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In Chapter 1: Knights of the Old Republic Volume 5, a terrible vision reaching far into the future alerts the secret Jedi Covenant to the importance of Taris, and they activate operative Celeste Morne. She encounters a monstrous threat, an ancient Sith artifact, an army of Mandalorians, and Zayne Carrick, the Padawan accused of killing his fellow students! Then, over 4,000 In Chapter 1: Knights of the Old Republic Volume 5, a terrible vision reaching far into the future alerts the secret Jedi Covenant to the importance of Taris, and they activate operative Celeste Morne. She encounters a monstrous threat, an ancient Sith artifact, an army of Mandalorians, and Zayne Carrick, the Padawan accused of killing his fellow students! Then, over 4,000 years into the future, Chapter 2 of "Vector" - Volume 3 of Dark Time - crosses into the period immediately following the events in Revenge of the Sith. The unfortunate misfit crew of the Uhumele is thrown into the path of Darth Vader and the now-ancient Jedi Master Celeste! Both Sith and smugglers will not leave this meeting without grave consequences . . . Book Details: Format: Paperback Publication Date: 1/31/2009 Pages: 144


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In Chapter 1: Knights of the Old Republic Volume 5, a terrible vision reaching far into the future alerts the secret Jedi Covenant to the importance of Taris, and they activate operative Celeste Morne. She encounters a monstrous threat, an ancient Sith artifact, an army of Mandalorians, and Zayne Carrick, the Padawan accused of killing his fellow students! Then, over 4,000 In Chapter 1: Knights of the Old Republic Volume 5, a terrible vision reaching far into the future alerts the secret Jedi Covenant to the importance of Taris, and they activate operative Celeste Morne. She encounters a monstrous threat, an ancient Sith artifact, an army of Mandalorians, and Zayne Carrick, the Padawan accused of killing his fellow students! Then, over 4,000 years into the future, Chapter 2 of "Vector" - Volume 3 of Dark Time - crosses into the period immediately following the events in Revenge of the Sith. The unfortunate misfit crew of the Uhumele is thrown into the path of Darth Vader and the now-ancient Jedi Master Celeste! Both Sith and smugglers will not leave this meeting without grave consequences . . . Book Details: Format: Paperback Publication Date: 1/31/2009 Pages: 144

30 review for Star Wars: Vector, Vol. 1

  1. 5 out of 5

    Scott Rhee

    “Star Wars: Vector” was a 2009 Dark Horse Comics publication that attempted to do what Marvel and DC were doing at the time with cross-over stories over multiple titles. It is basically a marketing scheme intended to get comic book buyers to buy more comics. Strangely enough, it works, which says something about the lemming-like consumerism of comic book fans. In “Vector, Vol. 1”, the storyline starts in the era of the Old Republic, which is a period of about 1,000 years before the events of “Epi “Star Wars: Vector” was a 2009 Dark Horse Comics publication that attempted to do what Marvel and DC were doing at the time with cross-over stories over multiple titles. It is basically a marketing scheme intended to get comic book buyers to buy more comics. Strangely enough, it works, which says something about the lemming-like consumerism of comic book fans. In “Vector, Vol. 1”, the storyline starts in the era of the Old Republic, which is a period of about 1,000 years before the events of “Episode 1: A New Hope”. Jedi Celeste Morne finds herself in the middle of a war on planet Taris, where Mandalorians are fighting Republican soldiers. To make matters worse, a plague has broken out, which turns the afflicted into mindless bloodthirsty creatures. Somehow, an inept Jedi Padawan named Zayne and his friend, a thief named Gryph, are integral to what’s going on, but Celeste doesn’t know how. Everyone is seeking a Sith artifact called the Muur Talisman, which is the most likely source of the plague. By a stroke of luck, Celeste gets her hands on it... And wakes up thousands of years later, in a coffin, during what is called the “Dark Times”. She is awakened by no less than Darth Vader himself, who is seeking the legendary Muur Talisman. Celeste, of course, has no idea who Vader is. When she discovers that he is a Sith Lord, she fights back. Celeste’s story continues in “Vector, Vol. 2” where she finds herself in the middle of the Rebel Alliances’s war against the Empire and then, hundreds of years later, in the years of Star Wars Legacy. Considering the fact that one would have to read dozens of issues in several titles in the Dark Horse Star Wars line to fully understand the context, I was actually able to follow the storyline well enough. If anything, “Vector” has given me a taste of other series that I may someday want to check out, which besides selling comic books was probably the intent.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Randy Lander

    All Star Wars comics are not created equal, and while there are things I like about all the Star Wars comics Dark Horse is currently publishing, I only pick up two of them in trade regularly. So I was a bit annoyed that to keep following the stories without skipping a trade, I had to buy the trades for the other ones. Randy Stradley's intro admits that they came up with this crossover as a response to Secret Wars/Final Crisis, etc. and unfortunately, while the series may have hit its commercial g All Star Wars comics are not created equal, and while there are things I like about all the Star Wars comics Dark Horse is currently publishing, I only pick up two of them in trade regularly. So I was a bit annoyed that to keep following the stories without skipping a trade, I had to buy the trades for the other ones. Randy Stradley's intro admits that they came up with this crossover as a response to Secret Wars/Final Crisis, etc. and unfortunately, while the series may have hit its commercial goals, creatively it's a hit to the two books in this volume. The Knights of the Old Republic story is not bad, exploring the origin of the Rakghouls (a legitimate KOTOR mystery) and furthering some of the story arcs of the characters, but it suffers from cartoony, exaggerated art that is not a fit to the story. The Dark Times story has great art, but has the same "shock value" excesses that put me off Dark Times in the first place. Soooo... meh. I'm not entirely sure, but at this point I'd probably recommend that regular readers of any of the Star Wars titles just skip over Vector in favor of the next stories.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lance Shadow

    Star Wars Vector was an epic comic crossover from Dark Horse Comics that spanned almost the entire star wars timeline at the time- The Old Republic, the Classic Skywalker Era, and the Legacy Era. It was integrated into four different comic book series from Dark Horse: John Jackson Miller's "Knights of the Old Republic", Mark Harrison's "Dark Times", The "Rebellion" series (written by John Ostrander, Jeremy Barlow, and Rob Williams), and John Ostrander's "Legacy" series. Each chapter in the cross Star Wars Vector was an epic comic crossover from Dark Horse Comics that spanned almost the entire star wars timeline at the time- The Old Republic, the Classic Skywalker Era, and the Legacy Era. It was integrated into four different comic book series from Dark Horse: John Jackson Miller's "Knights of the Old Republic", Mark Harrison's "Dark Times", The "Rebellion" series (written by John Ostrander, Jeremy Barlow, and Rob Williams), and John Ostrander's "Legacy" series. Each chapter in the crossover was intended to be a standalone story placed within the confines of their respective series. Technically, this volume also contained chapter 2 of Vector in its original release, the portion that takes place within "Dark Times". This review, however, is only looking at the first chapter in the Vector story, which also serves as the fifth volume for Knights of the Old Republic. THE STORY: The remaining masters of the Jedi Covenant have a terrible vision- one of untold destruction reigning upon the Jedi and the Republic, and maybe even the galaxy as a whole. Zayne Carrick and three other unfamiliar figures appear in that vision as well (although us the audience will recognize Darth Vader, Luke Skywalker, and perhaps Cade Skywalker from the Legacy comics). Fearing that Zayne may recover a sith artifact called the Muur Talisman on Taris and carry out what they fear is his plan to destroy the jedi order, the masters send out a jedi agent to recover the talisman to keep it safe- and to kill Zayne Carrick. A few weeks following the events of Daze of Hate, Knights of Suffering, The mandalorians have decimated the Tarisian Resistance, and the survivors have been pushed all the way to the Undercity. Zayne and Gryph have been running for their lives from the Rakghouls ever since. When the hapless duo come across a jedi named Celeste Morne, they stow away on a Mandalorian ship bound for jebble, a planet under their control. It turns into a race to stop the Mandalorians from using the Muur Talisman and taking over the galaxy- and from releasing a horrible plague with them. THE BAD: This comic doesn't have very many problems, but one of them is a big one: the artwork. How has the art in this series all of a sudden taken such a big downgrade? The action and backgrounds look ok, but holy kriff, the characters look ATROCIOUS. They really do look bad enough to damper the experience of reading this. While not that big of a problem, Pulsifer was a forgettable antagonist. He serves his role in the story fine and connects well to earlier story arcs in the series, particularly "Flashpoint", but as a character he lacks the complexity of Miller's other characters. Despite playing against type for a Mandalorian, he feels like a retread of Demagol. The other problems I have are with the core cast, but they are more nitpicks. Aside from Zayne and Marn, none of the other characters appear until the very end, and it feels like the explanation for their absence was rushed. And after such excellent growth in "Knights of Suffering" it feels like Zayne and Marn stay static here. THE GOOD: I have to be honest, I'm pretty surprised at how well this worked in the context of the rest of the series. I expected the first chapter of "Vector" to be a pointless detour in the context of the rest of the Knights of the Old Republic Series, but John Jackson Miller actually does a superb job weaving his portion of the Vector story into the overarching narrative of Zayne's story. Using Lucien Draay and the other masters of the covenant was the perfect way to integrate otherwise unrelated characters Luke, Vader, and Cade into their timeline for the Vector crossover. I also like how well connected the opening was to the events of "Knights of Suffering". I loved the ending, seemingly tying up loose ends with the Vector related stuff but also doing an excellent job setting up the rest of Zayne's story. I'm surprised by how much this arc, despite being part of a crossover, actually feels like some of the things that happened will have significant impacts on the rest of the KOTOR comics going forward. I also really liked the connections it makes to the rest of the Old Republic era lore- it makes for a great explanation for the origins of the rakghoul plague on Taris as seen in the first KOTOR video game, as well as provide a compelling explanation for why it is able to spread across the galaxy in the SWTOR time period. At the same time, it does a good job explaining why the rakghoul plague still was essentially contained on Taris during the events of the first KOTOR game. Zayne and Marn Hierogryph are so much fun here. Both characters are compelling, and their banter is kriffing hilarious. Celest Morne started out as a bit of a dull character, but she has her moments in the last parts of the story arc. Her character is definitely set up to be more important in later chapters of the Vector Crossover, but she made a decent enough impact here, and I think she did serve enough of a purpose to Zayne and his story to make it work. THE CONCLUSION: Final rating is 3.5 stars. While it's definitely not up to par with some of the other story arcs in the series, I was surprised at what I got, and I thought it was much better than it had any right to be. Miller did a great job integrating the Vector crossover's story into the rest of his KOTOR comics, and I think he did a good job not allowing Celeste Morn and the Muur Talismaan to overshadow Zayne and Marn. The artwork really sucked but the writing had the same balance of charm, comedy, scale, and stakes that the rest of the series has had thus far. As for the rest of the Vector Crossover itself, this chapter alone didn't peak my interest in the rest of it enough to check out the other comics that it crosses over with. That said, it serves as a worthy chapter in Zayne's adventures, and did a great job setting up the adventures to come.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Martin Christopher

    This relatively short story is part of a larger crossover series with other Star Wars comics. It barely has any plot and doesn't really add any new developments to the KotOR series. As such you can easily skip it and not miss anything of the story. It's really mostly a marketing stunt. The writing is very weak with nothing happening and there are really only four characters who have more than one or two lines of dialogue. Two of them are basically new to the series and also gone again by the end. This relatively short story is part of a larger crossover series with other Star Wars comics. It barely has any plot and doesn't really add any new developments to the KotOR series. As such you can easily skip it and not miss anything of the story. It's really mostly a marketing stunt. The writing is very weak with nothing happening and there are really only four characters who have more than one or two lines of dialogue. Two of them are basically new to the series and also gone again by the end. Zayne is just being Zayne as usual while Gryph is turning into an obnoxious Rob Schneider impersonator. The plot is so bad that the characters themselves are making jokes about it. And this is one of the ugliest comics I've ever seen. The coloring is great, but it boggles the mind how these pencils can be from someone who gets payed money from a big comic publisher. While this is not complete garbage, this is not "ok". This is very firmly "did not like it".

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sacha Valero

    There are two chapters in this book, the first is Vol. 5 of Knights of the old republic, and the second, Vol. 3 of Dark Times. Right away, the artwork in chapter 1 is off-putting. I hated it. As far as the story goes, it starts with Q'Anilia having a vision of an ancient Sith Lord, Zayne, Darth Vader, young Luke, and I think Cade. She also sees a talisman on the Sith and Lucien sends an agent to recover it. Zayne and Gryph are portrayed as totally incompetent morons who screw up everything. The ta There are two chapters in this book, the first is Vol. 5 of Knights of the old republic, and the second, Vol. 3 of Dark Times. Right away, the artwork in chapter 1 is off-putting. I hated it. As far as the story goes, it starts with Q'Anilia having a vision of an ancient Sith Lord, Zayne, Darth Vader, young Luke, and I think Cade. She also sees a talisman on the Sith and Lucien sends an agent to recover it. Zayne and Gryph are portrayed as totally incompetent morons who screw up everything. The talisman ends up taking control of Celeste, the Jedi who was sent to collect it. As she resists the ghost of the Sith Lord from taking over completely, Zayne places her in stasis. Before this, she gives him a key that will get him access to the store of Sith artifacts that Lucien and the others have been gathering in secret while he and Gryph are rescued by Alek and Jarael. And then Cassius Fett shows up and destroys the planet because of a Rakgoul plague, leaving Zayne grief stricken about Celeste. The story is fine other than the ridiculous way that Zayne and Gryph are portrayed. Although I'm reading these in chronological order I'm going to leave a review of Chapter 2 which takes place 4000 years after. The artwork is much, much better. As for the story, we carry on with Celeste. Some smugglers have located an object for a client, bringing it to an isolated planet. It happens to be Celeste in her stasis chamber. Vader is here, and when she wakes she begins asking questions and learns that the Sith have crushed the Republic. Upon hearing this she senses the darkness in Vader and a fight ensues. All the while the spirit of Karness Murr, who created the talisman, taunts her, telling her Vader is much stronger, and that she should just let him have it. This is a really good story, and I like where it goes. Can't wait to get to the Dark Times series. Overall the first chapter really leads to a lower rating for this volume.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

    (3963, 19 BBY) This is a unique collaborative volume that contains volume five of Knights of the Old Republic and volume three of Dark Times. Both are put together in one volume with a story woven around a Jedi introduced in the next installment of KotOR, Celeste Morne. Zayne gets mixed up on a mission with her to retrieve an ancient Sith artifact that can control the beasts of the Rakghoul Plague. On a side mission to eliminate Zayne, Celeste realizes that he is a better man than she thought. Wh (3963, 19 BBY) This is a unique collaborative volume that contains volume five of Knights of the Old Republic and volume three of Dark Times. Both are put together in one volume with a story woven around a Jedi introduced in the next installment of KotOR, Celeste Morne. Zayne gets mixed up on a mission with her to retrieve an ancient Sith artifact that can control the beasts of the Rakghoul Plague. On a side mission to eliminate Zayne, Celeste realizes that he is a better man than she thought. When she sacrificed herself to save the Mandalorians from the plague, she is thought dead. The Mandies now owe Zayne for warning them of the plague on their planed, but he leaves with a heavy heart. In the next section of the volume, Darth Vader is seeking a casket found deep in the ice on a barren planet. Within the casket is Celeste and the Sith icon that Vader seeks. With her, she brings a return of the Plague. While Captain Heren’s crew and Vader’s troopers aim to avoid the plague and the death is will surly bring, Vader and Celeste battle one-on-one, Celeste opting to give in to the Sith lord controlling the ancient item, giving her the ancient one’s power. This was an interesting collaborative piece that worked well together. I have not read the Dark Times arc yet, and I didn’t need to to know that this volume was vastly interesting. While the art for the KotOR piece is pretty bad, the shift in style to the Dart Times volume is absolutely gorgeous, and the two stories focus around Celeste and can be a stand-alone piece featuring her.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Malcolm Cox

    What a brilliant series this is! A noteworthy cross-over event that linked four comic runs at the time. This volume is four parts Knights of the Old Republic and 2 parts Dark Times. My main issue with this story, as with any crossover event, is that it happens in the middle of another story arc already in progress. Little explanation is given as to why what is going on where it is going on because that has already been established in the main story arc. But like I said, I have this issue with al What a brilliant series this is! A noteworthy cross-over event that linked four comic runs at the time. This volume is four parts Knights of the Old Republic and 2 parts Dark Times. My main issue with this story, as with any crossover event, is that it happens in the middle of another story arc already in progress. Little explanation is given as to why what is going on where it is going on because that has already been established in the main story arc. But like I said, I have this issue with all crossovers. The Dark Times segment possibly suffered more in this regard as the crew of the Uhumele suffer a significant death, which out of context is somewhat meaningless, particularly if you’ve not read the Dark Times series. Anyway, Zayne and Gryph were on top form causing mayhem everywhere they go which matched the somewhat zany artwork of the Knights of the Old Republic portion of the tale. The Rakghoul hoards made for a thrilling enemy with a unique look and feel to other alien hoards. I was reminded of the Chrysalids from UFO: Enemy Unknown. I also liked how the story explains the Rakghoul plague that featured in the original Knights of the Old Republic game, which was a mystery in the bowels of Tarsis that never got solved.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jared

    Star Wars Legends Project #16 Background: Knights of the Old Republic: Vector was released in four issues from January to May 2008. The trade paperback was released in January 2009. It was written by John Jackson Miller and pencilled by Scott Hepburn. Hepburn also pencilled 7 issues of The Clone Wars, along with various other things, mostly for Marvel (Captain Marvel, X-Men, The Avengers, Fantastic Four), but also some work on a "Dr. Horrible" comic, "Street Fighter," and "Thundercats." A spec Star Wars Legends Project #16 Background: Knights of the Old Republic: Vector was released in four issues from January to May 2008. The trade paperback was released in January 2009. It was written by John Jackson Miller and pencilled by Scott Hepburn. Hepburn also pencilled 7 issues of The Clone Wars, along with various other things, mostly for Marvel (Captain Marvel, X-Men, The Avengers, Fantastic Four), but also some work on a "Dr. Horrible" comic, "Street Fighter," and "Thundercats." A special note about Vector: I'm not reviewing all of it, because I didn't read all of it. Vector is a 12-issue timeline-hopping series that crosses four different ongoing (at the time) Dark Horse series: Knights of the Old Republic, Dark Times, Rebellion, and Legacy, with 4, 2, 4, and 2 issues in each series, respectively. So, I've read 4 of the 6 issues in volume 1, but I'm not hopping 4,000 years into the middle of the Dark Times series to continue it at this point. I'll get there when I get there. (I got there! And it only took me . . . *checks watch* . . . 5 years! You can read my review of the Dark Times issues of Vector here.) Vector begins sometime shortly after Daze of Hate, Knights of Suffering (my review here), still 3,963 years before the Battle of Yavin. It references various Sith Lords from Tales of the Jedi (most notably Naga Sadow), and introduces a new character, the "Jedi Shadow" Celeste Morne, who will be the main protagonist of the other Vector comics as they continue into the future. Zayne and Gryph return as major characters, but most of the other significant players from Knights of the Old Republic appear only briefly or not at all. Summary: The Mandalorians have smashed the Resistance on Taris, and Zayne and Gryph are scrambling to stay alive amidst the chaos of war and the horrors of the Rakghoul plague in the Lower City. More danger is headed their way, though, in the form of Celeste Morne, an agent of the Jedi Covenant dispatched by Lucien Draay to find an ancient Sith artifact of impossible power . . . and kill Zayne Carrick. Review: Ambitious, but not up to par. I look forward to seeing more of Vector in future series, but there's just no denying that it feels like an interruption of the Knights of the Old Republic series, despite the best intentions of everyone who worked on it. A bit of the problem is that it kind of comes out of nowhere, leaving several threads dangling from the last arc. When it begins, enough time has passed that I don't get to see the conversation between Zayne and Gryph about the death of Raana Tey, though you can fill in most of the rest of the gaps through hints dropped here and there. It's not really the writing, though. This is a fairly exciting story, and an interesting spin-off that makes clever use of elements that Knights of the Old Republic has had in play since the beginning. And Celeste Morne is a cool character who has a neat little arc over the course of these issues. I enjoyed all that well enough, and certainly impacts the direction that Zayne will take in future issues, so it's not like it's just irrelevant to the series as a whole. No, the problem is the art. The editor noted at the end of one of the issues that they wanted the art to set Vector apart from the rest of the series so far. Well, first of all, that seems kind of dumb when one of their stated goals for Vector is that it not feel like just a one-off gimmick. But, secondly, the art does stand out. It makes it seem like we've transitioned from a mature, quality masterpiece of graphic storytelling, into a cheap Saturday morning cartoon. There's a lot about this art style that I hate. For one thing, it's completely inappropriate to the seriousness of the story they're attempting to tell. The biggest problem, though, is the way the characters are drawn as ugly caricatures, particularly Zayne and Celeste. Zayne is only recognizable from his signature outfit. His face has been transformed into an upside down triangle, with his chin protruding way down in a sharp point. Celeste is even worse because I don't know what she's supposed to look like in actual human terms, so there's just no way to imagine her any differently. Her face looks hideous from almost any angle (it seems to shape-shift as she turns her head), shaped so bizarrely that I don't know how it's supposed to exist in three dimensions. Her lower jaw juts out so violently that the rest of her face appears concave. Half the time, she looks like she's angrily chewing on so many marbles that they're packed into her cheeks, and the rest of the time she just kind of resembles a chimp. Her eyes, nose, and mouth are slapped on at strange angles that don't appear to line up with each other in any way. It's just incredibly distracting, and awful. Click here for one example of what I'm talking about. Bad art can't destroy good storytelling, but this was an additional handicap that Vector definitely didn't need. Thank goodness they didn't turn the writing of this arc over to a different author, too, as a way of "setting it apart." I guess I should count myself lucky there. I'm glad to know, as well, that Hepburn will not be returning to either Knights of the Old Republic or Vector, and it's back to business as usual with the next issue. B-

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rizzie

    I'm reviewing ONLY the Dark Times chapter of this book. The very idea of this crossover is asinine and it really ruins the flow and readability of all 4 books that it involved. But that's the way things are, so how is it? Well, the Dark Times chapter at least is quite good. You don't need to read any of the other chapters to understand what is going on, as the characters don't really know either. Everything is explained just fine, and it's not overbearing. You may wonder what happens to a certai I'm reviewing ONLY the Dark Times chapter of this book. The very idea of this crossover is asinine and it really ruins the flow and readability of all 4 books that it involved. But that's the way things are, so how is it? Well, the Dark Times chapter at least is quite good. You don't need to read any of the other chapters to understand what is going on, as the characters don't really know either. Everything is explained just fine, and it's not overbearing. You may wonder what happens to a certain character at the end, but it's not relevant to the ongoing Dark Times plot at all. That's the main thing I want to get across. This is a VERY important chapter for Dark Times and cannot be skipped, but the rest of the crossover CAN be skipped if you are only reading Dark Times. I imagine the same is true for the other series involved, except maybe Legacy, which could require a more complete knowledge.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    In theory I don't think Vector is a particularly good idea, but it links some of the best Star Wars comics out there and in the hands of those competent artists it almost works. Zayne, Gryph, and Celeste are strong characters that jump off the page even coming into their story abruptly, and while the whole thing is an unwelcome interruption from Dark Times' normal business, I don't begrudge it too much. It feels just within the realm of plausibility, just barely. It doesn't add much to anyone's In theory I don't think Vector is a particularly good idea, but it links some of the best Star Wars comics out there and in the hands of those competent artists it almost works. Zayne, Gryph, and Celeste are strong characters that jump off the page even coming into their story abruptly, and while the whole thing is an unwelcome interruption from Dark Times' normal business, I don't begrudge it too much. It feels just within the realm of plausibility, just barely. It doesn't add much to anyone's story but Morne's, and perhaps Vader's, though. The art is good but even though Wheatley is back it doesn't match his work on Path to Nowhere.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mr. Twinkie

    Many readers consider this a disgusting marketing-stunt and the creators do admit that this is also the case. No secret there. The first part also seems to have a significant lower quality in the drawing than from previous volumes of the Knights of The Old Republic-series. It is quite remarkable that this could get published and if it didn't have a better second part this would have been close to a 1 star. Many readers consider this a disgusting marketing-stunt and the creators do admit that this is also the case. No secret there. The first part also seems to have a significant lower quality in the drawing than from previous volumes of the Knights of The Old Republic-series. It is quite remarkable that this could get published and if it didn't have a better second part this would have been close to a 1 star.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Read the first section while reading all the SW: KOTOR comic series. The plot is interesting and Celeste gets to have a little background and some character development in those four issues. Section 2, intertwined with SW: Dark Times, was pretty good. The artwork is completely different and I don't know any of the characters from that series, but I was interested to see what became of Celeste. Interesting interaction with Vader. Read the first section while reading all the SW: KOTOR comic series. The plot is interesting and Celeste gets to have a little background and some character development in those four issues. Section 2, intertwined with SW: Dark Times, was pretty good. The artwork is completely different and I don't know any of the characters from that series, but I was interested to see what became of Celeste. Interesting interaction with Vader.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    Feh. I can see what they were trying to do with this comic. They were trying to have a single thread to link together the "eras" of Star Wars-- Old Republic, Darth Vader, Luke Skywalker, and that one really weird far-future one with Cade Skywalker getting stalked by his great-great-however-many-greats-grandfather's Force ghost, as one does-- but it didn't really... work. Granted, this volume only covered the first two, a Knights of the Old Republic story and Darth Vader stumbling across someone fr Feh. I can see what they were trying to do with this comic. They were trying to have a single thread to link together the "eras" of Star Wars-- Old Republic, Darth Vader, Luke Skywalker, and that one really weird far-future one with Cade Skywalker getting stalked by his great-great-however-many-greats-grandfather's Force ghost, as one does-- but it didn't really... work. Granted, this volume only covered the first two, a Knights of the Old Republic story and Darth Vader stumbling across someone from the first story. The writing is fine, I guess, better in the Vader section, but the art isn't very good and the story just didn't hold my attention. Not for me.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    The art in this is SO BAD. Every so often, there's a panel of decent art, but most of it is well into "is that a person or a rakghoul?" territory. It's just SO BAD. In fact, it's so bad, it completely ruins the story. Assuming there was a story at all. It's some weird mismash of slapstick, rakghouls, and Sith artifact hi-jinks. And eye-bleedingly bad art. The art in this is SO BAD. Every so often, there's a panel of decent art, but most of it is well into "is that a person or a rakghoul?" territory. It's just SO BAD. In fact, it's so bad, it completely ruins the story. Assuming there was a story at all. It's some weird mismash of slapstick, rakghouls, and Sith artifact hi-jinks. And eye-bleedingly bad art.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alana

    So it's kind of got a zombie story feel, although not as bad as some of the actual zombie novels in the SW universe. This plotline was kind of boring, but with Zayne finally deciding to put an end to things with the Masters, maybe the next installment will pick up a bit more. Not my favorite artwork either, a little too cartoony for the seriousness of the story, but it still got the point across. So it's kind of got a zombie story feel, although not as bad as some of the actual zombie novels in the SW universe. This plotline was kind of boring, but with Zayne finally deciding to put an end to things with the Masters, maybe the next installment will pick up a bit more. Not my favorite artwork either, a little too cartoony for the seriousness of the story, but it still got the point across.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Givens

    I enjoy the idea of doing a story set across all the Star Wars comics' time periods, and got attached to the new character Vector introduced, but most of the four stories (in this and volume 2) weren't entirely gripping, and some of the art was awful. I enjoy the idea of doing a story set across all the Star Wars comics' time periods, and got attached to the new character Vector introduced, but most of the four stories (in this and volume 2) weren't entirely gripping, and some of the art was awful.

  17. 4 out of 5

    David Sarkies

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The First of the Cross-Over Comics 20 July 2012 Right at the beginning of this graphic novel there is a discussion about crossover comics and how they are used to generate more income for the various comic book houses and this is one of the reasons that they created this story. It appears that this story crosses four series, beginning with Knights of the Old Republic and ending with Legacy. I can understand how they use crossovers to generate more income and it is generally not from the crossover The First of the Cross-Over Comics 20 July 2012 Right at the beginning of this graphic novel there is a discussion about crossover comics and how they are used to generate more income for the various comic book houses and this is one of the reasons that they created this story. It appears that this story crosses four series, beginning with Knights of the Old Republic and ending with Legacy. I can understand how they use crossovers to generate more income and it is generally not from the crossover comic itself but rather by getting readers of one line of comics interested in other lines. In a way by tying the four series together you are bound to get a number of readers going to the other series to see what they are like. You do not make money from the crossover story itself, but from getting readers of one series to begin buying other series. This is basically a zombie story, though the term they use is Rakghoul. Everything about the Rakghoul screams zombie. They are hideous, mindless, and only interested in food, and if they bite you then you will turn into a Rakghoul. However, an ancient Sith artifact is found on Taris that turns out to not only create, but control, the Rakghoul, and Zane and Gryph get caught up in the hunt for this artifact, as well as introducing the main character in the Vector series, Celeste. She is a Jedi that works for Zane's enemies, but as with many of his enemies, she suddenly realises that he is incapable of being able to commit the crimes that he has been accused of, namely because he is so incompetent. Anyway, Knights of the Old Republic is set 4000 years in the past, and this series is supposed to be a crossover from the Old Republic era to the Legacy era, which is about 150 years after the events in Return of the Jedi. I have not read the second volume so I don't know how she survives the next 150 years, but we learn here that she survives 4000 years by going into stasis so that the Rakghouls will not break out of the planet and destroy the galaxy. However the catch is that the Talisman has taken control of her and an ancient Sith is trying to control her mind, but she is a strong woman who is able to resist its advances. Fast forward to post Revenge of the Sith and we discover that her stasis chamber has been discovered but nobody is able to open it. However a group of rebels are attempting to sell it only to discover that the deal was a set up by Darth Vader to get his hands on the box. It seems that in this second series, Dark Times, Vader is looking for a way to sideline Darth Sidius so that he might take control of the empire rather than being forced to serve Sidius. He believes that what is in this box is the key to his plan. However, as typically happens with bad guys, he is wrong, but because he plays a central role in all of the movies he cannot die. Instead he escapes, trapping Celeste and the resurrected Rakghouls on the plant. What happens to Celeste after this? I really don't know, though I may find out one day.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    One* of the reasons I strayed from DC Comics was its insistence on publishing confusing, expensive multi-issue crossovers on a regular basis. When I saw Darth Vader on the cover of this trade, I knew instantly what it meant: the crossover virus had infected Dark Horse. The one redeeming factor, however, is that Dark Horse's editors have no qualms about admitting this was a sales stunt--as evidenced in a column in the beginning of the book. (I couldn't believe what I was reading.) Not only does th One* of the reasons I strayed from DC Comics was its insistence on publishing confusing, expensive multi-issue crossovers on a regular basis. When I saw Darth Vader on the cover of this trade, I knew instantly what it meant: the crossover virus had infected Dark Horse. The one redeeming factor, however, is that Dark Horse's editors have no qualms about admitting this was a sales stunt--as evidenced in a column in the beginning of the book. (I couldn't believe what I was reading.) Not only does the second half of this trade go off on a tangent to satisfy its "Vector" crossover duties, but the art in the first half is absolutely terrible. I don't mind a cartoonish style, but this is poor art hiding behind a cartoonish facade: faces aren't stylized so much as distorted, often with a "smashed in" look to them, as if Celeste Morne just got punched in the face. What is the purpose of this, honestly? I think good scripts deserve good pencils and inks, and this trade's artists didn't do the script justice. (Such as it is...the script wasn't as strong as previous issues.) It was enjoyable, though, just not on the levels of the previous four trades. I am still impressed by Zayne's insistence on doing the right thing, much in the way of Batman never breaking his "one rule." Celeste is pretty much a paint-by-the-numbers stock character: orphaned female badass with a score to settle. She was pretty one-note and altogether dull. I didn't feel anything towards her as I have other characters in this series (yes, even the Moomo brothers.) It was jarring to see Darth Vader looming about in the second half, but such is the stuff of crossovers: just keep shoving ideas everywhere, even if they don't fit. Hopefully the quality will pick up in volume six. *Another reason? Celeste is a Jedi who wears a midriff. Please. How is this practical by any stretch of the imagination? This is the kind of nonsensical rubbish I bailed on DC for. (Huntress, I am looking at you...)

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Lanter

    To the best of my knowledge, this is the first crossover book I've ever read in comics where I was reading every series involved. Ultimately, I would say your interest in both titles (Knights of the Old Republic and Dark Times) is critical to determining how much you will enjoy Volume 1 of Vector. The first story arc from KOTOR is solid much like the series. If you know about Rakghouls from the video games then I think you will really appreciate the background information here. The art is a litt To the best of my knowledge, this is the first crossover book I've ever read in comics where I was reading every series involved. Ultimately, I would say your interest in both titles (Knights of the Old Republic and Dark Times) is critical to determining how much you will enjoy Volume 1 of Vector. The first story arc from KOTOR is solid much like the series. If you know about Rakghouls from the video games then I think you will really appreciate the background information here. The art is a little out of character for the series as a whole and is probably the weakest part of Vector. As the story shifts to Dark Times (with an absolutely gorgeous cover!), I was somehow surprised and delighted by how the stories connected to each other. I absolutely love Dark Times and so to get that connection along with the great art the series is known for was fantastic. The Dark Times story is short but very impactful (including one major event) and entertaining. Ultimately, if you like the Dark Times then you will enjoy this volume. If you don't as much or are only reading this for KOTOR your mileage will vary.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Michael Nash

    Vector is a storyline that runs across the four ongoing Dark Horse Star Wars series'. Volume 1 covers Knights of the Old Republic ( the setting of which seems to be based on Bioware's eponymous RPG), and Dark Times (a comic set in the period between the the overthrow of the Republic and the the rise of the Rebeliion, and in which Darth Vader apparently figures as a main character). The problem with this story is that it interacts seriously with the established stories of the various timelines, w Vector is a storyline that runs across the four ongoing Dark Horse Star Wars series'. Volume 1 covers Knights of the Old Republic ( the setting of which seems to be based on Bioware's eponymous RPG), and Dark Times (a comic set in the period between the the overthrow of the Republic and the the rise of the Rebeliion, and in which Darth Vader apparently figures as a main character). The problem with this story is that it interacts seriously with the established stories of the various timelines, which means that A. If you are trying to read on of these series (I am working through Star Wars: Legacy) then you have to read vector because it impacts the story, but B. if you haven't read these other series', then you have no idea what's going on during them in Vector. So, while the artwork was good and the writing was passable, I can't be enthusiastic over a comic in which I was confused the whole time.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    The only reason I picked up this volume to read was because the concluding volume contains stories in John Ostrander's Star Wars: Legacy series, and I really enjoy Ostrander's work. the good here is that the editors include a brief introduction before each section as Vector crosses over into all four of the Star Wars titles published by Dark Horse. The intro enables the casual reader to have, at the worse, a glimmer into what is happening in the respective series. The good here is the introducti The only reason I picked up this volume to read was because the concluding volume contains stories in John Ostrander's Star Wars: Legacy series, and I really enjoy Ostrander's work. the good here is that the editors include a brief introduction before each section as Vector crosses over into all four of the Star Wars titles published by Dark Horse. The intro enables the casual reader to have, at the worse, a glimmer into what is happening in the respective series. The good here is the introduction, to me, of Celeste the Jedi caught up in more than one conspiracy. Yet, I think Celeste's overall goal is to do good and to save people. Circumstances just don't always work out that way, and sometimes heroes, as Celeste does, have to make the best decisions possible. even when the best option still looks like defeat.

  22. 5 out of 5

    sixthreezy

    Wow I really enjoyed this volume of KOTOR. Granted, it's the first volume of the Vector storyline which is coming from the Knights. The Vector storyline I believe will be following the girl jedi with which Zayne becomes acquainted with during this volume. Darth Vader also has a minor role in here, which I liked as well. The plague of whatever-they're-called's... Was a cool bit of this too. I'd really like the rest of the KOTOR volumes to read as easily and provide as much excitement as this one Wow I really enjoyed this volume of KOTOR. Granted, it's the first volume of the Vector storyline which is coming from the Knights. The Vector storyline I believe will be following the girl jedi with which Zayne becomes acquainted with during this volume. Darth Vader also has a minor role in here, which I liked as well. The plague of whatever-they're-called's... Was a cool bit of this too. I'd really like the rest of the KOTOR volumes to read as easily and provide as much excitement as this one did, but so far only the first and this have done so. Not sure whether to continue with KOTOR, or sidetrack onto Vector.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Roberta

    This book is about the Muur Talisman, and goes across into three timelines. It originates in the Knights of the Old Republic where Zayne Carrick meets a Jedi Covenanter, Celeste. The second story is a continuation of the Dark Times series where Vader meets the bearer of the Muur talisman and involved the crew of the ship from the first two comics. The continuation of the series is supposed to be a sequel to the Rebellion and Legacy series moving farther in time. Interesting idea. The graphics were This book is about the Muur Talisman, and goes across into three timelines. It originates in the Knights of the Old Republic where Zayne Carrick meets a Jedi Covenanter, Celeste. The second story is a continuation of the Dark Times series where Vader meets the bearer of the Muur talisman and involved the crew of the ship from the first two comics. The continuation of the series is supposed to be a sequel to the Rebellion and Legacy series moving farther in time. Interesting idea. The graphics weren't quite as good as they've been in other comics.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mike Jozic

    When I read this trade the first time I was only reading DARK TIMES with any regularity. As a result, I found this crossover serviceable and entertaining but, overall, unremarkable. Four KOTOR trades later, however, and I'm much more invested in the story and can really appreciate what the creative teams are trying to accomplish, here. It may be my favorite of the OLD REPUBLIC collections so far and actually manages to use the 'event' as an opportunity to set the main character, Zayne, on a new When I read this trade the first time I was only reading DARK TIMES with any regularity. As a result, I found this crossover serviceable and entertaining but, overall, unremarkable. Four KOTOR trades later, however, and I'm much more invested in the story and can really appreciate what the creative teams are trying to accomplish, here. It may be my favorite of the OLD REPUBLIC collections so far and actually manages to use the 'event' as an opportunity to set the main character, Zayne, on a new path, one which I am very interested to follow.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Steven Shinder

    The art style for the KOTOR portion of this "cross-through" took some getting used to, and I found myself missing Jarael. It's difficult to tell whether or not anything in the KOTOR portion really adds much to Zayne Carrick's story. It definitely sets up Celeste Morne's story throughout Vector very well. The Dark Times portion felt more like a Darth Vader story than a Dark Times story. The Uhumele crew is barely featured, and there's no impactful death of any of them until the end, which I'm cer The art style for the KOTOR portion of this "cross-through" took some getting used to, and I found myself missing Jarael. It's difficult to tell whether or not anything in the KOTOR portion really adds much to Zayne Carrick's story. It definitely sets up Celeste Morne's story throughout Vector very well. The Dark Times portion felt more like a Darth Vader story than a Dark Times story. The Uhumele crew is barely featured, and there's no impactful death of any of them until the end, which I'm certain will be interesting to see the consequences of.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Max

    This succeed in getting me interested in reading KotOR at some point, despite the bad artwork, especially because I realized that part of Lost Tribe of the Sith references the Covenant. The plot overall is interesting, but I'm not sure how I feel about having zombies in Star Wars. It seems kinda stupid to me, but since apparently they come from KotOR, my reaction might be different when I read that series. This succeed in getting me interested in reading KotOR at some point, despite the bad artwork, especially because I realized that part of Lost Tribe of the Sith references the Covenant. The plot overall is interesting, but I'm not sure how I feel about having zombies in Star Wars. It seems kinda stupid to me, but since apparently they come from KotOR, my reaction might be different when I read that series.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Shaun

    Two Star Wars eras tied by a single story. I like the idea of a cross title event for Star Wars. The story was pretty fun and they brought in great characters from their properties like Zayne and Darth Vader. Celeste was a great addition to the mythos of the universe and a nice character to introduce during Vector. It was certainly fun to see how Zayne and his companions reacted to the Muur Talisman and the Rakghouls and Darth Vader wanting to use them for his own purposes.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Hedlun

    Maybe this is being picky but I didn't like that the Rakghoul Plague involved complete shape-shifting. Also, I haven't been paying attention to who did the pencil for the previous volumes but there is definitely a difference in style. I preferred the other. Am still enjoying the story line, though, and it was cool for them to do a cross over spanning so many years of the story line. Maybe this is being picky but I didn't like that the Rakghoul Plague involved complete shape-shifting. Also, I haven't been paying attention to who did the pencil for the previous volumes but there is definitely a difference in style. I preferred the other. Am still enjoying the story line, though, and it was cool for them to do a cross over spanning so many years of the story line.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jedi Sunni

    Darktimes vol 3: Not as long as I would of liked but still very enjoyable and filled with intrigue. This was a cossover that I thought was done very nicely and again it show just how deep into the dark side Vader has sunk. I thought that the Rakghoul plague was cool but I don't understand why everyone was not affected by it. Anyway great comic! My rating for this volume is 4.8 out of 5.0. Darktimes vol 3: Not as long as I would of liked but still very enjoyable and filled with intrigue. This was a cossover that I thought was done very nicely and again it show just how deep into the dark side Vader has sunk. I thought that the Rakghoul plague was cool but I don't understand why everyone was not affected by it. Anyway great comic! My rating for this volume is 4.8 out of 5.0.

  30. 4 out of 5

    DC

    I really didn't like the art in the first part of this book - too cartoony for my tastes, and Morne was far too asymmetrical. But I liked the story and characters enough to start in on the Knight of the Old Republic Series. I really didn't like the art in the first part of this book - too cartoony for my tastes, and Morne was far too asymmetrical. But I liked the story and characters enough to start in on the Knight of the Old Republic Series.

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