web site hit counter Oishinbo a la carte, Volume 2 - Sake - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Oishinbo a la carte, Volume 2 - Sake

Availability: Ready to download

R to L (Japanese Style)As part of the celebrations for its 100th anniversary, the publishers of the Tozai News have decided to commission the creation of the 'Ultimate Menu," a model meal embodying the pinnacle of Japanese cuisine. This all-important task has been entrusted to journalist Shiro Yamaoka, an inveterate cynic who possesses no initiative, but does have an incre R to L (Japanese Style)As part of the celebrations for its 100th anniversary, the publishers of the Tozai News have decided to commission the creation of the 'Ultimate Menu," a model meal embodying the pinnacle of Japanese cuisine. This all-important task has been entrusted to journalist Shiro Yamaoka, an inveterate cynic who possesses no initiative, but does have an incredibly refined palate and an encyclopedic knowledge of food.Each volume of Oishinbo follows Yamaoka and his colleagues through another adventure on their quest for the Ultimate Menu. Now, the best stories from the hundred-plus volume series have been selected and compiled into A la Carte editions, arranged by subject.In this volume, the focus shifts from food to drink--specifically, to sake. For centuries different types of sake have played the same roles in Japan as wine and beer have in the West, from inexpensive everyday drink to refined single-batch rarities. Above all, sake has been enjoyed as an accompaniment to a meal, and after a revelatory moment at a local pub, Yamaoka decides that drink pairings must be an integral part of the Ultimate Menu. So which foods go best with which drinks? Sit down, pour yourself a glass, and read on!


Compare

R to L (Japanese Style)As part of the celebrations for its 100th anniversary, the publishers of the Tozai News have decided to commission the creation of the 'Ultimate Menu," a model meal embodying the pinnacle of Japanese cuisine. This all-important task has been entrusted to journalist Shiro Yamaoka, an inveterate cynic who possesses no initiative, but does have an incre R to L (Japanese Style)As part of the celebrations for its 100th anniversary, the publishers of the Tozai News have decided to commission the creation of the 'Ultimate Menu," a model meal embodying the pinnacle of Japanese cuisine. This all-important task has been entrusted to journalist Shiro Yamaoka, an inveterate cynic who possesses no initiative, but does have an incredibly refined palate and an encyclopedic knowledge of food.Each volume of Oishinbo follows Yamaoka and his colleagues through another adventure on their quest for the Ultimate Menu. Now, the best stories from the hundred-plus volume series have been selected and compiled into A la Carte editions, arranged by subject.In this volume, the focus shifts from food to drink--specifically, to sake. For centuries different types of sake have played the same roles in Japan as wine and beer have in the West, from inexpensive everyday drink to refined single-batch rarities. Above all, sake has been enjoyed as an accompaniment to a meal, and after a revelatory moment at a local pub, Yamaoka decides that drink pairings must be an integral part of the Ultimate Menu. So which foods go best with which drinks? Sit down, pour yourself a glass, and read on!

30 review for Oishinbo a la carte, Volume 2 - Sake

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mir

    I enjoyed this slightly less than the first volume simply because I'm not as interested in or well-informed concerning sake, compared with food. And I was slightly annoyed by the dissing of wine (sake and wine can both be great! it isn't either/or!) but I suspect that this was in response to people being so snotty about wine (it's all French in this book) so I can sympathize. I didn't try to keep all the sake information straight because I suspect it is out of date at this point, and that part o I enjoyed this slightly less than the first volume simply because I'm not as interested in or well-informed concerning sake, compared with food. And I was slightly annoyed by the dissing of wine (sake and wine can both be great! it isn't either/or!) but I suspect that this was in response to people being so snotty about wine (it's all French in this book) so I can sympathize. I didn't try to keep all the sake information straight because I suspect it is out of date at this point, and that part of my brain is already used up keeping wines straight. I do wish I had a better memory, then I'd learn my beers and sakes, too, but I can't. The character development was good, I enjoyed the scenes very much. I really appreciate how passionate the author is, not just about food as a consumable, but about artisans and the economics of production. I also like that Yūko gets to be confident and knowledgeable about food, not just a supportive character for the male expert. One question: it seemed at one point to be implied that Shirō and Yūko are living together? I didn't think that they were even dating at this point (if they are kudos for depicting a workplace romance where people behave in a professional manner!), did I miss some subtle cues?

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    Rather more technical and detailed than the previous volume. In large part, that's because most of this volume is actually one story, in many parts. And that story is an exhaustive discussion of the sake industry, at the time it was written. I'm not sure how long ago that was, and I'm not sure how much, if anything, has changed in the industry since then, so I also don't know how much of Kariya's criticism of the industry is still a going concern. That really doesn't affect how it reads, though. Rather more technical and detailed than the previous volume. In large part, that's because most of this volume is actually one story, in many parts. And that story is an exhaustive discussion of the sake industry, at the time it was written. I'm not sure how long ago that was, and I'm not sure how much, if anything, has changed in the industry since then, so I also don't know how much of Kariya's criticism of the industry is still a going concern. That really doesn't affect how it reads, though. You can learn a lot about sake from this volume. But for me, it was a little too much of an infodump at times.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Hmm...I'll open up with this...Within this manga it states that champers won't make your drunk. Uhm...I think the manga is very wrong..lol In saying that WOW...This manga was like reading a fun history guide to Sake in Japan. I've had a few sake over my life and I've felt they've always been a hit or miss...And now I'm starting to wonder if the ones that were terrible was due to incorrect practices or the way the sake was actually made. Basically this volume centres around a banker who has refuse Hmm...I'll open up with this...Within this manga it states that champers won't make your drunk. Uhm...I think the manga is very wrong..lol In saying that WOW...This manga was like reading a fun history guide to Sake in Japan. I've had a few sake over my life and I've felt they've always been a hit or miss...And now I'm starting to wonder if the ones that were terrible was due to incorrect practices or the way the sake was actually made. Basically this volume centres around a banker who has refused a sake brewery a loan...Reason being is the guy doesn't believe that sake is worth investing money into no matter how good it may be. As you expect he's looking at it from a purely money stand point. As per usual it's up to Yamaoka and Kurita to sway him.. This manga highlights different booze from wine, shochu, to champagne and of course sake. For Westerners we think of 'sake' as the rice wine that Japanese drink..But really sake is a term for pretty much all alcoholic beverages over there. In Japan they usually refer to it as nihonshu. Loved it!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Luke

    The second volume of selection from the manga series featuring battling gourmands steps it up a notch. Sure, the first one talked about Japanese food and what it means to consider Japanese cuisine, but this one not only has a more consistent storyline, but it's also about something a lot of people would think is more important: booze. Sake, to be specific. Of course, it's not all kanpai and jollity and hangovers. Nope, it wouldn't be Oishinbo without a tranche of self-loathing and operatic glari The second volume of selection from the manga series featuring battling gourmands steps it up a notch. Sure, the first one talked about Japanese food and what it means to consider Japanese cuisine, but this one not only has a more consistent storyline, but it's also about something a lot of people would think is more important: booze. Sake, to be specific. Of course, it's not all kanpai and jollity and hangovers. Nope, it wouldn't be Oishinbo without a tranche of self-loathing and operatic glaring. Oh, and some history lessons. Because that's what you've signed on for, right? As with the first volume, this book collects a couple of different pieces from across the manga's run, yoking them together under the banner of sake. But unlike the first, a large portion of the book focuses on one story, involving the vicissitudes of a small sake brewery, and the good feelings of a banker. This is refreshing: rather than a degustation, we're offered a solid main. The amount of glaring between father and son continues, but it's on the back-burner. This book, rather, seems to use national identity and the worth of same as its focus. There's a lot of discussion about sophistication, local products and how the interaction of both feeds into both world standing and cultural output. There's a snook cocked at both wine and sake throughout, and while there's a scientific basis for both, it's impossible to read the alcoholic dick-measuring as something other than an examination of nationalism and its value. (It's difficult, though, to pick a clear winner. Sake is sometimes construed as simple and duplicitous - but it's better with seafood than wine, so can't be written off. Perhaps this failure to provide sake a definitive role - sophisticated or past it or both - is the effect of gathering stories from a couple of sources. Regardless, you'll learn a lot about the manufacture of the drink, so you are the winner, really.) Most of what I wrote in my review of the first volume applies here: the illustrations go from the simplistic to the super-detailed. There's explanatory notes - copious - at the end of the book to explain quirks of translation. And the explanation of particular culinary (well, alcoholic) byways and practices manages to supply the reader with a lot of information without it feeling too much like an infodump. I need a snack after all this drinking, however. I wonder what's next on the menu.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

    Second in the a la Carte series with the focus on sake this time. I am not a sake drinker but man was this book fascinating. I learned quite a bit about the world of sake including why I probably think I don't like it - lots of poorly made sake out there in the world. Now I'm intrigued to actually try a higher quality sake and see what I think. Second in the a la Carte series with the focus on sake this time. I am not a sake drinker but man was this book fascinating. I learned quite a bit about the world of sake including why I probably think I don't like it - lots of poorly made sake out there in the world. Now I'm intrigued to actually try a higher quality sake and see what I think.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lydia Presley

    I'm still in love with this series - however there were a few things in this volume that got to me and made my opinion of it drop just a little. This book was much more technical than Volume 1. Parts were incredibly interesting - learning the different types of Sake and how WWII impacted Japan with its lack of rice and the "need" to still make Sake. The story also attacks the perception that French white wines are to be paired with fish and challenges the reader to try sake instead. There was less I'm still in love with this series - however there were a few things in this volume that got to me and made my opinion of it drop just a little. This book was much more technical than Volume 1. Parts were incredibly interesting - learning the different types of Sake and how WWII impacted Japan with its lack of rice and the "need" to still make Sake. The story also attacks the perception that French white wines are to be paired with fish and challenges the reader to try sake instead. There was less focus in this volume on the relationship between son and father, and more education being offered, sometimes ad nauseum (I counted the story of WWII three times). All that being said, I learned quite a bit about sake. It probably would have been more had I been more familiar with wine names and sake types, but even as a beginner I took quite a bit. I think my favorite story in this volume was the one dealing with Champagne. I laughed out loud at the end of it and this volume is worth reading if only for that story alone.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Eustacia Tan

    Every time I read Oishinbo, I wish that it was translated and published in English in chronological order like most manga. Having them published by subject means that the overarching plot becomes jumbled and impossible to follow. That said, having them published by subject means that it’s possible to quickly and easily learn about one aspect of Japanese cuisine. Like the title says, Oishinbo: Sake is all about sake. Sake is actually a generic word for alcohol, what this book focuses on is mostly Every time I read Oishinbo, I wish that it was translated and published in English in chronological order like most manga. Having them published by subject means that the overarching plot becomes jumbled and impossible to follow. That said, having them published by subject means that it’s possible to quickly and easily learn about one aspect of Japanese cuisine. Like the title says, Oishinbo: Sake is all about sake. Sake is actually a generic word for alcohol, what this book focuses on is mostly nihonshu (Japanese alcohol), with one story on champagne. There are six stories in this book and they basically focus on how a lot of sake in Japan is fake sake (diluted with alcohol and additives) which tastes completely different from real sake. And that real sake pairs wonderfully with food and can hold its own against the finest wines. While most of the stories are short, there is one six-part story called “The Power of Sake” that goes into detail on how sake is made, how to differentiate between the different types of sake, and the sake scene in Japan (at the time it was written - this manga is really old so things probably have changed a lot by now). There is an abundance of information here and I wish that I read this earlier. As someone who wasn’t fond of nihonshu when I lived in Japan, I wonder if my dislike of the strong alcohol taste was because I wasn’t drinking the real stuff. As a student, our class parties would take place at restaurants with all-you-can-drink options, which I guess makes it natural that they would only serve the cheaper nihonshu. I would definitely recommend this book (and entire series) to anyone who loves Japanese food! The style of drawing is slightly different from the regular shoujo and shounen manga around today, but the stories are interesting and information-packed. I only managed to read the first few volumes in Japanese, so if I see other English translations, I’m gonna borrow them even though the big storyline won’t make sense. This review was first posted at Inside the mind of a Bibliophile

  8. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    I still liked this one, but not as much as the first volume; I didn't have much of a base knowledge of sake to begin with, so most of the information being presented was completely new to me knew and it felt like there was an overwhelming amount of of it at times. I especially felt this in the blind tasting sections of the book, wherein many different kinds of sake are examined at once. They were presented in a rapid-fire fashion, with a brief discussion of their methods of production and their I still liked this one, but not as much as the first volume; I didn't have much of a base knowledge of sake to begin with, so most of the information being presented was completely new to me knew and it felt like there was an overwhelming amount of of it at times. I especially felt this in the blind tasting sections of the book, wherein many different kinds of sake are examined at once. They were presented in a rapid-fire fashion, with a brief discussion of their methods of production and their results on the final taste of the sake, but without actually tasting the difference myself I had a hard time really making the finer points stick. I still feel like I learned a lot about different methods of producing sake, its history and place in Japanese culture, and the state of sake the industry at the time this was written. I'd really like to learn more and then come back to re-read this; I feel like I could get more out of it with some tasting experience or further reading.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Meg

    The second in the series....this food made me want to try sake (never have) and made me want to go to Japan to learn/taste more. This is definitely a book pro sake/Japan. It mocks people who buy things just to be important (fancy wines, but know nothing). I also think that the two main characters the son (forgive me for not jumping up to grab the book to see his name) and father spend a lot of time yelling at each other.... and magically the son helps his friend stop being an alcoholic, but teac The second in the series....this food made me want to try sake (never have) and made me want to go to Japan to learn/taste more. This is definitely a book pro sake/Japan. It mocks people who buy things just to be important (fancy wines, but know nothing). I also think that the two main characters the son (forgive me for not jumping up to grab the book to see his name) and father spend a lot of time yelling at each other.... and magically the son helps his friend stop being an alcoholic, but teaches him he can still drink and enjoy alcohol (wtf). I don't know if this series is considered outdated, but in this series the son can do no wrong and can fix anything....and his father is even more amazing. It can be a bit "roll your eyes", but I enjoy manga and learning about other foods....not sure I can read 7 of these, but I'll try. Read: if you enjoy learning about different alcohols.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Alyson Fortowsky

    More political than the other volumes of this series, with a lot of explicit criticism of the Japanese government for failing to regulate sake. This lack of regulation has led to an industry in which adulterated products are able to be sold as sake and because they are cheaper to make, these products constitute the majority of the industry. The characters speak admiringly of the French system of regulations, which is so entrenched that the idea of adding anything but grapes to wine would be utte More political than the other volumes of this series, with a lot of explicit criticism of the Japanese government for failing to regulate sake. This lack of regulation has led to an industry in which adulterated products are able to be sold as sake and because they are cheaper to make, these products constitute the majority of the industry. The characters speak admiringly of the French system of regulations, which is so entrenched that the idea of adding anything but grapes to wine would be utterly unacceptable to French wine drinkers. I wonder how much the sake industry in Japan has changed since the time of the series' publication and with the worldwide rise in craft brewing over the past decade or so.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alex Lawless

    This was very good! The review I'd give it is honestly very similar to the review I gave volume 1. It's a smaller, themed collection of stories (this one about sake), edited for English, taken out of the context of a much longer-running manga. I learned a lot about sake, and since this series is a little dated it made me want to look into the current state of affairs concerning the world and politics of sake-making. The notes in the back of the manga are incredibly helpful to provide context for This was very good! The review I'd give it is honestly very similar to the review I gave volume 1. It's a smaller, themed collection of stories (this one about sake), edited for English, taken out of the context of a much longer-running manga. I learned a lot about sake, and since this series is a little dated it made me want to look into the current state of affairs concerning the world and politics of sake-making. The notes in the back of the manga are incredibly helpful to provide context for English readers. I personally really love this series so far, but it can be a little dry in parts.

  12. 4 out of 5

    WF

    Educational. Basically, the message is that sake as a national drink is facing survival challenges due to its poor image, originally caused by compromises made arising from WW2 shortages but perpetuated by unscrupulous mass producers. Apparently anyone who doesn't think highly of sake as a cultural drink worth preserving has not drunk genuine sake made with traditional craftsmanship. Once they have experienced the real deal, they love it. This wisdom probably can be applied to any other national Educational. Basically, the message is that sake as a national drink is facing survival challenges due to its poor image, originally caused by compromises made arising from WW2 shortages but perpetuated by unscrupulous mass producers. Apparently anyone who doesn't think highly of sake as a cultural drink worth preserving has not drunk genuine sake made with traditional craftsmanship. Once they have experienced the real deal, they love it. This wisdom probably can be applied to any other national food or drink.

  13. 5 out of 5

    John

    The things that I liked about the first volume are present in this one and the shortcomings are also there. The dialogue is pretty stilted and the character design is still not great. But if you like reading about food generally, especially Japanese food, without just reading a non-fiction book, this is a good series. As the volume title suggests, most of this is about sake, but they also talk about wine and champagne. There's also a recipe at the beginning and some author notes in the middle. The things that I liked about the first volume are present in this one and the shortcomings are also there. The dialogue is pretty stilted and the character design is still not great. But if you like reading about food generally, especially Japanese food, without just reading a non-fiction book, this is a good series. As the volume title suggests, most of this is about sake, but they also talk about wine and champagne. There's also a recipe at the beginning and some author notes in the middle.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jo

    Still entertaining and lots of interesting information about Japanese food culture but a bit repetitive in places. Not surprisingly though when it’s all the Sake segments that are pulled from a much longer series.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Madonna Stephens

    Why have I never found this classic before?? It’s everything I want in a manga! Food, Japanese cultural knowledge, slice of life... and wow so much information about Sake. I never knew! Boutique Sake makers are the way to go! What a great manga.

  16. 5 out of 5

    ElphaReads

    Much like the first volume, OISHINBO A LA CARTE VOL 2 focuses on one aspect of Japanese cuisine and culture, this time talking about alcohol. I didn't realize that there were so many complex historical elements that go into sake, so this was SO interesting to read! Much like the first volume, OISHINBO A LA CARTE VOL 2 focuses on one aspect of Japanese cuisine and culture, this time talking about alcohol. I didn't realize that there were so many complex historical elements that go into sake, so this was SO interesting to read!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    I love Japanese teaching comics.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jenn Noto

    3.5 stars. (Unfortunately I can’t give half points on Goodreads so I just state it in the review section instead.)

  19. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Solid info with an interesting framing reference. Look forward to the next!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sydney Pacione

    Learning about the well-loved marriage of alcohol and food from the unique perspective of the sake industry in Japan is very interesting, even for a non-drinker like me!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    I really enjoyed volume 2, though not quite as much as volume 1. Volume 2 lacked the father/son narrative that was so strong in volume 1, and generally speaking was a bit more explanatory fiction with regard to its subject matter (sake) than it was narrative. I thought the stories in Volume 1 had the balance a little better. That said, it's a really fun read, and I learned a number of things about sake that I didn't know previously. It's a great way to introduce the material in a way that is likel I really enjoyed volume 2, though not quite as much as volume 1. Volume 2 lacked the father/son narrative that was so strong in volume 1, and generally speaking was a bit more explanatory fiction with regard to its subject matter (sake) than it was narrative. I thought the stories in Volume 1 had the balance a little better. That said, it's a really fun read, and I learned a number of things about sake that I didn't know previously. It's a great way to introduce the material in a way that is likely to stick in readers' minds.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    In this collection of stories from the long running manga series, the central theme is alcoholic beverages - in Japanese, as they explain in one of the notes in the book, "sake" means not just the rice based beverage that we know by that term, but any alcoholic beverage. So wine and champagne form the subject matter for a couple of these stories. But sake, based on rice, is the main drink dealt with here, and the author has strong opinions on both the beverage itself and on the Japanese sake ind In this collection of stories from the long running manga series, the central theme is alcoholic beverages - in Japanese, as they explain in one of the notes in the book, "sake" means not just the rice based beverage that we know by that term, but any alcoholic beverage. So wine and champagne form the subject matter for a couple of these stories. But sake, based on rice, is the main drink dealt with here, and the author has strong opinions on both the beverage itself and on the Japanese sake industry which critics of the large American breweries and fans of craft brewing will find it easy to relate to. Both the intricacies of the sake brewing process and the history of sake brewing in the twentieth century make for the most interesting reading in the book. Beyond that, the plotting is somewhat on the rudimentary side. I've elevated my opinion of the artwork in the series - it's actually pretty good, in this volume anyway. But the real draw for the series is the information given on Japanese cuisine and related topics, so if that has no interest for you, this isn't the book for you.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    The next installment of Oishinbo is about sake, but readers might be surprised to find out that word refers to all alcoholic drinks in Japanese - and that nihonshu is the word used specifically for rice wine (an important distinction for those considering travel in Japan). Between many moody culinary battles between Yamaoka and Kaibara we learn how to appreciate sake's (and other drinks') food pairings and what all those junmais and ginjos really mean. I do hope that the regulation of the sake i The next installment of Oishinbo is about sake, but readers might be surprised to find out that word refers to all alcoholic drinks in Japanese - and that nihonshu is the word used specifically for rice wine (an important distinction for those considering travel in Japan). Between many moody culinary battles between Yamaoka and Kaibara we learn how to appreciate sake's (and other drinks') food pairings and what all those junmais and ginjos really mean. I do hope that the regulation of the sake industry has improved since these manga originally came out, because it's truly confusing and misleading for the consumer to allow ambiguous language like "high quality" on labels while allowing sketchy additives. I can't say I agree with the proclamation that no (western) wine can truly pair with seafood, but I do appreciate sake's ability to suit almost any fish, and especially some of the bolder types of sashimi.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Gareth Bogdanoff

    This is the second English translation of an educational and entertaining if painfully pretentious manga series about Japanese cuisine. This volume focuses on sake, as you probably guessed by the title. However, it also goes into wine and champagne. If you are a wine lover, prepare to be offended. In this volume we learn of the terrible shortcomings of wine, particularly that it can't possibly go with seafood, ever. But sake on the other hand goes with everything. All trash talking of wine aside, This is the second English translation of an educational and entertaining if painfully pretentious manga series about Japanese cuisine. This volume focuses on sake, as you probably guessed by the title. However, it also goes into wine and champagne. If you are a wine lover, prepare to be offended. In this volume we learn of the terrible shortcomings of wine, particularly that it can't possibly go with seafood, ever. But sake on the other hand goes with everything. All trash talking of wine aside, I think that this book makes some very good insights into the sad state of the sake industry. But it also offers hope for the future of sake. Strangely, this is also how I feel about beer. If you are a beer lover like me, you just might see what I mean. I feel like I just reviewed a documentary, but this is actually a work of fiction.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    This volume of select episodes from the long-running Oishinbo manga features the six-part epic "The Power of Sake," in which Yamaoka spends more than 100 pages explaining every small detail of what is wrong with the Japanese sake industry and why the people of Japan should support small, artisanal sake breweries as a matter of national pride and cultural identity. But still manages to make it work as a story. It also has a chapter demolishing the fixation with the Beaujolais Nouveau release date This volume of select episodes from the long-running Oishinbo manga features the six-part epic "The Power of Sake," in which Yamaoka spends more than 100 pages explaining every small detail of what is wrong with the Japanese sake industry and why the people of Japan should support small, artisanal sake breweries as a matter of national pride and cultural identity. But still manages to make it work as a story. It also has a chapter demolishing the fixation with the Beaujolais Nouveau release date and one about what makes for proper champagne--these fall squarely into the "Yamaoka takes some idiot down a couple notches when it comes to a culinary issue" template, but can also show the character at his most dickish. (Which is part of the reason why, in "The Power of Sake," Karabai comes across more as a gruff elder statesman than the constant torment of Volume 1.)

  26. 4 out of 5

    Joanie

    I drink so little as it is, even socially, so it would likely take the span of my entire lifetime to try all those sakes in this volume but I would love to do so. This collection is more technical than the other ones, which made it more of a challenge, but it was worth it. I'm not familiar with the culture of sake at all and this was a very enlightening read. The characters are very passionate about their food and drink (at times comically so!), and you also get to learn about the history and th I drink so little as it is, even socially, so it would likely take the span of my entire lifetime to try all those sakes in this volume but I would love to do so. This collection is more technical than the other ones, which made it more of a challenge, but it was worth it. I'm not familiar with the culture of sake at all and this was a very enlightening read. The characters are very passionate about their food and drink (at times comically so!), and you also get to learn about the history and the process of making sake, along with the various regions that specialize in different types, and what the different names mean, etc. Like the other volumes, the character development and plot progression can jump around quite a bit, but it isn't that confusing. I'm thankful that these 'Best Of' volumes even exist so we could read them in English. These are so enjoyable.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Marissa

    I recently discovered the Oishinbo series which I really love because it brings together my love of comics and my love of food. I was excited to read the Sake edition because I recently went to an awesome sake tasting in Berkeley and was interested to have a chance to learn more about it. I was surprised that several of the stories were actually about French wine and champagne instead of about sake and the long series on sake itself was somewhat depressing to read, since much of it was about the I recently discovered the Oishinbo series which I really love because it brings together my love of comics and my love of food. I was excited to read the Sake edition because I recently went to an awesome sake tasting in Berkeley and was interested to have a chance to learn more about it. I was surprised that several of the stories were actually about French wine and champagne instead of about sake and the long series on sake itself was somewhat depressing to read, since much of it was about the uncertainty of sake's future considering that 90% of what's labeled as sake these days actually has a bunch of added alcohol and preservatives and other crap. I definitely did learn a lot that I hadn't known about sake before, however, and now know what type to look for if I want to have a better quality version of it than is widely available.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jason Keenan

    Sake is more than sake when it comes to this book. It touches on wine, shochu, and champagne. But the heart of the story is a long examination of sake - the decline of the industry in Japan and the loss of tradition methods. And thankfully the resurgence of craft brewers. Given this is a collection of stories from the past two decades I am unsure when the sake story was set. I'm now looking for something that explain the state of the industry to me. And perhaps serve as a guide to just some sake Sake is more than sake when it comes to this book. It touches on wine, shochu, and champagne. But the heart of the story is a long examination of sake - the decline of the industry in Japan and the loss of tradition methods. And thankfully the resurgence of craft brewers. Given this is a collection of stories from the past two decades I am unsure when the sake story was set. I'm now looking for something that explain the state of the industry to me. And perhaps serve as a guide to just some sakes. I love the manga approach here as well. The Oishinbo stories pack tonnes of details and facts into a rapidly moving story. I have the sense that this will be worth reading again and again to get the full flavour.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    I enjoyed volume 2, but felt that it suffered a bit from rehashing the same information over and again. The main sake story towards the end of the book was a mutliparter and covered almost everything the other sake stories told individually and the very last story in the series was more a cautionary tale against being a coward and alcoholic than an actual sake story and felt really odd as the end to the volume. Still, it's a fun series (despite the shortcomings with the way it was collected) and I enjoyed volume 2, but felt that it suffered a bit from rehashing the same information over and again. The main sake story towards the end of the book was a mutliparter and covered almost everything the other sake stories told individually and the very last story in the series was more a cautionary tale against being a coward and alcoholic than an actual sake story and felt really odd as the end to the volume. Still, it's a fun series (despite the shortcomings with the way it was collected) and I enjoyed learning about the various types of sake. It does make me curious how proper sake tastes given my only encounter with it sounds on par with what this series described as poor quality sake inspired alcoholic beverages.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    The second volume of the popular Oishinbo manga series dives right into sake, though it does talk about other spirits for good measure, including giving advice on how to order wine at a restaurant and how to tell good champagne from bad. The majority of the book is taken up by a discussion on the state of sake, and why most of the stuff from the big sake companies is terrible. As usual, there is some flag-waving about the importance of the liquor, but it's not too in-your-face, and the bare-bone The second volume of the popular Oishinbo manga series dives right into sake, though it does talk about other spirits for good measure, including giving advice on how to order wine at a restaurant and how to tell good champagne from bad. The majority of the book is taken up by a discussion on the state of sake, and why most of the stuff from the big sake companies is terrible. As usual, there is some flag-waving about the importance of the liquor, but it's not too in-your-face, and the bare-bones storytelling and so-so artwork (except when it comes to food itself) are at least easy to follow.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.