web site hit counter Peace, Locomotion - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Peace, Locomotion

Availability: Ready to download

Twelve-year-old Lonnie is finally feeling at home with his foster family. But because he's living apart from his little sister, Lili, he decides it's his job to be the "rememberer" and write down everything that happens while they're growing up. Lonnie's musings are bittersweet; he's happy that he and Lili have new families, but though his new family brings him joy, it als Twelve-year-old Lonnie is finally feeling at home with his foster family. But because he's living apart from his little sister, Lili, he decides it's his job to be the "rememberer" and write down everything that happens while they're growing up. Lonnie's musings are bittersweet; he's happy that he and Lili have new families, but though his new family brings him joy, it also brings new worries. With a foster brother in the army, concepts like Peace have new meaning for Lonnie. Told through letters from Lonnie to Lili, this thought-provoking companion to Jacqueline Woodson's National Book Award finalist Locomotion tackles important issues in captivating, lyrical language. Lonnie's reflections on family, loss, love and peace will strike a note with readers of all ages.


Compare

Twelve-year-old Lonnie is finally feeling at home with his foster family. But because he's living apart from his little sister, Lili, he decides it's his job to be the "rememberer" and write down everything that happens while they're growing up. Lonnie's musings are bittersweet; he's happy that he and Lili have new families, but though his new family brings him joy, it als Twelve-year-old Lonnie is finally feeling at home with his foster family. But because he's living apart from his little sister, Lili, he decides it's his job to be the "rememberer" and write down everything that happens while they're growing up. Lonnie's musings are bittersweet; he's happy that he and Lili have new families, but though his new family brings him joy, it also brings new worries. With a foster brother in the army, concepts like Peace have new meaning for Lonnie. Told through letters from Lonnie to Lili, this thought-provoking companion to Jacqueline Woodson's National Book Award finalist Locomotion tackles important issues in captivating, lyrical language. Lonnie's reflections on family, loss, love and peace will strike a note with readers of all ages.

30 review for Peace, Locomotion

  1. 4 out of 5

    Betsy

    Recently I was able to pinpoint why exactly I have such a hard time reviewing Jacqueline Woodson's recent books. I mean, Feathers was so difficult for me that I eschewed a review altogether and while I managed to put two words together for After Tupac and D Foster, it wasn't a review that stuck in my mind as one of my more sterling efforts. So what is it about Ms. Woodson that throws me for such a loop? It's not like she isn't good at dialogue or realistic characters. Her books contain depth and Recently I was able to pinpoint why exactly I have such a hard time reviewing Jacqueline Woodson's recent books. I mean, Feathers was so difficult for me that I eschewed a review altogether and while I managed to put two words together for After Tupac and D Foster, it wasn't a review that stuck in my mind as one of my more sterling efforts. So what is it about Ms. Woodson that throws me for such a loop? It's not like she isn't good at dialogue or realistic characters. Her books contain depth and complex situations. Reading her newest title Peace, Locomotion I was reminded of all of this. I was also reminded, however, that Ms. Woodson isn't the kind of writer for whom fast-action and in-depth plotting holds much allure. There is a plot to this sequel to Locomotion but it's slow. And removing it from my To Be Reviewed shelf a month after reading it doesn't help all that much either. Peace, Locomotion may well be Ms. Woodson's smartest novel yet. It's thoughtful. Caring. Touching. Smart. And there are layers of depth to it that many a novelist would kill for. Don't expect a car chase or anything, though. This is one for the kids with a brain in their heads and time on their hands. When last we saw our hero, twelve-year-old Lonnie Collins Motion (or Locomotion to his friends), he was living with his new foster mother Miss Edna, while his nine-year-old sister Lili is living with another woman. There's no one Lonnie really loves quite as much as his sister, but he doesn't get to see her half as much as he would like. In lieu of seeing her, he writes her letters that he hopes to someday give to her when she's older. Of course Lonnie is still mourning the death of their parents thanks to a fire years ago. On top of that Miss Edna's son Jenkins is returning, injured, from the war in Iraq and Lonnie doesn't know how he'll deal with that and if he'll be seen as some kind of interloper. Love and memory intersect in this thoughtful novel, causing Lonnie to work through the notions of families, old and new, and where he fits in. If Locomotion was a novel of poems, Peace, Locomotion is a novel of letters, a fact Lonnie acknowledges right from the start saying, "I still write a few poems but mostly I'm writing these letters to you, Lili." A difficulty any author has when creating a realistic child character with a gift like Lonnie's is in determining just how talented to make that child. Lonnie is a gifted poet. But how do you write in the voice of a kid without mistakenly allowing your own adult voice to shine through too strongly? When Woodson writes Lonnie's poems for this book, they are certainly gifted. I would argue that they're not unbelievably so, though. His limerick is a bit choice, but his later poem feels right. It's just the right mix of childhood wisdom, simple words, and deeper meanings. I can see how people might feel otherwise, though. I mean they are pretty smart poems. And writing, after all, is Woodson's trademark gift. It's what gets her all those pretty, shiny, round stickers on her books year after year. It's the gift of being able to synthesize a thought into just a few smart words. For example, a sentence that could have gotten sentimental and too cute goes another way when she writes, "Then she told me that no matter how big you get, it's still okay to cry if you need to because everybody's got a right to their own tears." And I'm sorry but speaking of crying, getting your readers to tear up before you're even ten pages in, heck before you're even EIGHT pages in? Not playing by the rules. Mind you, I felt like Woodson was, for some reason, playing the tear card early, leaving my eyes dry and clear by the ending. That's not a criticism, more an authorial choice that I wouldn't mind thinking over and chewing at a bit. As for the storyline itself, I was curious to see how she tackled the subject of post-traumatic stress within a scant 144 pages. The solution, it seems, is not to solve all the returning character's problems but simply to show that person as willing learn and grow in new ways. 2009 is the publishing year when a huge swath of children's books decided to finally start talking about the Iraq War. Previous children's novels like The Homework Machine and 100 Days and 99 Nights lightly touched on it, but they were either scant references or they didn't specify what war was being discussed. Now in addition to Peace, Locomotion we have Heart of a Shepherd, Bull Rider, and a host of other titles dealing with parents and siblings who have gone and come back. I've little doubt that we'll be seeing quite a few more before the year is out. But as I've said before, it's a slow kind of story. You're dealing with Lonnie's love and loss when it comes to having a sister he can't grow up with on top of his feelings about his newly returned foster brother. A book about emotions, thoughts, considerations, and growth isn't necessarily going to grab kids in the same way as your average action packed narrative or fantasy conceit will. Remember, however, that there are kids out there that like realistic books that talk about things they live and things they can understand. And there are children out there that enjoy a well-crafted sentence and a perfectly coined phrase. With that in mind, there is an audience for Ms. Woodson's works and there probably always will be. In a book that is oddly timeless for all that it relates to the issues of today, Peace, Locomotion is yet another win for the Woodson camp. Slow, steady, it wins the race. Ages 10 and up.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Gelse Tecalero

    Do you ever wonder what it feels like to be separated by your brother or sister? In this book Lonnie and his little sister have to be separated after something bad happens to his parents. The book is Realistic Fiction. Lonnie and his sister get separated and move to different foster homes and Lonnie starts to write poems and letters to his sister Lili. The setting of the book is in the past and it's Summer. Lonnie is eleven and he's writing his sister a letter that states that he's gonna be twe Do you ever wonder what it feels like to be separated by your brother or sister? In this book Lonnie and his little sister have to be separated after something bad happens to his parents. The book is Realistic Fiction. Lonnie and his sister get separated and move to different foster homes and Lonnie starts to write poems and letters to his sister Lili. The setting of the book is in the past and it's Summer. Lonnie is eleven and he's writing his sister a letter that states that he's gonna be twelve in a few days and he tells her that it's gonna means two things that soon his litter sister is gonna become nine and soon enough he'll be twenty-one and be able to take care of her and they'll still be living in Brooklyn and that they'll find a place near her foster mom's house because he knows that she loves her. In the middle of the story Lonnie's foster mom, Miss Edna is starting to always get upset because Lonnie's foster brother, Jenkins goes missing after a war and he tries to help Miss Edna by prays for Jenkins to come home. Days passed and Miss Edna gets news about her son and discovers that he survived and that he will be coming home after her fully recovers. By the end of the story Jenkins comes home but it's a little difficult for him because it wouldn't be the same for him anymore like to used to be. Lonnie offers Jenkins to help him walk so soon enough he wouldn't need the wheel chair anymore. Lonnie and Jenkins start to bond more and Lonnie gets more comfortable with his foster family. The type of conflict is person vs. person because in the book Lonnie has to accept that his little sister Lili is starting to call her foster mom, mom because Lonnie just wants Lili to call their real mom, mom. Lonnie's friend starts to ask him why he doesn't call his foster mom, mom because he has lived with her for a long time. The theme of this book is accepting because in the book Lonnie has to accept other people's opinions and what his sister will call her foster mom. Jenkins's has to accept that he doesn't have his leg anymore. The major symbol in the story is peace.The author's use of repetition is peace. The character's motivation is his friend because he encouraged Lonnie to ask for peace. The 1st person point of view affects the story because Lonnie has to solve and deal with things that he never thought he'd have to deal with. Lonnie and Jenkins are similar/different because both of them are going through hard times in there life, there different by the situations there both in. I would rate this book 1 star because it wasn't interesting because the whole book is just letters Lonnie writes for Lili. I would recommend this book to people who like stories that could be true but aren't.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Eva Mitnick

    There are some writers who just knock me right over with their writing talent. They know how to hone their words down to the most essential bones, so that the language is deceptively simple but contains maximum beauty and meaning. Patricia MacLachlan is one, Susan Patron is another. Simplicity, pithiness, grace, and humor – they make it look so easy. That Jacqueline Woodson belongs on that list was made crystal clear yet again by Peace, Locomotion. This book is told mostly through Lonnie’s letter There are some writers who just knock me right over with their writing talent. They know how to hone their words down to the most essential bones, so that the language is deceptively simple but contains maximum beauty and meaning. Patricia MacLachlan is one, Susan Patron is another. Simplicity, pithiness, grace, and humor – they make it look so easy. That Jacqueline Woodson belongs on that list was made crystal clear yet again by Peace, Locomotion. This book is told mostly through Lonnie’s letters to his sister Lili, who as we know from Locomotion is living in a different foster family, as well as a few of Lonnie’s poems. This is tough stuff. Lonnie is doing really well, considering that he’s in a foster family, is separated from his sister, and is still getting over the death of his parents. After all, he has gotten close to his foster mother Miss Edna and his foster brother Rodney, he’s got a nifty new teacher who appreciates his poetry, and his friend Clyde is a great guy to have in your corner. But Miss Edna’s older son Jenkins is in Iraq, where he is wounded in body and spirit – and Lonnie can’t help but miss his sister and his parents every day. That the good and the bad parts of life are inextricably meshed in anyone’s life comes through clearly as Lonnie writes to Lili in his clear, honest, unsentimental voice. He’s a real poet – he always tries to get to the truth and heart of the matter. There’s never any soppiness – just straightforward words like these, which made me cry after all the stuff these three guys and Miss Edna have been through: “Dear Lili, A few days ago, Miss Edna took some pictures of me, Rodney and Jenkins. Me and Rodney were sitting on the couch and Jenkins was in his wheelchair. Miss Edna said, I can’t believe I’m going to finally have some pictures of my three favorite men. And guess what? Today we got the pictures back. Miss Edna waited until we was all sitting down for dinner before she pulled them out. She said, I got something I think is going to crack a smile out of the hardest nut. Then she showed us the pictures and there was Jenkins, not even smiling one bit but giving me rabbit ears! We laughed for a long, long time. Love and Peace and Rabbit Ears, Locomotion” Highly recommended for grades 4 and up. Newbery contender, definitely.

  4. 5 out of 5

    April

    Peace, Locomotion by Jacqueline Woodson is an epistolatory novel, meaning it's written in letter form, told through the letters of twelve year old Lonnie Collins Motion to his sister Lili. Basically, Lonnie and his sister are in foster care, but with two different families, and Lonnie feels he must write a letter to his sister every day they are in foster care so they can remember the stage in their life, he doesn't send the letters though, choosing to save them for when they get out of foster c Peace, Locomotion by Jacqueline Woodson is an epistolatory novel, meaning it's written in letter form, told through the letters of twelve year old Lonnie Collins Motion to his sister Lili. Basically, Lonnie and his sister are in foster care, but with two different families, and Lonnie feels he must write a letter to his sister every day they are in foster care so they can remember the stage in their life, he doesn't send the letters though, choosing to save them for when they get out of foster care. Read the rest of my review here

  5. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    This was a bittersweet book that I'd use in class if I taught slightly younger kids. The main character is so sincere and idealistic, but the book isn't overly sentimental because it's also unabashedly honest about his tragic circumstances. I kind of wanted to give him a hug the whole time I was reading this. Like in all of her books, Woodson doesn't shy away from difficult topics, despite the age of her readers. And her preteen characters are so true to life, there's a nostalgic element to her This was a bittersweet book that I'd use in class if I taught slightly younger kids. The main character is so sincere and idealistic, but the book isn't overly sentimental because it's also unabashedly honest about his tragic circumstances. I kind of wanted to give him a hug the whole time I was reading this. Like in all of her books, Woodson doesn't shy away from difficult topics, despite the age of her readers. And her preteen characters are so true to life, there's a nostalgic element to her writing that I really enjoy.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Donna Bijas

    3.5 stars. Started and finished same day Woodson really does a wonderful job making children on the margin see and feel themselves in her books. Lonnie and Lili live with different foster families after a fire took their parents’ lives. The entire book are letters from Lonnie to his sister. I’d recommend this one to 4th grade and up.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jeimy

    I liked this epistolary novel, sequel to Woodson's Locomotion, but not as much as I enjoyed the first one. There is something about a boy that is into poetry that I found more compelling. Still, it was good to catch up with these characters and watch them grow up. I liked this epistolary novel, sequel to Woodson's Locomotion, but not as much as I enjoyed the first one. There is something about a boy that is into poetry that I found more compelling. Still, it was good to catch up with these characters and watch them grow up.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Hannah S.

    This book was incredible! It was realistic, and interesting, and although it's supposed to be a sequel to another book, I couldn't even tell untill I had finished the book! This book was incredible! It was realistic, and interesting, and although it's supposed to be a sequel to another book, I couldn't even tell untill I had finished the book!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    the sequel is just as good as the original. woodson does a tremendous job continuing lonnie and lili’s story.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    Is about many letter from a old brother who is fighting the war. The letter always wrote some memories and what happen in down there. And the end of the letter always wrote peace, love or miss you. He is not only a soldier he also is a great brother.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alea

    Peace, Locomotion is a hopefully book that speaks of the different definitions of family. Biological family, foster family, and your country. I believe the book is set around current issues but really it's relevant for any time period. I hadn't realized when I started reading, that this is a companion book to the book, Locomotion, but I felt it had to power to stand alone just fine. The book is a series of letters that Lonnie Collins Motion aka Locomotion writes to his little sister Lili. After l Peace, Locomotion is a hopefully book that speaks of the different definitions of family. Biological family, foster family, and your country. I believe the book is set around current issues but really it's relevant for any time period. I hadn't realized when I started reading, that this is a companion book to the book, Locomotion, but I felt it had to power to stand alone just fine. The book is a series of letters that Lonnie Collins Motion aka Locomotion writes to his little sister Lili. After losing their parents in a fire they are put into separate foster homes and don't get to see each other as often as they would like it. In his letters Lonnie tells his sister all about his life, his classes, his poetry, his friends and also his foster family who has a son in the war. I thought this was a sweet book that deals with some heavy issues in a very hopeful way. It made me smile but also made me a little teary eyed. The character of Lonnie is wise beyond his years and his love for his sister and foster family is touching. It's inspiring to see what a good person he remains after having to deal with so much at a very young age. The author has captured his voice perfectly.

  12. 4 out of 5

    L12_Robyn

    Peace, Locomotion by Jacqueline Woodson is the second story of Lonnie (Locomotion). The story is told through letters to his younger sister, Lili, who is in a separate foster home after their parents passed away. These letters are meant to be memory keepers that Lili will read when she is older and are meant to remember the events that have happened in Lonnie’s life. Lonnie now lives in a nice foster home with 2 older “brothers” and his foster Mom, Miss Edna. One of the young men, Jenkins, was o Peace, Locomotion by Jacqueline Woodson is the second story of Lonnie (Locomotion). The story is told through letters to his younger sister, Lili, who is in a separate foster home after their parents passed away. These letters are meant to be memory keepers that Lili will read when she is older and are meant to remember the events that have happened in Lonnie’s life. Lonnie now lives in a nice foster home with 2 older “brothers” and his foster Mom, Miss Edna. One of the young men, Jenkins, was off at war and came home broken physically and emotionally. The story, Peace Locomotion, talks about the struggles to find peace with the war, Lonnie’s separation from his sister, losing his parents and living in a new home. Each letter gives greater insight into Lonnie’s struggle to find peace. This is another moving story by Jacqueline Woodson. I am amazed by her depth as a writer and her ability to quickly bring characters to life. The lives of the protagonist and other main characters are believable, with a believable plot to go with it. This story would be a great example for middle school children on how to convey a story in alternative ways, through letter writing.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Joanna Marie

    The heartfelt voice of the young poet was once again heard in Jacqueline Woodson's Peace, Locomotion , sequel to award winning first book, Locomotion . If the first book was written in poems, the sequel takes it form as letters. Peace, Locomotion is the compilation of letters Locomotion had written to his sister, Lili, while there are living separately(as narrated in the first and second book). Just the mere fact of this is the voice of a 12-year old boy touches my heart already. I felt the The heartfelt voice of the young poet was once again heard in Jacqueline Woodson's Peace, Locomotion , sequel to award winning first book, Locomotion . If the first book was written in poems, the sequel takes it form as letters. Peace, Locomotion is the compilation of letters Locomotion had written to his sister, Lili, while there are living separately(as narrated in the first and second book). Just the mere fact of this is the voice of a 12-year old boy touches my heart already. I felt the love and the sincerity and the innocence and Lonnie's faith in humanity. This work is a profound piece. I would really really love to share this to my future children ♥

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kristen Jorgensen

    A young boy writes letters to his sister while they grow up in seperate Foster families. The thing I love more than anything about this book is that the Foster families for both kids are wonderful and supportive. I am sure that real foster families and step moms get very tired of the evil, neglecting stigma's that are placed upon them. It's refreshing to see such loving devotion and kindness. A young boy writes letters to his sister while they grow up in seperate Foster families. The thing I love more than anything about this book is that the Foster families for both kids are wonderful and supportive. I am sure that real foster families and step moms get very tired of the evil, neglecting stigma's that are placed upon them. It's refreshing to see such loving devotion and kindness.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Toni

    I just finished reading "Locomotion" with a group of fifth and sixth graders and we will be reading part of this out loud as we wait for the other groups to finish. Peace, Locomotion is written mostly in letters rather than poems, but is still masterfully done. I won't be able to read one part out loud because I will cry, so I'll make sure someone else reads that letter. Well done, Jacqueline Woodson! I just finished reading "Locomotion" with a group of fifth and sixth graders and we will be reading part of this out loud as we wait for the other groups to finish. Peace, Locomotion is written mostly in letters rather than poems, but is still masterfully done. I won't be able to read one part out loud because I will cry, so I'll make sure someone else reads that letter. Well done, Jacqueline Woodson!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kay Hommedieu

    I loved this story and the deeper feelings that Lonnie feels about peace and love.

  17. 4 out of 5

    MrsK Books

    Lonnie, aka Locomotion, continues to hope that one day he will be old enough to be the guardian of his little sister Lili. He has continued his writing, only now he is writing hope-filled letters to Lili. His school life has changed, or maybe fallen back into a place less inspired. Yet, because of his academic slump, he has chosen to write Lili's letters to ensure that their memories of life before the fire won't fade away into a "grayness" that has become "real, real quiet" in their minds. He i Lonnie, aka Locomotion, continues to hope that one day he will be old enough to be the guardian of his little sister Lili. He has continued his writing, only now he is writing hope-filled letters to Lili. His school life has changed, or maybe fallen back into a place less inspired. Yet, because of his academic slump, he has chosen to write Lili's letters to ensure that their memories of life before the fire won't fade away into a "grayness" that has become "real, real quiet" in their minds. He is gathering all of these letters into a box of "Before Time" for the time when Lili is once again living with him. What is Locomotion's newest challenge? He has a teacher that believes he can't be a poet without being published. So many times, a small comment can cause a student to choose to disengage in ways that spiral out of control! Living in Miss Edna's home, Lonnie is met with a realization that in this foster location there are words like home, son, brother, and comfortable moments of love and support. Turning 12 will be a year of cherishing his before the fire life and learning to embrace his before "as a man" life unfolds. Will he remain hope-filled about his little sister's "new" before life? Clyde is the friend that helps Locomotion regain his "for real" now life. Sometimes in life a stranger or someone who once seems like a foe, in reality becomes a life time friend. Clyde is honest. His honesty creates a "sounding board," a type of regulator for Locomotion. While Locomotion tries to come to terms with his new season of life, Clyde shares more about his own home. This form of bonding encourages Locomotion to move forward into an acceptance and freedom. Through Locomotion's acceptance of his life with Miss Edna and her sons, he begins writing to Lili a "one true thing" for the day. These letters become an exposure to the depth of a "for real" family life. For the first time since the fire, Locomotion is now willing to accept that his little sister has a "for real" life in a family that he wasn't ready to support. This sequel is as moving and inspiring as the first novel. The weaving of words, emotions, hopes, and acceptance portrays a realistic plot that creates an inner peace about how these characters are growing up. It is with much hope... that this reader eagerly waits Locomotion's next season... MrsK https://mrskbookstogo.blogspot.com/

  18. 5 out of 5

    Destini

     Book Report                 The book I read was Peace, Locomotion it was published in 2009 by Jacqueline Woodson. I really liked this book because it’s full of emotion and adventure, the vocabulary is very poetic and it gives you the true insight you need in order to understand Lonnie’s story and all that he went through.                  Peace, Locomotion is about a boy named Lonnie Collins Motion who after getting separated from his sister tragically endures the pain and loss of leaving the  Book Report                 The book I read was Peace, Locomotion it was published in 2009 by Jacqueline Woodson. I really liked this book because it’s full of emotion and adventure, the vocabulary is very poetic and it gives you the true insight you need in order to understand Lonnie’s story and all that he went through.                  Peace, Locomotion is about a boy named Lonnie Collins Motion who after getting separated from his sister tragically endures the pain and loss of leaving the memories of the family he once had behind, After finally feeling at home with his new foster family Lonnie starts rekindling the past memories of his family and putting them into his letters for his little sister Lili to read. The setting of this book revolves around Brooklyn New York during modern time. The theme of the story is to have hope and peace in your heart even through hard times and trials and tribulations, never lose sight of what’s most important to you. Lonnie experienced tragedy and setbacks as well as heart breaks but no matter what he always found his way back to what was most important to him.                   I like that this book is emotional and poetic, every detail was crucial to knowing Lonnie and his struggles like in one paragraph Lonnie gets handed back his math test and saw he got a low score on it he also saw that his good friend Clyde got a good score his test, he had the urge to cry but he held it in knowing that he wouldn't cry in class with everyone around. Lonnie had some difficulties when it came to academics but he really suffered in math in fact he couldn't care less for it, he thrived in writing though that was his strong suit and that was what he was good at it was in his writing that he found the most peace, it was in his writing that he was able to connect with his sister as well hold onto the memories he holds dearest to his heart.                    I highly recommend this book to anyone who loves reading stories with powerful messages that are full of emotion, adventure and heartwarming events.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Erin Frank

    Genre: Contemporary Realistic Fiction Awards: None Audience: 4th-6th grade A: The author helped connect the reader to the characters by writing the story in the form of letters. The letter format created a more intimate experience for the reader because they were reading the thoughts and actions of Lonnie. B: There are a number of topics mentioned in the book. Relationships with families is a big topic brought about in the book because Lonnie is learning to love his foster family including the olde Genre: Contemporary Realistic Fiction Awards: None Audience: 4th-6th grade A: The author helped connect the reader to the characters by writing the story in the form of letters. The letter format created a more intimate experience for the reader because they were reading the thoughts and actions of Lonnie. B: There are a number of topics mentioned in the book. Relationships with families is a big topic brought about in the book because Lonnie is learning to love his foster family including the oldest brother who he meets for the first time. He realizes it is okay to love this family too, even though they are not his original family. The topic of friendship is briefly looked at as Lonnie becomes closer to one of his classmates and they become good friends. There are also many behavioral, emotional, and mental challenges that Lonnie and his foster family are facing during the book. C: Compare Lonnie's feelings about his sister loving her foster family like her own family at the beginning of the book and the end. Answer: At first, Lonnie gets very upset that his sister would ever think to replace their parents with a new family. By the end of the book, he has discovered that he loves his foster family as well and that he can have more than one family. He learns to love and miss his parents while still loving his new family and thinks his sister should too.

  20. 5 out of 5

    aruajuanita

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. After Locomotion I had to read the second part too and I can‘t believe how incredibly sad, yet beautiful it is. While the first book Locomotion was written in poetry form to a general audience, the second one is dedicated to Lonnie‘s sister Lili, who still lives with her foster mother. It is a very beautiful read but be prepared for a lot of heartbreak. One of my favorite aspects of both books are the teachers and the importance of being a supportive, motivating teacher. I hated their new teache After Locomotion I had to read the second part too and I can‘t believe how incredibly sad, yet beautiful it is. While the first book Locomotion was written in poetry form to a general audience, the second one is dedicated to Lonnie‘s sister Lili, who still lives with her foster mother. It is a very beautiful read but be prepared for a lot of heartbreak. One of my favorite aspects of both books are the teachers and the importance of being a supportive, motivating teacher. I hated their new teacher who told him that he is not a poet as long as he did not publish a book because she destroyed his spirits. Luckily, he stands against her because he knows so many people telling him the opposite. As a teacher myself, I saw myself in Rodney who said that he hated school and was a bad students because his teachers kept telling him so and now he became a teacher to show students how smart they actually are. This is literally one of the reasons why I became a teacher too! Definitely a Must-Read!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    A very lovely and worth companion of Woodson’s original novel in verse. This one, told in letters from Lonnie to his sister Lili, who is living in a different foster home, has all the same heart of the first book, but builds upon Lonnie’s character. I loved getting to know him in verse, and here, the format allows for a bit more reflection, and a more solid connection between Lonnie and Lili. And while I would have loved to see letters exchanged and gotten Lili’s side as well, we still get a wid A very lovely and worth companion of Woodson’s original novel in verse. This one, told in letters from Lonnie to his sister Lili, who is living in a different foster home, has all the same heart of the first book, but builds upon Lonnie’s character. I loved getting to know him in verse, and here, the format allows for a bit more reflection, and a more solid connection between Lonnie and Lili. And while I would have loved to see letters exchanged and gotten Lili’s side as well, we still get a wide range of stories from Lonnie’s POV. The book touches on tough topics of family (born and created), friendship, education, PTSD, and rebuilding and redefining your world when you feel you’ve lost everything. Jenkins’ story was absolutely heartbreaking, but ultimately hopeful, as so many of Woodson’s stories are. As always, would recommend for just about any reader who loves great writing and heartfelt, fully-realized characters, and would definitely encourage reading the series in order to get the full effect.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Challice

    "Tonight, I'm thinking about Peace, Lili. I'm thinking about Peace real hard because I don't want to get drafted and I don't want more people to get used up. I close my eyes and I see the peace sign. I draw peace signs on my notebook. I try to picture everybody putting down their weapons and no war wars anywhere. Peace, Locomotion." Now this book I enjoyed much more than the first. This is the letters that Lonnie writes to his sister Lili. There is the opening letter where a teacher has killed th "Tonight, I'm thinking about Peace, Lili. I'm thinking about Peace real hard because I don't want to get drafted and I don't want more people to get used up. I close my eyes and I see the peace sign. I draw peace signs on my notebook. I try to picture everybody putting down their weapons and no war wars anywhere. Peace, Locomotion." Now this book I enjoyed much more than the first. This is the letters that Lonnie writes to his sister Lili. There is the opening letter where a teacher has killed the spark that Lonnie had for writing poetry and throughout the book we have a few scattered here and there. However, the book had much more meat and I could connect with characters and see much more to the story than a line or two. I enjoyed this a lot more and really had my heart strings tugged to be a foster mom one day. Love the aspect of the Vietnam (?) War and its horrors in a small and gentle way. " It's like there's a giant on my shoulders. And sometimes it feels like I'm just gonna fall right down under all that weight. But I don't, Lily. I stay standing. I stay standing."

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Mcauliffe

    Audio book "Peace, Locomotion" is Jacqueline Woodson's sequel to "Locomotion". It is about saying goodbye to the past and how to find contentment in the present. 12 year old Lonnie writes to his sister Lili who is in a different foster home. The two do see each other so these letters are not sent, but rather serve as a way to hold on to the memory of their parents. He hopes to someday hand them to her. Both are in loving situations and Lonnie is a sixth grader and aspiring poet. He shows us how a Audio book "Peace, Locomotion" is Jacqueline Woodson's sequel to "Locomotion". It is about saying goodbye to the past and how to find contentment in the present. 12 year old Lonnie writes to his sister Lili who is in a different foster home. The two do see each other so these letters are not sent, but rather serve as a way to hold on to the memory of their parents. He hopes to someday hand them to her. Both are in loving situations and Lonnie is a sixth grader and aspiring poet. He shows us how a teachers ill-used words can impact a student. He also uses these letters to reflect on his meetings with his sister. The plot widens when we learn that his foster brother, who has been fighting "insurgents" has been injured in the war. When his foster brother, Jenkins, returns Lonnie is able to see that his loss of parents is similar to the ordeals of war that Jenkins must cope with as well. I would recommend this novel for students in grades 4-7.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Carly

    SATISFIED: JACQUELINE WOODSON Twelve-year-old Lonnie and his little sister Lili are in separate foster homes after their parents pass away. Because of this, Lonnie feels the need to "remember" everything going around him to share with his sister some day. He takes the time to write events down to give her as a gift when he turns eighteen and can raise her himself. The stories are written in a lyrical type of language and it's an enjoyable read. It's tender watching Lonnie go through the stages of SATISFIED: JACQUELINE WOODSON Twelve-year-old Lonnie and his little sister Lili are in separate foster homes after their parents pass away. Because of this, Lonnie feels the need to "remember" everything going around him to share with his sister some day. He takes the time to write events down to give her as a gift when he turns eighteen and can raise her himself. The stories are written in a lyrical type of language and it's an enjoyable read. It's tender watching Lonnie go through the stages of realizing that he can give his heart to his new family, just as he did for the one he had before. I enjoyed this book for the most part. There were times where I didn't fully understand the need for certain parts, but I liked it over-all. The love that Lonnie has for his sister is very tender, and I loved all the characters who continually told Lonnie that they believed in him to be a writer some day. The poems where he is filled with hope are my favorite ones.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jennybeast

    Oh, man, all the feels in this book. Lonnie is sophisticated in his poetry and in his thinking, and that is well illustrated in his letters to his sister. This is definitely one of the most positive books involving the foster system that I've read -- Lonnie and Lili are separated after the deaths of their parents, but they both seem to be thriving with their new families. It's a quiet read, one that's all about the every day challenges of school and math and friends moving away and also the big Oh, man, all the feels in this book. Lonnie is sophisticated in his poetry and in his thinking, and that is well illustrated in his letters to his sister. This is definitely one of the most positive books involving the foster system that I've read -- Lonnie and Lili are separated after the deaths of their parents, but they both seem to be thriving with their new families. It's a quiet read, one that's all about the every day challenges of school and math and friends moving away and also the big ones -- fearing the loss of a son and brother in the Iraq war (although the exact war is never mentioned, and it could be any with IEDs), facing the loss of parents and growing up without your sibling. Lonnie's letters and poems are beautiful, though, celebrating all the little moments of light and new family connections and good, thoughtful friends and teachers. He's in the middle of a community that wants him to thrive, and that shines through.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kailey Farris

    Genre: Single Poem Book Awards: None Audience: 3rd Grade- 6th Grade A. The poems in "Peace, Locomotion" are primarily free verse poems as well as narrative poems. Many of Lonnie’s letters to Lili are narrative and tell a series of events and what has happened therefore, both these forms of poetry are present throughout the book. B. Similar to the first poetry book in this series, Lonnie uses a lot of sensory imagery to describe what has been happening in his life as well as some things about Lili si Genre: Single Poem Book Awards: None Audience: 3rd Grade- 6th Grade A. The poems in "Peace, Locomotion" are primarily free verse poems as well as narrative poems. Many of Lonnie’s letters to Lili are narrative and tell a series of events and what has happened therefore, both these forms of poetry are present throughout the book. B. Similar to the first poetry book in this series, Lonnie uses a lot of sensory imagery to describe what has been happening in his life as well as some things about Lili since according to Lonnie he is serving as the rememberer for the two. C. Write a letter to someone describing something going on in your life and or how you are feeling. Take inspiration from Lonnie's letters to his sister Lili. Dear Ashleigh, I miss getting to see you as often as I used to since I no longer live near you, but I am going to be able to see you soon. I can't wait to be able to be with you and have long talks like we always used to. Missing you, Kailey

  27. 4 out of 5

    Liz Murray

    At first I was missing the poetic element of Locomotion, but early on it's revealed his teacher doesn't think he can be a poet, unlike the teacher from last year. This book is told through letters Lonnie writes for his sister over the course of a year. He doesn't send them, but collects them to give to her later. He writes about how sad he is to miss her, but he has much affection for his foster mother and her sons, just as his sister has much affection for her foster mother. The children lost t At first I was missing the poetic element of Locomotion, but early on it's revealed his teacher doesn't think he can be a poet, unlike the teacher from last year. This book is told through letters Lonnie writes for his sister over the course of a year. He doesn't send them, but collects them to give to her later. He writes about how sad he is to miss her, but he has much affection for his foster mother and her sons, just as his sister has much affection for her foster mother. The children lost their parents in a house fire. I've probably already written that what gets me with Woodson's books is that traumatic topics are addressed but there is hope, and not hokey hope. This is a book aimed at late elementary readers and there is lots of space to paper the readers own feelings on reading the book. Lonnie is an engaging writer and I have a lot of affection for him.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Stacey

    4.25 The follow up to Locomotion is a compilation of daily letters from Lonnie to his sister Lili. Woodson uses few words to tell the story, but they're affecting and emotive. "Then she told me that no matter how big you get, it's still okay to cry if you need to because everyone has a right to their own tears." "I didn't want her to look at me because I didn't want her to see all the fire inside of me that feels like the fire that burned down our house." * the fire killed his parents "Seize upon 4.25 The follow up to Locomotion is a compilation of daily letters from Lonnie to his sister Lili. Woodson uses few words to tell the story, but they're affecting and emotive. "Then she told me that no matter how big you get, it's still okay to cry if you need to because everyone has a right to their own tears." "I didn't want her to look at me because I didn't want her to see all the fire inside of me that feels like the fire that burned down our house." * the fire killed his parents "Seize upon that moment so long ago. One breath away and there you will be, so you and carefree..."

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kaycee Monnens

    The sequel to Locomotion, this story brought me so much diversity in one little book. The format is entirely letters and it puts us in the shoes of a young boy who is dealing with a heap of “adult” issues at a very young age. This book is a subtle lesson for teachers, showing us that censorship still doesn’t keep students from encountering darkness. On the contrary, having books to relate to and lose themselves in may be the best medicine and teacher of all.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Robin McCann

    Jacqueline Woodson writes beautiful stories. This is a faster read about a boy who is writing letters to his younger sister. They were split up in the foster system into two different but good families. It is during the war and the boy is around 12. Kids that like to read stories about overcoming sad situations would like this story. It is not too dated and is an easy read with a positive ending.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.