality to the interactions, her two beaus equal to the task of winning her hand (for a while), the plot of the mystery really well done almost to the end. The protagonist was determined and not kowtowing to those in authority. In other words, a woman of the changing era. The politics was an interesting edition, although taking something from Carl Jung and using the idea of the collective unconscious to imply he condoned Nazism, well, no Still, I let it and other things slide. Until Chapter 27. The last 2 chapters of the book were such a letdown, so unrealistic. It's not that we don't discover who-done-it and why, but the execution of the finale was really heavy-handed. Characters who had not been, up until then, suddenly looking and acting crazy. I just couldn't get over the disappointment. The conclusion could have fit much better into the style of the rest of the book. I was so prepared to buy another in this series, now I'm seriously rethinking. What a shame. It is a bright, easy to read, fun cozy for most of the novel but I'm really sick of these slam-bam endings.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Riddell

    It’s a nightmare scenario that none of us ever want to experience; while searching for a missing colleague or friend you finally end up finding them dead. This is a tale told in the noir genre style and the 1930’s murder is served up as a mystery to be solved. The cast of characters, and suspects, are interesting, likable and intriguingly amusing. The English dialogue was also delightfully colorful, humorous and highly entertaining. An example: “She practically jingled with gold bangles and chai It’s a nightmare scenario that none of us ever want to experience; while searching for a missing colleague or friend you finally end up finding them dead. This is a tale told in the noir genre style and the 1930’s murder is served up as a mystery to be solved. The cast of characters, and suspects, are interesting, likable and intriguingly amusing. The English dialogue was also delightfully colorful, humorous and highly entertaining. An example: “She practically jingled with gold bangles and chains around her neck.”, and the act of being intimate with another was termed as “canoodling”. The humor was well placed but it never overshadowed the seriousness of the crime, of which Catherine and Harry were suspected of committing. It’s a challenge to create a character and plot lines that are intended to continue into a series of books but this seasoned author has no problem in generating interest. Catherine Tregowyn is determined in her pursuit of solving a crime but she is also a romantic who struggles with an ongoing childhood love relationship. Another character plays for her affections in the course of the story and this creates yet another interesting conflict, which forces Catherine into making a decision. This amorous sub plot, near the end of the book, increased my rating of this story and boosted my curiosity in continuing on to the next two books in the series. GG Vandagriff continues to entertain. If you’re a fan of noir crime mysteries, you’ll love this one!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Krystyna

    She has gotten the rarefied atmosphere of Oxford down to a T Terrific read. Okay the plot might seem far-fetched but as we all know Oxford and Cambridge are recruiting grounds for many Government departments, so why not a plot of Hitler enthusiasts especially as some parts of the Government felt the same way at this time. The fact that it led to murder, arson, kidnapping and poisoning is therefore not too surprising. The author's portrayal of the rarefied atmosphere is really brilliant and frankl She has gotten the rarefied atmosphere of Oxford down to a T Terrific read. Okay the plot might seem far-fetched but as we all know Oxford and Cambridge are recruiting grounds for many Government departments, so why not a plot of Hitler enthusiasts especially as some parts of the Government felt the same way at this time. The fact that it led to murder, arson, kidnapping and poisoning is therefore not too surprising. The author's portrayal of the rarefied atmosphere is really brilliant and frankly not a lot has really changed even today although there is a more 'common' element in the hallowed halls with more places being given out to the bright minds of today. However the male chauvinistic view is still alive and well. A gathering for the retirement of a beloved professor leads to murder when our main character finds a body in the small chapel. The search to clear her name of suspicion leads to another murder, a secret society, poisoning, love and self growth. Will she find the killer? Will she cut of the ties that linked her to her past and now let her face the future head on? Terrific characters embodying the society of the time lead to enhancing the story further.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Scot

    This novel gives you just what the cover and title suggest. If you like academic based murder mysteries (I do) all things Oxford (I do) and such stories set in the 1930s (I do) this is a book you will enjoy. It hit the trifecta for me. Sure, it crams so many cliches and familiar Oxford tropes into the first few pages I thought "Is this going to overdo it?" If you don't want a rich beautiful poet who could teach at Oxford she's so good but chooses to work with poor kids in the East End because she This novel gives you just what the cover and title suggest. If you like academic based murder mysteries (I do) all things Oxford (I do) and such stories set in the 1930s (I do) this is a book you will enjoy. It hit the trifecta for me. Sure, it crams so many cliches and familiar Oxford tropes into the first few pages I thought "Is this going to overdo it?" If you don't want a rich beautiful poet who could teach at Oxford she's so good but chooses to work with poor kids in the East End because she is compassionate as a heroine, look elsewhere. She is going out to eat constantly and her loving maid does everything she asks. She has the perfect outfits for every occasion. But she also has a rich volatile boyfriend just back from Kenya not interested in her mind or personal aspirations and a poetry professor critical of her work who's inexplicably charismatic, so she some issues. She is invited back to Oxford for a fete when she and that professor find a nasty elderly lady academic dead in the New Chapel. And the police now suspect our heroine. Uh oh! Some fun pandemic escapism for fans of Downton Abbey.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tahlia Fernandez

    Enjoyable enough, but very predictable. I think I expected the genius of Agatha Christie and so was disappointed. It wasn’t fair, but there it is. Description is a strong point for this author, however. I usually am not a reader who necessarily “sees” what I’m reading, but I had no problem imagining Cat’s clothes. Unfortunately, the thing I personally enjoy most in a book — characters that feel real — was lacking. I kept finding myself being pulled out of the book and grimacing because the charact Enjoyable enough, but very predictable. I think I expected the genius of Agatha Christie and so was disappointed. It wasn’t fair, but there it is. Description is a strong point for this author, however. I usually am not a reader who necessarily “sees” what I’m reading, but I had no problem imagining Cat’s clothes. Unfortunately, the thing I personally enjoy most in a book — characters that feel real — was lacking. I kept finding myself being pulled out of the book and grimacing because the characters felt “off”. Their interactions seemed to be rather forced, especially the romance. It was a nice relaxing way to spend a few hours, but I probably won’t be reading more of this author. Just not my cup of tea.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Elaine Bidstrup

    I thoroughly enjoyed this mystery! It takes place in the 20's - early 30's in England. One of my favorite eras (I love Boardwalk Empire, Phryne Fisher, and June's Journeys.) Catherine, an Oxford graduate and published poet, returns to Oxford to celebrate a professor's (I guess I should say 'don,' as the English do) retirement. After the dinner she and Dr. Harry Bascombe discover another don's body in a chapel. Both she and Dr. Harry are suspected of murdering her, so they decide to investigate. I thoroughly enjoyed this mystery! It takes place in the 20's - early 30's in England. One of my favorite eras (I love Boardwalk Empire, Phryne Fisher, and June's Journeys.) Catherine, an Oxford graduate and published poet, returns to Oxford to celebrate a professor's (I guess I should say 'don,' as the English do) retirement. After the dinner she and Dr. Harry Bascombe discover another don's body in a chapel. Both she and Dr. Harry are suspected of murdering her, so they decide to investigate. This leads to Catherine being concussed with a cricket bat, problems with Catherine's sometime boyfriend, Rafe, a visit to Dr. Harry's home, another murder, and a trip to the Isle of Man. Great descriptions of people, places, and things.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Hard to get past a few issues I thought An Oxford Murder was an entertaining story, but goodness it was hard to ignore the editing problems. I'm an American reader and even I noticed the writing is full of anachronistic American usages and phrases. And even modern American ones! Then there is the incorrect usage of British and period words that the reader stumbles over. And finally the general stiltedness of speech throughout. Is that supposed to make it period? Surprisingly, despite this, I like Hard to get past a few issues I thought An Oxford Murder was an entertaining story, but goodness it was hard to ignore the editing problems. I'm an American reader and even I noticed the writing is full of anachronistic American usages and phrases. And even modern American ones! Then there is the incorrect usage of British and period words that the reader stumbles over. And finally the general stiltedness of speech throughout. Is that supposed to make it period? Surprisingly, despite this, I liked the mystery and the characters. It's no Dorothy L Sayers, but I'll try another and hope the author finds an editor that knows the period and locale a little better.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    An Oxford Murder is an exciting whodunit, full of great characters and plot twists. If you think you’ve figured it out, chances are you’ll be wrong and that is the best kind of mystery. The characters are solid. Catherine and Dr. Harry shine throughout their adventurous murder investigation. Additionally, the writing is so descriptive, I found myself searching the internet to look up the pub, visited by Catherine, The Eagle and Child. I appreciate it when a book motivates me to delve deeper into s An Oxford Murder is an exciting whodunit, full of great characters and plot twists. If you think you’ve figured it out, chances are you’ll be wrong and that is the best kind of mystery. The characters are solid. Catherine and Dr. Harry shine throughout their adventurous murder investigation. Additionally, the writing is so descriptive, I found myself searching the internet to look up the pub, visited by Catherine, The Eagle and Child. I appreciate it when a book motivates me to delve deeper into something. I absolutely enjoyed spending time in 1930’s Oxford!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Diana

    Pleasant diversion 3.5 stars rounded up to 4 This was a pleasant little mystery - not quite a cozy mystery, but I liked its Oxford setting. Some of the plotting felt a bit "much" for my tastes, but there was nothing here that really made me roll my eyes or cringe. Like so many of these types of mysteries, the amateur sleuths seem to find clues and information that the police seem to overlook - a hallmark of such fare - which does require a fair amount of suspension of disbelief. However, in this n Pleasant diversion 3.5 stars rounded up to 4 This was a pleasant little mystery - not quite a cozy mystery, but I liked its Oxford setting. Some of the plotting felt a bit "much" for my tastes, but there was nothing here that really made me roll my eyes or cringe. Like so many of these types of mysteries, the amateur sleuths seem to find clues and information that the police seem to overlook - a hallmark of such fare - which does require a fair amount of suspension of disbelief. However, in this novel, it wasn't too badly done. It was a pleasant few days of reading overall.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Margaret

    Excellent first book in a cozy mystery series. It kept me reading past my bedtime a few nights. I was a bit lost at the beginning trying to keep all the dons/professors straight. Not being overly familiar with terminology used in the British upper learning circles made me pause and look things up a few times. Thoroughly enjoyed the characters and mystery. Several twists and turns that were enjoyable as well. Looking forward to Book 2!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    1934 Oxford. At a retirement party for Dr Sarah Sargent, Catherine Tregowyn and Dr Harry Bascombe discover the body of Dr Agatha Chenowith. As discoverers of the body they become suspects, so to clear their names they investigate the killing. Unfortunately there were a few historical inaccuracies in the story. Catherine is obviously not as intelligent as she thinks she is, and I really didn't find her that interesting. 1934 Oxford. At a retirement party for Dr Sarah Sargent, Catherine Tregowyn and Dr Harry Bascombe discover the body of Dr Agatha Chenowith. As discoverers of the body they become suspects, so to clear their names they investigate the killing. Unfortunately there were a few historical inaccuracies in the story. Catherine is obviously not as intelligent as she thinks she is, and I really didn't find her that interesting.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sharon M. Turner

    A Poem, A Murder, A Nazi It all started with a Retirement Sherry party that ended in a murder. From there Catherine felt that she needed to exonerate herself from being a suspect. Dr Harry was also a suspect so who better to team up with even if they didn't get along? One by one the other professors are suspected until a pattern shows up. Unfortunately several more murders and attempted murders happen. You really must read on to find out who is really responsible. A Poem, A Murder, A Nazi It all started with a Retirement Sherry party that ended in a murder. From there Catherine felt that she needed to exonerate herself from being a suspect. Dr Harry was also a suspect so who better to team up with even if they didn't get along? One by one the other professors are suspected until a pattern shows up. Unfortunately several more murders and attempted murders happen. You really must read on to find out who is really responsible.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    A Cup of Tea A charming light murder mystery set at Oxford in the 1930’s. The main criticism I have is grammatical errors such as misuse of homonyms I.e sites instead of sights. There were also some non sequiturs which leave you wondering if you missed a page. Other reviewers complained about poorly researched anachronisms. I can neither agree or disagree. I do however like the many references to foods.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Shana

    I would love to read more of these characters. Catherine and Dr. Harry need to do some more sleuthing. The details of the 1930’s Oxford and the time period with the literary background was very intriguing. The characters were fleshed out to want to know more and the mystery was interesting as they followed their leads. Please write more in this series.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Doreen

    Excellent! This is a well written, well developed mystery with an intricate plot. The main characters are likeable, funny, impulsive, and intelligent. I hope this is the first in a new series. The setting is latter 1930 's England with much political turmoil and concern about the rise of Hitler! Excellent! This is a well written, well developed mystery with an intricate plot. The main characters are likeable, funny, impulsive, and intelligent. I hope this is the first in a new series. The setting is latter 1930 's England with much political turmoil and concern about the rise of Hitler!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    This book is well written with likable characters. The mystery wove itself around and around. I did not have it solved at all. It is decidedly British with much phraseology from that time period and country. Very different from some of the authors other books I have read but still highly enjoyable.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lenneamw

    A Golden Age Romp Oxford and murder; its all been done before and done well. My expectation were low, but I found myself pulled into this tale of pre-WW2 murder and romance. As much a romance as a mystery, but not cloying or over wrought. There were brownshirts and a childhood sweetheart to dispose of as we romped through Oxford. Not a serious read, but fun and well done.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ellen

    Had trouble at first, wasn't sure I was going to be able to finish it but once I decided to at least give the book a chance I enjoyed it and want to read more of her work......I now understand her method of writing a lot better and now I want more. Give it a chance, this is a great story and wonderful characters. Had trouble at first, wasn't sure I was going to be able to finish it but once I decided to at least give the book a chance I enjoyed it and want to read more of her work......I now understand her method of writing a lot better and now I want more. Give it a chance, this is a great story and wonderful characters.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    Loved every articulate and well educated word. Exactly perfect for what it is! VERY articulate and intelligent characters - exposing the good and the bad. Most importantly, the great of the genre, British, academia, mystery and ver light romance. Loved the dialogue, the challenging plot, and now desperately in need of tea!

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