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Ghost Stories From The Raj

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Ruskin Bond's readers range from nine to ninety. And if there are such things as ghosts there are probably a few who are reading him in the spirit world. Ruskin Bond's readers range from nine to ninety. And if there are such things as ghosts there are probably a few who are reading him in the spirit world.


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Ruskin Bond's readers range from nine to ninety. And if there are such things as ghosts there are probably a few who are reading him in the spirit world. Ruskin Bond's readers range from nine to ninety. And if there are such things as ghosts there are probably a few who are reading him in the spirit world.

30 review for Ghost Stories From The Raj

  1. 5 out of 5

    Gorab

    Horror? These are horrible stories. Not sure why Mr Bond picked these. Not sure why I picked this, in spite of knowing these stories are only edited into this book by Bond. The condescending tone towards India in a few stories irked me.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rupali Rotti

    The most prominent feeling i got after reading this book was 'No wonder the British ruled over us Indians for centuries!' Though I had never heard of the 'Men-Tigers' or the 'Panther People' and which sounded far-fetched, the other concepts are still rampant in our society. There still are ghosts, haunted villages (there's a whole building in Mumbai which hasn't been occupied because its considered to be haunted), spirits of ancient village-heads protecting village/town limits (the townspeople of The most prominent feeling i got after reading this book was 'No wonder the British ruled over us Indians for centuries!' Though I had never heard of the 'Men-Tigers' or the 'Panther People' and which sounded far-fetched, the other concepts are still rampant in our society. There still are ghosts, haunted villages (there's a whole building in Mumbai which hasn't been occupied because its considered to be haunted), spirits of ancient village-heads protecting village/town limits (the townspeople of Shani Shingnapur, which is famous for its Shanidev temple, dont put locks on their doors because they believe that anyone stealing anything cannot cross the town limits - very recently I'd heard that one thief tried to steal something and flee, but though he was running, he couldnt reach/cross the tree at the town limit, it was as if he was running but wasnt covering any distance!) Munjia concept also used to be well-known, however, I haven't heard of it in recent times. And I'm not sharing these instances from reading books about it, I'm sharing these experiences of my talks with poor/uneducated people who I come in contact with. Also, just because I'm sharing these thoughts doesnt mean that I dont believe in such concepts. Though I dont want to believe, but I want to keep away from such places nonetheless (just in case they're true). The author only forgot to include a story about black magic. A friend of mine who is well educated, and pretty well to do, recently suffered from very bad luck and everyone in her family started falling sick with long term effects (she suffered from slip-disk and got a neck belt as well, her son broke a leg, her daughter got pushed into depression, her mother became gravely ill, etc). Then she found out that there was a hex-bag with some bones, graveyard dirt and whatnot stuffed in her house. Someone had tried to harm them on purpose! And this incident is only 3 years old!! Now I dont know how this could happen, scientifically, but I know for sure that the grass that Pundits use all across the country to sprinkle holy water on the people present, is a very good conductor of electricity. I also know that 'Om' is the single sound that creates the highest vibrations, and that our brain does get affected by vibrations and electromagnetic field. So overall, this book set me thinking and questioning the beliefs.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Meera Nair

    This is a collection comprising 11 short stories extracted from various magazines and texts that recount the experiences of British officials and personnel during the colonization of India. Set as far back as the 19th century, some of these stories offer the reader glimpses of hauntings, myths, and peculiar occurrences. I don’t think the tales in this book do justice to the title. Save for 2-3 short stories, none of the others even remotely felt like a “ghost story”. Rather, to me, it read like This is a collection comprising 11 short stories extracted from various magazines and texts that recount the experiences of British officials and personnel during the colonization of India. Set as far back as the 19th century, some of these stories offer the reader glimpses of hauntings, myths, and peculiar occurrences. I don’t think the tales in this book do justice to the title. Save for 2-3 short stories, none of the others even remotely felt like a “ghost story”. Rather, to me, it read like a diary entry capturing sporadic events in the lives of the narrator. If you’ve picked up the book with the intention of reading spooky, thrilling tales, you’re most likely in for a disappointment. Since these stories are written by diverse writers, the writing style varies substantially. I liked reading the ones by Alice Perrin; they captured the essence of haunting mysteries. The entire collection is short enough to finish reading in a couple of hours, but due to the kind of tales included I wasn’t all that motivated to read it in one sitting. I rarely ever feel this way about books but, in hindsight, this is one of those titles that if I had skipped, I wouldn’t have missed much.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Wendell D'Costa

    Ghost stories from the Raj, is an engaging Anthology by veteran writer Ruskin Bond. The stories of this book are not just any ghost stories, but are ghost stories that have occurred during the British regime in India. The many accounts of this book are from British army officials, or other locals with whom they illustrate "Haunted India". Now the book had many great stories. Tales of people who shapeshift into panthers and tigers. Local ghosts and demons who terrorize the British officials. And al Ghost stories from the Raj, is an engaging Anthology by veteran writer Ruskin Bond. The stories of this book are not just any ghost stories, but are ghost stories that have occurred during the British regime in India. The many accounts of this book are from British army officials, or other locals with whom they illustrate "Haunted India". Now the book had many great stories. Tales of people who shapeshift into panthers and tigers. Local ghosts and demons who terrorize the British officials. And also Spirits who return in pursuit of vengenance and love. But one story that stood out from the lot was A tale of the Malabar Jungles. It was a well written, well thought out story, which was beautifully edited by Ruskin Bond. The only downside of this book were the countless grammatical errors that our present throughout this book. Otherwise, it would be a thrilling historical Horror read for any reader.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Manab J Kalita

    Don't Even Bother I read, rather tried reading this disaster just because it's edited by Ruskin Bond. Such a bad thing to do. I judged a book by its cover. Stupid tales written in English that is long forgotten or unused. Let alone the droning monotone of bicentennial English, the stories are not even remotely true. Urghhh. I need something better today. Maybe I'll read a classic to numb the torture of this one. Don't Even Bother I read, rather tried reading this disaster just because it's edited by Ruskin Bond. Such a bad thing to do. I judged a book by its cover. Stupid tales written in English that is long forgotten or unused. Let alone the droning monotone of bicentennial English, the stories are not even remotely true. Urghhh. I need something better today. Maybe I'll read a classic to numb the torture of this one.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jacinth

    I stumbled upon this book in a small book fair. Lying desolately in a corner, the name Ruskin Bond caught my eye. I read the prologue where the editor (Mr. Bond- Ruskin, not James)describes the hilarious yet scary night vigil he kept for an elderly deceased woman. Never had I come across the combination of horror and comedy. Needless to say, I purchased the copy without further ado. While the supernatural creatures mentioned in the stories were extremely familiar, the tone of some of the stories I stumbled upon this book in a small book fair. Lying desolately in a corner, the name Ruskin Bond caught my eye. I read the prologue where the editor (Mr. Bond- Ruskin, not James)describes the hilarious yet scary night vigil he kept for an elderly deceased woman. Never had I come across the combination of horror and comedy. Needless to say, I purchased the copy without further ado. While the supernatural creatures mentioned in the stories were extremely familiar, the tone of some of the stories is very haughty. But an enjoyable read for a train journey.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rohit

    More creepy than scary and hence all the more effective. Enjoyed almost all the stories except for the first one. What is most attractive about the book is that these stories are set in a world which we know and care about and hence the scares feel more real and personal. My personal favorite would have to be the one with the panther people. Hope we get more stories like these. Makes for a great read on a dark, cold stormy night

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tariq Mustafa

    None of the stories were really 'horror stories' to be honest. However, those having a taste for Raj era English that comes with its own riveting mix of Urdu and Sanskrit, these stories are a wonderful collection. None of the stories were really 'horror stories' to be honest. However, those having a taste for Raj era English that comes with its own riveting mix of Urdu and Sanskrit, these stories are a wonderful collection.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sowmya

    The 'Ghosts' are good, the 'Stories' are good, the Raj, not so much. While the imperial narratives of ghostly experiences are fascinating, the undertones of the slavish treatment meted out, is just plain ghostly. This is a ghostly book, by all means! The 'Ghosts' are good, the 'Stories' are good, the Raj, not so much. While the imperial narratives of ghostly experiences are fascinating, the undertones of the slavish treatment meted out, is just plain ghostly. This is a ghostly book, by all means!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sujani Koya

    For a non ghost-story lover like yours truly who picked this book up for the atmosphere it promised, this might have set off interest in tales of beings formerly of this world. The stories are all narrations of British officers first published in the early twentieth century and so a sense of wonder about the 'complicated' natives is all over this collection. A sepia snapshot, each story is. Transporting us to the jungles of Burma or roads of Western Ghats or a bungalow in Ooty... We encounter an For a non ghost-story lover like yours truly who picked this book up for the atmosphere it promised, this might have set off interest in tales of beings formerly of this world. The stories are all narrations of British officers first published in the early twentieth century and so a sense of wonder about the 'complicated' natives is all over this collection. A sepia snapshot, each story is. Transporting us to the jungles of Burma or roads of Western Ghats or a bungalow in Ooty... We encounter an 'ayah' whose devotion to her wards clashes with her smarting from the Memsahib's admonitions, people who make out property deeds only in the name of a long deceased person in order to appease their spirit, tigers that were men once(!), abandoned temples guarded by mysterious men, djinns guarding ancient treasures... There is one story that is jarring as it draws on superstition heavily but other than that, Ruskin Bond had collected stories well! 😃

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sahana Venugopal

    I had the surreal experience of reading one half of this collection in England and the other half in India. The uncanny tales vary drastically in terms of their grammar, style, and even genre - the reader must set aside their expectations and simply go with the messy flow of the collection. It's not a very effective work of literature, but makes for curious reading. This is a set of lenses through which one can glimpse the shadowy depths of India's history through the eyes of her colonisers. -the I had the surreal experience of reading one half of this collection in England and the other half in India. The uncanny tales vary drastically in terms of their grammar, style, and even genre - the reader must set aside their expectations and simply go with the messy flow of the collection. It's not a very effective work of literature, but makes for curious reading. This is a set of lenses through which one can glimpse the shadowy depths of India's history through the eyes of her colonisers. -the lesson of one story is literally "stay away from incel Brahmin boys" and this is a timeless message.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Karan Sood

    Ruskin Bond the story-teller indeed! Bond compiled various stories as told by various British Officers during Raj and their experiences with super-natural. Some of the stories are really nail-bitters and some are plain without any component of surprise. Language is mixture of old and modern English. Its a good and quick read for someone interested in some ghostly flavors.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Reshu Maheshwari

    I am not a very good with this Genre of Spooky Books.. But looking at the short stories .. I got tempted .. it has some wonderful stories from British Raj and pre-post independence. Reminds me the stories from village folklore.. quick read .. and great english by Ruskin Bond..

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tiyas Das

    2.5(??)

  15. 5 out of 5

    Partha

    Vert nice collection all in Bond's signature interest and style. Vert nice collection all in Bond's signature interest and style.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mudit Singh

    Not very happy. Was expecting a more scary motive in the stories. Just good enough when you are bored.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Siddhartha Das

    Mundane stuff Mundane predictable stories except for couple of stories. Not justified for the reputation of the author. Not worth even for bed time story.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ayush

    Good.....

  19. 5 out of 5

    Apurva

    I like Ruskin Bond's writings. However, this book is a collection of ghost stories as told by English officers and other foreign inhabitants of India in British Raj and published in various vintage magazines such as "Indian State Railways Magazine". These are not really the stories that will give you goosebumps but still, they are interesting in that they provide glimpses of superstitions held among Indian people of the time. I like Ruskin Bond's writings. However, this book is a collection of ghost stories as told by English officers and other foreign inhabitants of India in British Raj and published in various vintage magazines such as "Indian State Railways Magazine". These are not really the stories that will give you goosebumps but still, they are interesting in that they provide glimpses of superstitions held among Indian people of the time.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ayush Kumar

    Some of the stories are interesting, but the book is too uneven to be really memorable. There's better stuff out there, and while some stories do hold your attention, the book overall doesn't really capture the imagination. Some of the stories are interesting, but the book is too uneven to be really memorable. There's better stuff out there, and while some stories do hold your attention, the book overall doesn't really capture the imagination.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Divya Sharma

    a set of very intriguing and interesting ghost stories connected to India and its history... some horror some funny.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tyler

    These stories were'nt very good, i could tell better ones. i would give this a 0. all though its very fast to read. These stories were'nt very good, i could tell better ones. i would give this a 0. all though its very fast to read.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nisha

  24. 4 out of 5

    Trivarna Hariharan

  25. 5 out of 5

    Laurel

  26. 5 out of 5

    Soumallya

  27. 5 out of 5

    Debarati Dasgupta

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sajal Roychowdhury

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dr Vandana Jain

  30. 5 out of 5

    Pallavi Sahay

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