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Warriors, Witches, Women: Mythology's Fiercest Females

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Warriors, Witches, Women is a guide to awe-inspiring mythical female creatures; from feminist fairies to bloodsucking, seductive temptresses, half-human half-bird harpies created from the wind, or protective  voodoo goddesses who still impact on African-American cultural feminism.  The stories of fierce females from mythology and folklore are retold, placing women firmly at Warriors, Witches, Women is a guide to awe-inspiring mythical female creatures; from feminist fairies to bloodsucking, seductive temptresses, half-human half-bird harpies created from the wind, or protective  voodoo goddesses who still impact on African-American cultural feminism.  The stories of fierce females from mythology and folklore are retold, placing women firmly at the centre of the narrative. Each powerful character will fire the imagination, entertain, and provoke debate.


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Warriors, Witches, Women is a guide to awe-inspiring mythical female creatures; from feminist fairies to bloodsucking, seductive temptresses, half-human half-bird harpies created from the wind, or protective  voodoo goddesses who still impact on African-American cultural feminism.  The stories of fierce females from mythology and folklore are retold, placing women firmly at Warriors, Witches, Women is a guide to awe-inspiring mythical female creatures; from feminist fairies to bloodsucking, seductive temptresses, half-human half-bird harpies created from the wind, or protective  voodoo goddesses who still impact on African-American cultural feminism.  The stories of fierce females from mythology and folklore are retold, placing women firmly at the centre of the narrative. Each powerful character will fire the imagination, entertain, and provoke debate.

30 review for Warriors, Witches, Women: Mythology's Fiercest Females

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sumit RK

    We are the granddaughters of the witches you weren't able to burn Warriors, Witches, Women is a guide to the legendary mythical female characters which brings old myths and folktales to life by casting them in a modern light. From feminist fairies to seductive temptresses, from fearsome witches to little known goddesses, this book covers a large variety of mythological characters. Divided into five sections, ( witches, warriors, bringers of fortune, elemental spirits, and munificent spirits ) i We are the granddaughters of the witches you weren't able to burn Warriors, Witches, Women is a guide to the legendary mythical female characters which brings old myths and folktales to life by casting them in a modern light. From feminist fairies to seductive temptresses, from fearsome witches to little known goddesses, this book covers a large variety of mythological characters. Divided into five sections, ( witches, warriors, bringers of fortune, elemental spirits, and munificent spirits ) it is accompanied by a glossary and suggestions for further reading. With beautiful illustrations and lots of information, Warriors, Witches, Women takes look at some of the prominent and some forgotten women in mythologies around the world. In all, Kate Hodges has collated 50 female lives covering the witches and warriors, spirits and benevolent goddesses. Each character profile contains a full-page illustration, their origin stories, and their relevance even in today's world. The illustrations by Harriet Lee Merrion are beautiful, capturing the essence of the character and bringing these fascinating characters to life. Medusa, Baba Yaga, Circe, Cassandra, Rhiannon, Kali, Cihuateteo, Ma ’at were some of the most interesting characters for me. The choice of characters was really inclusive, with legends taken from all parts of the world, from different times and different cultures. There were a lot of women in this book that you would not be familiar about and it was fascinating to learn about them. The stories not only cover the legend of the woman but also an attempt to correct the negative stereotypes about them and restore their reputations. It does acknowledge all the different narrations over time- how the stories and the characters themselves evolved, with a change in time and culture. Overall, this book was very informative and engaging. It had lovely illustrations, concise information and a mix of characters from diverse cultures. If you enjoy reading about mythologies from across the globe, then you will surely enjoy reading this book. Many thanks to the publishers Quarto Publishing Group - White Lion Publishing and Netgalley for the ARC.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nenia ✨️ I yeet my books back and forth ✨️ Campbell

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest WARRIORS, WITCHES, WOMEN is a reference book detailing notable figures from mythology and folklore from around the world. Each section is divided into categories: warriors, witches, elemental spirits, evil and benevolent. The author really made an effort to be diverse in her inclusions, so we have figures taken from Judeo-Christian religion, as well as Voudo deities, Japanese youkai, Buddhist and Hindu gods, Celtic goddesses and spirits, Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest WARRIORS, WITCHES, WOMEN is a reference book detailing notable figures from mythology and folklore from around the world. Each section is divided into categories: warriors, witches, elemental spirits, evil and benevolent. The author really made an effort to be diverse in her inclusions, so we have figures taken from Judeo-Christian religion, as well as Voudo deities, Japanese youkai, Buddhist and Hindu gods, Celtic goddesses and spirits, Meso-American spirits and gods, and notable gods and goddesses from the Ancient Greek and Roman pantheons. What really makes this book is the art, which is done by Harrliet Lee-Merrion. Every being gets a drawing and they're all in glorious full color. I think my favorite was probably the one for futakuchi-onna, who is actually far less creepy than she appears (and she is creepy: picture a woman with a mouth on the back of her head). This is the epitome of a coffee table book, and it's where my copy shall be going forthwith.  The reference section itself is pretty self-explanatory. Each figure gets a brief overview with some references to controversies or real-world applications and references. For example, Circe's section talks about the Margaret Miller book of the same name, and Baba Yaga's mentions Spirited Away, as serving as the basis of the inspiration for the witch in the movie. This book is more to give you a taste of each being and not really for hardcore research; it's a curiosity, more than anything. Were it not for the beautiful presentation of the book, I'd probably give it three stars instead of four. But the art, as I said before, is e v e r y t h i n g. Thanks to the publisher for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review!   3.5 stars

  3. 5 out of 5

    sarah

    Warriors, Witches, Women brings old myths and folktales to life by casting them in a modern light. The book would relate the tales to feminism, climate change and the Me Too movement. This made centuries old stories relevant and engaging. This book tells the story of some of the countless women who have had their tale shrouded because they were Too loud. Too powerful. Too smart. These women were either cast a witches, ugly and unloveable- cast as the villain, or erased from history, warning othe Warriors, Witches, Women brings old myths and folktales to life by casting them in a modern light. The book would relate the tales to feminism, climate change and the Me Too movement. This made centuries old stories relevant and engaging. This book tells the story of some of the countless women who have had their tale shrouded because they were Too loud. Too powerful. Too smart. These women were either cast a witches, ugly and unloveable- cast as the villain, or erased from history, warning others to not follow their lead. Not going to lie, the large majority of myths I know is from from Percy Jackson- so this was very informative and entertaining. I know I, and many others have been given a very white washed version of mythology. This collection however brings women from all over the world to show women of all colours, sizes and sexualities. The book is formatted with a beautiful illustration of the woman, followed by 3 pages of information about her. The illustrations in this book were breathtaking, and I would recommend checking it out for the sole purpose of seeing some of the gorgeous pictures. Some of the stories felt like a fairy tale. “Behind her fly her three magical birds, said to sing songs that can heal all sadness, wake the dead from their slumber and send the living whistling happily to their doom” - Rhiannon, Celtic goddess/fairy Some of my favourite stories, and ones I would recommend you learn more about include: ➽ Baba Yaga ➽ Cassandra ➽ Berchta ➽ Rhiannon ➽ Cihuateteo ➽ Baobhan sith ➽ Ma’at However, for me it was not quite digestible. Big chunks of text tend to remind me of textbooks and my eyes immediately glaze over, which began to happen a few times while reading this. Overall, this book was very informative and for the most part engaging. I would recommend it to anyone wanting to learn more about mythological women from across the globe- those famous, infamous and largely unknown. _____________________________________________________________ Thanks to White Lion Publishing for the ARC Release Date: 4 February 2020

  4. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    Thanks to Quatro Publishing Group- White Lion Publishing for granting my wish on NetGalley. I enjoy reading about strong women in both fiction and nonfiction and this collection of fab women from different mythologies from around the world was a superb read. Divided into five sections( witches, warriors, bringers of fortune, elemental spirits, and munificent spirits) and accompanied by a glossary, suggestions for further reading, and a mythological women playlist, this book was a great readin Thanks to Quatro Publishing Group- White Lion Publishing for granting my wish on NetGalley. I enjoy reading about strong women in both fiction and nonfiction and this collection of fab women from different mythologies from around the world was a superb read. Divided into five sections( witches, warriors, bringers of fortune, elemental spirits, and munificent spirits) and accompanied by a glossary, suggestions for further reading, and a mythological women playlist, this book was a great reading treat. There were the women that I knew from the Greek/ Roman, Celtic, and Norse traditions, but so many more that were fresh and new to me. All-powerful women that were important to their cultural stories but faced the threat of being put in their place by men or organized religions. Each woman has been given her 1-2 page allotment which offers the origin stories and connection to both religious and historical context and their relevance even in today's world. About the artwork that accompanies the text, I thought it gave an idea of how each woman was sometimes portrayed in her culture. Goodreads review published 02/01/20 Publication Date 04/02/20

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Lovingly collated, this is a diverse and well written book on various goddesses of various ancient myths and legends. Everything from Medusa, Mami Wata and the gender fluid rainbow serpent are included, with details about their origins and their place in today's society. There's frequent discussion over how these dieties have been reclaimed by strong females of today and how they are helping to redefine what it is to be strong, powerful and feminine. There were also a lot of Gods I had never hea Lovingly collated, this is a diverse and well written book on various goddesses of various ancient myths and legends. Everything from Medusa, Mami Wata and the gender fluid rainbow serpent are included, with details about their origins and their place in today's society. There's frequent discussion over how these dieties have been reclaimed by strong females of today and how they are helping to redefine what it is to be strong, powerful and feminine. There were also a lot of Gods I had never heard of before, and I learnt a lot that I want to go on and study further. Although the illustrations aren't necessarily to my taste, I do like the muted colour palette used and thought that overall they fit in well with the books aesthetic.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Maja - BibliophiliaDK ✨

    FEMINIST MYTHOLOGY = 👍👍 I have always loved mythology, it is one of my absolute favourite things. Even with all the time I have spent learning different mythologies, there were several amazing women here that I didn't know anything about. "Yes we are angry, yes we are making a noise about it, and yes, we are hungry for change. We are harpies." 👍 WHAT I LIKED 👍 Rehabilitation: Many of the women in these books have besmirched reputations. They are vilified, slutshamed and turned into neg FEMINIST MYTHOLOGY = 👍👍 I have always loved mythology, it is one of my absolute favourite things. Even with all the time I have spent learning different mythologies, there were several amazing women here that I didn't know anything about. "Yes we are angry, yes we are making a noise about it, and yes, we are hungry for change. We are harpies." 👍 WHAT I LIKED 👍 Rehabilitation: Many of the women in these books have besmirched reputations. They are vilified, slutshamed and turned into negative stereotypes. However, many of these women didn't start out as villains. This book goes a long way to restore their reputations. Present day representations: One thing I really enjoyed about all the women was learning about their present day representations in pop culture, fashion, idioms and such. Not surprisingly, Game of Thrones was referenced a bunch of times. Illustrations: Each woman is beautifully illustrated in a way that makes their stories come to life. ARC provided by the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dannii Elle

    Actual rating 4.5/5 stars. Circe. Medusa. The Furies. These, and many more, famed mythological women were equally as famed for their beauty as their monstrous qualities and, often too, their tragic endings. This collated fifty of mythology's females and provided the reader with a brief understanding of their story, their fate, and their contemporary relevance. This empowered the women who remained voiceless, abused, marginalised, the moral of the story, or the villain to be slain in male-centric s Actual rating 4.5/5 stars. Circe. Medusa. The Furies. These, and many more, famed mythological women were equally as famed for their beauty as their monstrous qualities and, often too, their tragic endings. This collated fifty of mythology's females and provided the reader with a brief understanding of their story, their fate, and their contemporary relevance. This empowered the women who remained voiceless, abused, marginalised, the moral of the story, or the villain to be slain in male-centric stories and sought to provide some measure of understanding for the dark deeds associated with them. I highly appreciated the diversity inside of these pages, as many areas of the globe were covered, not solely those who feature inside Greek or Roman mythology, which were previously the most well-known to me. I just as highly appreciated the modern-day women they featured alongisde them. For example, green goddesses were likened to climate change activist Greta Thunberg and outspoken women to many female political leaders. Harriet Lee Merrion's gorgeous and vibrant full-page illustrations accompanied Kate Hodges powerful words, making this a 200-page-long feminist celebration! I am fully obsessed with this art style and have discovered such a diverse array of mythological females to learn more about, in the future.

  8. 5 out of 5

    amanda

    What kind of legacy do you want to leave behind? What do you want to be known for? Warrior? Goddess? Monster? Witch? Queen? Harbinger? Ghost… Uh, I think you all know what I would choose. Witchy Ghost Queen remixed with Goddess This world is made of mythos. History is laced with fact and fiction and they intertwine. We have prayed to the Gods and Goddesses, sent our strongest soldiers off to wars, we dare not speak the name of certain spirits in fear of invoking their wrath. We learn to not repeat mist What kind of legacy do you want to leave behind? What do you want to be known for? Warrior? Goddess? Monster? Witch? Queen? Harbinger? Ghost… Uh, I think you all know what I would choose. Witchy Ghost Queen remixed with Goddess This world is made of mythos. History is laced with fact and fiction and they intertwine. We have prayed to the Gods and Goddesses, sent our strongest soldiers off to wars, we dare not speak the name of certain spirits in fear of invoking their wrath. We learn to not repeat mistakes but we also learn because it is fundamental to know and it is FASCINATING. History is rich and it is sordid and it is messy and I absolutely love it. I don’t think I have to hide the fact that I loved this book and how it highlights women: good and bad, fact or fiction. Warriors, Witches, Women is an illustrated book that showcases women from all around the world. These are the women made up up legends. The first chapter? Witches I’ve never heard of Morgan Le Fay but I learned that she is a British Fairy and Enchantress. The book also provides us with a really handy description and her history which I…am crying over. Another favorite entry of mine is The White Buffalo Calf Woman, an Indigenous American/Lakaotan Spirit who taught the Lakota Sioux Tribe tribes their most precious ceremonies their most precious ceremonies and environmental practices. It is books like this I love the most because they go into such careful detail into teaching us important history. Growing up, we always got a very white washed version of mythology and it was frustrating as a black child. All of these great people and they’re all…white. It’s stinging. This book does a great job in showcasing various figures of color such as Mami Wata, Cihuateteo, Yennenga , Futakuchi-onna. Of course, my creepy ass is also happy in the ghost section. I nearly wept. SO MANY GHOST FIGURES I KNEW NOTHING OR NEARLY NOTHING ABOUT? I’M…so happy you guys. This is a gorgeous book. The writing is impeccable and the artwork is amazing. Each entry has its own art and a lot of effort and love was put into it. You can absolutely tell. I plan to buy this when it’s available because an ARC copy doesn’t do it justice and I need my daughter to read this as well. Luckily we live in a time where she doesn’t have to go through what I did and doubt that just because her skin is dark doesn’t mean that her history isn’t rich in mythology. Her background is full of goddesses, strategists, elementals. Strong women past and present. It all leads back to her and she too will be known as legendary. Thank you very much to publisher and Netgalley for this copy of my ARC. All opinions are my own,. I wish I could give more than 5 stars.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Erika Sarutobi

    4.5 stars. I enjoy reading mythology and was interested in this since it was written through a feminist lens. Though it was fun reading through them, I can't help but feel like it was getting a bit repetitive with the feminist aspects in each entry because there were many. Each entry explained the history of each woman and the original story about them before the male authors of the past changed their description to be more wicked or weak and dimmined their strong aura so that people would not fol 4.5 stars. I enjoy reading mythology and was interested in this since it was written through a feminist lens. Though it was fun reading through them, I can't help but feel like it was getting a bit repetitive with the feminist aspects in each entry because there were many. Each entry explained the history of each woman and the original story about them before the male authors of the past changed their description to be more wicked or weak and dimmined their strong aura so that people would not follow/worship these powerful women. Overall, it was fun to read about these women from different culture though it had too many modern references to the point it was spoilery at times. Thank you Netgalley for providing me with the digital copy for an honest review.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Liv

    BOOK REVIEW - ⭐⭐⭐ Warriors, Witches, Women: Mythology's Fiercest Females by Kate Hodges This book is a guide to mythical women and female creatures across history and across the globe. It's clearly a very feminist interpretation of these women's stories and for that reason I really liked it. Kate Hodges has several sections to the book that split the mythical female creatures into different categories: warriors, witches, bringers of misfortune, elemental spirits and munificent spirits.  Kate Hodges BOOK REVIEW - ⭐⭐⭐ Warriors, Witches, Women: Mythology's Fiercest Females by Kate Hodges This book is a guide to mythical women and female creatures across history and across the globe. It's clearly a very feminist interpretation of these women's stories and for that reason I really liked it. Kate Hodges has several sections to the book that split the mythical female creatures into different categories: warriors, witches, bringers of misfortune, elemental spirits and munificent spirits.  Kate Hodges made these women much more relevant and accessible to the modern day as she discussed how these women stories came about, how their image changed due to patriarchal pressure. Hodges attempts to almost rehabilitate these mythical creatures to show how there were positive aspects to their stories. She also unpicks as to how some of them have been vilified because they've been the victim i.e. Medusa and Futakuchi-Onna.  I really liked that Hodges included mystical beings from more than just Greek and Norse mythology which I feel like is generally the focus of these kinds of books. She had a gender-fluid Aboriginal god/goddess, Vietnamese goddess, Mesopotamian goddesses, Japanese beasts, African goddess, and Mexican spirits to name a few. Lots of these mythical beings I'd never even heard of. There were 50 different mythical beings in the book and each one had 3-4 pages about them. Hodges included references to where their stories originated, how their stories changed over time and how that related to modern women. I think the major disappointment for me was that some of these names are in different languages or uncommon to me and just a reference to how to pronounce them would have been really helpful.  I also think that Hodges attempts to bridge her stories to modern day were a little stretched at times. When she wrote about the Japanese being Futakuchi-Onna it felt very generic as to how women are expected to be silent, not expected to eat. However, this "beast" originated in Japan and I feel like Hodges didn't focus enough for me in many instances on why these mythical beings got distorted in these specific cultures. So whilst it was really good she included lots of different beings from across the globe, I still wanted more.  Overall, this was enjoyable but I wasn't quite as immersed as I'd hoped. There was a little something missing from this book. eArc provided by NetGalley.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mariah

    ARC provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. “We will not wait to be offered leftovers from the feast. We will arrive in a whirl of wings and talons and pick off what belongs to us. Yes, we are angry, yes we are making a noise about it, and yes, we are hungry for change. We are harpies.” I have always been fascinated by mythology, in all it’s iterations. From Disney’s Hercules, to Wonder Woman, Saint Seiya, Inu Yasha and countless others, I developed an early inte ARC provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. “We will not wait to be offered leftovers from the feast. We will arrive in a whirl of wings and talons and pick off what belongs to us. Yes, we are angry, yes we are making a noise about it, and yes, we are hungry for change. We are harpies.” I have always been fascinated by mythology, in all it’s iterations. From Disney’s Hercules, to Wonder Woman, Saint Seiya, Inu Yasha and countless others, I developed an early interest in all things mythological since childhood. And as a twenty something latina woman I have discovered the power in other women’s stories – to learn from those who carved the path for where we are today. This books was the almagamation of those things for me. It is a true celebration of mythology’s fiercest females – the ones who we recognize at a glance, the ones that are still fighting not to be erased from the narrative and everything in between. This book is a spark. For me it was a catalyst to seek out those figures that I wasn’t yet familiar with, those whose struggles I related to. It acknowledged all the variations in the mythos – never claiming one true definite story, but recognizing how they changed over time and what that meant. Among my personal favorites are the Pontianak, the Harpies, Medusa, Banshees, The Morai (The Fates) & the futakuchi-onna. I love the idea of celebrating these stories and giving the back their power – from magazines claiming the name of Jezebel, Medusa’s luxurious comeback as – literally – the face of Versace, even Pokémon has claimed one of my new favorites and my inner nerd is so so happy. If you need some fuel for your fire, I'd pick this up sooner rather than later.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Greyson | Use Your Words

    Content Warnings: Sexual Assualt: Rape. Violence: death, violence. Representation: LGBTQIA+: Sapphic, lesbian, bisexual. POC. Religion. Actual Rating: 4.5 A wonderful collection of women in mythology. These figures don’t purely provide a comforting link to history, but make for powerful contemporary role models, their struggles, hopes and strength resonate. These fabulous women may be from the darkest past, but they’re leading the charge forward. And Thank goddesses for that. I love mythology. Content Warnings: Sexual Assualt: Rape. Violence: death, violence. Representation: LGBTQIA+: Sapphic, lesbian, bisexual. POC. Religion. Actual Rating: 4.5 A wonderful collection of women in mythology. These figures don’t purely provide a comforting link to history, but make for powerful contemporary role models, their struggles, hopes and strength resonate. These fabulous women may be from the darkest past, but they’re leading the charge forward. And Thank goddesses for that. I love mythology. As a kid I was fascinated with ancient Egypt and as I’ve grown older my interest has grown out into other myths and legends. I just always want to learn more. I’m so glad I requested this book. It’s a fantastic learn about women from all over the world, from all different myths and look at their stories through a modern feminist lens. I learned about so many different goddesses, deities and spirits I had never heard of and learned more about the ones I had. This book is a celebration of them all and I loved every moment of it. This is another book I can’t wait to purchase a physical copy of to add to my collection. — Thank you to Netgalley for providing me an advanced reader copy in exchange for my honest review. ___ │Blog│Instagram│Twitter│Tumblr│

  13. 4 out of 5

    thewoollygeek (tea, cake, crochet & books)

    A wonderful mix of characters from mythology full of strength and character , all female. I absolutely adored this and I love all mythology but this was an extra special read, some tales in here I hadn’t read much about before. I loved it so much I need a copy in hardback as soon as it’s out, a wonderful read, perfect for the fan of mythology, feminism or just great strong women. Thanks to netgalley and the publisher for a free copy for an honest opinion

  14. 4 out of 5

    Geoffrey

    (Note: I received an ARC of this book courtesy of NetGalley) I found myself majorly surprised twice by this book, both in the best of ways. First, while there is a sizable showing of figures from Greek mythology, they thankfully do not end up dominating the book as a majority, a phenomenon that I feel like I have unhappily encountered in too many mythological collections of stories and characters. Instead, they are just a fraction of a genuinely diverse and awesome array of mythological women wh (Note: I received an ARC of this book courtesy of NetGalley) I found myself majorly surprised twice by this book, both in the best of ways. First, while there is a sizable showing of figures from Greek mythology, they thankfully do not end up dominating the book as a majority, a phenomenon that I feel like I have unhappily encountered in too many mythological collections of stories and characters. Instead, they are just a fraction of a genuinely diverse and awesome array of mythological women who array who hail from faiths, tales, myths, and traditions from around the world. What proved to be just as unexpectedly rich were all the individual entries. Besides providing each woman's actual myth, they often included historical context and their cultural importance in both the past and present. There was even occasionally a thoughtful question or statement included just for readers to mull over. Overall, this compendium does a marvelous job highlighting and honoring the great women tales from lands and cultures from all over, and lovers of all things mythology-related should not hesitate to go out and enjoy Warriors, Witches, Women at their first available convenience.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Chloë

    Warriors, Witches, Women makes an empowering collection about mythology's fiercest women. It's unapologetically feminist and incredibly diverse, as it features legendary figures from all over the world and of different sexual orientations. From Maman Brigitte to Futakuchi-onna, Kate Hodges tells you about these women's stories and their evolution through the years. She gave each one four pages, one of them filled with a stunning portrait. Their stories pique your interest without becoming overwh Warriors, Witches, Women makes an empowering collection about mythology's fiercest women. It's unapologetically feminist and incredibly diverse, as it features legendary figures from all over the world and of different sexual orientations. From Maman Brigitte to Futakuchi-onna, Kate Hodges tells you about these women's stories and their evolution through the years. She gave each one four pages, one of them filled with a stunning portrait. Their stories pique your interest without becoming overwhelming. Grouped into five sections: these women are Witches, Warriors, Bringers of Misfortune, Elemental Spirits and Munificent Spirits. Their stories are retold and reframed. Even after millennia, they continue to inspire, to remind, to empower. Kate Hodges fights for the demonised and the overlooked. She gives those, taken from their roots, a place. I want to thank White Lion Publishing and NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jacquie

    Warriors, Witches, Women by Kate Hodges is like a who’s-who of the women of folklore who have influenced the women of the world. There are many that cross different regions and may be named differently in different locations. The details show that many were very independent until the male rulers modified the stories slowly. Often these women were used to try to influence women from trying to be too independent. This book made me want to read more about each. This is our history. It’s too bad we d Warriors, Witches, Women by Kate Hodges is like a who’s-who of the women of folklore who have influenced the women of the world. There are many that cross different regions and may be named differently in different locations. The details show that many were very independent until the male rulers modified the stories slowly. Often these women were used to try to influence women from trying to be too independent. This book made me want to read more about each. This is our history. It’s too bad we don’t continue to share with our future generations. I would recommend this book to anyone wanting to learn of these strong, and powerful women. I received this book free of charge from Netgalley and Quarto Publishing Group - White Lion Publishing but the opinions above are my own.

  17. 4 out of 5

    The Kawaii Slartibartfast

    I received this book from Netgalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This book is dynamite! Packed to the gills with mythology, Warriors, Witches, Women explores legendary female figures. For having so much information it's a surprisingly quick read! I received this book from Netgalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This book is dynamite! Packed to the gills with mythology, Warriors, Witches, Women explores legendary female figures. For having so much information it's a surprisingly quick read!

  18. 4 out of 5

    ariel

    **thank you to netgalley for the arc!** this was a really interesting book that goes into detail about the different women in folklore and legend. the writing is good, and the illustrations are stunning. i know nothing about mythology, so i'm not sure how accurate this is but it was interesting to read about! i really liked that it talked about so many different mythical women from around the world - and gives detail attention to each. if you're at all interested in women's role in mythology and **thank you to netgalley for the arc!** this was a really interesting book that goes into detail about the different women in folklore and legend. the writing is good, and the illustrations are stunning. i know nothing about mythology, so i'm not sure how accurate this is but it was interesting to read about! i really liked that it talked about so many different mythical women from around the world - and gives detail attention to each. if you're at all interested in women's role in mythology and magic, i would recommend it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Museofnyxmares

    *I was provided with a copy of this book by the publisher, in exchange for my honest opinion. 4.5 stars I really enjoyed this book, it just had everything in it! It had lovely illustrations, concise information and a diverse mix of individuals that it focused on, from race, to what these women actually were and meant to people. I am a huge fan of mythology and just reading about powerful women in general, but I don't think I've comes across a book with such an eclectic mix. I really loved that th *I was provided with a copy of this book by the publisher, in exchange for my honest opinion. 4.5 stars I really enjoyed this book, it just had everything in it! It had lovely illustrations, concise information and a diverse mix of individuals that it focused on, from race, to what these women actually were and meant to people. I am a huge fan of mythology and just reading about powerful women in general, but I don't think I've comes across a book with such an eclectic mix. I really loved that the book was split into different sections, as it felt like you got a more in depth look at each woman and got to see the variations that existed within each section. For example, the witches section featured the more eccentric witches that really dressed and acted the part, according to our modern idea of a witch anyway, and then also featured a witch like Circe, who was most notably a witch in regards to her skills with herbs. It beautifully reflected the multifaceted nature of women. It was very powerful how the author was spotlighting some very ancient figures, and diligently told their history, but still managed to link it to the modern world at the end of their piece. I found it fascinating to see how the author viewed their stories from a modern perspective and pointed out the influence that these figures had on the world, and most importantly, women today. Noting whether they were still of significant relevance or had sadly been forgotten with time. There were a lot of women in this book that I was not familiar with and it was a pleasure to learn about them, but I also learnt new things about the ones I was aware of. The author took the time to acknowledge the different variations that are out there about them and what the reasons for these changes in their stories may be, making sure to try and leave you with how they are most recently/popularly viewed. Along with noting if these women are still acknowledged today, came the recognition of how this goes hand in hand with feminism and the patriarchy. Certain figures, especially goddesses and witches, are viewed as symbols of feminism, often the ones who were freer, more assertive and were unconventional for the time period they lived/were worshipped in. It may not be the same time, with the same exact attitudes, but modern women still draw empowerment and inspiration from these figures. Sadly, some of the issues that these women experienced are still issues that women are experiencing today and these shared struggles have given these figures an immortality, as they are called upon for support today, just as their followers of the past called upon them. Not all of these women had the smoothest ride in getting their stories told though, as there was religious and misogynistic interference in relaying them. Some of their stories were twisted to paint them as negatively and therefore, as off putting as possible, some were mixed with the stories of women of different religions to make them more acceptable and some were barely told at all. In conclusion, I enjoyed this tremendously and can tell that a lot of hard work and passion went into this book, from the broad array of women featured from different backgrounds, the extensive knowledge and even the mythological women playlist included. Reading this will surely give you a boost of female power, as well as just appreciation of reading some very intriguing and entertaining stories, so I'd highly recommend it!

  20. 5 out of 5

    BookEnds&BagEnds

    As the saying goes, history is written by the victor, and invariably that victor is a man. This has been the case throughout history and stretches back into the distant mists of mythology. When I think of mythology my mind brings up images of Achilles standing triumphantly above the body of Hector by the gates of Troy, Jason departing Colchis clutching tightly the Golden Fleece and mighty Thor wielding Mjolnir. Also I think of Medusa, cold and evil. Helen of Troy, beautiful yet treacherous and the As the saying goes, history is written by the victor, and invariably that victor is a man. This has been the case throughout history and stretches back into the distant mists of mythology. When I think of mythology my mind brings up images of Achilles standing triumphantly above the body of Hector by the gates of Troy, Jason departing Colchis clutching tightly the Golden Fleece and mighty Thor wielding Mjolnir. Also I think of Medusa, cold and evil. Helen of Troy, beautiful yet treacherous and the Harpies, detestable bird like women lacking any redeemable features. The history and mythology that we are offered focuses on the masculine celebrating aggression, strength and victory. There seems no place for more feminine aspects and those that are well known within popular culture are portrayed, often as not, as one-dimensional, evil temptresses nothing more than objects for their more illustrious male contemporaries. It is almost as if the world we know has been won through war and violence, there has been no growth, no birth, no female touch. Where are the strong women? Where are the brave women? Where are the women who have changed worlds, lives and attitudes? Where are the women? Warriors, Witches, Women seeks to redress the balance and focuses on the female characters who have, despite contributing enormously to everything that exists have found themselves demonised, marginalised and white-washed out of history. It is a celebration of women. The book is broken down into five broad categories Witches, Warriors, Bringers of Misfortune, Elemental Spirits and Munificent Spirits. Each section details several mythological women either as individuals or as a group all of them represented by Harriet Lee Merrion's beautiful illustrations really capturing the essence and culture of the figure. The version I read was electronic and so I can only imagine how striking the published hardback will look, both in your hands and on your shelf. There is so much diversity and representation with Haitian love goddesses, the Hawaiian goddess of volcanoes and the Japanese Futakuchi-Onna all honoured within the pages. Rest assured though that the more well known figures are also included such as Freya, Artemis and the Banshee. Each figure has a decent sized narrative describing the origins of their myth, how their role and opinion has changed over time and often a morsel of their story, from the original sources, along with a modern take on how they fit into our society now. You won't learn everything about them from this book, but as an overview it is peerless and will encourage you to seek them out yourself. The writing style is fresh and informal with evocative descriptions, Kate Hodges is clearly both extremely knowledgeable and extremely passionate about the subject. You can really feel the love and respect which has been afforded to each and every figure. You will read about gods you never new existed, weep for wrongs you never knew were committed and fear visitation from entities you never knew resided in the dark. But beyond the illustrations, the history and the magnificent stories Warriors, Witches, Women raises some points worth discussion. In these myths the women are frequently subjected to abuse, they are ignored and dismissed but unflinchingly they continue. They show characteristics which, were they men, would be celebrated but instead are used to paint them into villains. Compare the number of masculine entities who lurk in the dark of myth with those of the feminine who wait with the explicit purpose of enticing and murdering men. Consider the modern use of gendered insults which derive from myth. Are we any different? What exactly have we learned? Honestly I couldn't recommend this book highly enough - read in in one go, dip in and dip out, regardless of age or gender you'll find treasure in these pages. What was the main thing I learned from this book? That Medusa is neither evil nor a monster. 5/5 This review was of an e-ARC courtesy of White Lion Publishing through NetGalley

  21. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    I received an advanced reader copy of this book to read in exchange for an honest review via netgalley and the publishers. What an amazing book this is! Every page has been carefully researched and has an abundance of knowledge just waiting to be devoured! This book is all about women - made up or real women? You decide. So many powerful kind, good, evil, wicked women to find out about in this book and I was shocked that I had only heard of about 1/4 of the women and spirits listed in this book! A I received an advanced reader copy of this book to read in exchange for an honest review via netgalley and the publishers. What an amazing book this is! Every page has been carefully researched and has an abundance of knowledge just waiting to be devoured! This book is all about women - made up or real women? You decide. So many powerful kind, good, evil, wicked women to find out about in this book and I was shocked that I had only heard of about 1/4 of the women and spirits listed in this book! A fantastic read that i will be exploring again very soon.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Eustacia Tan

    While I was requesting the book on Thor, I also chanced upon Warriors, Witches, and Women. Requesting this book from NetGalley was a no brainer because I love mythology and I thought it would be very fun to have the spotlight on women in various myths from around the world. While I enjoyed this feminist take on various women in religions and myth overall, it failed to impress on several counts. Warriors, Witches, Women looks at fifty different women that are grouped into five categories – Witches While I was requesting the book on Thor, I also chanced upon Warriors, Witches, and Women. Requesting this book from NetGalley was a no brainer because I love mythology and I thought it would be very fun to have the spotlight on women in various myths from around the world. While I enjoyed this feminist take on various women in religions and myth overall, it failed to impress on several counts. Warriors, Witches, Women looks at fifty different women that are grouped into five categories – Witches, Warriors, Bringers of Misfortune, Elemental Spirits, and Munificent Spirits. Each profile comes with an illustration, a quick biography and a short paragraph or two about their relevance to the modern world. For the most part, I liked that the profiles managed to give the readers a good sense of the woman being discussed, exploring their mythology and bringing out their relevance. The author did mention that she chose certain narratives over others, but they don’t always seem to the most traditional ones. For example, in the story of Uzume, it’s said that the mirror was hung so that it could reflect Uzume’s butt, whereas I’ve always read that the mirror was hung from a tree so that Amaterasu could see her face. I imagine that would be hard to do so if it was reflecting Uzume’s butt. I’m also a bit iffy on the book proclaiming that Saint Brigid was a lesbian – while I agree that her origins are possibly pagan, the claim that Brigid was in a relationship with her ‘soul sister’ seems to a bit of a reach and from what I understand, not an orthodox interpretation. The concept of Anam Cara, which I assume is the basis of the ‘soul sister’ claim, reminds me of David and Jonathan’s friendship which was deep and true and without romantic implications, as well as the call to koinonia within the Church. We should be celebrating and encouraging intimate friendships because we need friendships that are deep and true and it frustrates me a little to see that everything interpreted in a romantic way. So that chapter was mildly annoying on two accounts – first because we don’t know for sure what Brigid identified as and what was presented as fact seems to be a more modern interpretation, and second, because I’m tired of all ‘deep’ relationships being seen in a romantic light because that is not the be-all and end-all of our relationships. The whole “you can only find true happiness and fulfilment in a romantic relationship” idea is a damaging one that leads women to seek happiness in a relationship but that is a rant for another post. I also liked that there was a reading list and a playlist at the end of the book so that you can use it as a starting point to explore more about the women featured here. But sadly, there were a few points that stopped this book from being truly impressive to me. Firstly, there was the issue of diversity. The book definitely tries to be diverse, but it came across to me as not trying very hard. Out of the fifty women profiled, 10 were Greek and/or Roman 16 were from Europe (out of the 16, 4 were from the Celtic mythos) 6 were from Asia 6 from the African continent 2 from the continent of America 10 from the rest of the world I did my best but the contents page freely jumps between classifying by religion and ethnic group and as someone familiar mostly with Western and Asian cultures, I have a gap in my knowledge with regards to other countries. But even this count shows that over half the women are from traditional Western myths, with the Celtic myths representing a quarter of the whole of Europe. I’d argue that Asia and Africa have equally rich mythic traditions, yet they take up just under a quarter of all the women profiled. It seems like no matter what, there’s still dominance by the traditional Western and Greco-Roman myths. Secondly, the women chosen were kind of odd too. I mean, from China we only have Mazu, but what about Guanyin, Chang’Er, Mulan, the Huli Jin, or historical figures like the four great beauties? From Japan, there’s the Futakuchi Onna and Ame no Uzume but what about Ameterasu, Yuki-Onna, Murasaki Shikibu? Where are Korean women? Where are Cambodian women? Malay and Indonesian get lumped together in the Pontianak, which is described as a “Malay ghost” but whose Indonesian moniker, Kuntilanak, is also mentioned. I can only really comment on the Asian section but it felt rather random and unbalanced, especially compared to the amount of Green and Roman women mentioned. I can imagine that just reducing the number of Greek and Roman women (most of whom are already pretty famous) to three or four and then adding one or two women from other parts of the world would have made it so much more diverse. And the parts that were diverse really were the best parts. My favourite bigoraphies were of women who were completely new to me, such as Mami Wata (African goddess) and Yennenga (Mossi, African Princess). If the book wanted to celebrate the lesser-known women figures, as it seems from the Asian selection, then I want to see more of them and less of the more mainstream names like Hel, the Valkyries, Freyja, Cassandra, Medusa, etc. Finally, the illustrations were a bit odd too – the one about the Pontianak did not remind me of a pontianak at all. Perhaps it’s the lack of blood on her dress, perhaps it’s because her colouring was very similar to that of the selkies, but I did not get pontianak feels. The Japanese characters were better but I suspect it’s a lot to do with the kimonos. Overall, I’m conflicted about the book. I really like the concept and I think that for the most part, the biographies are well done but I wasn’t impressed with some of the illustrations and while I really love the Greek, Roman, Celtic, and Norse myths, I would have loved to see more from other countries as well. I suppose this is a case of misaligned expectations – For some reason, the introduction made me think it would be a lot more diverse than I found it. Disclaimer: I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley. This review was first posted at Eustea Reads

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    This book makes me want to go read more about these fantastic icons. I loved that we get such a wide variety of mythological woman from all around the world. I am so used to hearing the same myths and legends so it was a nice change and made me want to explore the entire mythology of countries I am not as familiar with. I especially want to look more into Irish folklore now, since I am part Irish and instantly was intrigued by Morrigan I am also already super fascinated with Japan folklore, but w This book makes me want to go read more about these fantastic icons. I loved that we get such a wide variety of mythological woman from all around the world. I am so used to hearing the same myths and legends so it was a nice change and made me want to explore the entire mythology of countries I am not as familiar with. I especially want to look more into Irish folklore now, since I am part Irish and instantly was intrigued by Morrigan I am also already super fascinated with Japan folklore, but wasn't as knowledgeable as I would like to believe and I loved the bit about Japanese yokai. I can't wait to read more stories about yokai in general! These woman are all so fantastic, strong and inspiring that you are bound to find new legends that you want to sink your teeth into. I loved that all the stories were short and too the point to get a taste test, but they leave you wanting more so you can seek out the legends for yourself. Some of these stories even gave me a better perspective on these women, i.e. with the story of Jezebel. Unfortunately, coming from a Christian background I had only been fed one narrative about her and reading her chapter made me rethink the villainizing of so many of these women. I have gained such a respect for not only these mythical women, but the act of storytelling and how narratives can be twisted for an agenda. This is a phenomena I know of quite well and it was so fascinating to see it exemplified here with these stories. The only reason this isn't a five stars is because there was a couple of parts that bugged me. It's my own prerogative, but for the gender fluid icons in here it felt weird to constantly refer to them as women, especially with the Rainbow Serpent. That chapter sticks out to me the most. I think it's great to have figures like that in here, but if you need to pigeon hole them into being a woman to fit the overall theme of the book, then maybe you shouldn't. That's my two cents on it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    The Resistance Bookclub

    **I received an ARC through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review** A powerful, informative and quick read for anyone interested in mythology and feminism. Kate Hodges delivers a good overview of mythological women from all around the world (and not just Graeco-Roman, Nordic and Celtic like most mythology collections would). The chapters are short, which is a strong point of the book: you don't have to fight through a lengthy biography of each one, but instead get a to-the-point summary of wh **I received an ARC through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review** A powerful, informative and quick read for anyone interested in mythology and feminism. Kate Hodges delivers a good overview of mythological women from all around the world (and not just Graeco-Roman, Nordic and Celtic like most mythology collections would). The chapters are short, which is a strong point of the book: you don't have to fight through a lengthy biography of each one, but instead get a to-the-point summary of who they are and why they are important. I can recommend reading one chapter a day before bed or after waking up for the ultimate feminist mythological inspiration. Chapters end with a paragraph on the importance of myths in today's world, proving that just because a myth is thousands of years old, doesn't mean the overarching theme of it isn't relevant any more. Kate Hodges does not only retell myths, she gives them a place in the continuing struggle for equality. The illustrations are simply gorgeous and really add to the magic. Furthermore, the book comes with a glossary, further reading and playlist section, three things I wish more books would do.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Amy Layton

    With beautiful, delicately-lined illustrations and a plethora of historical and modern information, Warriors, Witches, Women proves to be the multi-cultural and multi-faceted look at women in mythology for the decade. I appreciate the introduction of each personnage, what with an illustration, quotation, name spellings, and culture they’re from, and I even more appreciate the two pages filled with information on these women. However, I have to say that as much as I enjoy the information and illu With beautiful, delicately-lined illustrations and a plethora of historical and modern information, Warriors, Witches, Women proves to be the multi-cultural and multi-faceted look at women in mythology for the decade. I appreciate the introduction of each personnage, what with an illustration, quotation, name spellings, and culture they’re from, and I even more appreciate the two pages filled with information on these women. However, I have to say that as much as I enjoy the information and illustrations, the humor and examples are very modern–oft referencing Game of Thrones and other like media to make a point–which makes me wonder whether this book will be as long-lasting as I hope it will be. Besides that, I do think that it’s funny, and I do think that this is a great look at famous mythological women throughout cultures and centuries. Review cross-listed here!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Clare O'Beara

    Fifty strong women, some goddesses, some witches, some women thrust into legend, all the heroines of their own tales. From Medusa to the Morrigan, Helen to Pele, the Harpies and Furies, they have been celebrated even as some were cruelly treated or made the spoils of war. I enjoyed the richly coloured imagery and the global theme. Great work. I downloaded an e-ARC from Net Galley. This is an unbiased review.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    Easy to read, engrossing, short essays take a look at the mythical women of antiquity from all over the globe - and give them an interesting twist, viewed through a 21st-century feminist lens. The accompanying artwork was great too.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This is a beautiful book - I thoroughly enjoyed it - and I'd strongly recommend Hodges's book to people wanting to get to know some female mythological characters, some of which are still revered today. Hodges brings up both more well-known goddesses, spirits and fairies, but also some that might not be that familiar to everyone, and she spans many different regions of the world., not just the Greco-Roman region, but also Basque, Hawaiian, Welsh, Lithuanian and Vietnamese deities, fairies and ot This is a beautiful book - I thoroughly enjoyed it - and I'd strongly recommend Hodges's book to people wanting to get to know some female mythological characters, some of which are still revered today. Hodges brings up both more well-known goddesses, spirits and fairies, but also some that might not be that familiar to everyone, and she spans many different regions of the world., not just the Greco-Roman region, but also Basque, Hawaiian, Welsh, Lithuanian and Vietnamese deities, fairies and other characters are introduced for the reader. Their stories are presented and modern examples of their importance for everyday lives of people and popular culture are woven into the text. The illustrations by Harriot Lee Merrion are beautiful and adds a lot to the overall appeal of the book. I recieved this as a free E-ARC via Netgalley, all opinions are my own.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tahlia

    Loved this so much! Need to get my hands on a physical copy as this was very clunky to read as an ebook. Especially loved the mythological women playlist listed at the end!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kendra

    Light overview on some of the most common women of myth. Short but interesting notes about each of the women mentioned, and would be an excellent book for folks new to mythology. It was a pleasure wandering through the book.

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