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Patricia's Vision: The Doctor Who Saved Sight

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The inspiring story of Dr. Patricia Bath, a groundbreaking ophthalmologist who pioneered laser surgery—and gave her patients the gift of sight.   Born in the 1940s, Patricia Bath dreamed of being an ophthalmologist at a time when becoming a doctor wasn’t a career option for most women—especially African-American women. This empowering biography follows Dr. Bath in her que The inspiring story of Dr. Patricia Bath, a groundbreaking ophthalmologist who pioneered laser surgery—and gave her patients the gift of sight.   Born in the 1940s, Patricia Bath dreamed of being an ophthalmologist at a time when becoming a doctor wasn’t a career option for most women—especially African-American women. This empowering biography follows Dr. Bath in her quest to save and restore sight to the blind, and her decision to “choose miracles” when everyone else had given up hope. Along the way, she cofounded the American Institute for the Prevention of Blindness, invented a specialized laser for removing cataracts, and became the first African-American woman doctor to receive a medical patent.


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The inspiring story of Dr. Patricia Bath, a groundbreaking ophthalmologist who pioneered laser surgery—and gave her patients the gift of sight.   Born in the 1940s, Patricia Bath dreamed of being an ophthalmologist at a time when becoming a doctor wasn’t a career option for most women—especially African-American women. This empowering biography follows Dr. Bath in her que The inspiring story of Dr. Patricia Bath, a groundbreaking ophthalmologist who pioneered laser surgery—and gave her patients the gift of sight.   Born in the 1940s, Patricia Bath dreamed of being an ophthalmologist at a time when becoming a doctor wasn’t a career option for most women—especially African-American women. This empowering biography follows Dr. Bath in her quest to save and restore sight to the blind, and her decision to “choose miracles” when everyone else had given up hope. Along the way, she cofounded the American Institute for the Prevention of Blindness, invented a specialized laser for removing cataracts, and became the first African-American woman doctor to receive a medical patent.

30 review for Patricia's Vision: The Doctor Who Saved Sight

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bookishrealm

    Whewwwww! Ya'll this one was definitely a good one for black history month. I honestly didn't know anything about Patricia until I read this book and I'm so glad that I did. She was such an AMAZING individual and I learned so much about her fight to become an ophthalmologist. She NEVER let anyone deter her from following her dreams. It was so inspiring to read her story especially when I learned how much she did for communities. The artwork was also amazing. Whewwwww! Ya'll this one was definitely a good one for black history month. I honestly didn't know anything about Patricia until I read this book and I'm so glad that I did. She was such an AMAZING individual and I learned so much about her fight to become an ophthalmologist. She NEVER let anyone deter her from following her dreams. It was so inspiring to read her story especially when I learned how much she did for communities. The artwork was also amazing.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Shaye Miller

    So glad to get to listen to this one via Literally Cultured Read Aloud! Look forward to getting a print copy. Review to come... For more children's literature, middle grade literature, and YA literature reviews, feel free to visit my personal blog at The Miller Memo! So glad to get to listen to this one via Literally Cultured Read Aloud! Look forward to getting a print copy. Review to come... For more children's literature, middle grade literature, and YA literature reviews, feel free to visit my personal blog at The Miller Memo!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Gabrielle Stoller

    "Taking the high road may be arduous and long but it will lead to justice and triumph." I have never heard of Patricia Bath, the first African American woman to receive a medical patent. A woman who cared about correcting eyesight and giving everyone the chance at sight. Excellent person to learn about! "Taking the high road may be arduous and long but it will lead to justice and triumph." I have never heard of Patricia Bath, the first African American woman to receive a medical patent. A woman who cared about correcting eyesight and giving everyone the chance at sight. Excellent person to learn about!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Maura

    Interesting picture book biography of Dr. Patricia Bath, a pioneering woman who invented laser eye surgery.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    Patricia Bath, born on November 4, 1942 in New York City's Harlem neighborhood, was the first African American to complete a residency in ophthalmology in 1973. In 1976, she co-founded the American Institute for the Prevention of Blindness, which established that "eyesight is a basic human right." In 1986, she invented the Laserphaco Probe, improving treatment for cataract patients. She patented the device in 1988, becoming the first African American female doctor to receive a medical patent. The Patricia Bath, born on November 4, 1942 in New York City's Harlem neighborhood, was the first African American to complete a residency in ophthalmology in 1973. In 1976, she co-founded the American Institute for the Prevention of Blindness, which established that "eyesight is a basic human right." In 1986, she invented the Laserphaco Probe, improving treatment for cataract patients. She patented the device in 1988, becoming the first African American female doctor to receive a medical patent. The author of this biography for ages 6 and up tells us that while other little girls played nurse, six-year-old Patricia played the doctor. She stitched and sewed her dolls, mending them and dreaming of helping people in the same way one day. The fact that she was an African American, a girl, and from a family without money didn’t phase her then, or at any time. Her parents stressed the importance of education and hard work, and encouraged her interest in science by buying her a chemistry set. At the age of 16, Patricia became one of only a few students to attend a cancer research workshop sponsored by the National Science Foundation. The program head, Dr. Robert Bernard, was so impressed by her discoveries during the project that he incorporated her findings in a scientific paper he presented at a conference. After graduating from high school in only two years, Patricia headed to Hunter College, where she earned a bachelor's degree in 1964. She then attended Howard University to pursue a medical degree. She graduated with honors from Howard in 1968, and accepted an internship at Harlem Hospital shortly afterward. The following year, she also began pursuing a fellowship in ophthalmology at Columbia University. Through her studies there, she discovered that African Americans were twice as likely to suffer from blindness than other patients to which she attended, and eight times more likely to develop glaucoma. Her research led to her development of a community ophthalmology system, which increased the amount of eye care given to those who were unable to afford treatment; she convinced her former professors to operate on patients for free. In 1975, she moved to California to join the famed Jules Stein Eye Institute; she was the first woman hired there. At first she was given an office in the basement, next to the lab animals. Patricia demanded an equal workspace upstairs, and got it. Then she continued her quest of trying to restore sight to the blind. She came up with the idea of using lasers in eye surgery, and traveled to Europe in 1986 to study the idea, eventually inventing a new tool called the “Laserphaco Probe.” The U.S. granted her a patent for the device in 1988. The story then skips to Patricia’s retirement years, when she traveled to Tanzania, visiting a school for the blind, where the kids did not even have braille books. She sent them braille-computer keyboards, calling it “computer vision.” The author writes, “Dr. Patricia Bath saw possibility wherever she went.” Dr. Bath died on May 30, 2019 at the age of 76 at a University of California, San Francisco medical center from cancer-related complications. She was granted many honors and awards during her lifetime, including the 1995 NAACP Legal Defense Fund Black Woman Achievement Award. She was inducted into the American Medical Women’s Association Hall of Fame in 2001. The book concludes with a timeline, Author’s Note, more background about Dr. Bath, and a guide to further resources. Alleanna Harris uses bright colors and a style reminiscent of animation to illustrate Patricia’s story. Evaluation: This book highlights a little-known pioneer in African-American history and in medical history. Readers of all ages will find her story inspiring; she was an amazing person whose confidence and dedication are well worth emulating.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    Patricia's Vision: The Doctor Who Saved Sight is a biographical children's picture book written by Michelle Lord and illustrated by Alleanna Harris. It is an inspiring story of Dr. Patricia Bath, an African American eye surgeon who made significant contributions in the field of ophthalmology. Patricia Era Bath was an American ophthalmologist, inventor, humanitarian, and academic. She was an early pioneer of laser cataract surgery. She also became first woman member of the Jules Stein Eye Institut Patricia's Vision: The Doctor Who Saved Sight is a biographical children's picture book written by Michelle Lord and illustrated by Alleanna Harris. It is an inspiring story of Dr. Patricia Bath, an African American eye surgeon who made significant contributions in the field of ophthalmology. Patricia Era Bath was an American ophthalmologist, inventor, humanitarian, and academic. She was an early pioneer of laser cataract surgery. She also became first woman member of the Jules Stein Eye Institute, first woman to lead a post-graduate training program in ophthalmology, and first woman elected to the honorary staff of the UCLA Medical Center. Lord's text is rather simplistic, straightforward, and informative. Lord relates Bath’s story, from her childhood in 1940s Harlem to her success as an ophthalmologist, inventor, and philanthropist. Backmatter includes a timeline, author’s note, biographical note, works cited, further reading. Harris' lively illustrations complement this motivational text with detail and emotion, from early depictions of Patricia practicing medicine on her toys to the granting of her first patent and her later humanitarian work in Tanzania. The premise of the book is rather straightforward. Growing up in the late 1940s in Harlem, young Patricia first became curious about sight and sightlessness when she noticed a beggar with cloudy eyes. While her friends played nurse, Patricia wanted to be a doctor, and her working-class parents encouraged her love of science. As a young ophthalmologist, Dr. Bath began working in Harlem before moving across the country to the prestigious Jules Stein Eye Institute in California. All in all, Patricia's Vision: The Doctor Who Saved Sight is a great tribute to a beautiful life and an important spotlight on a little-known part of American medical history.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    This biography of Patricia Bath covers her childhood (focussed on science and education) and career as a eye doctor, where she opened new possibilities for people and communities. She connected her Harlem neighborhood clinic with the eye surgeons of Columbia medical school. She refused to accept second tier status when she became the first woman on the Jules Stein Eye Institute faculty -- rejecting the basement closet they proposed as her first office. She invented the laser tool that clears out This biography of Patricia Bath covers her childhood (focussed on science and education) and career as a eye doctor, where she opened new possibilities for people and communities. She connected her Harlem neighborhood clinic with the eye surgeons of Columbia medical school. She refused to accept second tier status when she became the first woman on the Jules Stein Eye Institute faculty -- rejecting the basement closet they proposed as her first office. She invented the laser tool that clears out cataracts, which is how the author first learned about her. All this was stuff I had never heard. The pictures are simple but deeply rich and saturated. I think they are done on computer? It's a realistic style with backgrounds chosen to focus attention. And I like how quotes from Bath are woven into the text, showing Bath's dedication to her patients and resistance to prejudice, whether aimed at women or Blacks. The backmatter has a timeline of Bath's life, including her death in 2019, a note from the author about discovering Dr Patricia Bath, her interviews with her, and other resources. It also has a dense page of more information, including her meeting with Dr Martin Luther King Jr. There's a works cited section and more reading "About Other Women in Stem" but they are hard for me to see because the library cover keeps most of the last page obscured.

  8. 5 out of 5

    GalindoLibrarian

    Great book about an amazing black woman doctor, teacher, inventor! I read it aloud to multiple groups of students and they were all blown away by her perseverance and dedication to doing good for others! There is one page though that almost reads as if the copy editor deleted a sentence or something. The page about the Harlem Hospital Eye Clinic does not read aloud well - it's confusing. But otherwise, well written, good use of repetition and some even noticed the play on words related to sight Great book about an amazing black woman doctor, teacher, inventor! I read it aloud to multiple groups of students and they were all blown away by her perseverance and dedication to doing good for others! There is one page though that almost reads as if the copy editor deleted a sentence or something. The page about the Harlem Hospital Eye Clinic does not read aloud well - it's confusing. But otherwise, well written, good use of repetition and some even noticed the play on words related to sight (she "saw" possibility and "worked hard to keep her eye on the future"). Great read-aloud for women's history month!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    Shared this book with my 4th grade class for our unit on scientists. It just so happens to also be a perfect fit for our unit on racial literacy. The story of a African American woman who went to medical school when women didn't attend medical school. And particularly not black women. She pushed through so many odds. She innovated eye procedures and surgeries. She is a real pioneer. Simple text. Good for older grade schoolers. Illustrations help in the understanding of the text. Themes include: pers Shared this book with my 4th grade class for our unit on scientists. It just so happens to also be a perfect fit for our unit on racial literacy. The story of a African American woman who went to medical school when women didn't attend medical school. And particularly not black women. She pushed through so many odds. She innovated eye procedures and surgeries. She is a real pioneer. Simple text. Good for older grade schoolers. Illustrations help in the understanding of the text. Themes include: perseverance, miracles, hope, science and technology, disability

  10. 5 out of 5

    Maria Marshall

    This is an excellent STEM biography. The strategic use of the refrain, "she saw possibility wherever she went," and direct quotations from Dr. Bath make this biography come alive and reinforce how Patricia never gave up. She fought for herself and others for her entire life. It is a great book showing how tenacity can overcome the barriers of gender, race, and complacency and create meaningful change for others. As well as a practical evaluation of the technology involved in treating blindness a This is an excellent STEM biography. The strategic use of the refrain, "she saw possibility wherever she went," and direct quotations from Dr. Bath make this biography come alive and reinforce how Patricia never gave up. She fought for herself and others for her entire life. It is a great book showing how tenacity can overcome the barriers of gender, race, and complacency and create meaningful change for others. As well as a practical evaluation of the technology involved in treating blindness and cataracts.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Ward

    In this interesting account of the inventor of the Laserphaco Probe, young readers will learn how perseverance, belief and an unrelenting drive to help the blind lead Patricia Bath to become a hero to so many. From humble begins and a strong-willed family, Patricia found the courage to become something others could only imagine. Neither social norms of the times or unfair treatment could stop her from becoming a doctor and inventing a technology that has helped so many people regain their sight. In this interesting account of the inventor of the Laserphaco Probe, young readers will learn how perseverance, belief and an unrelenting drive to help the blind lead Patricia Bath to become a hero to so many. From humble begins and a strong-willed family, Patricia found the courage to become something others could only imagine. Neither social norms of the times or unfair treatment could stop her from becoming a doctor and inventing a technology that has helped so many people regain their sight. I especially loved the extra information about Dr. Bath in the back matter and suggested titles for further reading that will give children further information about women in STEM.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Patricia overcame so much, against such odds, and yet that all felt strangely glossed over. The ending felt tacked on as well--by the way, she was in Africa and she got a bunch of computers for blind kids so that they could see. Weird. Please don't misunderstand me, this is a woman who conquered. She slayed. She was brilliant and made brilliant discoveries. And yet, this book fell flat. The illustrations were good and helped. This cover rocks. But the storyline was not compelling sadly enough. Patricia overcame so much, against such odds, and yet that all felt strangely glossed over. The ending felt tacked on as well--by the way, she was in Africa and she got a bunch of computers for blind kids so that they could see. Weird. Please don't misunderstand me, this is a woman who conquered. She slayed. She was brilliant and made brilliant discoveries. And yet, this book fell flat. The illustrations were good and helped. This cover rocks. But the storyline was not compelling sadly enough.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Susi Schaefer

    Amazing facts about an amazing doctor! Patricia's Vision is about determination, compassion and believing in what can be done, even when it has never been done before. I loved reading about the life of Dr. Bath and her inspirational journey of becoming a doctor and changing people's life by restoring their sight using tools she invented herself. Beautiful writing and gorgeous, scientific illustrations make this a very special book. Amazing facts about an amazing doctor! Patricia's Vision is about determination, compassion and believing in what can be done, even when it has never been done before. I loved reading about the life of Dr. Bath and her inspirational journey of becoming a doctor and changing people's life by restoring their sight using tools she invented herself. Beautiful writing and gorgeous, scientific illustrations make this a very special book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Danielle Dufayet

    Eye-opening story of inspiration! I feel so much richer knowing the story of a true humanitarian hero, Patricia Bath. Her journey of pursuing her dream and never giving up is so inspiring. Driven by her compassion, curiosity, imagination and determination, she restored sight to the blind! Like her, I, too, will remember to “choose miracles”. This is a beautiful story of a beautiful and important woman in history.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Amber Hendrick

    I absolutely love picture book biographies, especially when they introduce me to amazing women who changed the world. As someone who suffers from poor eyesight and who has benefited from laser surgery, I was delighted to learn more about Dr. Patricia Bath's strength, determination, and vision. Dr. Bath's important legacy will surely inspire. I absolutely love picture book biographies, especially when they introduce me to amazing women who changed the world. As someone who suffers from poor eyesight and who has benefited from laser surgery, I was delighted to learn more about Dr. Patricia Bath's strength, determination, and vision. Dr. Bath's important legacy will surely inspire.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jo Oehrlein

    A biography of Patricia Bath who became an ophthalmologist at a time when women, especially black women, were more likely to be nurses than doctors. She also pioneered laser surgery to help clear cataracts. She was driven by a desire to help people.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie Grover

    “Remember that the limits of science are not the limits of your imagination.” Patricia’s Ṿision is a biography about Dr. Patricia Bath, an ophthalmologist who patented laser eye surgery. This is a great story of empowerment and inspiration. ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

  18. 5 out of 5

    Annese

    This was a bit to bland to me. It glosses over the adversity she faced during her formative years. Even the timeline in the back is a bit lacking for me. I do, however, really enjoy the illustrations,

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nicki

    Striving to be her best and help people, Dr. Bath's brilliance, curiosity and perseverance saved so many people's sight. A story that needs to be told! Striving to be her best and help people, Dr. Bath's brilliance, curiosity and perseverance saved so many people's sight. A story that needs to be told!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Erin Berry Salazar

    My six year son enjoyed learning about Dr Bath!

  21. 4 out of 5

    N

    Wonderful! Another great picture book biography to share with my students!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Steph

    This story is amazing!!!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Shani

    What accomplishments of an unsung hero!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    This was a fascinating book. I loved learning about a pioneering woman and all that she did to make the world a better place. This is an excellent book!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dierric

    Great information about Patricia Bath, an African American woman who did extraordinary things in the world of medicine.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Norkett

    Always fun to learn something new and be surprised by people who do amazing things for humanity!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Elsa

    Good informational text

  28. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Dr. Patricia Bath followed her passion and vision to help others see and never let naysayers discourage her from getting an education, providing new services at community clinics, or from developing a new technology. She faced discrimination for her race and her sex, but she never gave up. This book richly details Dr. Bath's journey from a little girl who dreamed big to a renowned doctor/inventor who touched lives around the globe. An excellent choice for any nonfiction bookshelf. Dr. Patricia Bath followed her passion and vision to help others see and never let naysayers discourage her from getting an education, providing new services at community clinics, or from developing a new technology. She faced discrimination for her race and her sex, but she never gave up. This book richly details Dr. Bath's journey from a little girl who dreamed big to a renowned doctor/inventor who touched lives around the globe. An excellent choice for any nonfiction bookshelf.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mallory Gibson

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bean

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