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38 Latin Stories Designed to Accompany Frederic M. Wheelock's Latin: An Introductory Course Based on Ancient Authors

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Though intended as a supplement to Wheelock's Latin, this book is well suited for use in any introductory Latin course. All the stories in the book are based on actual Latin literature, with the stories simplified at first and made gradually more complex as the work progresses. Students will learn how classical Latin was really written as they become familiar with the work Though intended as a supplement to Wheelock's Latin, this book is well suited for use in any introductory Latin course. All the stories in the book are based on actual Latin literature, with the stories simplified at first and made gradually more complex as the work progresses. Students will learn how classical Latin was really written as they become familiar with the works of the great Latin authors.


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Though intended as a supplement to Wheelock's Latin, this book is well suited for use in any introductory Latin course. All the stories in the book are based on actual Latin literature, with the stories simplified at first and made gradually more complex as the work progresses. Students will learn how classical Latin was really written as they become familiar with the work Though intended as a supplement to Wheelock's Latin, this book is well suited for use in any introductory Latin course. All the stories in the book are based on actual Latin literature, with the stories simplified at first and made gradually more complex as the work progresses. Students will learn how classical Latin was really written as they become familiar with the works of the great Latin authors.

30 review for 38 Latin Stories Designed to Accompany Frederic M. Wheelock's Latin: An Introductory Course Based on Ancient Authors

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Jerpe

    Over the past several years I've spent dozens of hours noodling over this little book, reading to myself or working with students over some of the introductory passages. It doesn't seem like there's much here at first, a total of about 600 lines of Latin distributed over 38 passages, but the difficulty ramps up nicely. The first few are digestible with just a few weeks of Latin, but even with a few years of practice I can still break a sweat on the later passages. The representation is really wid Over the past several years I've spent dozens of hours noodling over this little book, reading to myself or working with students over some of the introductory passages. It doesn't seem like there's much here at first, a total of about 600 lines of Latin distributed over 38 passages, but the difficulty ramps up nicely. The first few are digestible with just a few weeks of Latin, but even with a few years of practice I can still break a sweat on the later passages. The representation is really wide-ranging, central authors like Caesar, Vergil, and Cicero are adapted here but also the likes of Terence, Sallust, and Petronius. Admittedly this is synthetic Latin but I think the styles of the various authors still manage to shine through. Anyhow I realized a couple of weeks ago that I had never taken the trouble to knock out every single passage, so with that completionizing spirit in my breast I set out to finish the job. Back on the shelf now for a year or so, until its time for a refresher.

  2. 4 out of 5

    DrosoPHila

    Designed to accompany the pedagogically backward grammar-translation of Wheelock's Latin , this consists of various short Latin texts. However, what lets the authors down is their focus on translation. Did the Romans think in English, translate their ideas to Latin, communicate with each other in Latin, and then translate the Latin back to English again in order to understand? Of course not; they thought and understood in Latin. Yet this absurd process is what Latin teachers expect from Latin Designed to accompany the pedagogically backward grammar-translation of Wheelock's Latin , this consists of various short Latin texts. However, what lets the authors down is their focus on translation. Did the Romans think in English, translate their ideas to Latin, communicate with each other in Latin, and then translate the Latin back to English again in order to understand? Of course not; they thought and understood in Latin. Yet this absurd process is what Latin teachers expect from Latin learners. Texts when used properly in language learning can result in pedagogically strong content-focused second language graded reading. Understanding can be checked using comprehension questions, which often can be answered without having a complete understanding of the grammar/vocabulary. It is better for one's learning to read lots of easier level text than struggle through smaller amounts of harder texts. The consequence however of the authors' bizarre focus on translation is that the texts are too short, overly grammar-focused, and completely lack comprehension questions. Illustrations would also have helped. Latinists' refusal to take notice of lessons from research into modern language instruction is bad for both teachers and students.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cole Whetstone

    Unity: Hunc librum solum in Latine legi. 3 Prompts: 1. Quōmodo studientes linguam Latinam optime discebunt? Studientes multis exemplis facilibusque optime discunt. 2. Debetne has fabulas longas esse? Non longas, sed parvas iucundasque necesse est. 3. Quō "Wheelock’s Latin Grammar” eget? Wheelock’s doctō solum grammatica plurīs pensīs eget 2 Implications: 1. Ego melius quam pensebam latine loquere possum. Cogitavi me non meminisse nullum linguae Latinae, sed multa memini! 2. Legere in partibus parvi Unity: Hunc librum solum in Latine legi. 3 Prompts: 1. Quōmodo studientes linguam Latinam optime discebunt? Studientes multis exemplis facilibusque optime discunt. 2. Debetne has fabulas longas esse? Non longas, sed parvas iucundasque necesse est. 3. Quō "Wheelock’s Latin Grammar” eget? Wheelock’s doctō solum grammatica plurīs pensīs eget 2 Implications: 1. Ego melius quam pensebam latine loquere possum. Cogitavi me non meminisse nullum linguae Latinae, sed multa memini! 2. Legere in partibus parvis optimum est. Si fabulae in hoc libro longiae fuissent, finire non potuissem. Rating: 4/5 * Hic liber optimus studiandi latini est, sed primum, nimis cortus est, secundum, magis fabularum habere debet, et denique, vocabularium in marginis habere debet. Quamquam, hoc libro fructus sum maxime!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ci

    This book accompanied me through the Wheelock Latin course. I recommend against reading it as a beginner without a teacher to double check one's understanding. Each chapter matches the Wheelock chapter nicely, but there are subtleties that must be worked out under guidance. These not not simple made-up stories but often extracts from original texts hence there are challenges that may be insurmountable for a self-study beginner. In my own case, it was guided by a teacher in a classroom setting, h This book accompanied me through the Wheelock Latin course. I recommend against reading it as a beginner without a teacher to double check one's understanding. Each chapter matches the Wheelock chapter nicely, but there are subtleties that must be worked out under guidance. These not not simple made-up stories but often extracts from original texts hence there are challenges that may be insurmountable for a self-study beginner. In my own case, it was guided by a teacher in a classroom setting, hence it is very useful and very interesting.

  5. 4 out of 5

    JR Snow

    Good companion to Wheelock's. Translating these stories is the best part of the whole Wheelock's learning system. Good companion to Wheelock's. Translating these stories is the best part of the whole Wheelock's learning system.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sammy

    This is a book for a specific purpose. Outside of that purpose, it's abysmal. This is not a book of "Latin stories" or in any way of use to self-learners. This is really an exercise book for the specific context of first-year Latin students reinforcing concepts through somewhat paraphrased creations in the language. As a classroom aid, though, it's satisfactory. One of the challenges with learning first-year Latin is that, of course, most surviving texts from Ancient Rome are too complex for you This is a book for a specific purpose. Outside of that purpose, it's abysmal. This is not a book of "Latin stories" or in any way of use to self-learners. This is really an exercise book for the specific context of first-year Latin students reinforcing concepts through somewhat paraphrased creations in the language. As a classroom aid, though, it's satisfactory. One of the challenges with learning first-year Latin is that, of course, most surviving texts from Ancient Rome are too complex for you. Most people don't write stories that only use five grammatical concepts, for instance, which can be easily plucked out of history for a student in their fifth week of learning the language! These stories help to bulk up this early period of a student's learning, with teacher guidance.

  7. 4 out of 5

    rogue

    The original stories aren't a bad read. The paraphrases in the second half of the book give a good taste of a variety of authors. Vocabulary lists are extremely generous. Overall a good companion for the beginning Latin student. The original stories aren't a bad read. The paraphrases in the second half of the book give a good taste of a variety of authors. Vocabulary lists are extremely generous. Overall a good companion for the beginning Latin student.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Abigail Danfora

    Awesome! we used it in Latin II, and the stories let you get practice translating Latin, and learn more ancient mythology and history. I'd reccomend it for intermediate Latin students who have most of the grammar rules down and a decent amount of memorized vocabulary. Awesome! we used it in Latin II, and the stories let you get practice translating Latin, and learn more ancient mythology and history. I'd reccomend it for intermediate Latin students who have most of the grammar rules down and a decent amount of memorized vocabulary.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Genevieve

    This book is awesome. The 38 stories are all drawn from latin texts or fables, and it's a good companion to Wheelock's textbook. This book is awesome. The 38 stories are all drawn from latin texts or fables, and it's a good companion to Wheelock's textbook.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Where I first read about the House of Atreus! Very good selection for the beginning Latin student

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    Book for college. It was easy to go through and learn from in a begainning Latin perspective. Overall, not bad.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Monty

  13. 5 out of 5

    John R Anderton

  14. 4 out of 5

    Bereket

  15. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Ann

  16. 4 out of 5

    Allie Farrell

  17. 5 out of 5

    Winifred

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sharon B Daniel

  19. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tyler

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mina

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra

  23. 4 out of 5

    Garret

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sam Corey

  25. 5 out of 5

    ArchMerc

  26. 4 out of 5

    Robert Di Ferdinando

  27. 5 out of 5

    Zach Speciale

  28. 5 out of 5

    Cayce Kenedy-brabson

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ana

  30. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

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