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Rumo is a little Wolperting who will one day become the greatest hero in the history of Zamonia. Armed with Dandelion, his talking sword, he fights his way across Overworld and Netherworld, two very different realms chock-full of adventures, dangers, and unforgettable characters: Rala, the beautiful girl Wolperting who cultivates a hazardous relationship with death; Genera Rumo is a little Wolperting who will one day become the greatest hero in the history of Zamonia. Armed with Dandelion, his talking sword, he fights his way across Overworld and Netherworld, two very different realms chock-full of adventures, dangers, and unforgettable characters: Rala, the beautiful girl Wolperting who cultivates a hazardous relationship with death; General Ticktock, the evil commander of the Copper Killers; Ushan DeLucca, the finest and most weather-sensitive swordsman in Zamonia; Volzotan Smyke, the corpulent Shark Grub; Rolv of the Forest, a Wolperting who can pass through the White Fire; Yggdra Syl, the guardian of the Nurn Forest and its talkative animals; Professor Abdullah Nightingale, inventor of the Chest-of-Drawers Oracle; and, the worst of luck, the deadly Metal Maiden. Astonishingly inventive, amusing and engrossing, Rumo is a captivating story from the wildly fanciful imagination of Walter Moers.


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Rumo is a little Wolperting who will one day become the greatest hero in the history of Zamonia. Armed with Dandelion, his talking sword, he fights his way across Overworld and Netherworld, two very different realms chock-full of adventures, dangers, and unforgettable characters: Rala, the beautiful girl Wolperting who cultivates a hazardous relationship with death; Genera Rumo is a little Wolperting who will one day become the greatest hero in the history of Zamonia. Armed with Dandelion, his talking sword, he fights his way across Overworld and Netherworld, two very different realms chock-full of adventures, dangers, and unforgettable characters: Rala, the beautiful girl Wolperting who cultivates a hazardous relationship with death; General Ticktock, the evil commander of the Copper Killers; Ushan DeLucca, the finest and most weather-sensitive swordsman in Zamonia; Volzotan Smyke, the corpulent Shark Grub; Rolv of the Forest, a Wolperting who can pass through the White Fire; Yggdra Syl, the guardian of the Nurn Forest and its talkative animals; Professor Abdullah Nightingale, inventor of the Chest-of-Drawers Oracle; and, the worst of luck, the deadly Metal Maiden. Astonishingly inventive, amusing and engrossing, Rumo is a captivating story from the wildly fanciful imagination of Walter Moers.

30 review for RUMO -MP3- - AUDIOBOOK

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Moers may have become my favorite author. I picked this book up on a whim, off the sale table at Powell's, and it was stunning. I think it's a children's book, but it's the rare children's book that doesn't adjust the language to read at "a sixth-grade reading level" or sanitize any of the violence. This book turned out to be the beautiful love child of J.K. Rowling and Norton Juster, raised by L. Frank Baum and the entire staff DC Comics. Beautifully illustrated, marvelously gory and violent wh Moers may have become my favorite author. I picked this book up on a whim, off the sale table at Powell's, and it was stunning. I think it's a children's book, but it's the rare children's book that doesn't adjust the language to read at "a sixth-grade reading level" or sanitize any of the violence. This book turned out to be the beautiful love child of J.K. Rowling and Norton Juster, raised by L. Frank Baum and the entire staff DC Comics. Beautifully illustrated, marvelously gory and violent while still lighthearted and playful, stunningly imaginative, and incredibly detailed. I'm in love. I immediately went out and bought the other two books of his that have been translated into English.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sylvester

    I completely disagree with the Washington Post - Rumo is no mash-up of Rowling/Douglas Adams/Shel Silverstein, nor is it *silly*. Moers is like no one else I've ever read, I think I can safely say that he stands alone in his style of writing. This particular novel has more plotline than previous ones I've read, and yes, it was too long - but it was too much of a *good* thing, which is better than too much of a bad thing. Everyone has got to try reading a Moers book at least once - he is so fabul I completely disagree with the Washington Post - Rumo is no mash-up of Rowling/Douglas Adams/Shel Silverstein, nor is it *silly*. Moers is like no one else I've ever read, I think I can safely say that he stands alone in his style of writing. This particular novel has more plotline than previous ones I've read, and yes, it was too long - but it was too much of a *good* thing, which is better than too much of a bad thing. Everyone has got to try reading a Moers book at least once - he is so fabulously inventive and quirky that it restores my goodwill towards humanity. Rumo is quite bloody and violent, which doesn't seem to help it as a children's book - however, kids can be quite bloodthirsty beings, and enjoy fantasy battles immensely without mixing them up with real life, so...be warned, but don't deprive them of the wonder, either. It's lines like these that endear me to 'Rumo': 'Rice-grain literature! Rice-grain literature! Whole novels inscribed by Bonsai Mites on grains of creamed rice! Hundreds of titles in stock!' Bonsai Mites - only one of the hundreds of creatures which populate Moers' books. No humans in sight. Highly recommended.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Oh, my what a fun and crazy read this was. If you have a hankering for fantasy, comedy, and awesomely unsettling illustrations, combined in one amazing adventure then you have come to the right place. Right from the word go we are introduced to a little Wolperting (a dog-like creature) called Rumo (named after the famous Zamonian card game). His content life being looked after by Hackonian Dwarves is thrown into chaos when he and the friends are taken captive by the evil Demonocles. So then begi Oh, my what a fun and crazy read this was. If you have a hankering for fantasy, comedy, and awesomely unsettling illustrations, combined in one amazing adventure then you have come to the right place. Right from the word go we are introduced to a little Wolperting (a dog-like creature) called Rumo (named after the famous Zamonian card game). His content life being looked after by Hackonian Dwarves is thrown into chaos when he and the friends are taken captive by the evil Demonocles. So then begins a madcap turn of events that sees Rumo go from one peril to another in a wild and wacky journey that left me with many warm and happy fuzzies. I totally loved the debut novel in the series, 13 1/2 Lives of Captain Blue Bear and love Rumo equally as well. Moers ability to create a world so bizarrely mind-blowing, and populate it with the most fantastical characters imaginable is simply amazing. This is easily the most creative and fun series I have read and may soon be my number one favorite. Seriously with characters like a talking sword called Dandelion, and a Shark Grub Volzotan called Smyke, what's is there not to like?

  4. 4 out of 5

    Amanda NEVER MANDY

    Rumo the wonder pup is named after a card game. If I had to choose a card game name for myself I would go with “Solitaire”. Not as catchy of course, but maybe going by a shortened version of the name instead might improve it a little. THEM: “How is the girl book cave treating you Solly?” ME: “Not a cave built for two friend, move along.” Sounds perfect to me. BACK TO THE REVIEW Rumo the wonder pup is a Wolperting but it took him a while to learn this fact because like my favorite Bluebear from anothe Rumo the wonder pup is named after a card game. If I had to choose a card game name for myself I would go with “Solitaire”. Not as catchy of course, but maybe going by a shortened version of the name instead might improve it a little. THEM: “How is the girl book cave treating you Solly?” ME: “Not a cave built for two friend, move along.” Sounds perfect to me. BACK TO THE REVIEW Rumo the wonder pup is a Wolperting but it took him a while to learn this fact because like my favorite Bluebear from another Zamonia story, Rumo’s first memory is of just existing. Thankfully this existence has placed him in the arms of a caring adoptive farm family. But what kind of story would it be if things stayed safe and happy? Thus begins a journey that lands Rumo in numerous situations that have zero learning curves. Think fast or be eaten alive would be the motto of this fantastical story of imaginary critters in imaginary lands. WHY I LOVED IT: Read the paragraph above again and let me know how anyone could not want to know more about this odd story. An engaging writing style plus off the wall illustrations wraps this one up with a big, fancy, glittery bow. WHY I DIDN’T LOVE IT ENOUGH TO GIVE IT FIVE STARS: It’s a bit much in the length department. I would find myself putting it down more often than I would have liked simply because the daunting idea of that much still left to go kept bubbling up. A great story should wipe this thought from your mind making the pages flutter on by. I can’t put my finger on exactly what it was that caused this flaw in my reading. Maybe it was the layers upon layers of adjectives or maybe it was because it was a lot darker than I expected. There is a lot of war, fighting and death in this one and not as much humor as was in the first book I read about this fictional world. So really, not the book’s fault but more a preference issue with this read. And now it’s on to wherever my silver thread might take me.

  5. 4 out of 5

    David

    We should all have some Wolperting in us. Walter Moers is a magical writer.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Starslug

    The one of the great achievements of Rumo is that, despite being a book of epic proportions, never becomes a chore to read. There are many more to choose from: for example, the delightful illustrations by the author spaced throughout, the biazare flights of imagination, the varied and unique characters, and a plot that is strange but never hard to follow. Strange is a good way to describe Rumo, but it is a strangeness grounded in both science and in literary savviness. Cliches are subverted with The one of the great achievements of Rumo is that, despite being a book of epic proportions, never becomes a chore to read. There are many more to choose from: for example, the delightful illustrations by the author spaced throughout, the biazare flights of imagination, the varied and unique characters, and a plot that is strange but never hard to follow. Strange is a good way to describe Rumo, but it is a strangeness grounded in both science and in literary savviness. Cliches are subverted with loving care, and insiduous and obscure references peppered throughout the text makes it especially rewarding to a knowledgable reader. (An example: a set of surgical tools based off prehistoric sea-creatures.) Knowing that many more are still lurking inside makes re-reading a tantalising prospect. For all its weird and wonderful creatures, Rumo does occasionally touch some darker depths. In fact, in its twisting and dreamlike folds, it manages to hit almost every spot: surreal humour, pure escapism, genuine adventure, and also manages to be quite moving at points. A fabulous book, quite possibly my favourite. It manages the near impossible feat of rambling engagingly.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

    I picked this book up on a whim from the local used book store. A walking talking wolf thing wielding a dandelion knife possessed by a demon just sounded fun. The blurb stating the book was equal parts J.K. Rowling, Douglas Adams, and Shell Silverstein seemed a little hard to live up to, but it was interesting praise none the less. When I looked on goodreads and saw an average rating of over 4 stars, I was sold. I'm a bit sad to say that the book didn't live up to the four star rating, the high I picked this book up on a whim from the local used book store. A walking talking wolf thing wielding a dandelion knife possessed by a demon just sounded fun. The blurb stating the book was equal parts J.K. Rowling, Douglas Adams, and Shell Silverstein seemed a little hard to live up to, but it was interesting praise none the less. When I looked on goodreads and saw an average rating of over 4 stars, I was sold. I'm a bit sad to say that the book didn't live up to the four star rating, the high praise, or my expectations. That's not to say it was bad, but it was nowhere near brilliant. Rumo, that main characters, is among the most dull, flat, and uninteresting main characters I've ever read. His assertion that he's bad with words and only good at fighting is valid. As I was reading I kept going to find out what what happen to some of the other, more interesting or dynamic characters, Rumo himself was just the vehicle to get me there. The other characters were good for the most part. Not always exciting, not always funny, but generally good, well made characters. There were certainly some laugh out loud moments, and some great page turning reading as well. The book also contains a lot of unnecessary world building. Multiple page back stories on characters that are only mentioned were a bit annoying. The amount of invented creatures was matched only by the number of made up words. Many of the creatures, and words, were unnecessary. Like the tangential back stories, I think the book may have been a bit better off minus a few of them. Overall though, this was a good, fun fantasy read. If you're a fantasy fan it worth reading, but I can't imagine putting it on any must read, or best of lists.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Robert Collins

    This one those books that is a fantasy comedy that is so funny you wet your self ever scream out loud. The b/w ill are what make this book extra special a Ghotic dark mad adventure access life death & hahahaha The Overworld the Underworld lost world every world this mystery of the Dog like the ugaly duck story but in a crazy fun Adult way onld disspoment is that other books in the series have not been Translated into English

  9. 5 out of 5

    Saskia Marijke Niehorster-Cook

    I was at once taken in by this great saga of a wolperting dog who is smarter and braver than most inhabitants from his Island Zamonia. If a bit more graphically violent than it's first companion book " The first 13 &1/2 lives of Captain Bluebear", the miraculous adventures of this hero begin with his kidnapping as a baby. His unfortunate luck brings him to be a captive on a floating rock inhabited by savage cyclops whose main desire is to eat live beings in gruesome manners. Fortunately, this wo I was at once taken in by this great saga of a wolperting dog who is smarter and braver than most inhabitants from his Island Zamonia. If a bit more graphically violent than it's first companion book " The first 13 &1/2 lives of Captain Bluebear", the miraculous adventures of this hero begin with his kidnapping as a baby. His unfortunate luck brings him to be a captive on a floating rock inhabited by savage cyclops whose main desire is to eat live beings in gruesome manners. Fortunately, this wolperting meets a shark grub that helps him grow up and confront his enemies. BUT WAIT! THIS IS JUST THE BEGINNNING! THERE IS MORE! As Rumo explores this fascinating world, he comes across a gamut of strange yet interesting characters that sometimes hunt him, sometimes haunt him and sometimes help him; all the while our dear character becomes wiser and more endearing. To write a full summary is to do it a disservice. This is a book I highly recommend to ALL. It is full of witticism, cleverness, unaccountable imagination, and oddly enough, great criticism to the world we live in. It is as if inventing this world, Mr. Moers draws a simile in which we must compare Zamonia to our world; somehow we are found lacking, our world pales in comparison, even though it also feels as if we are somehow safer here. If given a chance I would, without thinking twice, jump into Zamonia and live there the rest of my days... (688 pgs)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jersy

    This book is highly creative and has an interesting story, if it would only manage to stick with it. We are presented with backstories to every minor character and there are far to many of them. There is sometimes not really a focus. But on the upside, everything is kind of relevant, either to understand the character right now, or it becomes important later on. The illustrations made by the author are great to better understand his visions. I enjoyed them a lot. There are a little too much figh This book is highly creative and has an interesting story, if it would only manage to stick with it. We are presented with backstories to every minor character and there are far to many of them. There is sometimes not really a focus. But on the upside, everything is kind of relevant, either to understand the character right now, or it becomes important later on. The illustrations made by the author are great to better understand his visions. I enjoyed them a lot. There are a little too much fight scenes for my taste, but everything you might not care about that much is easily skippable thanks to notes on the sides demonstrating the beginning of a new topic. I was surprised how much I liked the characters that normally are not my kind of persons. Rumo, at least in the beginning, is easily bored and does only care for fighting, still I was sucked into his story from the beginning by Moers' writing. All the more I enjoyed Romu's development. My favorite part of the book is Rala's story near the end. It felt intense and dealt so differently from how other authors would do such a plot. I must admit I did not like every bit of the whole story as much as others, but on the whole, I found it to be a good book. The wonderful maps and pictures may be the reason I'm giving it 4 instead of 3 stars, but yeah, it's worth it. I recommend this to readers who like to read fantasy with new creatures and concepts, because this is, in my opinion, the biggest strength of this book. It involves a coming of age story, too, but I think for liking this book you must be open to Moers' kind of creativity.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Millin

    So many amazing adventures and some how they all tie in together at the end. Brilliant.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    This book reads like a children's book for adults. Although the tale starts off innocently enough, and maintains a child-like quality, it quickly delves into a lot of violence and some pretty scary ideas/monsters. (Nurn Forest, The Metal Maiden, The Vrahoks!) So don't look at the illustrations and think this is good for younger children, unless you think that they can handle ample violence and literary gore! The book is broken down into two parts:The Overworld and the Underworld. I personally enj This book reads like a children's book for adults. Although the tale starts off innocently enough, and maintains a child-like quality, it quickly delves into a lot of violence and some pretty scary ideas/monsters. (Nurn Forest, The Metal Maiden, The Vrahoks!) So don't look at the illustrations and think this is good for younger children, unless you think that they can handle ample violence and literary gore! The book is broken down into two parts:The Overworld and the Underworld. I personally enjoyed the latter more. It was a little more tightly constructed, which brings me to my main problem with the story. It spans over 600 pages, which is not a problem--sometimes I think the longer to the better!! This book though, I think could have been about 200 pages shorter. There was a lot of random tangents about side character histories' and a lot of meandering when traveling from place to place that I think was unecessary. I reccommend this story to anyone that enjoys fantasy for sure. I read a lot on the bus, and I found my self giggling quietly, both at the words on the page but often times more so at the illustrations that are interspersed throughout the story. I just bought another book by Moers ('The City of Dreaming Books'). Hope I enjoy it just as much...if not more! :)

  13. 5 out of 5

    ilovepancakes

    Wacky. Weird. Whimsical. A wonderful cure for chronic insomnia. I understand that the native language of this book is not English, so I ought to cut some slack, but I am traumatized from the agonizing amount of effort I put in to finish this book. I almost quit after 300 pages, but, by God, I swore I would not let some measly book defeat me! I never give up on a book, unless it is "The Tommyknockers" or "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance".I almost kept a running tally of redundant words, Wacky. Weird. Whimsical. A wonderful cure for chronic insomnia. I understand that the native language of this book is not English, so I ought to cut some slack, but I am traumatized from the agonizing amount of effort I put in to finish this book. I almost quit after 300 pages, but, by God, I swore I would not let some measly book defeat me! I never give up on a book, unless it is "The Tommyknockers" or "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance".I almost kept a running tally of redundant words, just to keep myself from falling asleep as the storyline twitched along with no sense of direction like an epileptic rabbit (I never again want to see the words "subterranean" or "give a wide berth to" or "alchemy" or any of its derivatives lest I start screaming and never stop). Just as the storyline began to look enticing, off it would bound in a mad fit to introduce us to some other random event. With random events came a team of random characters and superfluous detail. Knowledge is power, but learning about every minute back story of every single character encountered in the book was not enlightening or endearing. It was frustrating to the umpteenth degree and weighed down the storyline. So many times I progressed twenty or thirty pages only to close the cover of the book and say, "Maybe tomorrow it will be better. Maybe." But it never was.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    Sometimes a book just calls out to me from a bookstore shelf, and this one did. German author Moers creates an other-world fairy tale with a hero known as Rumo, a "Wolperting": a dog/wolf creature with an abundance of teeth, antlers, oppossable thumbs, and the abilities to fight like a Spartan, speak and build civilizations. I was hooked from the first page, which I felt compelled to read outloud. The writing is playful and sharp. For all its wierdness, the story becomes compelling very quickly. Sometimes a book just calls out to me from a bookstore shelf, and this one did. German author Moers creates an other-world fairy tale with a hero known as Rumo, a "Wolperting": a dog/wolf creature with an abundance of teeth, antlers, oppossable thumbs, and the abilities to fight like a Spartan, speak and build civilizations. I was hooked from the first page, which I felt compelled to read outloud. The writing is playful and sharp. For all its wierdness, the story becomes compelling very quickly. I'm only about a third of the way through, not feeling any rush, but the more I read of this the more I want to read. As for the plot, I'm not sure I can really sum that up. My favorite section so far is Moers' metaphor for a doctoral dissertation: an awkwardly constructed, unfinished structure with staircases that wander to nowhere, footnotes that buzz around in swarms, darkened rooms full of theories waiting to find logical connections, and general mayhem. This exist, of course, only in the mind of the doctoral student, and he guards it feverishly. Odd creatures, dark humor, veiled satire, other worlds--escapist fiction at its most entertaining. Just what I love to read when I'm on a break from work.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bookslut

    Oh! So magnificent! Longish, it's true--some of the back stories peppered throughout maybe could have been whittled back or out to decrease the bulk of it, but what a fabulous journey. I thought this was like Lord of the Rings, but much more enjoyable and creative. Any lover of fantasy should read this book, especially because it is that rare gem of well-written fantasy, not just a genre stock fiction. How had I never heard of Mr. Moers before? I thought this was a pleasure, and I plan to read a Oh! So magnificent! Longish, it's true--some of the back stories peppered throughout maybe could have been whittled back or out to decrease the bulk of it, but what a fabulous journey. I thought this was like Lord of the Rings, but much more enjoyable and creative. Any lover of fantasy should read this book, especially because it is that rare gem of well-written fantasy, not just a genre stock fiction. How had I never heard of Mr. Moers before? I thought this was a pleasure, and I plan to read all the available translated books of Zamonia. I don't think you have to necessarily read them in order--this was number three (two is not available in English), and I didn't feel any worse for not having read 1 or 2. The chronology of the later books may be more important. Anyway, I would have given it 5 stars if it had been a weeny bit shorter, or just a tad less violent. There were some portions that very gut-wrenching, though it was written in a way that was light-hearted enough that my wussy stomach could mostly handle it. A great book! p.s. I love a book with maps!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Maria Elmvang

    Walter Moers is a fairly new discovery, but so far I've loved everything I've read by him. This was no exception, although it started out a lot more slowly than the other books, so took me longer to get thoroughly hooked. However, by the time Rumo made it to Wolperting, there was no looking back. I love Walter Moers' quirky humour, and the way he lets the book medium help him tell a story and set an atmosphere. Rumo was a lot darker than the two other books, and it seemed like Walter Moers tried Walter Moers is a fairly new discovery, but so far I've loved everything I've read by him. This was no exception, although it started out a lot more slowly than the other books, so took me longer to get thoroughly hooked. However, by the time Rumo made it to Wolperting, there was no looking back. I love Walter Moers' quirky humour, and the way he lets the book medium help him tell a story and set an atmosphere. Rumo was a lot darker than the two other books, and it seemed like Walter Moers tried to combine more plotlines and tangents than he perhaps should have. The reasons for some of the digressions sometimes didn't become obvious until several hundreds of pages later. A terrific book, and I came to care a lot for the characters and the universe both. Fortunately I still have one Zamonian book left to read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alexis

    This audiobook was so much fun! and i love Walter Moer's zany Zamonia :) I had a great time following Rumo journey from a Hackonian dwarf farm to Roaming Rock and Wolperting, to Hel and back again. I learned the blood song and can now hold my own in a karaoke contest with the dead Yetis. I'm sure I'll be taking a peek into the drawer labeled "R" on Professor Nightingale's chest-of-drawers oracle again soon, but this time in hardcopy...I heard there are illustrations! This audiobook was so much fun! and i love Walter Moer's zany Zamonia :) I had a great time following Rumo journey from a Hackonian dwarf farm to Roaming Rock and Wolperting, to Hel and back again. I learned the blood song and can now hold my own in a karaoke contest with the dead Yetis. I'm sure I'll be taking a peek into the drawer labeled "R" on Professor Nightingale's chest-of-drawers oracle again soon, but this time in hardcopy...I heard there are illustrations!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kat!e Larson

    This was pretty gritty and dark, so it’s weird that I liked it as much as I did. But I love Zamonia. I love all the different species. And I loved the characters in this book. The story was so neatly intertwined; complicated and yet making perfect sense. It was just a really fun adventure... if a somewhat grisly one.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joikyo

    I have a new favorite book. The pacing is just perfect. Thats a big word to throw around but I honestly mean it. I had to read the last 150 in one go because it was just so incredibly thrilling and outright epic. So much was happening and nothing felt like it was coming out of nowhere because Moers manages to establish so much early in the book. Back then those where things you thought where just a little bit flavor to give the world more depth. But so much becomes relevant again and you remember I have a new favorite book. The pacing is just perfect. Thats a big word to throw around but I honestly mean it. I had to read the last 150 in one go because it was just so incredibly thrilling and outright epic. So much was happening and nothing felt like it was coming out of nowhere because Moers manages to establish so much early in the book. Back then those where things you thought where just a little bit flavor to give the world more depth. But so much becomes relevant again and you remember because you even suck up all the flavor he gives you because his writing style gives every silly little story so much humour and charm. Go and read this book. Do it. Now.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Janet Janet

    Extremely good

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kurt

    The follow-up to Moers' 13 1/2 LIVES OF CAPTAIN BLUEBEAR, this novel gives us the story of two late characters in that book, the Wolperting hero Rumo of Zamonia and his less savory associate, Volzotan Smyke, a gambling-addicted sharkgrub. And if those introductory words don't put you off, then this might be the book for you. Unlike the absurdist memoir character of BLUEBEAR, Rumo's story has a more directed arc - one defined by a Silver Thread that only he can see that beckons him to places beyon The follow-up to Moers' 13 1/2 LIVES OF CAPTAIN BLUEBEAR, this novel gives us the story of two late characters in that book, the Wolperting hero Rumo of Zamonia and his less savory associate, Volzotan Smyke, a gambling-addicted sharkgrub. And if those introductory words don't put you off, then this might be the book for you. Unlike the absurdist memoir character of BLUEBEAR, Rumo's story has a more directed arc - one defined by a Silver Thread that only he can see that beckons him to places beyond where he is. As a Wolperting - which, for your information, is a bi-pedal dog-like creature with tiny horns whose martial abilities as a species are unparalleled (which is saying something in the warlike world of Zamonia) - he runs up against predictable challenges of an unpredictable nature. This is mainly due to Moers' fertile imagination. To wit: the Dead Yeti, a platoon of mighty Yeti that mostly died in some Cogitating Quicksand that tried to warn them away, it really did, but then they died when they stepped into it anyway and the Cogitating Quicksand took up residence in their heads so that even though they're dead they haven't really lost consciousness. Phew. Similar to BLUEBEAR, Moers goes off on frequent tangents. Meet a new character? Better have a little bubble-story that encompasses who that person is, why s/he is the way s/he is, and how s/he got to where s/he is now. The constant digressions are fairly charming and, especially after BLUEBEAR, much more focused. I mean, Bluebear is just a bear telling you his amazing life story, but Rumo's on a mission. Naturally, there's a girl involved, but he doesn't really understand what "girls" are, which is a minor complication. Also, he can't swim. In spite of its length, the tenor of the writing is more or less middle-grade level, but it's length is not what really sets it into young-adult world. No, what catapults into the farther reaches of YA (if not adult) is the very frank gore and violence that are a part of Rumo's world. For instance, Rumo picks up a two-bladed sword (don't call it a knife, even if it is very small), into each blade of which has been forged the brain of a deceased creature - a Troglotroll who has taken the vicious name of Dandelion and an actual Demonic Warrior by name of Krindle the Cleaver (who himself was cut down by a Yeti by the name of Skullop the Scyther) whose favorite song is "The Blood Song." Blood! Blood! Blood must spurt and blood must flow! Blood! Blood! Blood must gush from every foe! Blood as far as the eye can see! Blood for all eternity! (Come on! You know the chorus! ALL TOGETHER NOW!) Part of the magic of Moers' writing is how many balls he juggles. He throws character after character into the mix and an astonishing number of them return in ways that make fairly logical sense ("logical" for a place like Zamonia, anyway). At a certain point, it becomes a waiting game - exactly how will Professor Kolibri make his return appearance, who drove him insane, and what could even drive someone like him crazy, given that he has four brains (he's a Nocturnomath, see...)? RUMO shares many of the faults of BLUEBEAR but given its more typical genre it is without question a faster read. Weird, fairly wonderful, violent (not gratuitous or gory so much as casual) with an epic cast. Oh, General Ticktock. Oh, the Lindworms. Oh, the Demonocles. For what it's worth, you could read this without having read BLUEBEAR and you'd be just fine. The one is not so much a sequel of the other so much as it is a volume set in the same world.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Chels

    They always say never to judge a book by its cover, but I always do. In my opinion it should be "Don't Judge a book ONLY by its cover." but the cover should be judged. The reason I say this is because I went to the library one day pressed for time. I am odd with how i look around at books. I really just go to a genre section I like, then find a good title, then if i like the cover+title I scope out a few pages to see how it is written, then I go from there. This book had me at the cover. I love w They always say never to judge a book by its cover, but I always do. In my opinion it should be "Don't Judge a book ONLY by its cover." but the cover should be judged. The reason I say this is because I went to the library one day pressed for time. I am odd with how i look around at books. I really just go to a genre section I like, then find a good title, then if i like the cover+title I scope out a few pages to see how it is written, then I go from there. This book had me at the cover. I love when lengthy novels still incorporate ant sort of artistic flare. Why is creativity and illustration reserved for children's books? I saw this book, The art on the cover, the title of it, and was instantly in love. Opened the book to find a beautifully illustrated map of "Zamonia" as well as an illustrated key of they main characters. I was already sure i was getting this book, but if i wasn't this would of sealed the deal for me. I nearly had a heart attack when I flipped through to find little doodles here and there, and fully illustrated pages elsewhere. Anyways, After getting into this book it actually took me quite a while to read which is odd for me because i can gobble down books in a few days tops. a single day depending on how much I am into the book and how long it is. I am not complaining though. It was slightly challenging to read only because of how it is written and then how it is translated. Not hard to read just a little difficult to get into at first and get comfortable reading. At least in my opinion. I liked that about it though, I was reading that book every possible minute I could. Every spare minute I had at work and then plenty of time at home. It was a really Fun read. Rumo was an interesting character and I loved his story and all the fascinating people he meets and things he see's along his journey. This book really does take you on an adventure. I don't think there is anything I didn't like about this book. The book is quite detailed and actually pretty graphic at times which I loved. Rumo also can kick some butt too(eventually)and i found his battle scenes fun to read and imagine. The Author didn't slack on the Gore either thankfully. Anyways I'm sorry this review is somewhat vague, I read the book earlier this year and a few more since then so my memory is a little foggy and also trying to add elements of other random books into the mix. :P I will definitely be getting the other 2 books before Rumo. Anyways, This book is super fun to read and I enjoyed it. :)

  23. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    Rumo, Rumo, Rumo! After reading my first Moers book, the one based on the paintings I was absolutely hooked. DO NOT be put off by how thick the book is, the amazing pictures take up quite a bit of space amongst the text. This is not your typical everything is peachy faerie tale, there are MANY dark and fowl creatures and situations along the way. Your imagination is certainly stretched beyond itself, with not all moments being caught in pictures. The book is structured to come across new charact Rumo, Rumo, Rumo! After reading my first Moers book, the one based on the paintings I was absolutely hooked. DO NOT be put off by how thick the book is, the amazing pictures take up quite a bit of space amongst the text. This is not your typical everything is peachy faerie tale, there are MANY dark and fowl creatures and situations along the way. Your imagination is certainly stretched beyond itself, with not all moments being caught in pictures. The book is structured to come across new characters and to hear of their life stories which give readers a break from Rumo. I particularly loved the stories of Rala, Smythe and Ursan. There is plenty of fighting and war and Moers does not pretty up death by wrapping it up in a lolly wrapper, not straying away from the awful gruesomeness that some of the characters inevitably face (poor cabinet maker). Although the Wolpertings and story are completely fictitious, the running of government, education and life style are subtle undertones of human life. It isn't a typical they all get away unscathed ending which I enjoyed. Truly one of the most original books I have ever read, could not put it down. I can't wait to read more of his books. I want to be a wolperting!!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

    This is my favorite Walter Moers book so far. Rumo is a Wolperting who discovers his abilities to be more than just pet just in time to be captured with his adopted family by the Demonocles and taken to Roaming Rock in anticipation of being dinner for them. Under the coaching of Volzotan Smyke (first seen in "Bluebear") he is brought to his potential to fight the Demonocles and free himself and his fellow captives. He is then free to follow his Silver Thread which takes him to the city of Wolpert This is my favorite Walter Moers book so far. Rumo is a Wolperting who discovers his abilities to be more than just pet just in time to be captured with his adopted family by the Demonocles and taken to Roaming Rock in anticipation of being dinner for them. Under the coaching of Volzotan Smyke (first seen in "Bluebear") he is brought to his potential to fight the Demonocles and free himself and his fellow captives. He is then free to follow his Silver Thread which takes him to the city of Wolperting. Being a Wolperting he is immediately taken in and trained to fight as a true Wolperting. He also finds what the Silver Thread represents; a lovely female Wolperting named Rala. One day while he is out trying to impress her, he comes home to find the city completely devoid of all Wolpertings and a gaping hole in its center. He then goes on a rescue mission to the underworld, following the scent of his friends. He is assisted by an unlikely cast of characters and eventually saves his friends and Rala from Gornab and General Tick-Tock. Fun and slightly scary!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    If you mixed together The Princess Bride, The Phantom Tollbooth, and 300, then you might have something approaching Rumo & His Miraculous Adventures. Rumo is a well-written fantasy with strange creatures, graphic fighting, and a very high body count. I loved how it told stories within stories. This was especially prominent near the beginning of the book, and I thought it was brilliant; however, as the book went on there were fewer stories within stories and the frame story became the main action If you mixed together The Princess Bride, The Phantom Tollbooth, and 300, then you might have something approaching Rumo & His Miraculous Adventures. Rumo is a well-written fantasy with strange creatures, graphic fighting, and a very high body count. I loved how it told stories within stories. This was especially prominent near the beginning of the book, and I thought it was brilliant; however, as the book went on there were fewer stories within stories and the frame story became the main action. The text was accompanied by really cool illustrations. In spite of being intimidated by the book's size (nearly 700 pages), not having a strong interest in fantasy, and finding the violence a little much at times, I really enjoyed the story. Apparently the author, Walter Moers, has written at least two other books set in the same fantasy world. Based on my experience reading Rumo, I would definitely at least pick one of Moers's other books up and give it a try.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    Here's the my blog where I post my reviews too :) http://room2347.wordpress.com/ I like plot driven books. I am always a little afraid of books that involve too much background information and characters that are (or at least seem to be) redundant. Sure Rumo could have a lot shorter. But would it have been the same fun and thrilling ride? Probably not. The book lives from it's background. Without it the book plot would be something like: "Rumo grows up searches for love and fights for it." I was a Here's the my blog where I post my reviews too :) http://room2347.wordpress.com/ I like plot driven books. I am always a little afraid of books that involve too much background information and characters that are (or at least seem to be) redundant. Sure Rumo could have a lot shorter. But would it have been the same fun and thrilling ride? Probably not. The book lives from it's background. Without it the book plot would be something like: "Rumo grows up searches for love and fights for it." I was afraid of books with too much background information but Moers took that away from me. We are thrown into a wonderful yet dangerous world, inhabited by wonderful yet dangerous creatures. Each information you can gain is a gift by the author. This book has everything. Two worlds, love, losses, fights, growing up, even biology. The world around Rumo is as interesting as his adventure itself. This was book by walter Moers and my first Zamonia book and it will not be my last. Sure this is one of those books you have to get into, but once you you won't be able to put it down.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rahul Mishra

    Walter Moers is a story teller. Not a novelist, not a brilliant literary genius... he is a story teller. His genius is in spinning a yarn and ensuring you are hooked. He may have ADHD, the way keeps changing track and tells stories about each character, each city, each historical event... and through all of it he keeps you hooked. Rumo, a wolperting- which is a half dog, half deer- and his journey through Zamonia to find Rala, his silver thread... his encounters with the copper killers, his journ Walter Moers is a story teller. Not a novelist, not a brilliant literary genius... he is a story teller. His genius is in spinning a yarn and ensuring you are hooked. He may have ADHD, the way keeps changing track and tells stories about each character, each city, each historical event... and through all of it he keeps you hooked. Rumo, a wolperting- which is a half dog, half deer- and his journey through Zamonia to find Rala, his silver thread... his encounters with the copper killers, his journey through 'Hel', his talking sword... this is the perfect/awesome bedtime story. And its intelligent to! Dont be fooled, this is not a children's book, its dark at times... very dark. I'm talking Torture chamber's, blood dripping from the ceiling... horror stories!! But it is also one of the best books in its genre of 'fantasy-fiction-for-all' that I have read. Think of the princess bride... with better imagination! A must read.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    Translated from the German. A fractured fairy tale comic adventure that's whimsical, weird, violent, philosophical and great fun for me. Bronson Pinchot is a terrific narrator with a fantastic range of vocal characterizations. The story could have been a serialized cartoon that would have fit nicely as a addition to the Bullwinkle Show. Rumo, the protagonist of the story, is a Wolperting, a sentient horned canid creature, whose adventures begin when the farm he lives on is attacked by giant demo Translated from the German. A fractured fairy tale comic adventure that's whimsical, weird, violent, philosophical and great fun for me. Bronson Pinchot is a terrific narrator with a fantastic range of vocal characterizations. The story could have been a serialized cartoon that would have fit nicely as a addition to the Bullwinkle Show. Rumo, the protagonist of the story, is a Wolperting, a sentient horned canid creature, whose adventures begin when the farm he lives on is attacked by giant demonic creatures who capture him and every living creature in his immediate surroundings. Rumo meets several peculiar characters on his many adventures. There is a lot of violence and scheming along with some ethical and philosophical lessons. Haunted forests, magical treasures and possessed swords with dual personalities. I'm looking forward to the other books in the series.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tyler Anderson

    Rumo might taste like a kids book when you first pick it up, but it really isn't. It's a funny, witty, violent, mean, scary and sometimes horny book with goofball illustrations and a wildly satisfying and approachable story of adolescent ardor and heroism as performed by a walking talking ninja-like dog. This is a really freaking great book, perfect to relieve your brain if you read too many books written by PhDs. And worth mentioning: it's by a German author. Kudos to the translator. Rumo might taste like a kids book when you first pick it up, but it really isn't. It's a funny, witty, violent, mean, scary and sometimes horny book with goofball illustrations and a wildly satisfying and approachable story of adolescent ardor and heroism as performed by a walking talking ninja-like dog. This is a really freaking great book, perfect to relieve your brain if you read too many books written by PhDs. And worth mentioning: it's by a German author. Kudos to the translator.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Seyma

    This book is so so amazing. I have read all Zamonia novels and even though it is hard, I have to admit that if I was to choose a favorite one, it would probably be this very book. I can not believe how one person is able to create such great worlds in his mind, I love every single character in this book. I love Rumo, Rolf, Rala, I love Smaik, Gaunab, I love Uschan de Lucca, and most of all, I love Walter Moers - thank you, you are one hell of a hero <3

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