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Holy Bible: Interactive Bible Stories for Children: New Testament

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Area: Middle East, Egypt Cross-references Section headings 5 1/4 X 7 1/4

30 review for Holy Bible: Interactive Bible Stories for Children: New Testament

  1. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Wilson

    Of course you don't evaluate Scripture when you are done reading through it, the way you can do with other books. But you can evaluate translations. My base translation is the KJV, but I frequently alternate with other versions for my regular reading. This read smoothly, and was not unlike the KJV. Of course you don't evaluate Scripture when you are done reading through it, the way you can do with other books. But you can evaluate translations. My base translation is the KJV, but I frequently alternate with other versions for my regular reading. This read smoothly, and was not unlike the KJV.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Karl

    A zombie invasion, Jesus healing people with spit, prophet-slave-girls, wizards ... When you read the bible as literature and not scripture you will notice that the Bible isn't a very Christian book, and you will realize that Christianity in the generations after Jesus was even more diverse than it is to day. The first third of the NT is the gospels, four quite different accounts of the life of Jesus. Mark is the story about a foul-tempered wizard. Luke is the oriental fairy tale of a mystic, int A zombie invasion, Jesus healing people with spit, prophet-slave-girls, wizards ... When you read the bible as literature and not scripture you will notice that the Bible isn't a very Christian book, and you will realize that Christianity in the generations after Jesus was even more diverse than it is to day. The first third of the NT is the gospels, four quite different accounts of the life of Jesus. Mark is the story about a foul-tempered wizard. Luke is the oriental fairy tale of a mystic, interspersed with obscure parables on theology. Matthew is about the absolutist who demanded complete subjugation to the Jewish law and turning the other cheek. Luke is a mystery story about the identity of Jesus. Q: Which is the only gospel where Jesus speaks ethics. A: Matthew. Q: What are the ethics of Matthew. A: Complete subjugation (Islam) to Jesus's interpretation of the Jewish law. Q: Wait a minute, Jesus was a tolerant lefty who liked non-violence, equality and all that stuff? A: Cherry-picking! According to Matthew Jesus was an extremist crack pot who went out of all bounds both in being nice to the poor and in insisting everyone should follow Jewish law to perfection. Q: Was Mary the mother of Jesus? A: Depends on which gospel you read. Q: Was Jesus born in Bethlehem? A: Depends on the gospel. Q: Did Jesus have siblings? A: Yes. Q: Was Jesus god? A: Depends on the gospel! (Matthew never says Jesus is god. Perhaps the Jesus of Mathew is a prophet, or god temporarily possessed Jesus? Why would Jesus otherwise cry out "My God, my God, why have you abandoned me?" when he hung on the cross? ... By the way there is a Zombie invasion after Jesus dies in Matthew." Leaving the gospels we get to acts of the apostles which is a kind of adventure-novel about the religion maker Paul. This book should be seen as fiction, as its Paul knows magic and founded dozens of churches. The story also features a couple of Greek slave girls who can see in to the future, and a bunch of genuine gentile wizards (who are way inferior to Paul). After acts we get to the genuine (and forged) letters by Paul. In these we get a fifth account about Jesus. Paul never actually met Jesus during his first stay at earth, but Jesus occasional speaks to Paul in visions. As you progress through the epistles it becomes clear that the Jesus of Paul is about as similar to the Jesus of Matthew as professor Dumbledore is to Saruman. It is like Paul never actually heard the story about Jesus, but only knew it via misunderstood clichés. The new testament drops pretty severely in quality after Paul's first few letters, and there is not much to comment upon until we reach the apocalypse, which is in a word strange.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mark Stephenson

    Jesus is peerless - but not friendless. Indeed a measure of what makes him without peer is the huge number of good and noble people who have aspired and still aspire to friendship with him. And whether friend, enemy or simply stranger to Jesus, what an infinite Friend and Advocate every human being has in the peerless only begotten Son of our Father which is in heaven! "Since by man came death, by man came also the resurrection of the dead. For as in Adam all die, even so in Christ shall all be Jesus is peerless - but not friendless. Indeed a measure of what makes him without peer is the huge number of good and noble people who have aspired and still aspire to friendship with him. And whether friend, enemy or simply stranger to Jesus, what an infinite Friend and Advocate every human being has in the peerless only begotten Son of our Father which is in heaven! "Since by man came death, by man came also the resurrection of the dead. For as in Adam all die, even so in Christ shall all be made alive."As I near completing yet another rereading of this marvellous compilation of writings of a few who attained friendship with the Master, I am moved by what he said (after his resurrection) to his beloved disciple John: " Behold, I stand at the door and knock: if any man hear my voice, and open the door, I will come in to him, and will sup with him, and he with me." and wonder if the most serious malnutrition problem of our time is that so many know not how to - or even decline to sup with their Saviour and truest friend.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Polansky

    Look, I don’t want to start a religious war here, and I’m not a believer so it’s not like I really have a dog in the fight, but there’s just nothing in this to match the sheer aesthetic genius of Genesis, let alone the brutal profundity of Job or Ecclesiastes. On the other hand, Matthew 6:17 is kinda my jam.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I finished reading this over a week ago. I have been pondering what I wanted to say here about my experience. I bought a self contained, soft-cover copy of the New Testament. It seemed surprisingly small to me. It’s only 404 pages. The book is only about 3/8ths of an inch thick. Contained within those four hundred plus pages is the testimony of the men who walked and talked with the Savior of the World. They bear their witness of His mortal life and His divine mission. Within these pages’ one fi I finished reading this over a week ago. I have been pondering what I wanted to say here about my experience. I bought a self contained, soft-cover copy of the New Testament. It seemed surprisingly small to me. It’s only 404 pages. The book is only about 3/8ths of an inch thick. Contained within those four hundred plus pages is the testimony of the men who walked and talked with the Savior of the World. They bear their witness of His mortal life and His divine mission. Within these pages’ one finds passages of scripture that are known and quoted throughout the Christian world. When you come across these passages, you can pretty much quote them to yourself without reading them. It was like re-reading a much loved favorite piece of fiction and remembering why that particular book is so cherished by you. In this case, the added fact that the Holy Spirit bears its subtle and quiet witness that these words and these events are true makes this experience a truly inspiring occasion in my life and adds further oil to my spiritual lamp.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Roberts

    I'm not sure I like what breaking the Bible into the Old and New Testaments to boost my yearly read count says about me. I'm also not sure I like Paul very much. I'm not sure I like what breaking the Bible into the Old and New Testaments to boost my yearly read count says about me. I'm also not sure I like Paul very much.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jelena

    Well, everyone knows the story: Conceived by a substance surrounding and exceeding everything and everyone, a child is born into an impoverished family in a barren land. Yet three wise travellers know the child to be the one who is awaited and foretold by the prophecy. Many years his whereabouts are uncertain, but he does return: grown up and with a reputation that precedes him. He returns to the capital in a fashion that makes everyone take notion of him: with passion and fire and vigour, commi Well, everyone knows the story: Conceived by a substance surrounding and exceeding everything and everyone, a child is born into an impoverished family in a barren land. Yet three wise travellers know the child to be the one who is awaited and foretold by the prophecy. Many years his whereabouts are uncertain, but he does return: grown up and with a reputation that precedes him. He returns to the capital in a fashion that makes everyone take notion of him: with passion and fire and vigour, committed to change the old ways of the structure and order, always staggering between being smug and being mistreated. In a tumbling series of events, he has to face a painful death through someone he considered a close friend. Yet again, the one from the prophecy returns once more, brought back in a new form by a power far beyond our world. In its core, all the drama is somewhat good actually and shows a fair incorporation of mythologems and archetypes. But there can never be an excuse for lobotomising dialogues and a protagonist with facial expressivity and articulation like a bowl of cereals. And no matter what anyone says, those Midichlorians are pure rubbish!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    This is the first time I've read the New Testament straight through. I started with the gospels and once I finished I was like, what the heck. Let's just keep going. Reading through the NT, verse by verse, book by book, puts the tenets of Christianity in a whole new light. Too many Christians swallow whatever comes from a pulpit (and yes, Fox News counts). The only way to get the real story--the real truth--is to read it. The NT is definitely a time consuming read, especially if you're just read This is the first time I've read the New Testament straight through. I started with the gospels and once I finished I was like, what the heck. Let's just keep going. Reading through the NT, verse by verse, book by book, puts the tenets of Christianity in a whole new light. Too many Christians swallow whatever comes from a pulpit (and yes, Fox News counts). The only way to get the real story--the real truth--is to read it. The NT is definitely a time consuming read, especially if you're just reading one chapter a night like I did. If you're looking for some highlights, here are my favorite books: Mark, Philippians, James, 1 Peter, 2 Peter, Acts, Galatians, Ephesians, 1 Corinthians, and Matthew.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    I don’t think I ever read the entire Bible in 12 years of Catholic school. In this version, some Books were narrated by Edward Herrmann and LeVar Burton, so those were easy to listen to. Other narrators were more difficult to listen to, so I definitely plan on sitting down and reading The Bible one day.

  10. 4 out of 5

    A.

    As a Christian, I love the Gospels, but a lot of Paul's words are a real slog. As a Christian, I love the Gospels, but a lot of Paul's words are a real slog.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jake

    Such a treat to re-read the New Testament this year; to focus on the life and teachings of the Savior and to rediscover many great writings of the Apostles.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kaju Janowski

    Reading this book as an agnostic I thought I would find something of philosophical value, some sort of set of ideas that would help me understand myself and the world I live in. Sadly, it was not the case. It was not all-for-nothing though. I did learn about differences in Christianity and Judaism, got to know about St Paul's devotion and got a closer look on Jesus's motives. In my personal opinion I recognised Jesus as a philosopher and I respect his willingness to improve people's life experien Reading this book as an agnostic I thought I would find something of philosophical value, some sort of set of ideas that would help me understand myself and the world I live in. Sadly, it was not the case. It was not all-for-nothing though. I did learn about differences in Christianity and Judaism, got to know about St Paul's devotion and got a closer look on Jesus's motives. In my personal opinion I recognised Jesus as a philosopher and I respect his willingness to improve people's life experience at the time. Last but not least, I found myself completely out of line of the Christian belief I was raised in and I freed myself of the term that does not describe me.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rhys

    DM rules for Jesus Christ. May have gimped him on some of these. CURE BLINDNESS Level: 3 School: Abjuration Components: V, A Range: Touch Casting Time: 1 round Duration: Permanent Saving Throw: None Target: touched creature Class: Cleric The creature touched has most kinds of blindness entirely removed. LESSER RESTORATION Level: 2  School: Abjuration Casting Time: 1 action Range: Touch Components: V A Duration: Instantaneous Classes: Bard, Cleric, Druid, Paladin, Ranger You touch a creature and can end either one DM rules for Jesus Christ. May have gimped him on some of these. CURE BLINDNESS Level: 3 School: Abjuration Components: V, A Range: Touch Casting Time: 1 round Duration: Permanent Saving Throw: None Target: touched creature Class: Cleric The creature touched has most kinds of blindness entirely removed. LESSER RESTORATION Level: 2  School: Abjuration Casting Time: 1 action Range: Touch Components: V A Duration: Instantaneous Classes: Bard, Cleric, Druid, Paladin, Ranger You touch a creature and can end either one disease or one condition afflicting it. RAISE DEAD Level: 5 Casting Time: 1 hour Range: Touch Components: V, S, M Duration: Instantaneous School: Necromancy You return a dead creature you touch to life, provided that it has been dead no longer than 10 days. If the creature's soul is both willing and at liberty to rejoin the body, the creature returns to life with 1 hit point. CREATE FOOD & WATER Level: 3  School: Conjuration Casting Time: 1 action Range: 30 feet Components: V A Duration: Instantaneous Classes: Cleric, Paladin You create 45 pounds of food and 30 gallons of water on the ground or in containers within range, enough to sustain up to fifteen humanoids or five steeds for 24 hours. The food is bland but nourishing, and spoils if uneaten after 24 hours. The water is clean and doesn’t go bad. TRANSMUTE LIQUID Level: 4 Classes: Sorcerer/Wizard Components: V, M Casting time: 1 round Range: Close (50ft. + 5ft./level) School: Transmutation Target, Effect, or Area: Single liquid substance Duration: Permanent This spell allows you to turn one common liquid into another, but does not allow for the spontaneous creation of liquids from nothing. This spell works on 5 cubic yards per caster level worth of liquid. So yes, you can turn water into wine now. WATER WALK Level: 3  Casting Time: 1 action Range: 30 feet Components: V S M (A piece of cork) Duration: 1 hour Classes: Cleric, Druid, Ranger, Sorcerer This spell grants the ability to move across any liquid surface—such as water, acid, mud, snow, quicksand, or lava—as if it were harmless solid ground (creatures crossing molten lava can still take damage from the heat). Up to ten willing creatures you can see within range gain this ability for the duration. CONTROL WEATHER Level: 8 Casting Time: 10 Minutes Range: Self (5 miles ) Components: V, S, M Duration: 8 Hours School: Transmutation You take control of the weather within 5 miles of you for the duration. You must be outdoors to cast this spell. Moving to a place where you don’t have a clear path to the sky ends the spell early.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Fairweather

    “Who also hath made us able ministers of the new testament; not of the letter, but of the spirit; for the letter killeth, but the spirit giveth life.” —2 Corinthians 3:6 “Christ hath redeemed us from the curse of the law, being made a curse for us: for it is written, Cursed is every one that hangeth on a tree.” —Galatians 3:13 “And they were astonished at his doctrine: for he taught them as one that had authority, and not as the scribes.” —Mark 1:22 “For the law was given by Moses, but grace and tr “Who also hath made us able ministers of the new testament; not of the letter, but of the spirit; for the letter killeth, but the spirit giveth life.” —2 Corinthians 3:6 “Christ hath redeemed us from the curse of the law, being made a curse for us: for it is written, Cursed is every one that hangeth on a tree.” —Galatians 3:13 “And they were astonished at his doctrine: for he taught them as one that had authority, and not as the scribes.” —Mark 1:22 “For the law was given by Moses, but grace and truth came by Jesus Christ.” —John 1:17 Dead law is the enemy. The new testament really bends the intellectual arc of the bible quite sharply towards the fulfillment of the “circumcision of the heart” first mentioned in the Torah. In the Torah, it struck me that the Jewish people sinned in their failure to follow the instruction of the law of God, which prevented them from reaching the land promised them by 40 years (which would not occur until in the Book of Joshua in the Nevi’im). Here, it is the improper following of law that is responsible for the (ir)realization of the state. What follows is the Nevi’im which is concerned with the writing of the prophets. Here, the state of Israel (and Judah) have been realized. The focus shifts towards the evils of the state and organized affairs of men as embodied in Babylon, a kingdom of men who serve as their own judge and celebrate their own achievements—the worship of idols, the emptiness of sacrifice and ritual (especially as articulated in Isaiah) and the need for the prophet to save the city from “rebellion against itself.” Circumcision of the heart is even more important in this regard as ritual and law is increasingly seen to be but a shadow of true faith. Finally, with the new testament, all that is implicit become explicit, with faith and circumcision of the heart taking center stage, even shedding its ties to land and people (that is, in being open to gentiles). Works and faith are the central elements of the new testament, reaching crescendo in the Pauline Epistles and the Epistle of James. Rather than the building of a physical kingdom, the new testament, with a weaker emphasis on the land and people has a stronger relationship with the kingdom of spirit (from Luke 7:35 - “wisdom is justified of all her children” and Peter says to Cornelius in Acts 10:28 that no man is common or unclean), an invisible kingdom where what actually matters in works are what is done through faith for God alone so that, in the words of Paul from Romans 2:14, people may act as “a law unto themselves” since, as in Mark 7:14-23 “things from within defile” or, Mark 9:50 “Salt is good: but if the salt have lost his saltness, wherewith will ye season it? Have salt in yourselves, and have peace one with another.” Matthew 6:4 similarly recommends “thine alms may be in secret” and for prayer recommends in 6:5 that “And when thou prays, thou shalt not be as the hypocrites are: for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and in the corners of the streets, that they may be seen of men, Verily I say unto you, They have their reward.” Replete with such expressions of faith and works, the new testament is explicit in its suspicion of the written law which is publicly observed by the orthodox Pharisees. Law in this form can be a tool, used for mortal benefit. This hatred of law is probably all the stronger since the principle of forgiveness plays such a central role in Christ’s proverbs. It will come as a surprise to no one that the sharpest condemnation of the Pharisees (and Jews) is their crucifying Christ. Embodied here is their lack of faith (examples of which are alluded to in Acts 7:55—“Which of the prophets have not your fathers persecuted? and they have slain them which shewed before of the coming of the Just One; of whom ye have been now betrayers and murderers”), lack of forgiveness, and embrace of secular law over spiritual principle. John 19:15 delivers the most damning example of this—“But they cried out, Away with him, away with him, crucify him. Pilate saith unto them, Shall I crucify your King? The chief of priests answered, We have no king but Caesar.” In this example the evil of the dead letter of law as a blunt instrument is very easily understood, as they refer to the law of Caesar rather than God. As mentioned earlier, the epistles of Paul expand upon the theme of the folly of law found in the gospels. James, whose emphasis on works was opposed to Paul’s emphasis on faith by Martin Luther (who dismissed James’ epistle as an “epistle of straw”) comes across differently in tone and subject. Paul definitely takes the cake when it comes to the fire of his words, but I had a more clear headed love for James’ epistle which in a manner of speaking sees the body as fulfillment of spirit rather than something that is simply corrupt—from James 2:26, “for as the body without the spirit is dead, so faith without works is dead also.” I appreciated how in the epistle of James, it is more concretely stated that faith receives fulfillment in works, while it is more of an implication in the Pauline Letters. Yet, I side with those whose interpretation doesn’t see a necessary split between the two outlooks. For when in John it is said in 15:4 “Abide in me, and I in you. As the branch cannot bear the fruit of itself, except it abide in the vine; no more can ye, except ye abide in me” both points of view are shown as being wrapped in one-another The branch is works… the vine is faith… the relationship is the fruit of truth, which is really what is important here. The true relationship between Paul and James is their being the completion of one another. But the unification of Paul and James is perhaps best expressed in Luke 9:62 where it is written that “Jesus said unto him No man, having put his hand to the plough, and looking back, is fit for the kingdom of God.” Faith underwrites works. What I remain unreconciled toward are the numerous statements in the gospels in which Christ shows ambivalence for familial obedience such as “a man’s foes shall be they of his own household” (in Matthew 10:36 for instance) and the almost unquestioning familial obedience recommended in numerous epistles. Without having resolved this for myself, I am more inclined to take Jesus’ statements more seriously, as they strike me as a more faithful expression of the “family of Jesus” alluded to in the gospels, as well as the dominant theme of the redemption of sinners and the redemption of gentiles in Paul’s epistles. There is a revolutionary fervor (I wish I could say this without it sounding trite, but such is the world these days) in the sayings of Jesus that I feel aren’t properly expressed in such sentiments found in the epistles. Also, the Book of Revelation? Who the fuck knows. Get back to me on that. The number 7 is a big one, though. All in all, I can’t help but step back from the new testament and read it secularly (I am not religious). It’s hard not to take the further turn inward and place the phenomenon parallel to the expansion of Roman Empire and its the “dead letter” of the law of its empire. But I’ve tried here to engage with the work on its own terms rather than talk about it in relation to world history—after all, I doubt I’m even equipped to do this. But it has been a pleasure to read and I certainly feel I have a greater understanding of… well, the spiritual journey of mankind?

  15. 5 out of 5

    John

    A very useful text. Basically you have *most* words that occur 30 times or less in the apparatus beneath the text. The author also defines some more common words that take an unusual form or unusual meaning. There is an appendix in the back for words that occur more than 30 times. The editor does a pretty good job. Frequently he also defines idioms that occurs - though not always. This is an ideal text for a late second year. There are some irksome features of the text. First, many times the edit A very useful text. Basically you have *most* words that occur 30 times or less in the apparatus beneath the text. The author also defines some more common words that take an unusual form or unusual meaning. There is an appendix in the back for words that occur more than 30 times. The editor does a pretty good job. Frequently he also defines idioms that occurs - though not always. This is an ideal text for a late second year. There are some irksome features of the text. First, many times the editor will define a word at the beginning of the paragraph and then assume that you need no more prompting. If you are jumping into the text, this can be a little jarring. Second, sometimes the editor defines unusual forms of very common irregular verbs. Third, some idioms are not defined at all no matter how often they occur. Of course, this text isn't supposed to do all the thinking for you, but I hope that in a later edition they can work on including more idioms and being more consistent.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    One of my favorite scriptures in the New Testament is in Romans 8, starting with verse 31: "What shall we then say to these things? If God be for us, who can be against us?...Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword?...Nay, in all these things are we more than conquerors through him that loved us. For I am persuaded that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor powers, nor things One of my favorite scriptures in the New Testament is in Romans 8, starting with verse 31: "What shall we then say to these things? If God be for us, who can be against us?...Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword?...Nay, in all these things are we more than conquerors through him that loved us. For I am persuaded that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor powers, nor things present, nor things to come, Nor height, nor depth, nor any other creature, shall be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Jesus Christ our Lord." These verses, to me, encapsulate the beautiful and comforting message of the entire New Testament. I believe with all my heart that the things written in the New Testament are true, that the accounts of Christ and his followers truly did happen. I will forever be thankful for the life, example, and Atonement of my Savior, Jesus Christ.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    Bit of a mishmash really. Lots of familiar stories, an insight into the values of the times, much repetition. Some wonderful resonant language. Much of it is of no particular interest unless you're a student of religion or have some other reason to read it. As a general reader I found it more of a slog than, say, James Joyce's Ulysses (and some of it frankly more bewildering too). Not something I'd want to recommend or read again, but at least it's a 'great book' to tick off my list. Bit of a mishmash really. Lots of familiar stories, an insight into the values of the times, much repetition. Some wonderful resonant language. Much of it is of no particular interest unless you're a student of religion or have some other reason to read it. As a general reader I found it more of a slog than, say, James Joyce's Ulysses (and some of it frankly more bewildering too). Not something I'd want to recommend or read again, but at least it's a 'great book' to tick off my list.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    Definitely one of he greatest books ever. Its entire purpose exists in helping mankind achieve their best. I sure hope I'm not at my best but I know that abiding by these teachings I will get there. This time through I listened to this amazing book and it is quite fascinating how you hear things different when you listen to it. Definitely one of he greatest books ever. Its entire purpose exists in helping mankind achieve their best. I sure hope I'm not at my best but I know that abiding by these teachings I will get there. This time through I listened to this amazing book and it is quite fascinating how you hear things different when you listen to it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mateusz

    Ok, parts where they where just giving you numbers of candlesticks in jerusalems temple where extremely boring, but they were kind a balanced by whole murderous rest of the book. But most of it were still boring. And full of contradictions.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Brown

    The beautiful history of the birth, life and teachings, as well as the resurrection of Jesus Christ, as well as the history of his apostles. I have read this multiple times, but it always touches my heart and strengthens my faith in my Savior.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Abby

    You know, honestly, I thought there'd be more Jesus in this. You know, honestly, I thought there'd be more Jesus in this.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jaclyn

    I don't often review religious texts, but I have been making a concerted effort in the past year to finish the scripture books I begin. I appreciate focused study, but the consistency of reading cover to cover has meant a lot lately. This is why I started "The New Testament" as we began the Come Follow Me study program. It's harder for me to listen to The New Testament than The Book of Mormon, but I'm glad to have revisited the four Gospels again. Their nuanced descriptions of the Savior's life a I don't often review religious texts, but I have been making a concerted effort in the past year to finish the scripture books I begin. I appreciate focused study, but the consistency of reading cover to cover has meant a lot lately. This is why I started "The New Testament" as we began the Come Follow Me study program. It's harder for me to listen to The New Testament than The Book of Mormon, but I'm glad to have revisited the four Gospels again. Their nuanced descriptions of the Savior's life are profound. I also appreciate the examples of Peter and Paul, and my heart broke again hearing Stephen's story. It's amazing what daily scripture study can do. Happy reading-- (Book 33 - 2019)

  23. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Gregory Peck has a wonderful sonorous voice, perfect for the stately elevated diction of the King James Version. I'm familiar with the King James New Testament from my English major, English teacher, and ministry school days. I'm definitely a fan of the narratives as in the Gospels and Revelation. I had forgotten how much a struggle it was for me to be engaged with the various epistles. We only ever read short passages in church; while I appreciated learning context, I really wasn't feeling them Gregory Peck has a wonderful sonorous voice, perfect for the stately elevated diction of the King James Version. I'm familiar with the King James New Testament from my English major, English teacher, and ministry school days. I'm definitely a fan of the narratives as in the Gospels and Revelation. I had forgotten how much a struggle it was for me to be engaged with the various epistles. We only ever read short passages in church; while I appreciated learning context, I really wasn't feeling them. This makes me want to listen to the Old Testament as an audiobook given that there are so many more stories and poems.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Calum

    Truly, truly, I tell you: with this book I am well pleased. An excellent modern translation which (almost) allows the original text to be understood - apart from the Book of Revelations which is some of the craziest shit I've ever read and is SURELY the psychedelic ramblings of a monk who doesn't take the opportunity to leave his monastery basement as often as he should. I also feel there are an unnecessarily large number of Epistles in the book (over half the book is just letters!), however I u Truly, truly, I tell you: with this book I am well pleased. An excellent modern translation which (almost) allows the original text to be understood - apart from the Book of Revelations which is some of the craziest shit I've ever read and is SURELY the psychedelic ramblings of a monk who doesn't take the opportunity to leave his monastery basement as often as he should. I also feel there are an unnecessarily large number of Epistles in the book (over half the book is just letters!), however I understand this is not a complaint I can direct towards Richard Lattimore. Overall, it's not just a Good book, but a Great book.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ellis Atwood

    Um, am I allowed to rate this less than a 5? The gospels were good, but the epistles, particularly the early ones, were full of pointless meandering and really cryptic passages. I guess my beef is not with the King James Version, but with the fact that it is still commonly used, despite archaic language, cryptic passages, and unending barriers to understanding. Insisting on this older version just seems so exclusionary to your average person who doesn’t have a strong grasp of Shakespearean Engli Um, am I allowed to rate this less than a 5? The gospels were good, but the epistles, particularly the early ones, were full of pointless meandering and really cryptic passages. I guess my beef is not with the King James Version, but with the fact that it is still commonly used, despite archaic language, cryptic passages, and unending barriers to understanding. Insisting on this older version just seems so exclusionary to your average person who doesn’t have a strong grasp of Shakespearean English.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Brenda Christensen

    I studied the N.T. this year in church and have a new found love and appreciate for this book, and for the Savior who is, of course, the main subject. There are so many reminders of how to live a good, purposeful life. I have filled its margins and pages with highlights and notes, starred favorite passages, and included quotes as well. I will be turning to its pages often. It reaffirms my belief that through Jesus Christ, there can be peace in my life today and every day.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Anita

    first time reading again since becoming latterday saint. i read it as part of a challenge to read the standard works. i was really impressed this time with the writings of paul. understanding the anchient church through the lens of the restored church really made quite a difference in the meaning of some of the verses.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    While I had always heard the biblical stories as a child and studied them in pieces, this was my first time reading the New Testament (KJV) from start to finish. Putting the different stories in context has given me a greater understanding of the book and those of the life and teachings of Jesus Christ, especially as they were applied by his followers in that meridian of time.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Hensley

    This will be read and re-read throughout my life sometimes just in verses or chapters or books within the book. So really I will never be finished reading The New Testament along with The Old Testament The Holy Bible

  30. 4 out of 5

    Joel San George

    I Love God,God is Great and Powerful.Amen

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