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I Hate Reading: How to Read When You'd Rather Not

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I Hate Reading is a highly visual paper-over-board chapter book designed to help even the most reluctant reader breeze through reading time, feel successful at reading, and even laugh! Get reluctant readers reading with I Hate Reading! OK. So, you have to read for 20 minutes, but you don’t want to. Maybe your mom or dad or teacher even has a timer—yikes! If you have to read, I Hate Reading is a highly visual paper-over-board chapter book designed to help even the most reluctant reader breeze through reading time, feel successful at reading, and even laugh! Get reluctant readers reading with I Hate Reading! OK. So, you have to read for 20 minutes, but you don’t want to. Maybe your mom or dad or teacher even has a timer—yikes! If you have to read, but you don’t like reading, this book is for you! If someone’s bugging you to open a book, grab this one. In this book, you’ll zoom through 20 minutes of reading . . . without really reading! Did you know that 65% of 4th graders in the US read below grade level? Learning to read can be frustrating. But it can also be fun. I Hate Reading by Beth Bacon validates the experience of reluctant readers and rewards them with laughter.


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I Hate Reading is a highly visual paper-over-board chapter book designed to help even the most reluctant reader breeze through reading time, feel successful at reading, and even laugh! Get reluctant readers reading with I Hate Reading! OK. So, you have to read for 20 minutes, but you don’t want to. Maybe your mom or dad or teacher even has a timer—yikes! If you have to read, I Hate Reading is a highly visual paper-over-board chapter book designed to help even the most reluctant reader breeze through reading time, feel successful at reading, and even laugh! Get reluctant readers reading with I Hate Reading! OK. So, you have to read for 20 minutes, but you don’t want to. Maybe your mom or dad or teacher even has a timer—yikes! If you have to read, but you don’t like reading, this book is for you! If someone’s bugging you to open a book, grab this one. In this book, you’ll zoom through 20 minutes of reading . . . without really reading! Did you know that 65% of 4th graders in the US read below grade level? Learning to read can be frustrating. But it can also be fun. I Hate Reading by Beth Bacon validates the experience of reluctant readers and rewards them with laughter.

30 review for I Hate Reading: How to Read When You'd Rather Not

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jillian Heise

    HILARIOUS upcoming book is a sneaky way to get kids reading (& laughing). Thanks to @harperstacks! If your kids love The Book With No Pictures, you'll want this one. HILARIOUS upcoming book is a sneaky way to get kids reading (& laughing). Thanks to @harperstacks! If your kids love The Book With No Pictures, you'll want this one.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mathew

    The introduction to this colourful, humorous book tells us that although it was written by Beth Bacon it was rather mischievously co-created by her children, Arthur and Henry. Originally self-published by Upstart Books and then picked up by HarperCollins in 2020, it is a very meta-esque book much in the guise of The Book with No Pictures. The book is presented through a series of 'scenes' in which the narrator, directly addressing the reader, invites us into a 'false' read. Our mum is watching u The introduction to this colourful, humorous book tells us that although it was written by Beth Bacon it was rather mischievously co-created by her children, Arthur and Henry. Originally self-published by Upstart Books and then picked up by HarperCollins in 2020, it is a very meta-esque book much in the guise of The Book with No Pictures. The book is presented through a series of 'scenes' in which the narrator, directly addressing the reader, invites us into a 'false' read. Our mum is watching us so it's important we pretend to be enjoying reading for at least 20 minutes. Through these scenes, the book plays with us, joking about how we are making it 'look' like we're reading and fooling the adult observer whereas, of course, we are involved in a form of play. From simple words to incredibly complex ones; from bright bold letters that take up a page and invite us to turn quickly or a series of bold and bright tips we course through the reading material at a rapid pace - who says turning the pages of a book has to be a slow thing? Who says we really have to read anything at all? The real joke of course comes at the end where it is revealed that you, the reader, have been duped into reading for a while. Whilst it might not convince reluctant readers to continue reading after this book (and it never claims to) it will definitely have made them smile. Quirky fun.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Breanne

    One day, I was looking through overdrive, trying to find something to end my reading slump and I found this. I thought to myself, "Wow! I hate reading, this is perfect! It's a sign from God!!!" Yeah, I don't hate reading, I was just under a deep reading depression. And I'm not seven years old. If I would have know this was meant for reluctant child readers, I would have never picked it up but it's a fun, bright, clever way to try and get kids to read. I doubt it would work for everyone since it k One day, I was looking through overdrive, trying to find something to end my reading slump and I found this. I thought to myself, "Wow! I hate reading, this is perfect! It's a sign from God!!!" Yeah, I don't hate reading, I was just under a deep reading depression. And I'm not seven years old. If I would have know this was meant for reluctant child readers, I would have never picked it up but it's a fun, bright, clever way to try and get kids to read. I doubt it would work for everyone since it kinda encourages skipping and bad habits. If you have a kid who has reading goals to accomplish for school, this could be useful to help get them back on track.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kari

    Need an awesome follow up read aloud to, The Book with No Pictures?? This is your winner-winner chicken dinner. While not as popular yet - I bought it after reading a review somewhere - Library didn't have it - I couldn't wait - bought it straight out as reluctant readers are my jam - and how to make reading fun or at least not so painful...and this book delivers. Must get MORE books from Beth Bacon (and what a great last name too... right?) Need an awesome follow up read aloud to, The Book with No Pictures?? This is your winner-winner chicken dinner. While not as popular yet - I bought it after reading a review somewhere - Library didn't have it - I couldn't wait - bought it straight out as reluctant readers are my jam - and how to make reading fun or at least not so painful...and this book delivers. Must get MORE books from Beth Bacon (and what a great last name too... right?)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Raven Black

    To help reluctant readers read but teaches only to pretend to skim the book. Perhaps kids would read this book but won't encourage them to read more. Doubt it would take even a reluctant reader 20 minutes to read To help reluctant readers read but teaches only to pretend to skim the book. Perhaps kids would read this book but won't encourage them to read more. Doubt it would take even a reluctant reader 20 minutes to read

  6. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    Humorous attempt to draw in reluctant readers. Designed for upper elementary/lower middle grades though may apply to anyone who is looking for an excuse to avoid reading a particular book. Large print and a plan to look like you're reading as you move through the book. Cute twist at the end. Humorous attempt to draw in reluctant readers. Designed for upper elementary/lower middle grades though may apply to anyone who is looking for an excuse to avoid reading a particular book. Large print and a plan to look like you're reading as you move through the book. Cute twist at the end.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Erica

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book might be better cataloged as humor rather than having a call number for reading & books. Nevertheless, a young person struggling with reading, who searches for tips to get them through it, will find it and it will bring some relief - not because it will end their struggle, but because they will know they aren't the only one. It has some excellent ideas! It gives several suggestions about how to believably pretend to read that are likely to succeed in getting people to leave you alone a This book might be better cataloged as humor rather than having a call number for reading & books. Nevertheless, a young person struggling with reading, who searches for tips to get them through it, will find it and it will bring some relief - not because it will end their struggle, but because they will know they aren't the only one. It has some excellent ideas! It gives several suggestions about how to believably pretend to read that are likely to succeed in getting people to leave you alone and could accidentally end up in you reading. Yet, sadly, it is missing some other excellent (and obvious) ideas that might actually help a non-reader become a reader. For example, one tactic that I figured out accidentally; if you can't or don't want to read a book, ask someone else who did read it to tell you something about it. If they say they *loved* it, ask what part they liked best. If they say it was exciting, ask them what part was most exciting, etc. When someone else predigests a book & presents the best parts, it will either motivate you to read it yourself, or you'll know exactly why you shouldn't waste your time. I do this quite often with young people in the library - because I can't read every book, and I don't have exactly the same reading tastes as every reader, but I've been persuaded, plenty of times! (The fact that Beth, Arthur, & Henry wanted to either distract, pester, or harm the kids at school who like reading created an "us-them" dynamic that seemed to me to be a really bad idea for everyone. Lashing out at people who mean no harm is not right. It's the adults putting pressure on kids that causes them pain, not the people who really just want to be left alone to read, right?) So, I am still thinking of alternative strategies that were not mentioned! There is the obvious technique of reading only the first few pages & the last few pages, and checking to see if you care how it got from point A to point Z. (This horrifies some people, but if you have ever read a book & then enjoyed watching the movie version, or vice-versa, you know that "spoilers" are not the worst thing in the world.) Another one I use often at work; Open a book to the exact middle, read 3 pages, and if you care at all, start at the beginning. The Bacons narrowly missed - by *almost* suggesting this; Get a book with LOTS of pictures, and just guess what the words might say. Every once in a while, check to see if you were right. If you are always right, don't read anymore, and if you are wrong & it kind of fascinates you... In the Bacon family's book, when a teacher asks (quite accusingly) "Are you just reading the pictures?" the appropriate response is "One picture is worth a thousand words. Of course I'm reading the pictures!" Anyway, this book *is* funny, and it's probably more funny if a reading teacher or librarian reads it to you, because then everyone can laugh about how it's totally okay to *not* love reading. There's so much pressure on kids to succeed at reading, and maybe not quite enough attention paid to what the non-reader needs or wants. Certainly they deserve the self-respect gained from knowing that Arthur and Henry don't really want to read.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tasha

    Exactly the right book to pick up when a child has to read for 20 minutes but doesn’t want to. Filled with humor and plenty of empathy for their plight, this book will have the pages turning quickly. Done with very little text on each page and large graphic elements, the book first looks at the rules of reading: Eyes on book. Butt on chair. Easy words are then offered in a list, and then a handful of hard words too, though you are encouraged to just skip words like “plutonium” and “photosynthesi Exactly the right book to pick up when a child has to read for 20 minutes but doesn’t want to. Filled with humor and plenty of empathy for their plight, this book will have the pages turning quickly. Done with very little text on each page and large graphic elements, the book first looks at the rules of reading: Eyes on book. Butt on chair. Easy words are then offered in a list, and then a handful of hard words too, though you are encouraged to just skip words like “plutonium” and “photosynthesis.” Ways to escape your reading exile are also suggested like going to the bathroom or getting a bloody nose. A few blank pages make them turn even faster. Still, in the end, the book actually will get reluctant readers to not only open it up but to read! The tone of this book is exactly right. There is a wonderful sneakiness to it, inviting children to scheme along with the narrating voice about how to stop reading. And yet, in order to play that naughty game, they have to read. The humor is broad and inviting, while still offering real tips for readers that actually work. The book design plays a huge role here too. With minimal text on the pages done in large fonts, the rest of the page is designed to be bright and lively with large graphical elements like zippers, flashlight beams, movie film, and the play of black pages and white. Funny and effective, get this into the hands of reluctant readers. Appropriate for ages 6-8.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Abby Rubin

    This book won't turn you into a lover of reading, but it will get you through the next twenty minutes or so. For a reluctant reader, or a kid who is in a reading slump, this could be just what they need to crack open the next book. While this is a humor book, it also has good tips to keep reading, like picturing the book as a movie, or reading together with your parents. Fun to read aloud as well. This book won't turn you into a lover of reading, but it will get you through the next twenty minutes or so. For a reluctant reader, or a kid who is in a reading slump, this could be just what they need to crack open the next book. While this is a humor book, it also has good tips to keep reading, like picturing the book as a movie, or reading together with your parents. Fun to read aloud as well.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sandra

    Hilarious! Yes, I had children and I have children who will actually love this. I am going to be tutoring our 9 year old granddaughter in reading, and will definitely read this to her and get her to read it to me. She will get a good kick out of it. Thanks Beth Bacon for something different and brilliant for children who are not fans of reading YET. Hard for me to understand as I always, always, always loved reading. Well-Done!

  11. 5 out of 5

    H

    This is a definite must-purchase for any teacher in grades 3 or under and elementary librarians. Even older kids might find this book - designed to keep a reading hater busy reading for their allotted 20 minutes a day. It's silly fun, and might just lure them into reading something equally silly - like The Book With No Pictures or even a 13 Story Treehouse story! Silly fun. This is a definite must-purchase for any teacher in grades 3 or under and elementary librarians. Even older kids might find this book - designed to keep a reading hater busy reading for their allotted 20 minutes a day. It's silly fun, and might just lure them into reading something equally silly - like The Book With No Pictures or even a 13 Story Treehouse story! Silly fun.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Grover

    Cute. Reminded me of The Book With No Pictures. Would be great for a classroom library. So many kids would like to read this book during silent reading time, especially the reluctant readers. Not going to purchase for our regular library, I don't think. Cute. Reminded me of The Book With No Pictures. Would be great for a classroom library. So many kids would like to read this book during silent reading time, especially the reluctant readers. Not going to purchase for our regular library, I don't think.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ilse O'Brien

    A fun meta book that striving readers will find funny and engaging. The concept of the book is tips to avoid reading while actually getting readers to read. Probably best for grades 2-4, but even older kids would identify with it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ivy Moser

    I'd be interested to see if reluctant readers like this book...it can be read quickly (10-20 minutes) but looks on the outside like a much longer book. The inside is full of silly narrative, talking directly to the reader, tackling the topic of having to read when they don't want to. I'd be interested to see if reluctant readers like this book...it can be read quickly (10-20 minutes) but looks on the outside like a much longer book. The inside is full of silly narrative, talking directly to the reader, tackling the topic of having to read when they don't want to.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cressida

    A suitable companion to "The Book With No Pictures." A suitable companion to "The Book With No Pictures."

  16. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    Clever, funny, and fun.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

    Cute, but mostly unhelpful. Laid out more as a picture book, and I don't see most kids looking through this more than once. It's humorous though, so it is entertaining. Cute, but mostly unhelpful. Laid out more as a picture book, and I don't see most kids looking through this more than once. It's humorous though, so it is entertaining.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    Clever, and I have some very reluctant readers in grades 5 and 6 that will find the humor hilarious.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Janelle

    This is the perfect book for the kid who is forced to read for 10-20 minutes, and even better suited for those who struggle to read with ADD.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    So. Funny!! The perfect book for every kid who says “I hate to read.”

  21. 5 out of 5

    Amber Hughes

    Reminded me of The Book With No Pictures- but for upper elementary readers! It definitely demonstrates how quickly twenty minutes could fly by if you commit to reading. Hope it encourages all sorts of readers to pursue more opportunities to read or even open a book!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Aliza Werner

    Wouldn’t this look great on display in your library! Breaking the 4th wall and “tricking” those who hate to read into reading. Some good tips buried in here and lots of humor.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    The Book With No Pictures for a Slightly Older Crowd.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Ewert

    Humorous book for kids who dread having to read for twenty minutes a day. This fast paced book gets you roped into reading the whole thing!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mollie

    This didn't hit me the right way, but maybe reluctant readers would like it? I don't know, this was pretty flat to me. This didn't hit me the right way, but maybe reluctant readers would like it? I don't know, this was pretty flat to me.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    I enjoyed this book. It reminded me a bit of The Book With No Pictures. I think I’ll read it to my students and let them use the time spent on their reading logs.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Renee

    I see this as an older version of the popular read aloud The Book With No Pictures. My 12 year old read this to me and we both were laughing.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Chang

    Clever. Real clever.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    A concept book that supposedly tricks kids into reading. Given that I am not the target audience for this one - I found it flatter that the proverbial.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Adrianna Ibrahim

    Cute idea but misses the mark.

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