web site hit counter Jefferson's Muslim Fugitives: The Lost Story of Enslaved Africans, Their Arabic Letters, and an American President - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Jefferson's Muslim Fugitives: The Lost Story of Enslaved Africans, Their Arabic Letters, and an American President

Availability: Ready to download

On October 3, 1807, Thomas Jefferson was contacted by an unknown traveler urgently pleading for a private interview with the President, promising to disclose a matter of momentous importance. By the next day, Jefferson held in his hands two astonishing manuscripts whose history has been lost for over two centuries. Authored by Muslims fleeing captivity in rural Kentucky, t On October 3, 1807, Thomas Jefferson was contacted by an unknown traveler urgently pleading for a private interview with the President, promising to disclose a matter of momentous importance. By the next day, Jefferson held in his hands two astonishing manuscripts whose history has been lost for over two centuries. Authored by Muslims fleeing captivity in rural Kentucky, these documents delivered to the President in 1807 were penned by literate African slaves, and written entirely in Arabic. Jefferson's Muslim Fugitives reveals the untold story of two escaped West Africans in the American heartland whose Arabic writings reached a sitting U.S. President, prompting him to intervene on their behalf. Recounting a quest for emancipation that crosses borders of race, region and religion, Jeffrey Einboden unearths Arabic manuscripts that circulated among Jefferson and his prominent peers, including a document from 1780s Georgia which Einboden identifies as the earliest surviving example of Muslim slave authorship in the newly-formed United States. Revealing Jefferson's lifelong entanglements with slavery and Islam, Jefferson's Muslim Fugitives tracks the ascent of Arabic slave writings to the highest halls of U.S. power, while questioning why such vital legacies from the American past have been entirely forgotten.


Compare

On October 3, 1807, Thomas Jefferson was contacted by an unknown traveler urgently pleading for a private interview with the President, promising to disclose a matter of momentous importance. By the next day, Jefferson held in his hands two astonishing manuscripts whose history has been lost for over two centuries. Authored by Muslims fleeing captivity in rural Kentucky, t On October 3, 1807, Thomas Jefferson was contacted by an unknown traveler urgently pleading for a private interview with the President, promising to disclose a matter of momentous importance. By the next day, Jefferson held in his hands two astonishing manuscripts whose history has been lost for over two centuries. Authored by Muslims fleeing captivity in rural Kentucky, these documents delivered to the President in 1807 were penned by literate African slaves, and written entirely in Arabic. Jefferson's Muslim Fugitives reveals the untold story of two escaped West Africans in the American heartland whose Arabic writings reached a sitting U.S. President, prompting him to intervene on their behalf. Recounting a quest for emancipation that crosses borders of race, region and religion, Jeffrey Einboden unearths Arabic manuscripts that circulated among Jefferson and his prominent peers, including a document from 1780s Georgia which Einboden identifies as the earliest surviving example of Muslim slave authorship in the newly-formed United States. Revealing Jefferson's lifelong entanglements with slavery and Islam, Jefferson's Muslim Fugitives tracks the ascent of Arabic slave writings to the highest halls of U.S. power, while questioning why such vital legacies from the American past have been entirely forgotten.

33 review for Jefferson's Muslim Fugitives: The Lost Story of Enslaved Africans, Their Arabic Letters, and an American President

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sara

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Forrester

  3. 4 out of 5

    John

  4. 4 out of 5

    Brianne Magnus

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jerry Landry

  6. 5 out of 5

    Roger

  7. 5 out of 5

    Hiba

  8. 4 out of 5

    Steve Walker

  9. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

  10. 5 out of 5

    Coco Rhoades

  11. 4 out of 5

    Judy

  12. 5 out of 5

    Taylor

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  14. 5 out of 5

    Misty

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mary

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dominic

  18. 4 out of 5

    Moira Carlock Rivas

  19. 4 out of 5

    James Hill Welborn III

  20. 5 out of 5

    Erica Ball

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tamim Diaa

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nazmin

  23. 4 out of 5

    Yasameen

  24. 4 out of 5

    April

  25. 4 out of 5

    Deepa

  26. 5 out of 5

    Edith

  27. 4 out of 5

    Emily Jane

  28. 5 out of 5

    Yoko

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tasasha

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

  31. 4 out of 5

    Marc Macià Farré

  32. 5 out of 5

    Lynne

  33. 4 out of 5

    Tim

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.