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Freedom: The Story of My Second Life

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Stolen Lives, Malika Oufkir's intensely moving account of her twenty years imprisoned in a desert jail in Morocco, was a surprise international best seller and the second non-fiction title ever selected for Oprah's Book Club.In her highly anticipated follow-up, Malika reflects on the life she lived before and during incarceration and how dramatically the world had changed Stolen Lives, Malika Oufkir's intensely moving account of her twenty years imprisoned in a desert jail in Morocco, was a surprise international best seller and the second non-fiction title ever selected for Oprah's Book Club.In her highly anticipated follow-up, Malika reflects on the life she lived before and during incarceration and how dramatically the world had changed when she emerged. Malika Oufkir was born into extreme privilege as the daughter of the king of Morocco's closest aide, and she grew up in the palace as companion to the Moroccan princess. But in 1972, her life of luxury came to a crashing halt.Her father was executed for attempting to assassinate the king, and she and her family were locked away for two decades. After a remarkable escape, Malika and her family returned to the world theyd left behind, only to find it transformed. Living for the first time as an adult, Malika writes candidly about adjusting to the world we take for granted, from negotiating ATMs to the excesses of shopping malls, to falling in love and sex. In Stolen Lives, Malika mourned the children she was not having as she wasted away in prison. When she is finally free, motherhood becomes crucial to Malika's ability to fully live her life: she adopts first her niece, then a baby boy from Morocco. Full of insight and piercing observations, as well as humor, Freedom is as masterful and thoughtprovoking as the original.


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Stolen Lives, Malika Oufkir's intensely moving account of her twenty years imprisoned in a desert jail in Morocco, was a surprise international best seller and the second non-fiction title ever selected for Oprah's Book Club.In her highly anticipated follow-up, Malika reflects on the life she lived before and during incarceration and how dramatically the world had changed Stolen Lives, Malika Oufkir's intensely moving account of her twenty years imprisoned in a desert jail in Morocco, was a surprise international best seller and the second non-fiction title ever selected for Oprah's Book Club.In her highly anticipated follow-up, Malika reflects on the life she lived before and during incarceration and how dramatically the world had changed when she emerged. Malika Oufkir was born into extreme privilege as the daughter of the king of Morocco's closest aide, and she grew up in the palace as companion to the Moroccan princess. But in 1972, her life of luxury came to a crashing halt.Her father was executed for attempting to assassinate the king, and she and her family were locked away for two decades. After a remarkable escape, Malika and her family returned to the world theyd left behind, only to find it transformed. Living for the first time as an adult, Malika writes candidly about adjusting to the world we take for granted, from negotiating ATMs to the excesses of shopping malls, to falling in love and sex. In Stolen Lives, Malika mourned the children she was not having as she wasted away in prison. When she is finally free, motherhood becomes crucial to Malika's ability to fully live her life: she adopts first her niece, then a baby boy from Morocco. Full of insight and piercing observations, as well as humor, Freedom is as masterful and thoughtprovoking as the original.

30 review for Freedom: The Story of My Second Life

  1. 5 out of 5

    Malak Alrashed

    Talk about boring autobiographies and mention Malika's book. Congrats, everyone hates you and your heart is made of stone but at least you have an opinion, a risk worth taking. Talk about boring autobiographies and mention Malika's book. Congrats, everyone hates you and your heart is made of stone but at least you have an opinion, a risk worth taking.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mandy

    This is another book I've had on my "to read" list for yrs. I really enjoyed her first book "Stolen Lives" (kind of feel bad saying that considering what the book was about) and was curious what happened to her after she was freed. I finally got around to reading this one and got half way through and realized, even though the chapters were labeled differently, it basically said the same thing in each chapter/topic. At first I found it interesting, Malkia Oufkir's attempts to join the world in wh This is another book I've had on my "to read" list for yrs. I really enjoyed her first book "Stolen Lives" (kind of feel bad saying that considering what the book was about) and was curious what happened to her after she was freed. I finally got around to reading this one and got half way through and realized, even though the chapters were labeled differently, it basically said the same thing in each chapter/topic. At first I found it interesting, Malkia Oufkir's attempts to join the world in what we take for granted (such as, the faucet's that run by themselves and Oufkir on her hands and knee's in a public restroom looking for the special button to turn it on or when she used an ATM maching for the first time, etc....). It was also interesting her thoughts on "free" people, and how true her thoughts were, and how I hadn't even thought or realized the things we do. However, unless you are interested in reading how a person discovers modern day technology/life/etc... the chapters/stories run together. Malika Oufkir has quite the story to share and I'm definitely grateful my story is not anything like her's. She is quite the trooper. And one more thing, I really wish she shared more about what happened to her siblings. That is one of the reasons why I wanted to read this book, but I understand this was her story not their's...just curious how they turned out as well.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kasey

    This book focuses mainly on Ms. Oufkir's struggle to reintegrate back into modern society after a 20-year imprisonment. I think I may have enjoyed it more if I had red her first book first. The book didn't flow well for me, so although it was interesting it was not an easy read. If nothing else though, I came away with more appreciation for the freedoms we enjoy in the US, particularly our bounty of fresh food. I will think of her now every time I open my fridge and wonder if my eggs are still f This book focuses mainly on Ms. Oufkir's struggle to reintegrate back into modern society after a 20-year imprisonment. I think I may have enjoyed it more if I had red her first book first. The book didn't flow well for me, so although it was interesting it was not an easy read. If nothing else though, I came away with more appreciation for the freedoms we enjoy in the US, particularly our bounty of fresh food. I will think of her now every time I open my fridge and wonder if my eggs are still fresh. This book reminds me to be thankful to live in a free country and for all the luxuries that I enjoy, but that we should also be more aware of the injustices and cruelties that others in the world are experiencing right now. I think we get too oblivious to the horrors that go on in the world. I think there would be much outrage if Americans took their blinders off and became motivated to do something about the cruelties that take place in other parts of the world, but then again, considering the reaction to Iraq war, maybe not.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    Freedom is the follow up to Stolen Lives. This book was much better than the first, but I recommend you read them together. At first this book makes you feel somewhat defensive and irritated when Malika talks about how spoiled we are. Cognitavely we know that we, westerners,are spoiled and often take things for granted but from Malika's perspective as a virtual princess then beening isolated for 20 years to being an upper middle class person in France was eye-opening. We can laugh about the old Freedom is the follow up to Stolen Lives. This book was much better than the first, but I recommend you read them together. At first this book makes you feel somewhat defensive and irritated when Malika talks about how spoiled we are. Cognitavely we know that we, westerners,are spoiled and often take things for granted but from Malika's perspective as a virtual princess then beening isolated for 20 years to being an upper middle class person in France was eye-opening. We can laugh about the old days of 8 Track players or cassettes and pre cellphone and ATM machines, but to have skipped all of that is a totally different thing. Sometimes Malika gets depressed about her past and all that she lost but slowly learnes to cope in the new technologically advanced world. Malika suffers from post tramatic syndrome which gives a new perspective of the syndrome from the currently common PTSD soldier stories.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Maha

    A nice-to-read book about the author's experiences as compared to her family's experience described in her first book. BUT the chapters do not flow into each other and the author seems to have written down her thoughts and feelings at the time of writing with little editing later on. The books adds to our understanding of her harsh experience in prison and how she is managing to cope with being free! Twenty years of harsh imprisonment still live with her and we admire her strength and persistenc A nice-to-read book about the author's experiences as compared to her family's experience described in her first book. BUT the chapters do not flow into each other and the author seems to have written down her thoughts and feelings at the time of writing with little editing later on. The books adds to our understanding of her harsh experience in prison and how she is managing to cope with being free! Twenty years of harsh imprisonment still live with her and we admire her strength and persistence as a free women.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Read this in an afternoon. I'm glad she is on the road to recovery. The same strengths that allowed her to endure the hardships seem to be the same that hold her back now. I wish her the best. Read this in an afternoon. I'm glad she is on the road to recovery. The same strengths that allowed her to endure the hardships seem to be the same that hold her back now. I wish her the best.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

    A very disappointing book. Such an important and sensitive topic and there was no emotion in the writing at all.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Billie Jo

    I definitely would recommend reading Stolen Lives before this sequel. This stream of conscious narrative of adjusting to Western life after the isolation of being a political prisoner for 20 years is insightful into the internal conflicts encountered during her ongoing adjustment to life outside her physical prison and within her own internal one. Her search for the fairy tale happiness she would tell stories about for her younger siblings in captivity helped her hold out for a life that would m I definitely would recommend reading Stolen Lives before this sequel. This stream of conscious narrative of adjusting to Western life after the isolation of being a political prisoner for 20 years is insightful into the internal conflicts encountered during her ongoing adjustment to life outside her physical prison and within her own internal one. Her search for the fairy tale happiness she would tell stories about for her younger siblings in captivity helped her hold out for a life that would make her happy even when the path to get there was not what she envisioned. Her journey has many life lessons in acceptance, finding happiness, living ones own life, and the best and worst approaches for getting involved with a 40 year old virgin.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

    Malika Oufkir's first book, "Stolen Lives," was such a gripping tale of privilege, imprisonment, survival and ultimately, triumph, that this book couldn't possibly measure up. Quite frankly, the story of Oufkir's survival after her release as a political prisoner is rather mundane and normal. While that is very good news, it is a ho-hum story. I'm glad that she's doing well, and that she's enjoying a good life, but this book was boring and disjointed. "Stolen Lives" is still one of my favorite b Malika Oufkir's first book, "Stolen Lives," was such a gripping tale of privilege, imprisonment, survival and ultimately, triumph, that this book couldn't possibly measure up. Quite frankly, the story of Oufkir's survival after her release as a political prisoner is rather mundane and normal. While that is very good news, it is a ho-hum story. I'm glad that she's doing well, and that she's enjoying a good life, but this book was boring and disjointed. "Stolen Lives" is still one of my favorite books of all time. "Freedom: The Story of my Second Life" is a drab denouement to "Stolen Lives."

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ion

    This is a follow-up book to "Stolen Lives", a book written by the daughter of a Moroccan General implicated in a failed coup against Hassan II, King of Morocco. The father was killed, but Malika Oufkir, her mother, aunt, and her four siblings, were thrown in jail for 20 years. This book described Malika's life after they were freed, the shock she went through adapting to a changed world. It is a dramatic, but also an easy read because of the humour the author writes with. This is a follow-up book to "Stolen Lives", a book written by the daughter of a Moroccan General implicated in a failed coup against Hassan II, King of Morocco. The father was killed, but Malika Oufkir, her mother, aunt, and her four siblings, were thrown in jail for 20 years. This book described Malika's life after they were freed, the shock she went through adapting to a changed world. It is a dramatic, but also an easy read because of the humour the author writes with.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Darla Brown

    One of those books I kept wanting to pick up. An easy read of a difficut true experience of life after a 20 year imprisonment in Morocco. Highly recommend.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Shereen Karimi

    Not as strong as her first book.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    31 December 2006 Since late November, I had been working away at Malika Oufkir's Freedom: The Story of My Second Life, a brief but almost entirely unsatisfactory book. Perhaps I would have appreciated it more had I read her previous book about her family's twenty-year imprisonment by the Moroccan government, but she leaves out key details and a coherent timeline that would make the story complete. For instance, she begins with the adoption of her son and shares her concerns about whether she has 31 December 2006 Since late November, I had been working away at Malika Oufkir's Freedom: The Story of My Second Life, a brief but almost entirely unsatisfactory book. Perhaps I would have appreciated it more had I read her previous book about her family's twenty-year imprisonment by the Moroccan government, but she leaves out key details and a coherent timeline that would make the story complete. For instance, she begins with the adoption of her son and shares her concerns about whether she has motherly instincts, but doesn't mention him in the conclusion in which she thanks everyone else who has helped her recover. In the first half she describes the challenges of adapting to modern life with ATMs, credit cards, consumerism, etc. without a trace of humor. Obviously, she lived through a horrible experience, but how will she ever recover if she can't see anything remotely humorous in say, figuring out how to take a number at the social security office? It was too polished to be an unedited diary, but too scattered to be a coherent story. If she'd had a better editor, this could have been an interesting book. Here's the rub, I'm an empathetic person, I felt no empathy for the author. Very frustrating.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Loy Machedo

    When I purchased Malika Oufkir’s “Freedom”, little did I know that this was the sequel to her best seller ‘Stolen Lives’ – a moving account of her twenty years imprisonment in a desert jail in Morocco. I have not read the prequel, so I would have to base my thoughts on this book by itself. In this book, Malika reflects on how dramatically the world has changed after her release from prison. Malika Oufkir, the daughter of the king of Morocco’s closest aide whose life of luxury morphed into an unfor When I purchased Malika Oufkir’s “Freedom”, little did I know that this was the sequel to her best seller ‘Stolen Lives’ – a moving account of her twenty years imprisonment in a desert jail in Morocco. I have not read the prequel, so I would have to base my thoughts on this book by itself. In this book, Malika reflects on how dramatically the world has changed after her release from prison. Malika Oufkir, the daughter of the king of Morocco’s closest aide whose life of luxury morphed into an unforgivable dark dungeon of death, darkness and dammed imprisonment that lasted two decades. She shares her justifiable surprise of trying to adjust into a changed world twenty years later - Of shopping and ATM’s, excessive confusion and lack of gratitude, of her courage to adopt a child and to having a loving husband. Although this book has its deep and profound moments, I still regret not having read the first book as I felt much of what she brought about here was spilled over from her past publication. Overall, it did have its profound moments and did leave me reflecting on my own life.....but not deep enough for me to recommend this book to anyone. Overall ratings – 4 out of 10.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Anonymous

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Good so far. It's eye-opening to hear someone's perspective on how she sees our current way of living to be so strange and foreign to her, for example, a plastic card that everyone carries to withdraw money from a "Monster Machine" and allows us to accumulate things that seem so frivolous to her. We've become people that are over-indulgence and wasteful, careless consumers. I finished the book today. Wow! For a prisoner, consumed by terror of her past, the pain of losing 20 years of her life, los Good so far. It's eye-opening to hear someone's perspective on how she sees our current way of living to be so strange and foreign to her, for example, a plastic card that everyone carries to withdraw money from a "Monster Machine" and allows us to accumulate things that seem so frivolous to her. We've become people that are over-indulgence and wasteful, careless consumers. I finished the book today. Wow! For a prisoner, consumed by terror of her past, the pain of losing 20 years of her life, losing her beloved father and not given the burial he deserved, the suffering she constantly suffered within and outside from hateful words (due to influence and knowledge of her time in the desert jail to be treated like animals), and the disappointing feeling of not being acknowledged for what the King and his regime done to her family...can anyone blame her constant fear, her constant way to flee from this chaotic and loud world that exudes superficiality, to relearn daily how to live in such a foreign land with a 20 year gap of absence? A truly amazing survivor who I cannot fathom one ounce of her resilience if I'm not at all a believer. That strength can only come from God.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tanja

    Every now and then I love to read biographies, autobiographies, and memoirs. This memoir is a follow up on "Stolen lives" that I have not yet read. In "Freedom" Malika Oufkir describes the years after her imprisonment of 20 years and how hard it was to become a fully functional person again. I especially like her view of consumerism. Here is an exerpt: "Even the elderly, who should have reached the age of wisdom, are lured into stores by ergonomic recliner chairs in which they can sit alone and Every now and then I love to read biographies, autobiographies, and memoirs. This memoir is a follow up on "Stolen lives" that I have not yet read. In "Freedom" Malika Oufkir describes the years after her imprisonment of 20 years and how hard it was to become a fully functional person again. I especially like her view of consumerism. Here is an exerpt: "Even the elderly, who should have reached the age of wisdom, are lured into stores by ergonomic recliner chairs in which they can sit alone and stupefied in front of the TV, or buy garden furniture they will carefully arrange beside their flowerbeds, awaiting the day when their children, who stopped coming long ago, might decide to visit. Even worse, the elderly are urged to buy their own funerals, life insurance, and cemetary plots, so that they won't be any bother when the time comes for them to stop consuming."

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tyra

    This was a quick easy read, but very interesting. I love her first book Stolen Lives which was her autobiography of being imprisoned with her family. This book talks about how she coped with life after getting out of prison. The adjustments she had to try and live a normal life with her fears. She talks of her fear of men in uniform (police, military) and her adjustment to changes in technology and everyday living. My favorite story is of her in the bathroom of a nice restaurant and not being to This was a quick easy read, but very interesting. I love her first book Stolen Lives which was her autobiography of being imprisoned with her family. This book talks about how she coped with life after getting out of prison. The adjustments she had to try and live a normal life with her fears. She talks of her fear of men in uniform (police, military) and her adjustment to changes in technology and everyday living. My favorite story is of her in the bathroom of a nice restaurant and not being to figure out how to turn the water on in the sink. Watching many people use it and then looking underneath on the floor and around to see if they used their foot to turn it on. Finally, someone noticed her delima and told her to just put her hands under the faucet and the water turned on.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    A follow-up to Stolen Lives, this book by Malika Oufkir is a memoir in short story like segments. Each chapter starts with a word like "freedom" or "motherhood" and then goes on to explain her relationship to that word in a few pages. In many ways this book is more difficult to read than Stolen Lives: Twenty Years in a Desert Jail. The tale in Stolen Lives is horrifying (the conditions of their captivity and escape), but separate from the reader. In Freedom, Malika Oufkir describes her interacti A follow-up to Stolen Lives, this book by Malika Oufkir is a memoir in short story like segments. Each chapter starts with a word like "freedom" or "motherhood" and then goes on to explain her relationship to that word in a few pages. In many ways this book is more difficult to read than Stolen Lives: Twenty Years in a Desert Jail. The tale in Stolen Lives is horrifying (the conditions of their captivity and escape), but separate from the reader. In Freedom, Malika Oufkir describes her interaction with this world that grew and changed for 20 years while she was locked away, and it often doesn't reflect well on modern society.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Dianne Kaucharik

    Reading Oufkir's first book "Stolen Lives", also published as "La Prisionnere", is an absolute prerequisite to understanding how the author's horrific and unjust 20 year imprisonment affected her adjustment to freedom. Oufkir describes with humour some adjustments to modern technology and societal ways. Of greater significance were her criticisms of the excesses of society - consumerism, greed and waste. Who else has lived an adorned life amongst royalty in a King's palace followed by extreme de Reading Oufkir's first book "Stolen Lives", also published as "La Prisionnere", is an absolute prerequisite to understanding how the author's horrific and unjust 20 year imprisonment affected her adjustment to freedom. Oufkir describes with humour some adjustments to modern technology and societal ways. Of greater significance were her criticisms of the excesses of society - consumerism, greed and waste. Who else has lived an adorned life amongst royalty in a King's palace followed by extreme deprivation then reintegration into society? Who else is better able to provide that valuable perspective? In spite of some difficulty I had with her writing style and flow, I appreciate the core messages and continue to have profound respect and empathy for the author.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    Although I liked Stolen Lives better, I appreciated reading how she integrated into the "free world". My daughter and I attended a book signing from her and the thing that struck me the most during her presentation was her appreciation for food. She mentioned that going to a restaurant and having a conversation while consuming her meal will never makes sense to her. How can one not appreciate the importance of the food laid before them? Food is a gift, necessity of life. How can one not give it Although I liked Stolen Lives better, I appreciated reading how she integrated into the "free world". My daughter and I attended a book signing from her and the thing that struck me the most during her presentation was her appreciation for food. She mentioned that going to a restaurant and having a conversation while consuming her meal will never makes sense to her. How can one not appreciate the importance of the food laid before them? Food is a gift, necessity of life. How can one not give it the sole concentration and appreciation it deserves? In this book she talks about hoarding bits of her meals in the back of her refrigerator that she may never eat but feels compelled to stock pile just in case. Interesting thought process from a woman who spent 20 years in prison.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    This book was very grounding for me. It made me stop and take a step back and realize everything that we just assume people know about how to navigate modern day society and utilize technology. I'm far from a history person, so I had trouble following the background of events leading up to, during, and following her imprisonment. However, I think anyone could empathize with Malika Oufkir's 20 years spent imprisoned fighting over moldy bread covered with rat feces. I will definitely look to read This book was very grounding for me. It made me stop and take a step back and realize everything that we just assume people know about how to navigate modern day society and utilize technology. I'm far from a history person, so I had trouble following the background of events leading up to, during, and following her imprisonment. However, I think anyone could empathize with Malika Oufkir's 20 years spent imprisoned fighting over moldy bread covered with rat feces. I will definitely look to read her other books.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Richards

    In this book it becomes obvious why oufkir had a co- author in the first book. I wouldnt say that the content is bad just that it is very rambling and disorganized. There is no coherent timeline for her " story." She skips around in time without telling you that she is doing so which left me feeling confused. It felt like i was reading her journal rather than something intended for other people. I also found her to be contradictory at times. I respect her for what she went through and how she is In this book it becomes obvious why oufkir had a co- author in the first book. I wouldnt say that the content is bad just that it is very rambling and disorganized. There is no coherent timeline for her " story." She skips around in time without telling you that she is doing so which left me feeling confused. It felt like i was reading her journal rather than something intended for other people. I also found her to be contradictory at times. I respect her for what she went through and how she is coping but not necessarily as an independent author.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mohsen

    I don't have any experience in reading translated autobiographical works but are u kidding me?! I read better translations of google translate by sixth graders learning to type. So bad! As for the book itself, it's the memoir of an old person who time traveled through centuries of drama into the future and is just catching every piece of technology that exists in our day. But instead of awe, this beautiful woman reacts with sadness. It's 200 and something pages of someone moping. If you wish to I don't have any experience in reading translated autobiographical works but are u kidding me?! I read better translations of google translate by sixth graders learning to type. So bad! As for the book itself, it's the memoir of an old person who time traveled through centuries of drama into the future and is just catching every piece of technology that exists in our day. But instead of awe, this beautiful woman reacts with sadness. It's 200 and something pages of someone moping. If you wish to read this, don't read the Arabic translation.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

    The second is just as equally overwhelming and inspiring..It's a story about self discovery, walking out from the shadow, having the courage to learn to love, and to be loved. It's a story about finding your feet in the world you've lost contact with for the last 20 years...trying to rediscover who you are, discovery of womanhood, catching up with the modern world, technology or simply lost time... Quote" spit out hatred, it weakens and evaporates, leaving you able to breath again, free to love or The second is just as equally overwhelming and inspiring..It's a story about self discovery, walking out from the shadow, having the courage to learn to love, and to be loved. It's a story about finding your feet in the world you've lost contact with for the last 20 years...trying to rediscover who you are, discovery of womanhood, catching up with the modern world, technology or simply lost time... Quote" spit out hatred, it weakens and evaporates, leaving you able to breath again, free to love or to hate not on principle, but by choic

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dina Kaidir

    A follow up to her best-selling book Stolen Lives...Malika writes with dignity about the indignities of her life experiences. Coming out of prison, house arrest and under the constant watch of law enforcement, in this book she talks about how she deals with freedom. Something we all take for granted sometimes. Insightful, touching and inspiring. I so enjoyed this book that I really need to pick up a copy of her first book!!!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ginger Poulsen

    Definitely not as intriguing as her first book, but still interesting. It was thought-provoking to have her describe how crazy it is that restaurants put a basket of bread on the table and people absent-mindedly fidget with the bread and not really eat it. For someone who lived in starvation for years, that is unfathomable. Also the changes in technology while she was locked up--like automatic faucets in restrooms--making the world a foreign land she had to learn.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lachelle

    I found this book a little harder to get into than her first because it isn't told in story-form, but rather grouped into experiences of her adjusting to life outside of prison. I can't ever imagine what she has gone through, and I think her story is amazing. This book just didn't hold my interest as well. I found this book a little harder to get into than her first because it isn't told in story-form, but rather grouped into experiences of her adjusting to life outside of prison. I can't ever imagine what she has gone through, and I think her story is amazing. This book just didn't hold my interest as well.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    I didn't find it quite as compelling a read as Stolen Lives but it was nice to see how Malika has adjusted to life “on the outside”. Interesting to see how she reacts to the latest modern conveniences (ticket dispensers, hands-free faucets and soap dispensers, ATMs, grocery stores!). Was glad to read that she’s finally found peace. I didn't find it quite as compelling a read as Stolen Lives but it was nice to see how Malika has adjusted to life “on the outside”. Interesting to see how she reacts to the latest modern conveniences (ticket dispensers, hands-free faucets and soap dispensers, ATMs, grocery stores!). Was glad to read that she’s finally found peace.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Meg - A Bookish Affair

    I had read Malika Oufkir's book, "Stolen Lives" several years ago. That book detailed her 24-year stint in Moroccan prison with her family. This book details her life after she was released from prison. It's interesting to see how she coped with her release and amazing to see all of the things that we take for granted. It is a short read but kind of disjointed. I had read Malika Oufkir's book, "Stolen Lives" several years ago. That book detailed her 24-year stint in Moroccan prison with her family. This book details her life after she was released from prison. It's interesting to see how she coped with her release and amazing to see all of the things that we take for granted. It is a short read but kind of disjointed.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Makita

    I couldn't even get through it, I read it for an hour and then starting just skimming....it was boring. I feel bad saying that because she has many emotional scars and her life will always be a struggle because of what happened to her but it isn't interesting enough for a novel, it should be a book on dealing with anxiety and I have already read one of those!!! I couldn't even get through it, I read it for an hour and then starting just skimming....it was boring. I feel bad saying that because she has many emotional scars and her life will always be a struggle because of what happened to her but it isn't interesting enough for a novel, it should be a book on dealing with anxiety and I have already read one of those!!!

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