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Personal Injuries

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An ambitious personal injury lawyer, Robbie Feaver finds his less-than-ethical practices coming back to haunt him when, in exchange for leniency from prosecution, he is forced into an uneasy alliance with an enigmatic female FBI agent, in a story of greed, human weakness, love, and unexpected heroism.


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An ambitious personal injury lawyer, Robbie Feaver finds his less-than-ethical practices coming back to haunt him when, in exchange for leniency from prosecution, he is forced into an uneasy alliance with an enigmatic female FBI agent, in a story of greed, human weakness, love, and unexpected heroism.

30 review for Personal Injuries

  1. 4 out of 5

    RJ - Slayer of Trolls

    The fifth volume in Turow's Kindle County returns the series to the excellent form of the first two volumes, Presumed Innocent and The Burden of Proof. The story of an FBI sting operation investigating judicial malfeasance features shocking plot twists all the way to the final few pages, and as usual Turow's characters are surprisingly well drawn. Turow's faults are still evident as well, especially lengthy passages of exposition and description (the first time we visit any room there will be a The fifth volume in Turow's Kindle County returns the series to the excellent form of the first two volumes, Presumed Innocent and The Burden of Proof. The story of an FBI sting operation investigating judicial malfeasance features shocking plot twists all the way to the final few pages, and as usual Turow's characters are surprisingly well drawn. Turow's faults are still evident as well, especially lengthy passages of exposition and description (the first time we visit any room there will be a descriptive note of every single item of furniture along with any mementos or pictures that might be present) that slow the plot unnecessarily.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Judi

    The events in this novel are narrated by Defense Attorney George Mason who tells us from the start that this is a "lawyer's story, the kind attorneys like to hear and tell. About a case. About a client." So we should already know that this isn't going to be the run-of-the-mill courtroom drama. The case at first appears to be about tax evasion. The IRS Criminal Intelligence unit has found a non-interest bearing checking account that has millions in it and large sums of money withdrawn from it. No The events in this novel are narrated by Defense Attorney George Mason who tells us from the start that this is a "lawyer's story, the kind attorneys like to hear and tell. About a case. About a client." So we should already know that this isn't going to be the run-of-the-mill courtroom drama. The case at first appears to be about tax evasion. The IRS Criminal Intelligence unit has found a non-interest bearing checking account that has millions in it and large sums of money withdrawn from it. No taxes have been paid on any of this money. The real case, though, is about where this money is going; US Attorney Stan Sennett wants to use this fraud to get at the whole corrupt judicial system existing within Kindle County since the days of Mayor Bolcarro. The client is Robbie Feaver. Feaver & Dinnerstein are personal injury lawyers and have been best friends since childhood. Dinnnerstein's uncle happens to be Brendan Tuohey, Chief of the entire Kindle County Superior Court. It's suspected that they use this account to pay off judges to sway decisions in their favor. US Attorney Sennett has made it quite clear that it's jail or cooperation. Cooperation always means ratting out; either choice is tough on Robby. Jail means that he won't be able to be with his wife during her final year - she has A.L.S. (Lou Gehrig's disease). Ratting out, well, he's not a rat. Yet, he can't go to jail, he must take care of Lorraine. So he agrees to help with the sting as long as his partner, Dinnerstein, is protected. He claims that Dinnerstein knows nothing about what the money is really used for. Thus George Mason helps Robbie Feaver go undercover with the FBI. Turow's strength is that he always tells a good lawyer story. The whole FBI undercover sting is incredible from a technical as well as a personal perspective. However, it his character handling that is the most impressive. Robby Feaver is one of those people that most would find offensive. Too good looking and knows it, wears tailored Italian suits with lots of gold jewelry and too much cologne. He speaks too loudly and talks too much. Everything is a play. Look at his profession, he's an ambulance chaser! His one redeeming virtue is that he knows this about himself. Turow manages to keep Robbie true right up through the end, without him feeling like a stereotype. We learn most about Feaver through his interactions with undercover FBI agent Evon. She is acting as a paralegal clerk to keep an eye on Robbie. Our empathy for Robbie is absolutely necessary to the story line. A lesser writer would not be able to pull off the extra meaning behind the title. Turow's skill can be compared to that of a method actor. Not once does the reader have to worry about motivation - we are with these people. And the book certainly has it share of suspense and twists. To Turow's credit he also handles Robbie's wife's A.L.S. well, bringing to light the "Cruelest Disease," but not by making the book read like a tear jerk. By the way, this is the same disease that Stephen Hawking has been miraculously surviving for so long.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Arlene Sanders

    I know Robbie Feaver. Maybe you do, too — if you’re lucky. In my opinion, Robbie is among the most brilliantly — and lovingly — created characters in fiction. Robbie is a lawyer, a nice Jewish boy, handsome, sexy, funny, and a complex human being. “You could never count on him for honesty, assuming he even knew what it was. He was unruly and incorrigible. But if she stumbled, he’d come running. She couldn’t even say for sure she’d be able to reach out when he extended a hand. But he’d be there. she I know Robbie Feaver. Maybe you do, too — if you’re lucky. In my opinion, Robbie is among the most brilliantly — and lovingly — created characters in fiction. Robbie is a lawyer, a nice Jewish boy, handsome, sexy, funny, and a complex human being. “You could never count on him for honesty, assuming he even knew what it was. He was unruly and incorrigible. But if she stumbled, he’d come running. She couldn’t even say for sure she’d be able to reach out when he extended a hand. But he’d be there. she wasn’t going to forgive him, really. But she had to stop pretending with herself. Nine hundred people had just turned out, all there to buoy Robbie Feaver in his grief, nearly every one a friend who’d experienced his openness and the soothing warmth of his care. And she was one, too. You couldn’t fight facts.” There have been at least two Robbie Feavers in my life, and as much as I love men, I loved these two most of all. It was an extraordinary delight to find such a beloved character in a novel. Robbie shows us what love truly is — unconditional love, the kind of love you would be both blessed and unlikely to find in your lifetime. The man is deeply flawed: dishonest, irresponsible, undependable. Unfaithful, yet faithful: he strays, but always comes back to you. In PERSONAL INJURIES, Mr. Turow tests Robbie Feaver (pronounce it “favor”) beyond all limits of physical and emotional endurance. Robbie’s wife has a fatal illness. She is slowly dying throughout the novel. The course of her illness is graphic and heartbreaking. The strength of courage of this woman and her husband are beyond the meaning of courage and strength. In PERSONAL INJURIES, Mr. Turow explores love in all its forms: Robbie and his wife, Robbie and a lesbian woman, Robbie and his law partner and lifelong friend, Mort Dinnerstein. “There is deep feeling between these men,” one of the lawyers says, though Robbie and Mort are not homosexual. In PERSONAL INJURIES, love transcends sex. Scott Turow is a brilliant writer. He unfailingly delivers a great story, a roller coaster ride, and a page-turning cliffhanger. Sometimes the writing bogs down just a little bit. Forget and forgive that. The book is superb. And don’t pigeonhole this author as a “genre writer” of law thrillers. He is far, far better than that and getting better all the time. PRESUMED INNOCENT is a great read, and in the opinion of many reviewers, his best book. But I think his skill with characterization—making his characters real and complex and exciting for us—is, in PERSONAL INJURIES, superior to his other works. Arlene Sanders Blue Ridge Mountains, Virginia www.ArleneSanders.com

  4. 5 out of 5

    David

    Robbie is a lawyer who got caught passing bribes to judges. They make a deal with him to wear a wire so they can convict the judges. Things get more and more dangerous-- but the story is more about Robbie's philosophy of life and his impact on those around him.. his own lawyer and the beautiful F.B.I. agent posing as his new legal secretary and his wife, who is suffering from Lou Gehrig's disease. This is a tough book to read. Robbie's philosophy is to love those around him, though he does it th Robbie is a lawyer who got caught passing bribes to judges. They make a deal with him to wear a wire so they can convict the judges. Things get more and more dangerous-- but the story is more about Robbie's philosophy of life and his impact on those around him.. his own lawyer and the beautiful F.B.I. agent posing as his new legal secretary and his wife, who is suffering from Lou Gehrig's disease. This is a tough book to read. Robbie's philosophy is to love those around him, though he does it through a hard shell. He thinks life is a play and everyone is pretending to be something. He is a thorough scoundrel that slowly wins over the people closest to him. In the meantime, the young FBI chick is having her own inner conflict and this story is about inner conflict more than anything else. Turow can build some decent characters and insert some good lawyerly jokes and legal wrangling. However, this one spent too much time dealing with character issue and not nearly enough time advancing the plot. Not my favcrite, but worth forcing through.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    There is trouble afoot in the author‘s fictional Kindle County - specifically judiciary corruption. So the IRS, the “Feebs” and the local authorities place a compromised attorney - Robbie Feaver - undercover to flush out the gavel wielding crooks in black robes. Our narrator of this convoluted tale with a cast of many many characters is Mr. Feaver’s not so willing attorney. Being a Turow novel there is some wonderful writing and very poignant descriptions/observations on life, death and being tr There is trouble afoot in the author‘s fictional Kindle County - specifically judiciary corruption. So the IRS, the “Feebs” and the local authorities place a compromised attorney - Robbie Feaver - undercover to flush out the gavel wielding crooks in black robes. Our narrator of this convoluted tale with a cast of many many characters is Mr. Feaver’s not so willing attorney. Being a Turow novel there is some wonderful writing and very poignant descriptions/observations on life, death and being true to oneself. Unfortunately for this reader the storyline never gained any traction and simply plodded along - hence the low rating.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Craig Monson

    Personal Injuries takes readers once again to Kindle County, USA (somewhere in flyover country) and, in my view, back to the standard of Presumed Innocent. Within the first 1,000 words the Feds + IRS have turned a rich, successful, charming, womanizing personal injury lawyer, whom they wire up and employ to entrap a cohort of judges and various minions of the court, all similarly on the take. As the investigation lumbers forward over six months, through a thicket of legal, logistical, and electr Personal Injuries takes readers once again to Kindle County, USA (somewhere in flyover country) and, in my view, back to the standard of Presumed Innocent. Within the first 1,000 words the Feds + IRS have turned a rich, successful, charming, womanizing personal injury lawyer, whom they wire up and employ to entrap a cohort of judges and various minions of the court, all similarly on the take. As the investigation lumbers forward over six months, through a thicket of legal, logistical, and electronic challenges, the G-men’s best laid plans seem often to go awry and by the end some readers may be left dissatisfied by who does or does not get nabbed by the long arm of justice. Given Turow’s interest in lingering over his characters, the plot does not rattle along at the pace of the latest TV or silver screen shoot-em-up sequel. Here, increases in tension often seem to result from governmental screw-ups or bad guys' craftiness, which leave our anti-hero to improvise as best he can. Characters’ personal dramas often eclipse the slow progress of The Sting, which may appeal to readers interested as much in whozzit about as whatzit about. Turow once again introduces a fair share of Others (the African-American, the lesbian, the Jew, the Mormon) without lapsing deeply into stereotype and allows them equal opportunity to behave nobly, ignobly, or both. Character flaws give Turow lots to talk about and by the end good guys can offer less to admire than some bad guys. As one might expect, there are also inconvenient and unattractive truths of life, death, and society for readers to confront, shrug off, or simply not like.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Devine

    With a review of a 1999 copyrighted book I've obviously come across it in a second-hand shop. As a writer, I know this does the author out of a royalty (and regret that) but it's the best I can afford. And second-hand sales at least get an author additional readers. It's also a fact that I find myself more comfortable with traditional fiction writing from last century than some of its more modern forms. One way to judge a book is by how well it measures up to its cover blurbs. I agree with the "Gu With a review of a 1999 copyrighted book I've obviously come across it in a second-hand shop. As a writer, I know this does the author out of a royalty (and regret that) but it's the best I can afford. And second-hand sales at least get an author additional readers. It's also a fact that I find myself more comfortable with traditional fiction writing from last century than some of its more modern forms. One way to judge a book is by how well it measures up to its cover blurbs. I agree with the "Guardian" reviewer that "Turow succeeds in bringing his characters to life and in exquisite and moving detail". They are a colourful lot, though I found the narrator, who appears occasionally in the first person, rather unnecessary to the story. However, I would not have used the superlatives of other reviewers quoted on the back cover. I did not find it "spectacular" (though I appreciate the amount of effort the author put into research), nor all that much of "a humdinger of a plot", nor particularly "gripping". For me, judged against other thrillers I've read, it was not a page-turner, so I read it doggedly in small doses. The very small font size of this edition also made it more difficult to read easily. After trying Turow, I still prefer Grisham.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tex

    Maybe I’m done with Scott Turrow and maybe it’s lawyer procedural that I’m done with. Maybe it’s because I just read a phenomenal debut novel and then a YA fantasy and then this. This one dragged on for me. The title seemed to have nothing to do with the story. The only character that got any kind of depth was the main shady lawyer. The narration was first person which did not seem to have any reason attached to it as the narrator was a mere silhouette of a person. Good like a plain bread and Am Maybe I’m done with Scott Turrow and maybe it’s lawyer procedural that I’m done with. Maybe it’s because I just read a phenomenal debut novel and then a YA fantasy and then this. This one dragged on for me. The title seemed to have nothing to do with the story. The only character that got any kind of depth was the main shady lawyer. The narration was first person which did not seem to have any reason attached to it as the narrator was a mere silhouette of a person. Good like a plain bread and American sandwich is good in that it highlights how well written some books are. (Pardon my dangling...)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ernie

    Never read a book by this guy, and don't really read legal thrillers at all. Still, I think Turow has a real knack for character building and even the side characters are all fleshed out enough to be interesting. The plot itself is a little much, but I stuck around just to see the interactions between the players. I listened to the audiobook which was brilliantly narrated and overall I found it quite enjoyable. Never read a book by this guy, and don't really read legal thrillers at all. Still, I think Turow has a real knack for character building and even the side characters are all fleshed out enough to be interesting. The plot itself is a little much, but I stuck around just to see the interactions between the players. I listened to the audiobook which was brilliantly narrated and overall I found it quite enjoyable.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    I liked this one better than Pleading Guilty, the other Turow novel I've read dealing with a financial crime rather than a murder. The character depth in this book was amazing. I found myself hating Robbie Feaver and then, by the end of the book, forgiving him for all his indiscretions. Evon Miller was the other character I really felt attached to by the end of the book. I thought Turow did an incredible job filling out her character, which left me feeling like I didn't really know her until nea I liked this one better than Pleading Guilty, the other Turow novel I've read dealing with a financial crime rather than a murder. The character depth in this book was amazing. I found myself hating Robbie Feaver and then, by the end of the book, forgiving him for all his indiscretions. Evon Miller was the other character I really felt attached to by the end of the book. I thought Turow did an incredible job filling out her character, which left me feeling like I didn't really know her until near the end of the book. Miller's story was really what drove the book for me. I found myself turning pages more to find out what was going to be revealed about her next rather than what was happening with the larger plot. Turow did a great job of developing reader empathy for these character's and their struggles of self-discovery. I believe even Robbie, as deceitful and self-centered as he was, didn't know everything about himself before he met Evon Miller. And Evon Miller discovered herself along the way too, which I suppose was to be expected since the jacket summary pretty much gave us that much. The way their stories worked to complement each other and blend together was real literary genius in my opinion. I only rate this one four stars because there were still some places I found myself trudging through.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Crick Waters

    I did not like this book. From little thinks like Turow's insistence on shifting from referring to characters by first name then last name, even in the same paragraph. Really? Why?? Purely annoying to the reader having to keep track of what's going on in two character name-spaces. It would have been one thing if certain characters referred to each other by last name for effect, but that wasn't the case. This book is in the third person - I suspect I was supposed to care about the main character I did not like this book. From little thinks like Turow's insistence on shifting from referring to characters by first name then last name, even in the same paragraph. Really? Why?? Purely annoying to the reader having to keep track of what's going on in two character name-spaces. It would have been one thing if certain characters referred to each other by last name for effect, but that wasn't the case. This book is in the third person - I suspect I was supposed to care about the main character Feaver by the end of the book - perhaps because I was anticipating such a manipulation I was immune to it. Nonetheless, I found no favor in Feavor and actually only finished the book out of curiosity: what would Turow do to this character? In the end, there were no monumental triumphs and no spectacular defeats. The really bad guy never comes to justice, and the really good guy doesn't get his man. A whole book of buildup and no climax.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    I had hopes that this book would be better than the one I just read – I was still charged from the plot turn and rather hopeful to read a true page turner. Nope – didn't happen. This book did not hold my interest. It was overly descriptive, slow and drawn out. It was actually painful to read. I continued through the book hoping as Pleading Guilty, it would suddenly be good – it never happened. I would not recommend this book. I had hopes that this book would be better than the one I just read – I was still charged from the plot turn and rather hopeful to read a true page turner. Nope – didn't happen. This book did not hold my interest. It was overly descriptive, slow and drawn out. It was actually painful to read. I continued through the book hoping as Pleading Guilty, it would suddenly be good – it never happened. I would not recommend this book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tracey

    I hadn't read a Scott Turow book since probably the late 80s. I think my reading taste has advanced since those days. This book had complex legal machinations and intricately woven character parts, but was hard for me to follow - hard to remember all the characters' names. I just wasn't that impressed. Interesting story, but too long and too much intricate info for me. I hadn't read a Scott Turow book since probably the late 80s. I think my reading taste has advanced since those days. This book had complex legal machinations and intricately woven character parts, but was hard for me to follow - hard to remember all the characters' names. I just wasn't that impressed. Interesting story, but too long and too much intricate info for me.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michael Adamchuk

    Stan Sennett, DA, wants to clean up the Kindle County judiciary. With the help of the IRS, he finds out a local attorney, Robbie Feaver, has been paying off judges from a slush find he has with his partner, Mort Dinnerstein. Senett uses the leverage to set up a sting using Feaver. Some interesting legal maneuvers, a love story, and greed.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dolores

    Meh. Too many words to just get to an ending I didn't even really like. I liked Robbie (sometimes) Rainey (sad) and Evon ok but the rest not so much. Maybe the next Turow book I have on my shelf will be better. Meh. Too many words to just get to an ending I didn't even really like. I liked Robbie (sometimes) Rainey (sad) and Evon ok but the rest not so much. Maybe the next Turow book I have on my shelf will be better.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Charlie Ravioli

    Although this ranks lower to his other books I’ve read, it is still very good. A few things: 1. the story is a good one and keeps its pace as much as a thriller as a legal drama, 2. The narrator is a character you kind of know the least about although he is present throughout the book (an interesting technique), 3. Almost all the characters are in one way or another damaged and really not all that likable (some are less so than others but on the whole...). Turow’ so titles are always so good in Although this ranks lower to his other books I’ve read, it is still very good. A few things: 1. the story is a good one and keeps its pace as much as a thriller as a legal drama, 2. The narrator is a character you kind of know the least about although he is present throughout the book (an interesting technique), 3. Almost all the characters are in one way or another damaged and really not all that likable (some are less so than others but on the whole...). Turow’ so titles are always so good in that they are almost always double meaning. This one is no exception in that the main protagonist is a personal injury attorney but also the book is rife with people being “personally” injured throughout the book and across multiple fault lines (family, friends, partners, professional colleagues, etc.). Also the protagonists wife suffers from ALS which is also in a way a VERY personal injury. A still have a few of Turow’s I haven’t read but after having read three so far this year (one was a re-read), I think I’ll take a break from binging and pace myself to savor what’s left with a little distance of time.

  17. 5 out of 5

    David Portas

    Another cracking legal thriller. The only slight problem with the author is the books are very very long.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Evelyn Wilson

    I think I shouldn't star this but am not going to read it. Didn't care for The Laws of Our Fathers. I try to read 100 pages but stopped in that one at 97. Too much nonsense information. I think I shouldn't star this but am not going to read it. Didn't care for The Laws of Our Fathers. I try to read 100 pages but stopped in that one at 97. Too much nonsense information.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Vicki Elia

    Audiobook Review 4 3/4 Stars This novel is perhaps Turow's greatest piece of fiction of his entire collection. It's not a legal courtroom drama. It is the story of Robbie Feaver, a high-end ambulance chaser, who is caught in a bribery scheme that includes all the Judges and their minions in Kindle County. Robbie reluctantly agrees to flip on the Judges and work with the FBI. His motives are relatively simple -- he wants to protect his long-time partner Mort and his wife Lorraine, who is dying of A Audiobook Review 4 3/4 Stars This novel is perhaps Turow's greatest piece of fiction of his entire collection. It's not a legal courtroom drama. It is the story of Robbie Feaver, a high-end ambulance chaser, who is caught in a bribery scheme that includes all the Judges and their minions in Kindle County. Robbie reluctantly agrees to flip on the Judges and work with the FBI. His motives are relatively simple -- he wants to protect his long-time partner Mort and his wife Lorraine, who is dying of ALS. Told from the point of view of Robbie's lawyer, who is only a bit player in the character lineup, Robbie, with all his flaws and faults, a man who wanted to be a theatrical performer becomes a true star. In this wonderful saga, so unlike Grisham's recent pablum, we fall in love with the characters. Our minds and hearts move with them, break for them, fear for them. Turow's prosaic approach to weaving this complex story line with compelling dialogue is a real winner. Don't miss it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ross

    Seeking mysteries I happened upon this work and having read Presumed Innocent long ago, and 4-5 years ago I had read a well written non-fiction documentary by Turow of a noted miscarriage of justice. So I decided to give it a try. The story starts off with what portends to be an intersting plot. But then for the technically picky reader like me (scientist) it becomes contrived nonsense. For example, the author asks us to believe the anti-hero, a crooked personal injury attorney, has been practic Seeking mysteries I happened upon this work and having read Presumed Innocent long ago, and 4-5 years ago I had read a well written non-fiction documentary by Turow of a noted miscarriage of justice. So I decided to give it a try. The story starts off with what portends to be an intersting plot. But then for the technically picky reader like me (scientist) it becomes contrived nonsense. For example, the author asks us to believe the anti-hero, a crooked personal injury attorney, has been practicing law for decades taking insurance companies to the cleaners, GET THIS, without a license to practice law. Progressing from details like this the book descends in the end to utterly contrived nonsense. I asked a couple of lawyer friends who are Turow fans whhat they thought of it and they said "great." Go figure.

  21. 4 out of 5

    katie

    I liked this book. As hard as it was to get into at first with all the legal jargon and long paragraphs, this book really is a story about a confused, lost, idealist human being. While Robbie made mistakes and lied constantly, he was a deep character that Turow wrote incredibly well. The plot wasn't the most exciting, but I think the story was more about building the characters. (It was strange that we knew less about the narrator than any of the other people.) The depiction of Rainey and ALS wa I liked this book. As hard as it was to get into at first with all the legal jargon and long paragraphs, this book really is a story about a confused, lost, idealist human being. While Robbie made mistakes and lied constantly, he was a deep character that Turow wrote incredibly well. The plot wasn't the most exciting, but I think the story was more about building the characters. (It was strange that we knew less about the narrator than any of the other people.) The depiction of Rainey and ALS was depressing though, but the way Robbie treated her and his mom showed another side of his personality that made you realize while he was a huge liar, he also deeply cared about the people around him.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alison

    I enjoyed this book, it was a pretty good read. Overall it was a good story but, there were times I almost got bored with things that really didn't play that much into the story line. I did like toward the end when things started to come together, good twists and turns and an ending I didn't see coming which I think maybe I should have. Hind sight is 20/20 right, like the 6th Sense, you go back and watch it a 2nd time and you're like "Ah, Bruce Willis WAS dead the whole time!" Sorry if I spoiled I enjoyed this book, it was a pretty good read. Overall it was a good story but, there were times I almost got bored with things that really didn't play that much into the story line. I did like toward the end when things started to come together, good twists and turns and an ending I didn't see coming which I think maybe I should have. Hind sight is 20/20 right, like the 6th Sense, you go back and watch it a 2nd time and you're like "Ah, Bruce Willis WAS dead the whole time!" Sorry if I spoiled that for anyone :) But in the end this book was worth the read especially if you're a Scott Turow fan, it's not your typical legal thriller but went in a different direction which I liked, good break from the usual legal thriller you're going to read out there which made it worth the read.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Hagen

    Personal Injuries, by Scott turow, a-minus, Narrated by Mark Bramhall, Produced by Hachette Audio, downloaded from audible.com. Robbie Feaver is a well-known personal injury lawyer who almost always wins his cases. He is partnered with a lawyer he has known all his life, and the two work well together. But the Federal Distyrict Attorney and the FBI find out that he had fraudulently withheld money from the IRS. It’s quite a bit of money, so the prosecutor gets Robbie to agree to wear a wire and in Personal Injuries, by Scott turow, a-minus, Narrated by Mark Bramhall, Produced by Hachette Audio, downloaded from audible.com. Robbie Feaver is a well-known personal injury lawyer who almost always wins his cases. He is partnered with a lawyer he has known all his life, and the two work well together. But the Federal Distyrict Attorney and the FBI find out that he had fraudulently withheld money from the IRS. It’s quite a bit of money, so the prosecutor gets Robbie to agree to wear a wire and inform on others in order to make his own crime less. But has the prosecutor made deals with other people in the scenario as well. If so, how far does the betrayal go? Scott turow books are always extremely dramatic and spellbinding. This one is no exception. Very good.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Wow! What a great read. Scott Turow's writing is ourstanding: storyline, dialogue and character development are all first-rate. I didn't see the ending coming the way it came. Made perfect sense but still a real suprise. This story also resonated with me on a personal level. The description of one of the character's struggle with ALS, with it's slow and hideous progression, was painfully accurate. Having watched ALS slowly take my father's life in 1999 (but not his dignity) I can attest to both Wow! What a great read. Scott Turow's writing is ourstanding: storyline, dialogue and character development are all first-rate. I didn't see the ending coming the way it came. Made perfect sense but still a real suprise. This story also resonated with me on a personal level. The description of one of the character's struggle with ALS, with it's slow and hideous progression, was painfully accurate. Having watched ALS slowly take my father's life in 1999 (but not his dignity) I can attest to both the accuracy of Turow's description of this progressive disease and the abject fear it produces for the alert mind of an ALS patient trapped inside their own body.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Krizia Anna

    This was a remarkable book from an author and a genre I don't usually read about. I was quite shocked that I liked this. The story was well thought of, well paced and well written. The characters are memorable and they became a part of you. It's a law story that has heart and I think that what was good about it. I think this book is underrated so I recommend everybody to grab a copy and read it! Watch out for the twist at the end! This was a remarkable book from an author and a genre I don't usually read about. I was quite shocked that I liked this. The story was well thought of, well paced and well written. The characters are memorable and they became a part of you. It's a law story that has heart and I think that what was good about it. I think this book is underrated so I recommend everybody to grab a copy and read it! Watch out for the twist at the end!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dennis

    This had enought twists and turns to make it interesting. I don't know if I'd call it believable but it was fun, in its way. This had enought twists and turns to make it interesting. I don't know if I'd call it believable but it was fun, in its way.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Abbas

    I was delighted by the "density" of the descriptions of both the outer and inner worlds of the places and people in the book. I was delighted by the "density" of the descriptions of both the outer and inner worlds of the places and people in the book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    goes on and on and on. good to fall asleep by.

  29. 5 out of 5

    David

    My average rating is in the low 3's, an overall rating that very much resembles a bell curve. When I first started reading this novel, it was in bed before nodding off for the night. After a 100 pages or so, I knew that this story needed to be consumed when I was fully alert, ie. during daylight hours. That is when the story became alive for me. This is a story about good gone bad, a story about a person's life, in this case a lawyer, with his practice, with his mother, with his wife, and with h My average rating is in the low 3's, an overall rating that very much resembles a bell curve. When I first started reading this novel, it was in bed before nodding off for the night. After a 100 pages or so, I knew that this story needed to be consumed when I was fully alert, ie. during daylight hours. That is when the story became alive for me. This is a story about good gone bad, a story about a person's life, in this case a lawyer, with his practice, with his mother, with his wife, and with his willingness to go off the path of right into wrong. It is a good read, perhaps better if there were not quite so much off the beaten path into parts that could have been cut. Perhaps a Readers Digest condensed book would have been better, for me at least. I start to fidget when they start going over 500 pages. Shorter might have rung up the rare five for me. The ending was somewhat of a surprise though not unexpected, just in how.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Karl Jorgenson

    Turrow is a fantastic writer. His similes have similes and every one is spot-on. He loves characters; 80 percent of his books are characters. Reading Turrow, I am immersed in the world of Kindle County courts with its judges, lawyers, defendants, and minor players. It could not be more real if it was real. And that is Turrow's one weak spot: when you read Grisham or some other thriller writer, you can suspend your disbelief and enjoy a fantastic story with a huge payoff. When you read Turrow, it' Turrow is a fantastic writer. His similes have similes and every one is spot-on. He loves characters; 80 percent of his books are characters. Reading Turrow, I am immersed in the world of Kindle County courts with its judges, lawyers, defendants, and minor players. It could not be more real if it was real. And that is Turrow's one weak spot: when you read Grisham or some other thriller writer, you can suspend your disbelief and enjoy a fantastic story with a huge payoff. When you read Turrow, it's a pretty good story with amazing characters, but you never, never have to suspend disbelief. Turrow never made up a story that couldn't have happened and no aspect of the story is impossible. The reader comes away with a warm feeling that these things really happened while the reader was there, but the payoff is somewhat smaller since the events are real and thus more ordinary than most fiction.

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