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Bestselling author Garth Nix's amazing Seventh Tower series is back--now with a great new look! Tal and Milla are only one step away from death. Evil is only one step away from triumph. An old war is made new again. The ultimate power is up for grabs. As shadows rage, ancient spells return, illusion reigns and corruption threatens. The search for hope is the bravest quest. Th Bestselling author Garth Nix's amazing Seventh Tower series is back--now with a great new look! Tal and Milla are only one step away from death. Evil is only one step away from triumph. An old war is made new again. The ultimate power is up for grabs. As shadows rage, ancient spells return, illusion reigns and corruption threatens. The search for hope is the bravest quest. The Seventh Tower is the key to it all.


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Bestselling author Garth Nix's amazing Seventh Tower series is back--now with a great new look! Tal and Milla are only one step away from death. Evil is only one step away from triumph. An old war is made new again. The ultimate power is up for grabs. As shadows rage, ancient spells return, illusion reigns and corruption threatens. The search for hope is the bravest quest. Th Bestselling author Garth Nix's amazing Seventh Tower series is back--now with a great new look! Tal and Milla are only one step away from death. Evil is only one step away from triumph. An old war is made new again. The ultimate power is up for grabs. As shadows rage, ancient spells return, illusion reigns and corruption threatens. The search for hope is the bravest quest. The Seventh Tower is the key to it all.

30 review for The Violet Keystone

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jerry

    An underwhelming finale to a mediocre series.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Spencer Borup

    If you've read my reviews of the first five books of The Seventh Tower series, you'll know I love it and everything Garth Nix. So I'll skip all the geek-out moments and go right to my problems with THE VIOLET KEYSTONE and the series as a whole. Nix tried to paint a masterpiece without enough canvas. There ya go. He has created a BRILLIANT world with no room to explore. If I were to accept that, yes, this was written for small children, as a kind of "epic fantasy" scaled down for elementary grades If you've read my reviews of the first five books of The Seventh Tower series, you'll know I love it and everything Garth Nix. So I'll skip all the geek-out moments and go right to my problems with THE VIOLET KEYSTONE and the series as a whole. Nix tried to paint a masterpiece without enough canvas. There ya go. He has created a BRILLIANT world with no room to explore. If I were to accept that, yes, this was written for small children, as a kind of "epic fantasy" scaled down for elementary grades, then I would say: WHY ONLY SIX BOOKS? The ending of the entire series was incredibly rushed and stakes could have been raised higher to make a seventh book for the big final epic. DUDE, YOU CALLED THE SERIES THE **SEVENTH** TOWER! You based your magic and caste system on the 7 colors of the rainbow. SO WRITE A SEVENTH BOOK! But, unfortunately, sadly, HEARTBREAKINGLY, it's more than that. This story could have been so absolutely incredible--we KNOW Nix can write the hell out of a book; SABRIEL came out 6 years before The Seventh Tower--if it had been given that larger canvas and if Nix had spent more time crafting a well-rounded story to frame his breathtaking world. We have not one, not two, but THREE vastly different worlds inside this series, and at the end you're left STARVING because none of it feels substantial. Give us more. For Jeebus' sake, at the end Tal congratulates himself for (SPOILER ALERT) saving his whole family, and then the reader thinks, "Wait a hot second... We never EVER get to meet Tal's father... or his brother... or his sister.... Why do I care if they're okay?!" Again, this series was amazing. Don't get me wrong. But it could have been something so much more.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nicky

    The final book of the Seventh Tower series. Ultimately, I didn't think this series was as good as Garth Nix's other work, but I thought it was a lot of fun to read, and I think it would make a good introduction to Nix's work, particularly for kids. It has interesting characters, who have faults and good sides, and several strong female characters who are active in the story and fully as capable as the male characters -- often more so. Plenty to interest kids regardless of gender: pacy and fun, w The final book of the Seventh Tower series. Ultimately, I didn't think this series was as good as Garth Nix's other work, but I thought it was a lot of fun to read, and I think it would make a good introduction to Nix's work, particularly for kids. It has interesting characters, who have faults and good sides, and several strong female characters who are active in the story and fully as capable as the male characters -- often more so. Plenty to interest kids regardless of gender: pacy and fun, with a whole world to explore. For an adult reader, it lacks subtext and polish, but Garth Nix is always worth a read, to my mind.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ben Fleck

    The Violet Keystone: Or, What Just Happened aka The End I honestly don't know what or why or how anything in this novel happened, but it did and now this series is over. Tal, Milla, Adras, Odris, and all the rest of the merry gang of Spiritshadows, Chosen, Icecarls, Underfolk, etc. etc. come together in their last battle to do something regarding a Veil and shadows and sunstones. Idk, y'all. Things are so convoluted and I still don't know how the rules of this world work. I still don't know ho The Violet Keystone: Or, What Just Happened aka The End I honestly don't know what or why or how anything in this novel happened, but it did and now this series is over. Tal, Milla, Adras, Odris, and all the rest of the merry gang of Spiritshadows, Chosen, Icecarls, Underfolk, etc. etc. come together in their last battle to do something regarding a Veil and shadows and sunstones. Idk, y'all. Things are so convoluted and I still don't know how the rules of this world work. I still don't know how anything in this world works. Maybe that is my problem? It was okay? Things happen, characters do stuff, and an ending is reached. I think I enjoyed it and I think I know what is going on, but I really don't. I know I liked the Spiritshadows Adras and Odris. They were fun! I think I liked the initial concept of the world back in the first few books. There was just such a fast-paced plot that I never had time to stop and really think about what was actually happening. So ultimately, The Seventh Tower series was just okay. A bit confusing and meddled, but quick-paced and with some fun characters. Nothing too memorable though.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Saher Estrada

    The Violet Keystone is honestly my absolute favorite book of all the book in the seven tower series.The Violet Keystone is the last book of the seven tower series and it bring back all of our main charcters and i'm saying ALL!The characters are of course Milla the war chief, Tal a chosen, Malen a crone, Ebbit and Crow both Freefolk ,Odris and Adras the spirit shadows, Fashnek, and who can forget Quorr Quorr Quorr Ahhtorn Sezicka or Zicka for short and of course the main villan Shishin or Sharrak The Violet Keystone is honestly my absolute favorite book of all the book in the seven tower series.The Violet Keystone is the last book of the seven tower series and it bring back all of our main charcters and i'm saying ALL!The characters are of course Milla the war chief, Tal a chosen, Malen a crone, Ebbit and Crow both Freefolk ,Odris and Adras the spirit shadows, Fashnek, and who can forget Quorr Quorr Quorr Ahhtorn Sezicka or Zicka for short and of course the main villan Shishin or Sharrakor the thing controlling Shishin.How this connects to me is becouse one day we had a family Reunion and it felt happy or better that there is more of us working together like in the story. The characters stop the villan and my favorite character Crow kill The villan but crow also met the light.I really recommend this book to people who love this series or fantisy but of course read the other books first.:)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Parcoast

    Ok, so this is the last book in the series. If you decide to read these books, and I hope you do, I recommend getting the combined volumes, rather than reading them one little book at a time. The continuity would have been nice. So the pros: The best thing about this book is that it is so Garth Nixish. The only way to describe it is realistically abstract. The characters are real. The society speaks to challenges in our own society. The setting is blissfully fictional. I really really really hop Ok, so this is the last book in the series. If you decide to read these books, and I hope you do, I recommend getting the combined volumes, rather than reading them one little book at a time. The continuity would have been nice. So the pros: The best thing about this book is that it is so Garth Nixish. The only way to describe it is realistically abstract. The characters are real. The society speaks to challenges in our own society. The setting is blissfully fictional. I really really really hope I find more to read by Nix. The cons: I have pointed it out for every volume: this was written for a really young audience. While I think it hit its mark, I can't help but think that it was a waste of Nix's talent. He can do so much more for a 9th grade+audience, that writting for a 4th grade audience seems like a total waste. Take Aenir and super-size it. Make the world deeper, the denizens of Aenir more co-dependent, their society more relevant. Take the number of characters from among the chosen and double them. Let them run amuck, running into each other, affecting Tal, having their own subplots. This could have been Harry Potterish in scope rather than Junie B Jonesish (don't get me wrong I love JBJ too). Sigh. Just a lost opportunity for so much more enjoyment. 4 Stars. Double the length/depth and it is 5.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Looking back at this series from some distance (it's months since I read this volume and years since I started the series) it feels very much like an author learning his trade; the contrast in writing quality between first and last volumes is large. Perhaps the best aspect of the series is the imagination on display, which certainly intimates what Nix would prove capable of in later works, particularly the Old Kingdom and Keys to the Kingdom series. THIS REVIEW HAS BEEN CURTAILED IN PROTEST AT GO Looking back at this series from some distance (it's months since I read this volume and years since I started the series) it feels very much like an author learning his trade; the contrast in writing quality between first and last volumes is large. Perhaps the best aspect of the series is the imagination on display, which certainly intimates what Nix would prove capable of in later works, particularly the Old Kingdom and Keys to the Kingdom series. THIS REVIEW HAS BEEN CURTAILED IN PROTEST AT GOODREADS' CENSORSHIP POLICY See the complete review here: http://arbieroo.booklikes.com/post/54...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lynette ~ Escaping Reality – One Book at a Time ~

    The Violet Keystone was a stunning conclusion to the Seventh Tower series. I absolutely ADORED it! So many new revelations, exciting turns, and just overall amazing-ness. Full review to come soon. I'm 15, and I HIGHLY recommend this book. The Violet Keystone was a stunning conclusion to the Seventh Tower series. I absolutely ADORED it! So many new revelations, exciting turns, and just overall amazing-ness. Full review to come soon. I'm 15, and I HIGHLY recommend this book.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Michael Reyes

    Ah! I finally got to finish this "epic" bildungsroman of Tal [of the Chosen] and Milla [of the Icecarls]. Being the last book in the series, I'll be giving my 2 cents on the book itself and then the series as a whole. As the last book in the series, it finds itself wanting. Sure it's a Garth Nix book, but I feel that this project didn't do his creativity justice. The final showdown was a bit of a letdown. So much needless deaths. Underused characters... The ending of this book, although open-ende Ah! I finally got to finish this "epic" bildungsroman of Tal [of the Chosen] and Milla [of the Icecarls]. Being the last book in the series, I'll be giving my 2 cents on the book itself and then the series as a whole. As the last book in the series, it finds itself wanting. Sure it's a Garth Nix book, but I feel that this project didn't do his creativity justice. The final showdown was a bit of a letdown. So much needless deaths. Underused characters... The ending of this book, although open-ended and left more questions than answers (like the previous books in the series) felt more like a proper ending for the first book in a series of books, and it doesn't look like the publishers are going to make more books for this series. Now on to the series itself. It isn't the best fantasy series that's aimed at budding teens, but it is unique. Imagine a world plunged in utter darkness, illuminated only by the light of sunstones. Then you have, at the very least, 3 distinct civilizations: The Chosen - people that live within a huge castle that know nothing of the outside world, The Icecarls - nomadic tribes that follow the migration pattern of ice creatures called Selskies, and Aenirans - beings that live on a different plane of existence that turn into sentient shadow when entering the Dark World. I LOVE the concept... But the execution fell short of what it could have been. Honestly speaking, instead of releasing a new book every 3-4 months, they could've just spent a year or two working on making ONE BOOK, the first in a series of books. I think it would've been better that way. Reading this series has proven to be an exercise in patience, especially if you were following this series when if first came out. The introduction of certain people that actually didn't provide anything to the plot, or were just forgotten as the series wore on, make it hard to invest feelings for them. But if there's something that one can take away from the series is the lesson of being understanding of cultures outside your own, and maybe learning something from it and improving your own. (view spoiler)[And that leads me to the quote that irks me the most, "The Chosen has become an Icecarl, and the Icecarl a Chosen" (or something to that effect). The reason being is that this quote is inaccurate when it comes to Mila. All she did was learn how to use Light Magic, and maybe tolerate the shadow beings a bit, but does that make her more of a Chosen? No! To be a Chosen, you have to believe in the need for the hierarchy of colors. To the Chosen, nothing is more important than rank. Your life's goal was to raise your family status to reach Violet (Ebbit was an exception to this rule because he's got a bit of a screw loose) and this is something that Mila never got. Just being able to use Light Magic doesn't make her more of a Chosen. It's the same as saying that by being able to wield a katana, it makes me more of a Japanese. No, it doesn't. FACT. Tal, on the other hand had become more of an Icecarl. His belief in the hierarchy has faded. His high & mighty attitude, gone. He started adapting to the Icecarl way of doing things. So that part of the quote was a bit true. (hide spoiler)] All things aside, this is a series that you should read, at least once. Especially if you're a fan of Nix.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Hayden Davis

    It's starts off at the end of the last book as usual and it's where Tal keeps getting knocked out over and over again. Then at the third time he finds himself in a crystal ball and he wonders what it was and then he remembers when Milla was in the crystal ball and they had to free her out. Then he realized he was in the hall of nightmares. And it scared him a little when he tried to escape using his newly found power now is the king of the chosen and so he tries to control the sunstones that sur It's starts off at the end of the last book as usual and it's where Tal keeps getting knocked out over and over again. Then at the third time he finds himself in a crystal ball and he wonders what it was and then he remembers when Milla was in the crystal ball and they had to free her out. Then he realized he was in the hall of nightmares. And it scared him a little when he tried to escape using his newly found power now is the king of the chosen and so he tries to control the sunstones that surround the crystal ball one by one but then the keeper of the ball realizes and tries to stop him by starting the machine and then he blacks out and goes to sleep. You will have to read the rest to figure out what happened next. There are many figurative devices in the seventh tower the violet keystone but some of them are. First is an onamonipiea:"It pulsed. Once ... twice ... three times." Next is imagery:"It was as wide as the fort and tall as an Icecar, rushing forward with a deafening crash and rumble." Next is personification:"It had veered a little to one side in the rebound. Only half of it would strike the Icecarls fort." Next is an onamonapia:"When they burst out of the Veil, output into the sunstone lit corridor winding it's way up and around ahead of them." I would rate this book 4 stars because of like every book it's fun to read I also like books that continue on sure you have to wait but the author usually makes you wait and it is like a cliffhanger and you don't like it so you wait till the second book comes out. I also like the book because of the adventure and the different things like how there are different keystones that power the veil or how all of the free spirit shadows try to break the veil so that they can become in control again. This book is different than most of the books I've read and I like it. That's why I would write this book a 4 out of five stars.

  11. 5 out of 5

    AE

    It was a good balance of using some standards while maintaining a certain freshness. It wasn't entirely predictable despite hitting a trope here and there. I wish we'd had more time to get to know Crow and the Crone girl (can't remember her name), because they end up pretty important. My other (main) complaint is that the book ends too quickly and we never got as much info as I wanted. For starters, what exactly did Milla and Tal do to stop the fighting? What exactly is Tal going to do to improv It was a good balance of using some standards while maintaining a certain freshness. It wasn't entirely predictable despite hitting a trope here and there. I wish we'd had more time to get to know Crow and the Crone girl (can't remember her name), because they end up pretty important. My other (main) complaint is that the book ends too quickly and we never got as much info as I wanted. For starters, what exactly did Milla and Tal do to stop the fighting? What exactly is Tal going to do to improve the class issues among the Chosen? Also, I would have liked to know more about the machine creatures in the tower, and maybe some more details about the previous war and Ramellan and Danir and so forth. That being said, I super appreciated the ending. Things aren't perfect, but people who die are (largely) still dead. (view spoiler)[I can't even be mad about Ebbitt because I love him and also how can anyone be upset that he's going to go chat up some old Crone lady probably with science? (hide spoiler)] It's also made clear that things aren't going to be easy, and Milla and Tal will both have a lot of work to do for their respective people - and they're both going to have to change some things in both their cultures due to their now-expanded viewpoints. But on top of that, I especially appreciated the lack of teen romance. There wasn't some kind of awkward dialogue thrown in at the end, they don't have some vague implied scenes anywhere, it's just a boy and a girl who become friends and then go off as allies whose priorities are their respective people. I liked that. I wish more books were comfortable with that sort of thing rather than feeling the need to throw in feelings and crushes and true love every time. Overall, would recommend this series. It's a pretty solid middle grade fantasy, with some cool worldbuilding, a fun fast-paced storyline, and cool characters that AREN'T forced together.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Lange

    Nix, Garth. The Violet Keystone. HarperCollins Childrens, 2010. Genre: Fantasy, Fiction (2 books) Summary: This is one of the last books in the Seventh Tower series, which is why I have rated it so low. This is no fault of the author Garth Nix, but I was completely lost as to what was going on. I was unaware that this was a full series or else I would have tried to look for another book, or hopefully find the original. If you started this series from the beginning I'm sure that you will love this Nix, Garth. The Violet Keystone. HarperCollins Childrens, 2010. Genre: Fantasy, Fiction (2 books) Summary: This is one of the last books in the Seventh Tower series, which is why I have rated it so low. This is no fault of the author Garth Nix, but I was completely lost as to what was going on. I was unaware that this was a full series or else I would have tried to look for another book, or hopefully find the original. If you started this series from the beginning I'm sure that you will love this one as the culmination seems pretty fitting, but I have no way to be sure. Our main characters, Tal and Mila now have gathered more allies in an effort to battle the mighty dragon Sharrakor who is evil and has plans of destroying their world. Will they succeed? You will have to pick up this book to find out. As I have stated above, I unintentionally read this book out of order, so I spent more time googling what happened prior in an effort to help me understand what was going on. I don't know about you, but anytime I have to stop where I am in a book and open my computer to understand what was going on is beyond frustrating. Given who our characters are though if you are someone who is currently in middle school and have read the books that precede this one, I think you will be very happy with this series. A Creative Writing Lens: Nix does a nice job of having his characters provide something significant to the story. What I mean by that is that each and every ally that Tal and Mila befriend provides some sort of important skill or trait to help the siblings progress on their journey to defeat Sharrakor. I often have two very important characters in my stories and everyone else just becomes part of the scenery. I would love to try and improve that in my own writing.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Christy Johnson

    Clearly the best book of the series, this book had action, good pacing, strong characterization and growth, and a solid ending. I appreciated that the ending wasn't comprised of purely of sunshine and rainbows for a perfect happy ending, but of sacrifice, strong friendships and alliances that will work together to face upcoming trials in the new society. I just wish that after spending six books watching Tal work to reunite his family we could have seen them all together even once. The reader wa Clearly the best book of the series, this book had action, good pacing, strong characterization and growth, and a solid ending. I appreciated that the ending wasn't comprised of purely of sunshine and rainbows for a perfect happy ending, but of sacrifice, strong friendships and alliances that will work together to face upcoming trials in the new society. I just wish that after spending six books watching Tal work to reunite his family we could have seen them all together even once. The reader was robbed of that moment after such build up. Seeing and experiencing after such build up would be better than simply knowing it happened. Also, I couldn't ever tell if Sushin lived or died. Maybe I missed that, but as long and arduous as it was for me to finish the series, I won't be rereading it anytime soon. Glad I stuck it out.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Col

    Pretty solid ending, liked how Nix suddenly crammed in a bunch of bizarre elements (the biomechanical locomotor, Yeerk-esque "mind-drills" out of nowhere, the implication that the Chosen created or altered the biosphere out on the Ice) in the final volume, though it was certainly no Keys to the Kingdom. It was also the last place I ever expected to find the temperature inversion of higher atmospheric layers come up. I appreciated immensely that it wasn't a status quo ending and gave the impressio Pretty solid ending, liked how Nix suddenly crammed in a bunch of bizarre elements (the biomechanical locomotor, Yeerk-esque "mind-drills" out of nowhere, the implication that the Chosen created or altered the biosphere out on the Ice) in the final volume, though it was certainly no Keys to the Kingdom. It was also the last place I ever expected to find the temperature inversion of higher atmospheric layers come up. I appreciated immensely that it wasn't a status quo ending and gave the impression of a single episode in a longer, untold story, even if I didn't get quite as much explicit lore as I would've liked. And the lack of a shoehorned romance. I would've liked a bit more (you call the series seventh tower then only write 6 books? C'mon man), which is a good sign. Hopefully Sabriel manages to live up to the absurd hype.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Clorinspats Clorinspats

    Finally done! This was a mildly satisfying end to a roller coaster of a series. I think this one returned to what I had enjoyed about the first two books in the series: a focused Tal working with a determined Milla through astronomical odds. They finally have the enemy sitting in front of them and they put their all into fighting. It did feel pretty anticlimactic. I don't want to spoil the ending, but I feel it could have gone better. Many characters ended up having huge changes to their personal Finally done! This was a mildly satisfying end to a roller coaster of a series. I think this one returned to what I had enjoyed about the first two books in the series: a focused Tal working with a determined Milla through astronomical odds. They finally have the enemy sitting in front of them and they put their all into fighting. It did feel pretty anticlimactic. I don't want to spoil the ending, but I feel it could have gone better. Many characters ended up having huge changes to their personality, and I do wonder more about the consequences of everyone's actions. I did enjoy it...I'm just being nitpicky, I suppose.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sean Bai

    This is a story that takes me back to my youth. I remember when I had dreams after reading book six, feeling like I was in the world. Garth Nix builds a very captivating world, and I finished reading this series for the second or third time right after I graduated from university with a BA. In this world, there are two groups of humans. One group lives in a castle and there is a heirarchy of lower class citizens who don't have mastery over light and higher ranked people who have magical stones t This is a story that takes me back to my youth. I remember when I had dreams after reading book six, feeling like I was in the world. Garth Nix builds a very captivating world, and I finished reading this series for the second or third time right after I graduated from university with a BA. In this world, there are two groups of humans. One group lives in a castle and there is a heirarchy of lower class citizens who don't have mastery over light and higher ranked people who have magical stones that allow them to wield different colors of light, and there is another group of humans that live out on the ice.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Clare

    What a series!!! I have thoroughly enjoyed every book and could not wait to find out what happened to Tal and Mills in the end. Sad to have finished the series though, this is definitely a series I would read all over again and enjoy just as much.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Zarabeth Davies

    The final instalment left a few questions unanswered but in a good way that lets you imagination fill in the blanks.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    This was the ending the series deserved! Non-stop action and a great resolution. For more reviews check us out at ReadingOverTheShoulder.com

  20. 4 out of 5

    Steve Worland

    Good series. A little weak in places, but still an engaging read.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sivyu

    I thought that it picked up and got much better as the series went along. It was a pretty good YA read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    10TX

    The Violet Keystone is the sixth and final book in The Seventh Tower series--a series Scholastic says is written at a 4th grade reading level. It was a good conclusion to a well written series, but I have reservations about the series that might concern other Christian parents as well. (see below) I must admit when the first book in the series arrived, I was fairly certain it would be the last Seventh Tower book I would purchase. The cover on my copy is designed to catch the attention of the audi The Violet Keystone is the sixth and final book in The Seventh Tower series--a series Scholastic says is written at a 4th grade reading level. It was a good conclusion to a well written series, but I have reservations about the series that might concern other Christian parents as well. (see below) I must admit when the first book in the series arrived, I was fairly certain it would be the last Seventh Tower book I would purchase. The cover on my copy is designed to catch the attention of the audience for which the book was written, namely 9 or 10 year olds. I was off-put. Nevertheless, here I am, having not only finished the final book, but having cried over the fate of one of the characters. And though hormones most definitely contributed more than anything to the appearance of actual tears, I have to give some credit to the author for characters more dynamic than many you will find in books aimed at this audience. Just like the characters, the world Nix created is not as simple as it first appears, and one is left wishing he had created this world, not for a young audience, but for a mature audience where more of the complexity and beauty could be explored and expanded upon. I was drawn in to this creation of his and eagerly awaited each new addition to the series. I am sorry to be leaving behind the Castle and the Ice, and can only hope that there will be other Nix books set in this same world. The Violet Keystone built toward the final conflict slowly and it honestly read more like it was the book that would set-up for the final confrontation rather than the last book in the series. And then the final battle was over, just like that. If the author had slowed down and given his audience more credit, trusted they did not need every problem resolved in a few short chapters, this may have been a four or even five star book. Instead, after six books of resolving one problem only to find two more, and while characters faced decisions that would alter their entire world, suddenly--much too suddenly--everything is resolved. Bad guy dead, most of the world put back together differently, and our heroes in their rightful places. I followed Tal and Milla through five books and patiently dealt with their oppositional behavior. They are children after all, and they think and act like children. As an adult, at times it was frustrating to read. However, children are often unintentionally selfish, self-centered, and narrow-minded, and it is a credit to the author that he didn't write his young protagonists as miniature adults. But then suddenly, in the final book, as if the characters themselves somehow knew they wouldn't get another chance, everyone decided to be cooperative. It was just too sudden, lacking in any more of a reasonable motivation for this sudden change than any of the other life-threatening perils the children and others had already faced. And speaking of too sudden, after five books of cliff-hangers and problems that took half a book or more to resolve, the final battle with the mastermind of all their troubles was, once they caught up with him, a matter of a few pages. It was anti-climatic. The same series that drew me through five previous books ended so abruptly I was left thinking, "Is that really it?" 3 stars. It was good but it could have and should have been better. Now all of this is the book review of an adult of more than 40 years reading a book written for 8-12 year olds. As a parent, I have a few thoughts as well. Sexuality? There is none. Language? Nothing to object to. Violence? Very sensitive children may be upset at the violence that is done to the antagonists in order to bring them to justice, but the average child who watches TV and movies aimed at this age range will find nothing upsetting. Only one "good" character doesn't get his happy ending, and he is able to have a heroic one nonetheless. Evil is punished; good prevails. This is very important to children in this age range. Spirituality? Herein lies my biggest issue. I understand the book is fantasy. I get that there is no correlation in our world to the Ice, the Castle, nor Aenir. There is however somewhat of a resemblance to spirit guides of the occult world in the Spiritshadows of the Chosen. Therefore, I cannot recommend this book to Christian parents, who may not wish for their young children to read anything which might create a desire to have a shadow companion gained from entering a trance-like state and then bonding oneself to a companion from another realm.

  23. 5 out of 5

    J.S. Young

    I am in a state of disbelief right now there is nothing I can say that will make the ending any less painful. But it was majestic, the whole book had a sense of adventure and urgency that never seems to fail in these books. Both Milla and Tal are making their ways to the Violet Tower as Sushin and Sharrakor are ready to dismantle the Veil once and for all. Now as always I'm gonna start at the end and how awesome it was. The return to Aenir was a perfect way to end it though the disconnection of I am in a state of disbelief right now there is nothing I can say that will make the ending any less painful. But it was majestic, the whole book had a sense of adventure and urgency that never seems to fail in these books. Both Milla and Tal are making their ways to the Violet Tower as Sushin and Sharrakor are ready to dismantle the Veil once and for all. Now as always I'm gonna start at the end and how awesome it was. The return to Aenir was a perfect way to end it though the disconnection of Adras and Odris from Tal and Milla broke my heart a little. The banter between the two pairs was exquisite and Adras's humour was always a highlight of the book. But it was perfect as they had to start as they meant to go on and that meant no more Spiritshadows. The confrontation with Sharrakor was intense the whole flying into the middle of a hurricane thing would look so good on a big screen and then the fight with the dragon was awesome but of course it came with heartbreak. My poor Crow. Now I feel like you aren't meant to like Crow because he is a backstabbing asshole but he's also ridiculously cool. Him and Tal share some awesome scenes and the fact Crow came to Tal to help him from the Hall of Nightmares was a mark that you can be wrong about people. And Crow kind of does admit that he is wrong and he needed to do better. But that's okay because he did do better, he worked with Chosen and Icecarl to get to Aenir and its thanks to him that Sharrakor died. The bottle of caveroach poison was lethal to touch so even if they had plummeted of the tower of the Khamsoul he would have died anyway. He knew it though I think, he had already asked them not to forget about the Underfolk and to unite them so now it felt like he knew all along he had a chance that they didn't. He was brave and awesome and him and Tal are faves. Of course throughout the book we get a mix of Tal and Milla chapters. Milla at the beginning is learning more of her light magic which is awesome even if it does almost get her killed but she is clearly running out of steam. All the Icecarl are worn out but they are ready to keep going. I just realised while typing this that most of the Icecarl we see are exceptionally strong women so fuck yeah for that. Go Garth Nix! By the end she has learnt so much of being a chosen but she is still an Icecarl at heart. She keeps fighting till the very end and she is awesome for that. Milla is never defined by her interactions with Tal and she doesn't become a love interest just a really good friend to Tal. With the Talon's of Danir she is a dangerous warrior and she is just incredible. Tal my precious flower has come a long way too. Of course he is now Emperor of the Castle because he is the true wielder of the Violet Keystone. Which was a great moment when Milla's like nahh he can have it. Because he is very talented that must be said he is incredible with Light Magic. But it's been an ongoing thing that he has improved massively. He really has and by the end he can wield so much without aid it's just amazing. But he's also learnt a lot along the way, the sadness of when Crow died was touching and his not wanting to Emperor is a mark of how young he truly is. He makes mistakes but he keeps fighting and I'm so glad he does because at the end he really does go toe-to-toe with Sushin and Sharrakor and it's epic. Harsher note I wish it had been Ebbitt that died. It's kind of a tricky moment because it seems like he is going to but he pulls through. But Ebbitt always saddens me because his mind is truly addled with age. Which is intriguing to see in fantasy because though he is so smart and helpful yet he is limited because his mind does wander. Like with the Wormwalker he is so interested in them he has to be lead away. But he does have great lines such as 'Do Something Imperial.' It's so great but sadly I wish it was him.... There are of course many other things to discuss such as what the harpoons were for because we do get told thank god. They stop things moving so yay for that. We get to see Zicka again who is of course King of Information/ quick bit of exposition. Malen who is actually interesting because of the struggle with being so detached from the Crone hive mind. And she goes to Aenir and helps with the taking down of Sharrakor so ten points for being awesome Malen. In the end though everyone is happy, Milla and Tal are going their separate ways for at least a year. Tal's family is reunited and he is Emperor. It's excellent but like where's the sequel series?

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kiki

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I am not in the age range this series of books aimed at. But I was also not in the age range of the Abhorsen trilogy and I really enjoyed those books. So I thought I’d give The Seventh Tower a try. I enjoyed it, but it was written much more simply than Abhorsen was – more aimed at its demographic without hoping to also please older readers. And the plot was also simpler. It felt more by-the-numbers, like the author was going through all the correct steps to create a plot, without enough focus on I am not in the age range this series of books aimed at. But I was also not in the age range of the Abhorsen trilogy and I really enjoyed those books. So I thought I’d give The Seventh Tower a try. I enjoyed it, but it was written much more simply than Abhorsen was – more aimed at its demographic without hoping to also please older readers. And the plot was also simpler. It felt more by-the-numbers, like the author was going through all the correct steps to create a plot, without enough focus on character to make the reader care deeply for them. Young readers out for an adventure might not notice, but older readers will. I think I was also off-put by the fact that a major goal of the story was (SPOILER ALERT… but not really…) to keep the world dark. In the context of what was happening in the story, that made perfect sense, but it’s still really hard to put your heart into blocking every ray of sunlight from the fictional world you’re living in. And last, but not least, I felt the author broke one of the unspoken promises that every author makes to their readers at the beginning of a book. SPOILER ALERT (AND I MEAN IT THIS TIME): The book ends without any explanation being given for why the war(s) had started in the first place. And there was absolutely no need to withhold this information – there were multiple characters who could have revealed EVERYTHING we wanted to know. You can’t do that. If you raise questions at the beginning of a book, you’re promising the reader that you will answer them before the end. This is the end. The war is over. We should get to know why it started. That said, it is true that the world was unique, the characters were likeable, and the adventure was adventurous. I suspect kids in the targeted age range will enjoy these books just fine.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey

    One of the elements of writing in this genre that Nix is particularly gifted at is creating original fantasies and worlds. This series is no exception. However, in comparison to some of his other works, especially The Abhorsen Trilogy, the exploration of this world and the characters within is weak at best. The story is interesting because Nix presents the audience with a new mythology, but he rushes through the plot, circumnavigating what could be some really amazing explorations of the world h One of the elements of writing in this genre that Nix is particularly gifted at is creating original fantasies and worlds. This series is no exception. However, in comparison to some of his other works, especially The Abhorsen Trilogy, the exploration of this world and the characters within is weak at best. The story is interesting because Nix presents the audience with a new mythology, but he rushes through the plot, circumnavigating what could be some really amazing explorations of the world he’s created. As a result, it’s more difficult to imagine this parallel universe and its characters and creatures, and it doesn’t draw the reader in nearly as much as it could. This series breaks one large story into several books, and since each of these is easily around the high 100s and low 200s in page length, Nix could have spent more time giving description, metaphors, and poetic/aesthetic language to flush this world out. This would make everything significantly more engaging for the readers, and ultimately, foster growth and interest in the books, the fantasy, the world, and the characters therein. Ultimately, there’s just nothing to bite into. -Lindsey Miller, www.lindseyslibrary.com

  26. 5 out of 5

    Charles Streams

    The sixth book in the Seven Tower Series really did it for me. It was a perfect combination of the characters development, battles, and answers. I was so happy to have Ebbit be in this book so much. He's one of the most refreshing and original characters I've read in a long time. Milla and Tal finally meet together again and we find out the Sharrakor was really just possessing Sushin. I loved how the final battle included a bunch of characters and that Tal was finally able to become Emperor. It The sixth book in the Seven Tower Series really did it for me. It was a perfect combination of the characters development, battles, and answers. I was so happy to have Ebbit be in this book so much. He's one of the most refreshing and original characters I've read in a long time. Milla and Tal finally meet together again and we find out the Sharrakor was really just possessing Sushin. I loved how the final battle included a bunch of characters and that Tal was finally able to become Emperor. It was nice, though tough, to have Milla remain in character to the very end. She left the castle without even looking back. In stories and tv shows it gets so easy to just expect the two main characters to eventually start kissing, but in this case Tal and Milla stayed in character. I loved how Ebbit showed up alive and well again, disguised as an icecarl, and still with the Codex. While the main story was all tidied up, like most books I was still left with a desire to know more details. What happened with the person enslaved in the lake that Milla escaped from? Yes we heared Adras and Odris were still alive, but I really wanted to see them again. Probably never be more books, but I'd definitely like to have more to see the future of all the characters.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Saga

    Maybe I dropped out of the demographic of this series sometime 20 years ago and shouldn't review this from the point of view of an adult, but what the heck. Many children's/YA books are slim and lightweight enough to fit into my pocket without making it look like as if I were lining my jacket with roof tiles. Novels for grown-ups with similar dimensions commonly fall into the plague-pit of cheap Harlequin romance or other soppy, yawn-inducing, plotless pulp (feel free to correct me), which is ex Maybe I dropped out of the demographic of this series sometime 20 years ago and shouldn't review this from the point of view of an adult, but what the heck. Many children's/YA books are slim and lightweight enough to fit into my pocket without making it look like as if I were lining my jacket with roof tiles. Novels for grown-ups with similar dimensions commonly fall into the plague-pit of cheap Harlequin romance or other soppy, yawn-inducing, plotless pulp (feel free to correct me), which is exactly why I prefer the aforementioned category, even if it does often suffer from a lack of description and somewhat one-dimensional language. Hence, minus points for the 'easiness' and some unnecessary repetition, pluses for the very imaginative world and quite likable characters. Nix seems to possess a unique talent for creating non-cliche fantasy realms riddled with detail and a fairy-tale-esque atmosphere that doesn't lose its allure midway through. Enjoyed the series thoroughly and rather regretted putting the books down whenever I had to. Naturally some similarities with Nix's other adventures (everyone appears to possess a shadow-friend or a guard or some sort...), but they weren't that distracting.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Leigha

    Younger me: 5 stars Adult me: 5 stars *For the first book in a "child/teen/middlegrade/nostalgic" book, I am going with the rating younger me would have gone with, then if I read on in the series, I will rate the books what adult me believes it should be rated. If the book is a stand alone, I will go with whatever rating I feel most comfortable giving the book. Please note, I do not really think books should have an age limit. People should read what they want to regardless of the intended age gro Younger me: 5 stars Adult me: 5 stars *For the first book in a "child/teen/middlegrade/nostalgic" book, I am going with the rating younger me would have gone with, then if I read on in the series, I will rate the books what adult me believes it should be rated. If the book is a stand alone, I will go with whatever rating I feel most comfortable giving the book. Please note, I do not really think books should have an age limit. People should read what they want to regardless of the intended age group, except for kids reading erotica or something, of course.* -- Garth Nix is an auto buy/read for me...eventually. I first read his The Old Kingdom Trilogy as a teen, than I discovered this series and then The Keys to the Kingdom series. These are the only books I have read of his so far as I am just way behind, but believe me, one day, I will have read all of his books. I just love his writing style! This series is something I read in my early 20s, but I still consider it nostalgic. Of course all the nostalgic books get a glowing 5 star rating. I wonder how I will rate his newer books.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nidah (SleepDreamWrite)

    Nervous it being the finale, wondering how everything comes together. Bet Tal is feeling deja vu what with climbing the tower again. This time he has Milla however. Except its a little different. It has to do with not only finding a certain keystone but finds out someone he was told was dead or presumed dead isn't. As to where they are, well let's just say its get a little awkward? Thus it leads to a big battle as Tal and his new friends fight to both his and Milla's world, along with his dying Nervous it being the finale, wondering how everything comes together. Bet Tal is feeling deja vu what with climbing the tower again. This time he has Milla however. Except its a little different. It has to do with not only finding a certain keystone but finds out someone he was told was dead or presumed dead isn't. As to where they are, well let's just say its get a little awkward? Thus it leads to a big battle as Tal and his new friends fight to both his and Milla's world, along with his dying mother. Since its been a long time since I read these, not sure if there was a hint or what have you, of a romance between Tal and Milla. I remembered their friendship and it being one of my favorite things about their characters. If there wasn't a romance, then wow, that's a first, as least from what I read over the years. As for the cover, both old and new, my first thought, what is that?! Really good series. Make me wonder why hasn't it been optioned as a movie or something already? As long as it done right that is.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kat_mein

    This whole series just needs props for the fact that it stars a male and a female character who hate each other initially, come from completely different cultures, learn about each culture, work together and realign their world views about each other and their cultures, become allies, and end the series NOT ending up together and going their own separate respective ways with respect for each other but also their own lives (which make A LOT of sense given their separate goals and priorities). I in This whole series just needs props for the fact that it stars a male and a female character who hate each other initially, come from completely different cultures, learn about each culture, work together and realign their world views about each other and their cultures, become allies, and end the series NOT ending up together and going their own separate respective ways with respect for each other but also their own lives (which make A LOT of sense given their separate goals and priorities). I initially read the series as a 10 year old, and then re-read them as a 20 year old, and gosh it is SO refreshing to read a series where the male and female leads (who have equal screen time, and agency, and their own strengths and weaknesses) are just friends (and honestly, it's more like begrudging allies from shared suffering). It's so rare in books nowadays (not just YA, but kids books too, for there to be a relationship that isn't deep friendship where they all get along swimmingly/romance by the end of a long series). 4 stones out of 5.

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