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Courtney Crumrin and the Night Things

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Presenting the initial COURTNEY CRUMRIN miniseries in a new digest-sized format. Courtney's parents have dragged her out to a high-to-do suburb to live with her creepy Great Uncle Aloysius in his spooky old house. She's not only the new kid in school, but she also discovers strange things lurking under her bed. Presenting the initial COURTNEY CRUMRIN miniseries in a new digest-sized format. Courtney's parents have dragged her out to a high-to-do suburb to live with her creepy Great Uncle Aloysius in his spooky old house. She's not only the new kid in school, but she also discovers strange things lurking under her bed.


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Presenting the initial COURTNEY CRUMRIN miniseries in a new digest-sized format. Courtney's parents have dragged her out to a high-to-do suburb to live with her creepy Great Uncle Aloysius in his spooky old house. She's not only the new kid in school, but she also discovers strange things lurking under her bed. Presenting the initial COURTNEY CRUMRIN miniseries in a new digest-sized format. Courtney's parents have dragged her out to a high-to-do suburb to live with her creepy Great Uncle Aloysius in his spooky old house. She's not only the new kid in school, but she also discovers strange things lurking under her bed.

30 review for Courtney Crumrin and the Night Things

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    Comics for Goth preteens in the vein of Tim Burton or Jhonen Vasquez. Courtney and her parents move in with her warlock uncle. Her parents are completely self-absorbed and only care about getting in good with their rich neighbors. Courtney hates everything and begins to learn magic in a world where bad things can and do happen to children. The one thing that bothered me was that Courtney is drawn without a nose.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Colleen Venable

    Any book where children occasionally get eaten by night creatures without any apologies by the author is okay in my book! Courtney is such a fantastic character. Wish I was half as badass as she is! (Though personally I am happy I have a nose. Why does she have no nose?! Why did I not even notice she didn't have a nose until someone pointed it out to me?!) Any book where children occasionally get eaten by night creatures without any apologies by the author is okay in my book! Courtney is such a fantastic character. Wish I was half as badass as she is! (Though personally I am happy I have a nose. Why does she have no nose?! Why did I not even notice she didn't have a nose until someone pointed it out to me?!)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jim Ef

    A nice horror graphic novel for kids that grown ups might like too. Its a good choice for a spooky bedtime story, well stories, since every issue its a diferent adventure for Courtney.

  4. 4 out of 5

    David

    This is a graphic novel series aimed at about a 12-year-old's level. Courtney Crumrin is a fairly stock character: the rude, precociously misanthropic little girl who's brought to a new town by her callow, grasping, negligent parents, where they stay for free in a rich great-uncle's mansion while trying to climb the social ladder. Courtney has no friends and doesn't fit in, but soon discovers that her Uncle Aloysius has some interesting books and more interesting hobbies, and that all kinds of g This is a graphic novel series aimed at about a 12-year-old's level. Courtney Crumrin is a fairly stock character: the rude, precociously misanthropic little girl who's brought to a new town by her callow, grasping, negligent parents, where they stay for free in a rich great-uncle's mansion while trying to climb the social ladder. Courtney has no friends and doesn't fit in, but soon discovers that her Uncle Aloysius has some interesting books and more interesting hobbies, and that all kinds of ghoulies and ghasts hang around the mansion, and the surrounding town. Courtney has adventures with a goblin in the woods, meddles with magic to deal with bullies and her social isolation, and has to go rescue an infant she is babysitting from the Goblin Market. Finally, she is almost replaced by a doppleganger. It's cute in places and Courtney has attitude. But not terribly original, and there seems to be no major metaplot; not surprising, given the target audience. Also, I was not a fan of the artwork, particularly Courtney and her fish-eyed, noseless face that makes her look like an alien Bratz doll. It was okay, and I might read other books in the series if I see them at the library, but it's certainly not something I'd go out of my way to finish. I think children will find it far more resonant and creepy; I saw it as a Middle-Grade version of Tales from the Crypt.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mindi

    Loving this artwork! If you like fantasty/supernatural then you'll like this storyline. It's fantastic...and volume 2 is even better! Loving this artwork! If you like fantasty/supernatural then you'll like this storyline. It's fantastic...and volume 2 is even better!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rachel (Kalanadi)

    I need more!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Skye Kilaen

    A young adult graphic novel series that's also compelling for adults. (Or at least the adults in this house, who bought all seven full color hardbacks even though our library has them.) It begins when young Courtney goes to live with her uncle, a wizard, after her daffy parents finally run out of the ability to pretend they have lots of money. Turns out Courtney has some magical gifts of her own, and her uncle may be a much needed emotional connection for Courtney... or just another heartbreak. T A young adult graphic novel series that's also compelling for adults. (Or at least the adults in this house, who bought all seven full color hardbacks even though our library has them.) It begins when young Courtney goes to live with her uncle, a wizard, after her daffy parents finally run out of the ability to pretend they have lots of money. Turns out Courtney has some magical gifts of her own, and her uncle may be a much needed emotional connection for Courtney... or just another heartbreak. These books are dark. Very, very dark. Murder, painful losses, social isolation, and at least one quasi-suicide attempt by a child. Why do I love them? Because (a) those things can make good fiction, and (b) Courtney's character has a fully developed, unique, interesting personality and a desire for justice that I empathize with. She's growing up in a world where allies are few and dangers are many, and she has power that she doesn't yet know how to manage. She takes the initiative when there's a problem, though sometimes that doesn't turn out as the right thing to do. The magic here is creepy as hell, the art is ominous and otherworldy when appropriate, and the consequences for mistakes are appropriately weighty. Definitely track down the color version if you can, but if you can't, the story is clearly just as good in black and white.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dimitris

    A nice read but unfortunately nothing more

  9. 4 out of 5

    GrilledCheeseSamurai (Scott)

    I don't know why it took me so long to read this. I mean, I knew who Courtney Crumrin was, I was aware of her existence, of this book(s), I was even intrigued. despite that, I just never took the time to actually read any of this series. For some reason, the other day (I think it was actually a Comixology sale?) I all of a sudden found myself finally reading this. Even weirder - I found myself not only really enjoying it, but forcing myself to slow down and not read it all in one sitting. I wante I don't know why it took me so long to read this. I mean, I knew who Courtney Crumrin was, I was aware of her existence, of this book(s), I was even intrigued. despite that, I just never took the time to actually read any of this series. For some reason, the other day (I think it was actually a Comixology sale?) I all of a sudden found myself finally reading this. Even weirder - I found myself not only really enjoying it, but forcing myself to slow down and not read it all in one sitting. I wanted to at least get two sittings out of it. I loved the character of, Courtney. I loved the dynamic she had with her family and I absolutely loved the art. I just found the whole thing charming and a delight to read. It's the perfect pallet cleanser when you just want to sit back and...enjoy. I will most definitely be carrying on with the rest of the books. :)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rose

    "Courtney Crumrin and the Night Things: Volume 1" is rife with dark humor and imaginative interactions, much of which I enjoyed for the most part. I wouldn't say it's the most engaging comic I've ever come across for its genre, but it is entertaining for an introductory read, and one I'd likely continue to see what happens. The titular protagonist is a young girl who, along with her parents, goes to live with her strange, but oddly alluring uncle. From there, Courtney has to deal with a little mo "Courtney Crumrin and the Night Things: Volume 1" is rife with dark humor and imaginative interactions, much of which I enjoyed for the most part. I wouldn't say it's the most engaging comic I've ever come across for its genre, but it is entertaining for an introductory read, and one I'd likely continue to see what happens. The titular protagonist is a young girl who, along with her parents, goes to live with her strange, but oddly alluring uncle. From there, Courtney has to deal with a little more than the average new girl. When you live in a town full of creepy things - talking cats, changelings, goblins, beasts, among others - it's a little more than the average kid can handle. Courtney, on the contrary, seems to embrace the weirdness in her new life with a smart, snarky attitude, and she isn't afraid to fight back. In retrospect, I found that I liked Courtney's character and was willing to follow her through her respective encounters. Despite places where the commonplace humor is a bit forced and cheesy, the story does have decent dark humor and situational focus. The episodic pursuits Courtney finds herself within are interesting, from one instance of magic gone wrong (when Courtney tries to fit in with her peers and ends up getting *too* much attention) to dealing with a doppelganger attempting to steal her identity. Those elements drew me in, though I'll admit that I wasn't necessarily drawn to many of the characters in this work other than Courtney and her uncle. I think that's probably the story's major Achilles heel, because the characters don't draw you into the work, and most of them (other than Courtney and her uncle) aren't even around long enough for you to get to know them. The art style is appealing, particularly in its darker, convoluted stylings. I liked both the full color and B&W panels the graphic novel showcased. It feels like the kind of story suited for those who like Grimm's Fairy Tales (especially in places where the story gives off a dark contrast) and those who like the paranormal in an episodic format may find the interactions among different creatures fun. Despite the age recommendation of 7 and up, I would say that this story is probably better suited for elder teens. Overall score: 3/5 Note: I received this as an ARC from NetGalley, from the publisher Oni Press.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    I first became aware of the Courtney Crumrin series when I saw it compared to Tom Siddell's brilliant Gunnerkrigg Court graphic novels (originally a web-comic), which I absolutely adore. When a friend also had good things to say about the Courtney Crumrin comic, I decided I needed to give these books a try, and I'm glad that I did! Courtney Crumrin and the Night Things is a trade edition, containing the four individual issues of the comic, and is narrated by a goblin named Butterworth, who in I first became aware of the Courtney Crumrin series when I saw it compared to Tom Siddell's brilliant Gunnerkrigg Court graphic novels (originally a web-comic), which I absolutely adore. When a friend also had good things to say about the Courtney Crumrin comic, I decided I needed to give these books a try, and I'm glad that I did! Courtney Crumrin and the Night Things is a trade edition, containing the four individual issues of the comic, and is narrated by a goblin named Butterworth, who introduces the tale of young Courtney, and how she and her status-conscious parents first came to live with their Great-Uncle Aloysius Crumrin in his sinister mansion in the exclusive suburb of Hillsborough. Courtney's difficulties fitting in with her spoiled classmates, her growing awareness of the unearthly creatures around her, and her interest (and involvement) in her Uncle Aloysius' hobby of witchcraft, are all set out here, in a narrative that never fails to entertain. Like another reviewer, I was particularly struck by the fact that one of Courtney's classmates wanders off into the woods and is never seen again (eaten by a goblin), and this causes little excitement. This is emblematic of the way in which the extraordinary is accepted with little comment, an aspect of Ted Naifeh's storytelling that I find very appealing. The artwork is spot on, particularly in the way that it captures the general vacuity of Courtney's parents, or Uncle Aloysius' frightening, yet somehow also endearing, mien. All in all: a fabulous little comic! I will definitely be seeking out the sequels!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    Disclaimer: I got a free ARC via netgalley. Poor Courtney Crumrin. Her parents are clueless, the family has moved in with her mysterious uncle, she’s the new kid at school, and there is something that goes bump in the night in her bedroom. What’s a girl to do? Use her noggin. Courtney Crumrin, like Tiffany Achling, is the girl’s answer to Harry Potter. She’s Hermione gone gothic. Well, slightly Goth. Courtney is her own teen after all. (And how come male authors keep doing this, not female ones?) Th Disclaimer: I got a free ARC via netgalley. Poor Courtney Crumrin. Her parents are clueless, the family has moved in with her mysterious uncle, she’s the new kid at school, and there is something that goes bump in the night in her bedroom. What’s a girl to do? Use her noggin. Courtney Crumrin, like Tiffany Achling, is the girl’s answer to Harry Potter. She’s Hermione gone gothic. Well, slightly Goth. Courtney is her own teen after all. (And how come male authors keep doing this, not female ones?) This volume contains three stories about Courtney as she adjusts to her new life. The first is about her experiences in a new school, and the other two are adventures. What Ted Naifeh has done, and done brilliantly, is take that out of place teen feeling and grafted in onto fairy stories. And I don’t mean Tinkerbelle fairy or the Tooth Fairy. I mean the let’s dance in the fairy ring for days fairy. Courtney isn’t nice or sweet. In fact, she’s every anti-social teen you’ve ever met. Yet because of this, she becomes the every teen. The idea of belonging or not belonging, that desire to be social that inflict even the most unsocial of us, runs though these three stories. Yet, while Courtney is that outsider teen, she isn’t a victim. She might be a potential bully victim, but she fights back. There is something special about Courtney in her anti-behavior, in her ability to learn from her mistakes, of her better nature. The reader roots for her. Naifeh makes great and intelligent use of fairy motif and lore. There is a bit about magic, and the story is framed by a goblin/demon that resembles a large wolf. He’s not sweet, don’t worry. In addition to the use of teen awkwardness, Naifeh makes good use of family behavior in terms of changelings. There is some social and family dynamic commentary here, such as people who have children as a status symbol. There are wonderful touches of detail, not only in how the tales are used, but also in the families and the drawings. In addition, Courtney’s desire to be herself is balanced by her parents’ desire to belong. While the moral might not be subtle, the parents are not necessary walking clichés or stereotypes either. Despite their brief appearances, there is some depth to them. This is a great book for a teen or an adult to read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Diz

    This book was a disappointment for me. First, I didn't really like the characters in it. Courtney in particular is a boring character. She doesn't really have any personality other than she doesn't like things. She hates her parents. She hates her school. She hates her life. That is her only defining characteristic. As for her character, it's uneven. At the beginning of the book, she is a scared little child when she sees a small monster in her room. A few pages later, she's running through the This book was a disappointment for me. First, I didn't really like the characters in it. Courtney in particular is a boring character. She doesn't really have any personality other than she doesn't like things. She hates her parents. She hates her school. She hates her life. That is her only defining characteristic. As for her character, it's uneven. At the beginning of the book, she is a scared little child when she sees a small monster in her room. A few pages later, she's running through the woods to chain up a goblin that had just eaten her only friend in town. There's no real explanation why her character changed so much other than she found one of her uncle's magic books. Second, the book really takes the idea that adults are stupid and kids are smart to an extreme. Courtney's parents are portrayed as loveless, money-obsessed zombies. The other adults that appear in the story are pretty much the same. I guess I'm just too old to get into that kind of story. There is one good thing about this book. The variety of monsters is quite good, and it's a lot of fun to look at the character designs for these monsters. There's one particular monster with a skull head that appears in Courtney's bedroom that I really like. His first appearance is pretty terrifying.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Seth T.

    I had read the four chapters that comprise this initial volume of the adventures of Courtney Crumrin as they had originally appeared in single issues. I had found the series amusing but nothing spectacular. It's grim and fun, but shows little staying power. Which is why it took me so long to review the collection. I had purchased the first two volumes of the series in a fit of patriotism (participating in wild consumer endeavors is the best way to show ones support of the establishment). They've s I had read the four chapters that comprise this initial volume of the adventures of Courtney Crumrin as they had originally appeared in single issues. I had found the series amusing but nothing spectacular. It's grim and fun, but shows little staying power. Which is why it took me so long to review the collection. I had purchased the first two volumes of the series in a fit of patriotism (participating in wild consumer endeavors is the best way to show ones support of the establishment). They've sat unread on my bookshelf for about two years. Slightly weary of the non-fiction work I've been devouring, I needed something inconsequential upon which to rest my mind, so I picked up The Night Things. Largely, the series showed itself to be as I remembered it. An amusement and little more. Ted Naifeh's art was fun to look at and the story-telling fun, but the episodic nature of the chapters did little to help me empathize with characters. The stories, to be plain, were not very engaging. Really, they concluded just as they were beginning. I could wish for more from a series.

  15. 5 out of 5

    David Skies

    Courtney Crumrin, your lack of a nose disturbs me.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mauoijenn

    This was such a great graphic novel. Written excellent with enough detail even for a gn. Very very good!! :)

  17. 5 out of 5

    Pardis Ahmadi

    the story is kinda cliche. but i really enjoyed it. the illustration is so unique. definitely will continue reading the series.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Craig Phillips

    I LOVE this series. This, and Jeff Smith's Bone, really got me into comics. Huge fan of Ted's work. He is a gifted storyteller and artist and I look forward to reading his latest work. I LOVE this series. This, and Jeff Smith's Bone, really got me into comics. Huge fan of Ted's work. He is a gifted storyteller and artist and I look forward to reading his latest work.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Danielle The Book Huntress (Back to the Books)

    Courtney Crumrin has a very informative preface by Kelly Crumrin, addressing the inherent scariness of childhood. It gave me something to think about. I know I was a kid that loved reading scary books, although I admit I did get a bit too scared a time or two. One part of his commentary that hit me hard was that he felt the collective conscious of children picked up on the real monsters that prey on children in the world. I didn't like to think about that, because I hate the idea of children bei Courtney Crumrin has a very informative preface by Kelly Crumrin, addressing the inherent scariness of childhood. It gave me something to think about. I know I was a kid that loved reading scary books, although I admit I did get a bit too scared a time or two. One part of his commentary that hit me hard was that he felt the collective conscious of children picked up on the real monsters that prey on children in the world. I didn't like to think about that, because I hate the idea of children being harmed or suffering. However, I can see some logic to his comment that childhood nebulous fears might be a manifestation of a subconscious awareness of what real children face. With that thought-provoking beginning to this graphic novel collection, I had some higher expectations but also that this volume would 'go there.' It did. I'm not sure how I feel about some of the plot elements. I stand strongly against children being harmed or killed, and there is one aspect that felt so wrong to me in this book. I kept wondering why Courtney didn't use the power she gained over the goblin for a different result. I do feel that there was a bit of nihilism to this graphic novel, and that's something I just can't go for. Courtney has had a tough life, and her parents are beneath contempt. I can see things from her viewpoint and accept that she didn't get a very good moral foundation for her life, and that certainly affects her choices. I did cheer for her that she pursued her baby sitting charge into the Goblin Market, even though she did it for selfish reasons. The result of that didn't hit me with the right note, although the faerie enthusiast in me loved a look at the inhabitants of the Market, not to mention the changeling folklore and a talking cat (not sure I want my own cats to be able to talk, since they'd probably cuss me out). One thing I did like about this novel is how it addresses the situations that kids face everyday: bullying, isolation and ostracism, and parents who aren't sufficiently involved in their day to day sufferings (for whatever reasons). Of course I hope most parents are better at parenting than Courtney's but I acknowledge that good parents can have so much going on that they don't have the energy to address issues that seem so trivial like being mildly bullied or feeling like a social outcast. I was bullied and I know how that felt. I know my mother cared, but how much could she do, day to day? And children are very creative in their cruelty. Sometimes you just have to grit your teeth and get through it. In a lot of instances, parental interference can make it worse, although there are certainly times when a parent definitely needs to step in. I didn't like Courtney's dabbling in witchcraft at all. I have an aversion to witchcraft, so that's part of it. I don't have an issue with magic in the abstract sense, but I really dislike the use of spells to control people (which is the crux of my dislike of witchcraft), which is what Courtney was doing. At least, the author shows the negative results of this, and has Courtney's Great-Great Grand-Uncle step in. One of the things I wasn't keen on with this book was the ambiguous and somewhat unresolved and rather dark endings. Yeah, yeah, that's the whole theme of this book, I know. Maybe this is going back to the overall theme of the inherent darkness of childhood. I am more of an upbeat ending girl, even as a fan of horror. I think you can have horror and still get a sense of hope, and in the case of Courtney's situations, I don't feel that much hope, even when the original crisis is somewhat resolved. Will I continue to read this series? Probably, but not back to back. It's a bit to dark to pile these on one after another. I wish this was in color, but I did like the drawings and the manner in which the character personality is conveyed. And I loved Courtney's hair so much! Overall, this was pretty good, but I didn't love it, for the reasons above. It's definitely an appropriate choice to read in the month of October for an atmospheric and horror-esque book. Or just anytime if you like books that are dark in theme with younger characters. I think that this book is for readers over 11, more or less okay for the middle grade/juvenile age group.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Karissa

    I got an eGalley of this book through NetGalley.com. It was a really excellent graphic novel filled with mystery, some creepy things, and magic. After reading it I want to go out and read all of the other books in the series. Courtney Crumrin is forced to move into her great-uncle's old creepy house with her parents (who are broke and need a place to live). To say that Courtney doesn't fit in in this prestigious town and preppy school is an understatement. Then one night Courtney sees something i I got an eGalley of this book through NetGalley.com. It was a really excellent graphic novel filled with mystery, some creepy things, and magic. After reading it I want to go out and read all of the other books in the series. Courtney Crumrin is forced to move into her great-uncle's old creepy house with her parents (who are broke and need a place to live). To say that Courtney doesn't fit in in this prestigious town and preppy school is an understatement. Then one night Courtney sees something in her room and she finds that her uncle's house holds more mysteries and more magic than she had ever imagined. Now if COurtney could just stay out of trouble for a while and not cause any magical mischief that would be great... Courtney is tough, sassy, and very much her own girl. She doesn't take crap from anyone and doesn't try to blend in. She reminded me a lot of the girl, Mandy, from the cartoon Grim and Evil. I loved her. She tries so hard to make her own path but still finds herself feeling a bit lonely and scared at times. The camaraderie she develops with her great-uncle is sweet, especially since her parents are so absent (both mentally and physically throughout the story). There are a lot of great characters in this story but Courtney and her great-uncle are the highlights. This graphic novel contains three sub-stories. One is about what happens when Courtney tries out a spell to make everyone like her. The second is about what happens when Courtney goes to babysit for some neighbors and finds out their baby has been replaced with a goblin of sorts. The third tells about when something mimics Courtney and tries to take over her place in everyone's life. The illustrations are wonderful. It is always easy to follow and easy to tell what is going on. Only the first part was in full color (probably because it is an advanced copy) but the part that was in color was excellent! The colors are lush and dark and perfectly match the tone of the story. This is a great graphic novel for all ages. Some parts might be a bit scary for younger kids, most of it is just kind of creepy and not really scary. Overall I absolutely loved this book! Now I want to go out and read all of the COurtney Crumrin books :-) Courtney is a fun character and the combination of magic/magical creatures/creepy house is creative and fun. This is a graphic novel that is beautifully drawn and I think people of all ages will really enjoy it. I really enjoyed this and look forward to reading more of these books in the future. If you like the Locke and Key series, but want something that is kid-friendly this would be a great series to read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Khairul Hezry

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This review is from my blog: The Malaysian Reader: Here’s what I love about Ted Naifeh’s book. It’s basically a story with a familiar theme: a young girl moves to a new place and a new school and has to make new friends. Except there are strange goings on in her new place (her granduncle Aloysius spooky old house to be precise) and there are even stranger things in the woods of her new neigbourhood. But those aren’t what I love about this book. They are great and familiar tropes but what hooked me This review is from my blog: The Malaysian Reader: Here’s what I love about Ted Naifeh’s book. It’s basically a story with a familiar theme: a young girl moves to a new place and a new school and has to make new friends. Except there are strange goings on in her new place (her granduncle Aloysius spooky old house to be precise) and there are even stranger things in the woods of her new neigbourhood. But those aren’t what I love about this book. They are great and familiar tropes but what hooked me in was the dark route the author chose to take. There are at least three instances in this collection that would make the unreasonable parent throw this book in disgust and petition the local and school library to ban it from their shelves. Without spoiling it too much, two kids get eaten by a night creature (one of them was bullying the other so it was a comeuppance, but still…) and a baby is exchanged with a goblin and the baby sold at the Dark Market in Goblin Town. Well here’s the thing, these disappearances were not resolved in favour of the humans at all. The goblin gets to stay in the crib pretending to be a human baby at the story’s end (Courtney is told that human babies are kidnapped and sold to strange creatures all the time and besides in this case the baby’s mother wouldn’t know the difference anyway) and it was only mentioned in passing that the bullied kid would be missed by no one. No mention at all of what the neigbours thought of the missing bully. Well, I guess I did go and spoil it after all. Here’s one more: the only reason the night creatures visited the bully was because they were told to by Courtney herself. So this is a story about a kid who ordered a hit on her tormentor. Now you see why I love this book. It tickles my dark soul and pushes all the right buttons in me. If you’re still shocked, let me assure you that all the violence and auctioning of a baby happens ‘off-panel’. Courtney soon discovers her weird granduncle is actually very nice but he does have a secret which he eventually shares with Courtney. This first volume is a collection of four previously published graphic novels in which were in paperback and black and white. This time around the adventures of Courtney Crumrin is bound in hardcover and in colour and if you are just as weird as me you should get this book and share with your little siblings or children. They’ll thank you for it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    colleen the convivial curmudgeon

    I had already read this book in the original black & white, but when I saw they had released a color edition I squeeled in delight and just had to have it - and my wonderful husband obliged me. :> First, for the art, the colors do wonderful things. One of the, erm, issues with Naifeh's art is that a lot of it is similar and I sometimes find it hard to differentiate things. The color both helps create depth and detail, as well as just bringing the images to life. 4.5 stars. As to the stories - some I had already read this book in the original black & white, but when I saw they had released a color edition I squeeled in delight and just had to have it - and my wonderful husband obliged me. :> First, for the art, the colors do wonderful things. One of the, erm, issues with Naifeh's art is that a lot of it is similar and I sometimes find it hard to differentiate things. The color both helps create depth and detail, as well as just bringing the images to life. 4.5 stars. As to the stories - some of them were more abrupt than I remembered but I still, overall, really like the world and the characters. Well, by characters I mean Courtney and Uncle A. Everyone else kind of sucks - but that's sort of the point. But I wish there was a bit more to some of the stories - they could stand to be longer, to develop more. The stories I'll give a 3 - 3.5, depending. I will say I'd forgotten how dark the stories were. I don't mean the scary house, and magic and goblins and things - those I remembered. I mean when (view spoiler)[Courtney's 'friend' in the first story gets eaten, and the narrator just says something like "And, well, no one missed him much, sad to say, and Courtney did have other things on her mind". Also, in the story with the changeling baby, Courtney fails to save the baby and Uncle A is like "These things happen, Courtney. I wouldn't let it bother you too much." (Please note I'm paraphrasing, as I don't have the book in front of me... ) (hide spoiler)] So, yeah, it's not that I'd minded or anything, and it adds a level of cynical reality to the stories - I was just sort of surprised that I'd forgotten... which I guess, in a way, is rather fitting. Heh. Anyway - I really enjoy this series, and I'm very happy they've gotten a full color make-over. ^_^

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    This first volume of the Courtney Crumrin collection features Courtney facing both school bullies and strange gothic creatures, after her parents run short on money and move themselves and Courtney in to live with creepy Uncle Aloysius. Courtney finds herself in a darkly weird new world, but her ingenuity and drive help her tackle both her social problems and the things that go bump in the night. This book is an interesting blend of supernatural and real-life problems. Courtney is tough and cleve This first volume of the Courtney Crumrin collection features Courtney facing both school bullies and strange gothic creatures, after her parents run short on money and move themselves and Courtney in to live with creepy Uncle Aloysius. Courtney finds herself in a darkly weird new world, but her ingenuity and drive help her tackle both her social problems and the things that go bump in the night. This book is an interesting blend of supernatural and real-life problems. Courtney is tough and clever, with a perpetually sullen attitude and temper, but she also has very normal tween emotions. She travels to the Goblin Market in pursuit of the child that was stolen while she babysat, but she also deals with social isolation, and literally comes face to face with everything that she isn’t. Courtney is always wholly—if not admirably—herself, making this not only a solid horror tale for tweens who enjoy dark stories, but also an affirmation of self-acceptance. This would be a good book for reluctant readers who enjoy dark stories, as the illustrations do much of the work of telling the story, and a majority of the text is dialogue. It would definitely be good on a tween horror display, though it might be a bit grim for younger or more sensitive tweens.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Actually I am not a big fan of graphic novels, so may be that's the reason I wasn't fascinated by it. It wasn't a bad one, It was a nice quick read. but just that. I liked Courtney's uncle a lot, I like these weird characters, that you think they are evil, but actually they are kind from inside. It was fine, but not a very good book that deserves more than 3 stars, at least for me! Actually I am not a big fan of graphic novels, so may be that's the reason I wasn't fascinated by it. It wasn't a bad one, It was a nice quick read. but just that. I liked Courtney's uncle a lot, I like these weird characters, that you think they are evil, but actually they are kind from inside. It was fine, but not a very good book that deserves more than 3 stars, at least for me!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jenna

    The pages seemed rather too cramped for my taste and it made it hard for me to read. Similarly for the drawing style, it seemed to change too much. But I found the characters interesting and it reminded me of Lemony Snicket, Coraline, and Tim Burton...

  26. 4 out of 5

    Trinity

    The art is eye-catching and the story is entertaining, but the book never quite rises to be worthy of four stars.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kristy

    Love it! Like a slightly younger version of Buffy.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Emmy

    What a delightfully creepy book! This is the sort of thing young Em would have absolutely loved. As it was, I certainly enjoyed the first installment of the series, and look forward to continuing. The sense of atmosphere and pacing in this book was just perfect. While the start was a little slow, it quickly fell into a steady rhythm, not too fast, not too slow, and with just the right amount of thrills and chills. It's suspenseful and creepy without being outright scary, and this makes it a grea What a delightfully creepy book! This is the sort of thing young Em would have absolutely loved. As it was, I certainly enjoyed the first installment of the series, and look forward to continuing. The sense of atmosphere and pacing in this book was just perfect. While the start was a little slow, it quickly fell into a steady rhythm, not too fast, not too slow, and with just the right amount of thrills and chills. It's suspenseful and creepy without being outright scary, and this makes it a great introduction into the genre of Gothic literature for children. Courtney is an interesting character. She doesn't fall into the pit of being completely perfect, and there are times when you almost don't like her. But, she's never annoying, never vapid, and surprisingly, for a story like this, she so far has not become the overly-creepy kid. It's kind of a turn-off for me when you write a "scary" children's book, and the main character is some little Wednesday Addams knock-off who is painfully morbid (and ends up being painfully annoying). The creepy story and setting with a (fairly) normal kid makes for much more interesting reading!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kim Savage

    Funny little graphic novel about a little girl and some creatures that could either make you chuckle or give you nightmares. I like Cortney. She does not fit in with her peers, and she’s a little bit grumpy. But...she is not afraid ... whether it be to stand up to a creature, a bully, or for herself. With a little help from her creepy uncle, she still manages to come out okay. Fun read.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Mellen

    Quick, cute, nothing that I was that excited by, but not bad either. I would definitely try the next one, and see if it catches me more. They were something I think my 7 year old, lover of spooky books, would adore, so I'm gonna suggest she read it before I return it to the library. Quick, cute, nothing that I was that excited by, but not bad either. I would definitely try the next one, and see if it catches me more. They were something I think my 7 year old, lover of spooky books, would adore, so I'm gonna suggest she read it before I return it to the library.

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